About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, July 04, 2022

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, July 4, 2022

Lady Liberty, Uncle Sam & Community Parade through Volcano
Lady Liberty, Uncle Sam and the Hawai'i County Band strolled along Old Volcano Highway on July 4, accompanied by the Hawai'i County Band, political leaders and representatives of churches, performing arts and horse riding groups. 
See the Photos by Lina Kolosov

UNITED PUBLIC WORKERS ENDORSED KAI KAHELE FOR GOVERNOR late last week. Kahele described the endorsement as "brave and bold." He noted that UPW "is one of Hawai'i's largest public-sector unions, which stood on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic to ensure that our government was able to offer critical services to our community throughout the global health crisis."
Merle Becker, in white, from Aikane Plantation Coffee put together the O Ka'u Paniolo
 team for the July 4 parade in Volcano. Ikaika Derasin carries the flag. Photo by Lina Kolosov
Lorilee Lorenzo and Ikaika Grace are O Ka'u Paniolo.
Photo by Lina Kolosov
   Kahele said, "There is no doubt that our communities are at a crossroads. Our keiki and young families are leaving in droves because our government and leadership have left them behind. Special interests and corporations have pushed out and marginalized the working class — leading to the rich becoming richer while our hard working local families continue to struggle. And yet, politicians continue to stuff their political pockets with high-dollar contributions from big money, corporate donations, outside dollars, and PACs — much like some of the candidates in this race for governor.    The candidate said that he is hopeful that "through this endorsement, we can get our community thinking about what matters in this election — that our working people matter in this election. What's at stake is far greater than a political office. Our integrity is at stake. Our local values are at stake. Our future in Hawaiʻi is at stake."
    Kahele promised campaign reform as one "of the steps we must take to restore trust in our government and in leadership statewide — including our unions."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

DURING THE JULY 4 WEEKEND, THE STATE'S EMERGENCY POWERS are the topic of an opinion piece by Grassroot Institute of Hawai'i CEO Keli'i Akina. Akana writes:
    "This weekend is a time for celebrating the Declaration of Independence, which was the inspiration behind the founding of the United States of America.
Mayor Mitch Roth and his wife Noriko. Photo by Lina Kolosov
    "In Hawai'i, this July 4th can be additionally meaningful, as we have the opportunity to defend liberty and uphold the system of political checks and balances embodied in both our national and state constitutions."
    Akina noted that last week Gov. David Ige announced his "intent to veto" SB3089, a bill that aims to reform the state's emergency powers law. "The measure would prevent the governor from unilaterally extending states of emergency beyond the statutory limit and imposing orders that conflict with the state Constitution or are not relevant to public safety or health."
    Akina pointed out that "the background for such a reform is the more than two years of lockdowns and other extreme government measures related to COVID-19 that we experienced firsthand starting in March 2020, and some of which still linger today. During that long period, we learned about the flaws in the 
Grand Marshal Tim Tunison with Dina Kegler and Emma and Jesse Tunison.
Photo by Lina Kolosov

current law, the most notable of which is its automatic termination clause. This section of the law, which plainly says that an emergency shall end after 60 days. was ignored by the governor as he issued supplemental proclamation after supplemental proclamation, extending the initial emergency period seemingly indefinitely.
    "But that wasn't the only problem exposed by the unusually long public health-related state of emergency. The governor unilaterally suspended laws and made new ones, if only temporarily, making him into a kind of super-legislator. Combined with his repeated emergency extensions, the result was an unchecked expansion of executive power that could last as long as the governor wanted."
    Akina pointed to Malia Hill, one of his colleagues at the Grassroot Institute of Hawaii, who explained in her January 2021 policy report, Lockdowns vs. Liberty, that a "legislative check on the governor is the 
The Village Church with its sanctuary on Wright Road in Volcano. Photo by Lina Kolosov
best way to restore the state's constitutional balance of powers, especially considering the reluctance of the courts to step in and the uncertainty over how they might rule. Changing the law itself will ensure that the people of Hawai'i have a voice in their government during future emergencies."
    The Grassroot leader credited the majority of the state legislators in both chambers and said, "They understood the problem posed by the flawed statute and came close to reforming it during their 2021 

A patriotic car in the Volcano Parade July 4. Photo by Lina Kolosov
session. During the 2022 session, they tried again and came up with SB3089. This new bill, which passed with overwhelming bipartisan support, allows the Legislature to terminate an emergency, in whole or in part, by a two-thirds vote. It also states that the governor's emergency powers must be consistent with the Hawaii Constitution, and requires justification for the suspension of laws. Finally, it deals with the question of whether the automatic-termination clause is the final word on ending an emergency or whether the governor can extend an emergency."
 
