About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, December 18, 2021

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Saturday, Dec. 18, 2021

Discovery Harbour Residents Parade with Lights for the Holidays
Golf carts, motorcycles, four-wheelers, trucks and cars were all in the mix of decorated vehicles
that wound through Discovery Harbour streets Saturday to celebrate the holidays. See more photos below.
Photo by Cheryl Cuevas
"WE CAN FIGURE A WAY TO SAVE OUR DEMOCRACY," said Sen. Mazie Hirono, speaking on the U.S. Senate floor this week. She said that as the year comes to a close, she is extremely worried about voter suppression, jerrymandering and efforts to deny Americans their right to vote. 
    She said some efforts to restrict voting would "make it darn near impossible for Black people and other people of color, elderly individuals, students, working families, and people with disabilities to vote.”
    Hirono said that claiming voter suppression tactics are necessary to protect election integrity is "so deeply damaging to our democracy. We all know that countless investigations have uncovered absolutely no evidence of systemic or widespread voter fraud. We all know that the 2020
Santa came to Discovery Harbour at sunset.
Photo by Cheryl Cuevas

election was the most secure election in our nation’s history. And we certainly all know this not about voter fraud, it’s about advancing a political agenda by denying large swaths of Americans their fundamental right to vote. If this isn’t un-American, I don’t know what is. Which is why voter suppression is the most urgent crisis facing our country today. And which is why, it is the single most pressing issue the Senate must address,” she added.
    Hirono said: "The foundation of American democracy is built upon the sacred right to vote, and there is no doubt that right is under attack today. This year alone, 550 voter suppression bills have been introduced in state legislatures across the country.
    “In Texas, it is now illegal to compensate workers who help voters who don’t speak English and for election officials to encourage eligible voters to apply to vote by mail. In Fulton County, Georgia—a county that historically votes Democratic—the number of ballot boxes has been reduced from 38 to eight. That’s one ballot box for every 100,000 voters. And in Florida, ballot drop-off boxes can only be utilized during early-voting hours and boxes must be located at either a county’s elections office or early-voting sites."
    Voting suppression has "gone so far as to make it illegal to hand a bottle of water to voters waiting in line. I truly want to know how you can even pretend to justify that law. But when you shut down or severely limit the hours of polling locations, remove eligible voters from the voting list, create unnecessary hurdles to vote, and eliminate Election Day registration, who do you think this hurts?"
    Hirono said hard won rights won't be preserved "if we don’t protect the right to vote. To quote my friend and colleague, Senator Warnock, 'voting rights are preservative of all other rights.'”
Golf carts were popular in the Discovery Harbour parade
on Saturday at sundown. Photo by Cheryl Cuevas
     
    Hirono noted, “We are nearing the one-year anniversary of the attack on the U.S. Capitol. ...We are still learning the consequences of that day, but we know for certain this act of domestic terrorism was an attack on free and fair elections in this country....Congress must take action to restore the integrity of our voting system and make sure every American’s voice is heard and counted. And we’ve tried. We’ve tried four times to stop these unconstitutional state level laws from undermining our elections.
    “We’ve tried to pass common sense reforms that would allow all eligible voters to vote by mail; make Election Day a federal holiday so all working families can vote; and establish federal criminal penalties for deceiving voters with false and misleading information about voting.
    “And most importantly, we’re tried to pass the John R. Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act, which would give the Department of Justice the tools to keep these blatant voter suppression laws from being enacted in the first place.
   “Quoting Senator Warnock again, “as we cast that vote to begin addressing the debt ceiling, this same chamber is allowing the ceiling of our democracy to crash in around us. We figured out a way to save our economy, we can figure out a way to save our democracy."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar/. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Christmas Comet Leonard. Photo by Tara Mostofi
THE CHRISTMAS COMET OF 2021 is worth a look, according to Lew Cook who writes the monthly Stars column for The Ka`u Calendar newspaper. Officially named Comet Leonard, it is now in the evening sky and had an outburst as it passed closest to earth a couple of days ago. While visible with binoculars, it 
may now be visible with the naked eye from dark skies. Look for Comet Leonard right after sunset low to the horizon a few degrees below Venus for the next several evenings, says Cook and co-reporter Tara Mostofi who captured the accompanying photo. The fuzzy patch on the upper left is the Snowgloble globular cluster. The bright star above the nucleus of the Christmas Comet is d Bootes, a 4.8 magnitude star.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar/. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI'I COOPERATIVE EXTENSION AGENT Andrea Kawabata suggests that local farmers look into selling through  the federal General Services Administration. She writes, "Have you ever considered selling your product or service to the biggest buyer in the world? The Federal Government? Learn about contracting opportunities, the process and resources available."
    An online meeting will be Monday, Dec. 20, noon - 1:30 p.m. A link to be sent to those who register at https://www.eventbrite.com/o/sba-hawaii-17058643441?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery.
    Pamela Smith-Cressel, Director, Office of Business Utilization – Pacific Region, will discuss contracting opportunities, the process, and resources available. She plans to answer the question, "What does GSA do?" Through the virtual meeting, attendees can: Understand how the Federal Government makes their buying decisions; learn what GSA buys; learn how to sell to and through GSA; understand how to market to the agency; learn about advocacy resources and identify GSA sources of support.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar/. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
See the December and past issues of The Ka`u Calendar
at www.kaucalendar.com.


















































KAʻŪ COFFEE MILL & VISITOR CENTER. Buy online at kaucoffeemill.com and in person at 96-2694 Wood Valley Road, daily, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.