Through the roof waving Old Glory. Photo by Lina Kolosov
    Akina said that as recently as a few weeks ago, "Ige indicated that he might allow SB3089 to pass. Unfortunately, somewhere along the way he changed his mind and decided to defend the arbitrary and limitless use of executive power in an emergency. SB3089 is hardly the extreme, anti-health-and-safety bill characterized in the governor's press statement. In fact, it bears a strong resemblance to bills passed in other states as a result of their experiences during the coronavirus lockdowns.
    Akina contended that "All SB3089 does is correct an oversight in the existing emergency-management statute, which clearly was not crafted to deal with coronavirus-type public health emergencies. It even allows the Legislature to partially end a declared emergency, thereby providing a mechanism for the state to keep receiving and distributing federal aid.
    "My hope is that Gov. Ige will change his mind and allow SB3089 to become law. But if he doesn't, the Legislature can vote to override his veto in a special session. A veto override requires a two-thirds vote in both the House and Senate. Given that SB3089 passed easily to begin with, there should be enough support to override Ige's veto of the bill. At the same time, however, the Legislature is preoccupied with the state budget bill, and it would be easy for the emergency powers bill to get lost in the shuffle."
State Senator Joy San Buenaventura who represents east Ka'u through Volcano into Puna will run for a new district this election that will not include Ka'u. Photo by Lina Kolosov
   Akina said, it's important to let the Legislature know how important this bill is, by calling or sending a letter to your state House and Senate representatives." He recommended going to the "Take Action" page on the Grassroot Institute's website to fill out the necessary information. "The page will help you identify your elected representatives and assist you in crafting a message about SB3089. This is your opportunity to tell your elected officials what you think about this bill and why it is vital to head off or override the governor's veto."
   Akina contended that "Two years of "emergency rule" did untold damage to our liberties — and to the economic and social fabric of Hawaii. Let us act now so Hawaii's future generations never have to experience what we most recently had to endure. This Fourth of July weekend, take real action for liberty and let your legislator know why we need to restore the constitutional balance of powers by ensuring that SB3089 becomes law."
Supporters of Michelle Galimba for County Council walk the Volcano July 4 Parade. Photo by Lina Kolosov
Michelle Galimba with cattle dogs at Volcano Fourth of July. Photo by Lina Kolosov

Hawai'i Pacific Parks supports Hawai'i Volcanoes. Photo by Lina Kolosov

The Mikado opens July 22 at Kilauea Theatre, produced by KDEN. Photo by Lina Kolosov

Don's Towing shows off a hot car during the July 4 Parade in Volcano. Photo by Lina Kolosov
The Hare Krsna community participates in all the
Volcano July 4 parades. Photo by Lina Kolosov

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

Sunday, July 03, 2022

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Sunday, July 3, 2022

 
Parading Comes Back After Covid Down Time
Leading the parade through Nāʻālehu on Saturday, the ʻO Kaʻū Kākou banner celebrates Independence. See the photos below, including winner of Most Patriotic, and know that the Volcano 4th of July Parade begins on Monday at 9 a.m. on Old Volcano Hwy and Wright Road, followed by festivities at Cooper Center.  Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
HAWAI'I HAS THE LOWEST GUN MORTALITY RATE IN THE COUNTRY but Hawai'i County Prosecutor Kelden Waltjen and other prosecutors, corporation counsels and police chiefs around the state are worried about pressure to allow the public to openly carry handguns in public places.
The bald eagle marches ahead of baseball players.
Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
    The concern comes in the wake of a Supreme Court decision last week that points to gun laws in Hawai'i, California, New Jersey and Maryland, suggesting they are too restrictive and should be reviewed. Last week the Supreme Court overturned a New York law requiring a person wanting to carry a handgun to prove a special need, "a proper cause."
     Hawai'i's law is similar to New York's and police chiefs here have issued only four permits to carry a gun in public in 22 years. The Supreme Court decision takes away the discretion of the police chiefs.
     On Sunday, The Honolulu Star-Advertiser published a statement from the state Attorney General's office that says, "The Department of the Attorney General had a productive initial meeting with the counties … and looks forward to further discussing with them how to best ensure the safety of the community, while responding to the recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion. Determining the
Thy Word Ministries takes first in the parade entries as Most Patriotic.
Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
 best way to respond to the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling while ensuring the protection of public safety is a complex undertaking. The department is committed to working with all stakeholders in the coming months to address these issues.”
      The meeting last Thursday involved police chiefs, prosecutors and other public officials statewide. According to the Advertiser story, the Hawai'i County Prosecuting Attorney, said, that he "plans to meet with Corporation Counsel Elizabeth Strance and Hawai'i Police Department Chief Paul Ferreira to discuss how the county 'will be addressing any appropriate changes to application processes and enforcement,' in consultation with the AG’s office."
    The Advertiser also reported that "from 2010 to 2019, Hawai'i County had the highest gun death rate, followed by Kaua'i County. Honolulu had the lowest gun death rate during that period, followed by Maui County."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm
Kaʻū Auto Repair carries a crashed car to warn of the dangers of drinking and driving.
Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses

THE LEGALITY OF AERIAL AND OTHER FIREWORKS has drawn a statement from the Hawai'i Police Department. Hawaiʻi Island police issued a statement saying the department "is concerned about illegal aerial fireworks" and is "reminding the public about the rules governing the use of fireworks so they may enjoy a safe Fourth of July."
Ocean View Auto Parts rolls with a bold logo design.
Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
    Hawaiʻi state law dictates that anyone purchasing, possessing, storing, setting off, igniting or discharging aerial devices, display fireworks or articles pyrotechnic without a valid pyrotechnic permit may face Class C felony charges resulting in a five-year term of imprisonment if convicted.
    "Please remember that anyone igniting aerial pyrotechnic displays risk not only their life but also the lives of loved ones nearby and potentially neighbors as well," says the HPD statement.
    Legal fireworks are permitted from 1 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday, July 4. Residents who want to set off fireworks must have paid a permit fee of $25, available from the Hawai‘i Fire Department, which allows an adult to purchase 5,000 individual firecrackers."
Kaʻū Baseball is back, and marching in the parade in Nāʻālehu. Photo by Lina Kolosov

    Common fireworks allowed without a permit include:Cylindrical fountains; Cone fountains; Wheels;
Illuminating torches and colored fire; Dipped sticks; Sparklers; and Salutes.

Miranda Farms celebrates independence, its owners successful refugees from El Salvador, creating Kaʻū Coffee farms.
Photo by Lina Kolosov
     Fireworks are prohibited at any time outside the specified time period on the Fourth of July;
in any school building or on any school grounds without authorization from school officials; within 1,000 feet of any hospital, convalescent home, care home for the elderly, church where services are held, and zoo, animal hospital or shelter.
Hawai'i County Band is a regular at the Independence Day Parade. Photo by Lina Kolosov
   Prohibited fireworks include: Jumping jacks; Flying pigs; Rockets; Helicopters; Satellites; Roman candles; Mines; Shells; and Aerial luminary devices, also known as sky lanterns.
Friends of Kaʻū Libraries has been integral in keeping libraries
 open to the public in Ka'u. Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses

    Hawai‘i Police Department reminds residents that it’s also illegal to:Extract the explosive or pyrotechnic contents from any fireworks; and to throw ignited fireworks at, into, or from a moving vehicle.
   It is illegal for anyone under the age of 18 purchase, possess or ignite any fireworks unless they are under the immediate supervision and control of their parents or an authorized adult.
    HPD also issued Fireworks Safety Tips for Pets from the County of Hawai‘i Animal Control Services: Keep pet secured inside. Pets tied up outside can panic due to the loud noise and may break their tie-out or jump over a fence to escape the noise. Make sure  pet is microchipped and the current owner information is updated, to help increase the chances of reunification.
First responders roll through Nāʻālehu, supporting the Independence Day Parade. Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
    Go to Foundanimals.org to register pet’s microchip. Thunder shirts, favorite treats, and crating, are all ways to help keep pets calm. Check with veterinarian about anxiety medications for dogs. Check  yard for fireworks debris before allowing pets to explore the area.
   HPD also asks the public “to please kokua by following the rules regarding fireworks to reduce the risk of injuries to people and pets alike.” Police say officers “will be enforcing the fireworks law and looking for violators. Violators are subject to a fine of up to $500.”

Firefighter and medic Jack Moses of the Pāhala Engine Co. II.
Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
SPONSOR A BUCKLE, VOTE FOR RODEO QUEEN ahead of the Saturday, July 9 Rodeo organized by Kaʻū Roping & Riding Association and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. Event to be held on the rodeo grounds behind Nāʻālehu Park. Call 808-854-7917.

ENJOY THE 3RD ANNUAL EXPERIENCE VOLCANO FESTIVAL on Saturday, July 30th and Sunday, July 31st from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Last year, over 2,500 visitors attended and over 40 events were featured during the EVH festival. See experiencevolcano.com. With questions, contact experiencevolcano@gmail.com. All vendor locations are taken.
"Your Life Will Never Be the Same,"  are the words from 
Nāʻālehu Assembly of God. Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses

SIGN UP FOR KAʻŪ COFFEE TRAIL RUNS with a change of date from July 3 to Sept. 17. Registration deadline for the annual event is Sept. 14. Organized by Hawaiʻi Island Racers, the 50K begins at 6 a.m., Half Marathon at 7 a.m., and 5K at 7:15 a.m., all starting from Kaʻū Coffee Mill at 96-2696 Wood Valley Road in Pāhala. Proceeds go to support ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. For more details on the event and registration fees, visit https://www.kaucoffeetrailruns.com/.
OKK sponsored a fun site for keiki and bingo for seniors at Nāʻālehu Ballpark and Community Center
after the Independence Day Parade. Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses

After the Parade
Thy Word Ministries takes first in the competition during the Independence Day Parade,
sponsored by ʻO Kaʻū Kākou in Nāʻālehu on July 2. Photo by Lee McIntosh

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, July 2, 2022

The Independence Day Parade is Back in Nāʻālehu
U.S. and Hawaiian flags flew at the Independence Day Parade on Saturday in Nāʻālehu, sponsored by ʻO Kaʻū Kākou and the McIntosh family. On horseback, Dedrick Souza carried the Hawaiian flag and Makana Gravela carried the U.S. flag. The parade brought back pa'u riders and their horses, both decorated in the colors and flowers of each Hawaiian Island.  One political candidate rode on horseback and other supporters of those running in the upcoming election paraded on foot. See photos here and much more, including the winning entry in the parade in Sunday's Kaʻū News BriefsPhoto by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
Hawai'i Island is represented by London Dacalio, the color red and the
 lehua flower. 
Photo by Lina Kolosov
Ni'ihau is represented by Lorilee Lorenzo, the color white,
 and the pupu Ni'ihau shell lei. Photo by Lina Kolosov
 
AFFORDABLE HOUSING IS BOLSTERED BY NEW BILLS     signed into law by Gov. David Ige on Friday.
 A statement from his office say the three bills "support the state's ongoing effort to build more affordable homes and provide families and individuals experiencing homelessness with the services they need.
    The bills are: HB2512 Relating to ʻOhana Zones. SB3048 Relating to State Funds, and HB2233 Relating to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families.
    HB2512 (Act 235) will extend the ʻOhana Zone pilot program through June 30, 2026 and provide $15 million to fund services for this fiscal year. It will also provide for some exemptions of regulations that will allow the continuation of innovative projects that began under the COVID-19 emergency proclamations. Finally, Act 235 will allow people who receive accommodations or services at the ʻOhana Zone site, to request a 90-day extension of those services.
    "Since its inception in 2018, the ʻOhana Zone pilot program has served more than 5,500 individuals across the state, and we've added 400 more beds to shelter and housing inventory. This new law will enable us to continue our forward progress through partnerships with the counties and homeless service providers," said the governor.
    SB3048 (Act 236) will allow the Hawaiʻi Housing Finance and Development Corp. (HHFDC) to transfer GO Bond proceeds from the Rental Housing Revolving Fund into the Dwelling Unit Revolving Fund. This will enable the HHFDC to develop infrastructure improvement projects as it works to expand the state's housing inventory.
    Act 236 also deposits $300 million into the Rental Housing Revolving Fund, half of which is set aside for the development of rental housing for working families and individuals who earn a moderate income. This could potentially finance up to 1700 units.
    "My administration met our initial goal of producing 10,000 affordable units by 2020, and exceeded that by 3,500 additional units. Many more are needed, and this funding will keep the momentum going," said Ige.
O'ahu is represented by Lily Dacalio, the color yellow and
the ilima flower. Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses
    HB2233 (Act 237) gives the Department of Human Services the authority to provide a housing assistance subsidy of up to $500 per month to participants in the first-to-work program. "This bill will help prevent currently housed people from falling into homelessness. Together, these bills represent a significant investment in our communities and ensure that we are able to meet the needs of families and individuals across the state," said the governor.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm
Lana'i is represented by Nova Lorenzo, the color orange and
 the kauna'oa plant. She is assisted by dad Frankie Lorenzo.
Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses

KAʻŪ RESIDENTS ARE INVITED TO MEET THE CANDIDATES RUNNING FOR ELECTION. Sponsored by Hawaiʻi County Democratic Party, it takes place on Monday, July 4 at Old Kona Airport Pavilion from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m..
    Governor candidates scheduled to meet with the public are Vicky Cayetano, Josh Green, Richard Kim  and Kai Kahele.
   U.S. Representative candidates for representing Kaʻū and all of rural Hawaiʻi attending the event are Jill Tokuda and Patrick Branco.
  Lt. Governor candidates are Ikaika Anderson, Keith Amemiya, Sylvia Luke and Sherry Menor-McNamara plan to be there.
   The candidate running for District 3 in the state Senate to represent Kaʻū into Kona, scheduled for the event, is Dru Kanuha. 
    Planning to attend are County Council candidates for Kaʻū into Kona Colehour Bondera and Shane Palacat-Nelsen.
    Live Music will be by Krazy Daze. Also entertaining is the Beamer-Solomon Halau O Po'ohala.
    Dozens of Door Prizes include a 58" flat screen tv.
    There will be no potluck due to Covid. No Potluck. Bento Boxes will be available on site.
Moloka'i is represented by Mckella Akana, the color green
and the kukui nut flower.
 Photo by Lina Kolosov

    The Democratic Grand Rally at Hilo Bandstand will be on Friday, July 22 at 5:30 p.m..

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

VOLCANO VILLAGE FOURTH OF JULY PARADE welcomes walking and riding groups and individuals. It is sponsored by Volcano Community Association in Volcano Village from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.. The Monday, July 4 parade starts at the Post Office at 9 a.m. and ends at Cooper Center on Wright Rd., followed by Cooper Center's Independence Day celebration packed with live entertainment, craft and food vendors, keiki games and a large silent auction from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Parking maps can be found at www.thecoopercenter.org. (No parking at Cooper Center except handicap permitted vehicles with prior reservation.)

SPONSOR A BUCKLE, VOTE FOR RODEO QUEEN ahead of the Saturday, July 9 Rodeo organized by Kaʻū Roping & Riding Association and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. Event to be held on the rodeo grounds behind Nāʻālehu Park. Call 808-854-7917.

Maui is represented by Tehani Souza, the color pink
 and the lokelani rose.
 Photo by Lina Kolosov
ENJOY THE 3RD ANNUAL EXPERIENCE VOLCANO FESTIVAL on Saturday, July 30th and Sunday, July 31st from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Last year, over 2,500 visitors attended and over 40 events were featured during the EVH festival. See experiencevolcano.com. With questions, contact experiencevolcano@gmail.com
 All vendor locations are taken.

SIGN UP FOR KAʻŪ COFFEE TRAIL RUNS with a change of date from July 3 to Sept. 17. Registration deadline for the annual event is Sept. 14. Organized by Hawaiʻi Island Racers, the 50K begins at 6 a.m., Half Marathon at 7 a.m., and 5K at 7:15 a.m., all starting from Kaʻū Coffee Mill at 96-2696 Wood Valley Road in Pāhala. Proceeds go to support ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. For more details on the event and registration fees, visit https://www.kaucoffeetrailruns.com/.

Kaua'i is represented by Laina Akiu, the color purple and mokihana. Photo by Lina Kolosov

Kaho'olawe is represented by Pua Carruthers, the color gray and the hinahina plant.
 Photo by Lina Kolosov

Michelle Galimba riding with supporters of her candidacy
 for County Council. Photo by Brenda Iokepa-Moses

Supporters of Kai Kahele, candidate for governor and member of U.S. Congress, walked to campaign
for the Native Hawaiian National Guard colonel with roots in Miloli'i. Photo by Lina Kolosov 

Libertarian candidate for state House of Representatives Michael Last.
Photo by Lina Kolosov

Saturday, July 02, 2022

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, July 1, 2022

Nāʻālehu's Independence Day Parade is Saturday, July 2  at 11 a.m. along Hwy 11 and often features the
County of Hawai'i Band. Photo by Julia Neal

REAFFIRMATION OF THE COUNTY'S  COMMITMENT TO WORKING ON CLIMATE CHANGE came from Mayor Mitch Roth on Friday in the wake of a Supreme Court ruling limiting the Environmental Protection Agency's ability to regulate greenhouse gas emissions of power plants. A statement from the mayor says, "The June 30th ruling of 6-3 'in favor' goes against the nation's efforts to reduce the carbon footprint and combat climate change globally. However, the EPA maintains that it has authority to address greenhouse gas emissions from the power sector, and EPA Administrator Regan said in an Associated Press article published earlier this week that the agency "will move forward with lawfully setting and implementing environmental standards that meet our obligation to protect all people and all communities from environmental harm." 
   Roth said, "We remain committed to our goal of fostering a sustainable Hawaiʻi Island where our keiki can thrive and succeed for generations to come. Regardless of decisions made on the Federal level, we have the power to take action on a local level, and that's powerful. As a county, we will continue efforts to shift our fleet to 100 percent alternative fuel vehicles, pressure the Governor to declare an energy emergency to fasttrack the PUC and get us closer to our goal of 100% renewable energy by 2045, and push forward on our 1t.org pledge to help plant one million trees on Hawaiʻi Island before 2030 to help with carbon drawdown and combat global climate change. 
The U.S. Supreme Court's decision to cut back on the power of the EPA to tackle climate change led to a reaffirmation of County of Hawai'i's Climate Action Plan, which includes the planting of one million trees.
Photo from Hawai'i County
  "In addition, we will continue working toward our Climate Action Plan and engaging partners statewide to join our efforts." 
    The County of Hawaiʻi Research & Development Climate Action Plan works to identify values, actions, and implement strategies that directly relate to the needs and concerns of Hawaiʻi Island. "The County of Hawaiʻi also continues to commit to the Paris Climate Change Agreement and work towards the goal of 100% renewable transportation by 2045 to lower greenhouse gas emissions," says the county statement.
    Concerning Hawaiʻi County's climate history, the mayor noted that in 2017, "Hawai'i County joined the Climate Mayors network to uphold the Paris Agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, hold global warming to 1.5 degrees C, and accelerate the transition to a clean energy economy that benefits our people's security, prosperity, and health."
    In December 2017, Mayor Harry Kim joined other Hawai'i counties in a pledge to transform transportation by signing a Proclamation of Commitment to 100% Renewable Ground Transportation by 2045. This would ensure that all public and private ground transportation is fueled by renewable energy by 2045.                         
    County of Hawai'i also pledged to lead by example and establish a goal of  operating a 100 percent renewable-powered city fleet by 2035. 

Mayor Roth at the TEDx County of Hawaiʻi event hosted in 2021 as part of a TEDx Countdown to Climate 

Change series.

    In October 2019, the Hawai'i County Council passed Resolution 322-19, declaring a Hawai'i County climate emergency and requesting regional collaboration towards an immediate, just transition and emergency mobilization effort to restore a safe climate. The County of Hawai'i completed the 2015 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory Report in January 2020, which was developed to serve as a basis for understanding emissions trends and where to prioritize reduction efforts in a County Climate Action Plan.     
     Following the GHG Inventory, the first draft of the County of Hawai'i Climate Action Plan was released for public comment. This document "is the next step forward for Hawai'i County to reach its Greenhouse Gas emissions goals and protect our communities health and safety. Implementing the actions and strategies outlined in this plan will enable Hawai'i Island to become more sustainable and self-reliant while embracing its role in mitigating global climate change," says the county statement.
    In March 2020, the Hawai'i County Council passed Bill 142 to amend Chapter 2, Article 8, Section 2-37 of the Hawai'i County Code 1983 (2016 edition, as amended), relating to the Department of Research & Development's Sustainability Action Committee. The amendment includes climate change in the subjects the committee can advise on. It also includes environmental science as a basis on which a member can serve on the committee. The County Council provided more information on the Department of Research & Developments' alignment with the Sustainability Action Committee. In July 2020, the County of Hawai'i signed on to the Climate Mayors Congressional Letter delivered to leaders in D.C. advocating a zero-carbon green economy that creates good-paying jobs and prioritizes equity.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

FOOD SYSTEMS SPECIALIST WITH Hawaiʻi County's Department of Research & Development, has been accepted into the 2022 Bloomberg American Health Initiative Fellowship at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Sarah Freeman is one of 50 awarded a full scholarship as a Bloomberg Fellow to pursue a Master of Public Health. 
    The Bloomberg American Health Initiative Fellowship aims to create experts to combat the nation's five most critical health challenges: addiction and overdose, adolescent health, environmental challenges, obesity and the food system, and violence.
Sarah Freeman, Food system Specialist with County of
Hawai'i has received a Bloomberg Health Fellowship.
   Freeman has a Bachelor of Science in Conservation and Resource Studies from UC Berkeley, concentrating on urban agriculture, conflict resolution, and city repair. As a Food System Specialist, she focuses on improving Hawaiʻi's food systems by working with government and community-initiated projects to foster a sustainable and thriving Hawaiʻi Island.
    "We are proud to support Sarah through this incredible opportunity in hopes that she will return home with added skillsets to better serve our community," said Mayor Mitch Roth. "Her excellent work for the County as a collaborative organizer in food systems made her the perfect candidate for the Bloomberg Fellowship. We look forward to her return and wish her the best throughout her fellowship. Food security is a key component of a sustainable community, and we will remain committed to bolstering production islandwide."
     Of five crucial health challenges facing the nation, Freeman will be focusing on the obesity and food system challenges throughout her Master's program. "Freeman will continue to be supported by the County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research & Development through her studies and will continue to help the community after she receives her degree. In addition, the skills and tools she will gain from her Master of Public Health and focus on obesity and the food system will aid her
continued work as a Food System Specialist for the County of Hawaiʻi," says the statement from the county.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

THIS INDEPENDENCE DAY WEEKEND, Hawai‘i Police Department is participating in the Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over impaired driving awareness campaign. The primary goal of the law enforcement presence will be to prevent the tragedies previously seen around the July 4th holiday.
    According to the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration,
11,654 people were killed in motor vehicle crashes that involved an alcohol-impaired driver in 2020. Last year, 493 people died in motor vehicle traffic crashes over the July 4th holiday period (6 p.m. July 2 to 5:59 a.m. July 6). Of those fatalities, 41 percent (201) occurred in alcohol-impaired driving crashes.
    On this island, traffic fatalities have increased dramatically compared to last year. To date there have been 20 traffic deaths on island, compared to 12 this time last year.
   Of the 12 traffic fatalities at this time last year, being impaired was a factor in ten of them. So far this year, test results have shown that impairment is a factor in seven of the 20 fatalities. However it should be noted that test results for 10 of the fatalities have not been finalized, so this number may increase significantly, says a statement from HPD.
    “While we wish everyone a safe and happy Fourth of July holiday, we need to be clear that drunk driving in Hawai’i is 100 percent illegal and completely dangerous,” said Torey Keltner, Hawai‘i Police Department’s Traffic Services Program Manager, “especially in light of the dramatic increase in traffic fatalities we’ve seen so far this year.”
    “It’s important to understand that there’s absolutely no excuse for drinking and driving, impairment can occur even after just one alcoholic beverage. Being impaired at all means your ability perceive a situation, understand the correct course of action, and react to it are distorted and/or slowed.
    “Sometimes fractions of seconds in a traffic crash are the difference between life and death,” said Keltner. He adds that Hawai‘i Police Department will be out in force conducting saturation patrols and DUI checkpoints to help keep Hawai‘i Island residents safe.
    “Being arrested for a DUI costs thousands of dollars and it means you put yourself, your passengers and everyone on the road at risk.
    “There are many options for getting home safe, other than driving a vehicle while impaired. Call a friend, a family member, and nowadays you can call a ride share or taxi very easily. It doesn’t cost a lot for sober ride and you can avoid very dangerous situations and potentially life altering events.”
    With many Fourth of July festivities wrapping up late in the evening, nighttime hours are particularly dangerous: Over the 2020 July 4th holiday period, of the 201 people who died in alcohol-impaired motor vehicle traffic crashes, 85 percent of the crashes were at night (6 p.m.–5:59 a.m.).
    Police urge motorists to drive responsibly this holiday weekend and have a safe driving plan. If you plan on drinking, plan on not driving. Hawai‘i Police Department recommends these safe alternatives to drinking and driving:
    Designate a sober driver or plan to use public transportation or a ride service to get home safely. It could save you $10,000 on a DUI.
    When seeing a drunken driver on the road, contact the police department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or in case of emergency, 911.
    Have a friend who is about to drink and drive? Take the keys away and make arrangements to for the friend to return home safely.
    "This Fourth of July, commit to only driving 100-percent sober. Don’t lose your independence on Independence Day, and don’t be a deadly risk to yourself and other innocent people. Remember: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over." says the HPD statement.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm


VOLCANO VILLAGE FOURTH OF JULY PARADE welcomes walking and riding groups and individuals. It is sponsored by Volcano Community Association in Volcano Village from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.. The Monday, July 4 parade starts at the Post Office at 9 a.m. and ends at Cooper Center on Wright Rd., followed by Cooper Center's Independence Day celebration packed with live entertainment, craft and food vendors, keiki games and a large silent auction from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Parking maps can be found at www.thecoopercenter.org. (No parking at Cooper Center except handicap permitted vehicles with prior reservation.)

SPONSOR A BUCKLE, VOTE FOR RODEO QUEEN ahead of the Saturday, July 9 Rodeo organized by Kaʻū Roping & Riding Association and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. Event to be held on the rodeo grounds behind Nāʻālehu Park. Call 808-854-7917.

BECOME A SPONSOR AT THE 3RD ANNUAL EXPERIENCE VOLCANO FESTIVAL on Saturday, July 30th and Sunday, July 31st from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Last year, over 2,500 visitors attended and over 40 events were featured during the EVH festival. Sign up as a sponsor at experiencevolcano.com. If you have questions, contact experiencevolcano@gmail.com
All vendor locations are taken.
SIGN UP FOR KAʻŪ COFFEE TRAIL RUNS with a change of date from July 3 to Sept. 17. Registration deadline for the annual event is Sept. 14. Organized by Hawaiʻi Island Racers, the 50K begins at 6 a.m., Half Marathon at 7 a.m., and 5K at 7:15 a.m., all starting from Kaʻū Coffee Mill at 96-2696 Wood Valley Road in Pāhala. Proceeds go to support ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. For more details on the event and registration fees, visit https://www.kaucoffeetrailruns.com/.

Thursday, June 30, 2022

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Thursday, June 30, 2022

 

This image from University of Hawaiʻi indicates the impacts of Climate Change.
Illustration from U.H.

THE SUPREME COURT'S DECISION ON THURSDAY TO LIMIT THE ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY IN ADDRESSING CLIMATE CHANGE has drawn concern from Hawaiʻi Gov. David Ige and Board of Land & Natural Resources Chair Suzanne Case. Case is also Hawai‘i Climate Adaptation and Mitigation Commission co-chair. She said:
    “It’s unfortunate that this ruling limits the federal government's ability to act strongly on climate change. We have a moral imperative to address climate change due to impacts we already see to natural resources. Sea level rise is eroding our beaches and shorelines. Coral bleaching is damaging our reefs. Warmer temperatures are forcing disease-carrying mosquitoes into higher elevations where the avian malaria they infect native birds with, is on the verge of causing the extinction of two honeycreeper species in as little as two years. Right now, we are experiencing the impacts of drought statewide, and this has already caused more frequent and more intense wildfires.
    “As Gov. Ige said, Hawai‘i has shown great progress and leadership in addressing both the causes and impacts of climate change and we will continue to work with other leaders at all levels of government who remain committed to addressing what is the greatest existential threat facing the planet.”
  Case said that the Climate Commission sees this ruling as reaffirming the need for climate action at the state level. Climate Commission Co-Chair Mary Alice Evans said, “Just as we did in 2017, when the federal government withdrew from global leadership, Hawai‘i, in partnership with other states will step forward to lead on climate action.” Evans emphasized the importance of mitigation and adaptation actions locally, “as we are already experiencing droughts, flooding, and heat stress.”
    The Land Board statement says, "The Climate Commission promotes ambitious, climate-neutral, culturally responsive strategies for climate change adaptation and mitigation, in a manner that is clean, equitable, and resilient." The Climate Commission was created by Act 32 in 2017. The commission is administratively attached to Department of Land & Natural Resources. 
    Learn about the Climate Commission at https://climate.hawaii.gov/hi-commission/
    The governor said, “Hawaiʻi has long led the nation in response to the existential threat of climate change, and we will continue to do so. This ruling is another reminder that government action at all levels is needed, and Hawaiʻi has shown that it is possible. We will continue our work with other governors and local leaders to enact priority policies and take high-impact actions to help lead the world to a better place.”  
    The vote on the Supreme Court was three to three and is seen as supporting a return to mining coal for energy. The case involves West Virginia vs the EPA. It is also involves the view that the EPA has too much administrative power.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

HAWAIʻI POLICE DEPARTMENT'S 95TH Police Recruit Class Recognition Ceremony was held on Thursday, at Hilo Hawaiian Hotel in Hilo. This was an invite-only ceremony limited to police personnel, guest speakers, and family members of the recruits. The public was able to view the ceremony live by visiting the Hawaiʻi Police Department’s Facebook page.
    The 95th Police Recruit Class began training on December 16, 2021. The recruits started off as strangers who had come together from a variety of backgrounds and previous career paths. In the end, after six and a half months of intensive training, they graduated with a class of nine police recruits.
Hawai‘i Police Department's 95th Recruit Class: Left to Right: Collin
 Roberts, Melani Cline, Grant Kunihiro, Rylan Fujii, Derek Okabayashi,
 Mikhail Watkins, Troyson Reilly, Marcus Sosa, Edward Petrie.
Photo from HPD
    Class Officers are: Officer Edward Petrie, Class President; Officer Collin Roberts, Vice President; Officer Melani Cline, Secretary; and Officer Troyson Reilly, Treasurer.
    Other members of the class are Rylan Fujii, Grant Kunihiro, Derek Okabayashi, Marcus Sosa, and Mikhail Watkins.
    Special recognition was given to those recruit officers who achieved outstanding performance during the course of academic training. The Academic Award was awarded to Officer Edward Petrie who attained and upheld the highest grade point average on weekly and certification examinations.
Officer Collin Roberts was presented with the Firearms Award for his interest and proficiency in the use of firearms and for attaining the highest rating in firearms training. Recipients of the academic and firearms awards will have their names engraved on a perpetual plaque, which is displayed in the department's training room.
    Officer Grant Kunihiro was recognized with the Physical Fitness Award for excelling and maintaining his level of physical conditioning. Officer Collin Roberts received the Overall Outstanding Recruit Award for his performance and motivational qualities.
    The newly graduated officers will undergo four months of on-the-job field training with veteran police officers before they are qualified to work alone.
 
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm

Fencing to keep ungulates out of native forests in Hawaiʻi
Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo
FLIGHT OPERATIONS FOR HAWAI'I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK are set for July:
    July 6 and 7 between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. to support vegetation monitoring between 6,000-ft and 8,000-ft. elevation in the Kahuku Unit.
    July 13 between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. to support vegetation monitoring between 6,000-ft and 8,000-ft. elevation on Mauna Loa.
    July 18 between 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. for sling loads of fence material and gear to the Koa Unit of ʻŌlaʻa, between 3,500- and 4,000-ft. elevation.
    July 19 between 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. for ungulate survey in Kahuku between 4,000- and 6,000-ft. elevation.
    July 19 and July 21 between 8:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m. for Hawaiian petrel monitoring on Mauna Loa between 8,000- and 9,000-ft. elevation. July 20 and 21 between 7 a.m. and 8 a.m. to support vegetation monitoring between 6,000- and 8,000-ft. elevation on Mauna Loa.
    July 21 between 8 a.m. and 11 a.m. for survey and control of invasive guinea grass in the coastal Keauhou area, between sea level and 2,500-ft. elevation.
  July 22 between 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. for sling loads of fence material and gear to the Koa Unit of ʻŌlaʻa, between 3,500- and 4,000-ft. elevation.
    In addition, USGS will start a schedule of low-level helicopter flights in early July that will cover Kīlauea volcano over a three-week period. (Visit the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory website for more information). The USGS may conduct additional flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation.
     The statement from the Park says it "regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather. Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain back-country facilities."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at www.kaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.htm


VOLCANO VILLAGE FOURTH OF JULY PARADE welcomes walking and riding groups and individuals. It is sponsored by Volcano Community Association in Volcano Village from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.. The Monday, July 4 parade starts at the Post Office at 9 a.m. and ends at Cooper Center on Wright Rd., followed by Cooper Center's Independence Day celebration packed with live entertainment, craft and food vendors, keiki games and a large silent auction from 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Parking maps can be found at
www.thecoopercenter.org. (No parking at 
Cooper Center except handicap permitted 
vehicles with prior reservation.)

SPONSOR A BUCKLE, VOTE FOR RODEO QUEEN ahead of the Saturday, July 9 Rodeo organized by Kaʻū Roping & Riding Association and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. Event to be held on the rodeo grounds behind Nāʻālehu Park. Call 808-854-7917.

BECOME A SPONSOR AT THE 3RD ANNUAL EXPERIENCE VOLCANO FESTIVAL on Saturday, July 30th and Sunday, July 31st from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Last year, over 2,500 visitors attended and over 40 events were featured during the EVH festival. Sign up as a sponsor at experiencevolcano.com
If you have questions, contact experiencevolcano@gmail.com. All vendor locations are taken.

SIGN UP FOR KAʻŪ COFFEE TRAIL RUNS with a change of date from July 3 to Sept. 17. Registration deadline for the annual event is Sept. 14. Organized by Hawaiʻi Island Racers, the 50K begins at 6 a.m., Half Marathon at 7 a.m., and 5K at 7:15 a.m., all starting from Kaʻū Coffee Mill at 96-2696 Wood Valley Road in Pāhala. Proceeds go to support ʻO Kaʻū Kākou. For more details on the event and registration fees, visit https://www.kaucoffeetrailruns.com/.