PUNALUʻU BAKESHOP online at bakeshophawaii.com and in-person 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days a week in x.


ALIʻI HAWAIʻI HULA HANDS COFFEE. Order by calling 928-0608 or emailing alihhhcoffee@yahoo.com.


AIKANE PLANTATION COFFEE COMPANY. Order online at aikaneplantation.com. Call 808-927-2252


MIRANDA'S FARMS KAʻŪ COFFEE. Order online at mirandafarms.com or, in person at 73-7136 Mamalahoa Hwy. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com..


KUAHIWI RANCH STORE, in person. Shop weekdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday, 11 am to 3 p.m. at 95-5520 Hwy 11. Locally processed grass-fed beef, live meat chickens, and feed for cattle, goats, sheep, chickens, horses, dogs, and pigs. Call 929-7333 of 938-1625, email kaohi@kuahiwiranch.com.


DEPRESSED, ANXIOUS, NEED SOMEONE TO TALK TO? Call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.


LEARN SELF-CARE THROUGH Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group at facebook.com/bhhsurg



WOMEN'S COLLECTIVE OFFERS HEALTH PROGRAMS. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


YOGA WITH EMILY Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222.


CHOOSE ALOHA FOR HOME is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up at chooselovemovement.org/choose-love-home.


EDUCATION


Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs at rb.gy/o1o2hy. For keiki grades 1-6. Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.


ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides for Chromebooks and iPads at rb.gy/8er9wm. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.


Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.


Public Libraries are open for WiFi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., limited entry into library with Wiki Visits. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. WiFi available to anyone with a library card, from each library parking lot. See librarieshawaii.org.


Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.


Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption.View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report at rb.gy/awu65k.


Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.


Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.


Online Directory at shopbigisland.com, co-sponsored by County of Hawai‘i, has a signup sheet for local businesses to fill in the blanks. The only requirement is a physical address on this island.
COMMUNITY

Food Assistance: Apply for The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences COVID-19 Family Relief Funds. Funded by Volcano Community Association, and members of the VSAS Friends and Governing Boards, who have donated, the fund supplies KTA or Dimple Cheek Gift Cards, or gift cards to other locally owned business, to VSAS families in need. Contact Kim Miller at 985-8537, kmiller@volcanoschool.net. Contributions to the fund can be sent in by check to: VSAS, PO Box 845, Volcano, HI 96785 – write Relief Fund in the memo. See volcanoschool.net


ENROLL CHILDREN, from first through eighth grade, in Kula ʻAmakihi, a program from Volcano School of the Arts & Sciences. It started Aug. 3. Call 808-985- 9800 or visit www.volcanoschool.net.


WALK THROUGH A GUIDED NATURE TRAIL & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. www.volcanoartcenter.org. Call 967-8222.


KAʻŪ ART GALLERY is open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. in Nāʻālehu. It features and sells works by local artists and offers other gift items. "We are always looking to collaborate with local artists in our community," said assistant Alexandra Kaupu. Artists with an interest in being featured at Kaʻū Art Gallery and Gift Shop, contact gallery owner and director Corrine Kaupu at kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz.


GOLF & MEMBERSHIPS for Discovery Harbour Golf Course and its Clubhouse: The Club offers Social Memberships, with future use of the clubhouse and current use of the pickleball courts as well as walking and running on specified areas of the golf course before 8 a.m. and after 3 p.m. to enjoy the panoramiocean views. Golf memberships range from unlimited play for the avid golfer to casual play options. Membership is required to play and practice golf on the course. All golf memberships include Social Membership amenities. Membership fees are designed to help underwrite programs and improvements to the facilities.Call 808-731-5122 or stop by the Clubhouse during business hours, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at 94-1581 Kaulua Circle. Email clubatdiscoveryharbour@gmail.com. See The Club at Discovery Harbour Facebook page.


ALOHA FRIDAY MARKETPLACE, hosted by Main Street, is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., grounds of The Old Shirakawa Estate in Waiʻohinu. It features: Made in Hawai'i Products, Organic Produce, Creative Crafts, ARt, Flower and Plants, Food, Ka`u Coffee, Gluen Free Low Carb Goodies, Wellness Services and Products, Clothing, Hand Crafted Treats, Music and more. Vendor and customer inquiries: AlohaFridayMarket@gmail.com.


VOLCANO FARMERS MARKET, Cooper Center, Volcano Village on Sundays. 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, baked goods, food to go, island beef and Hawai‘i Coffee. Cooper Center's EBT Machine, used at the Farmer's Market, is out of service until further notice. EBT is used for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly Food Stamps. Call 808-967-7800.


OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY MARKET, open Saturdays and Thursdays, 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Council. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at 5:30 a.m., $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.


O KAʻŪ KĀKOU MARKET, in Nāʻālehu, open Wednesday, and Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon. Limit of 50 customers per hour, 20 vendor booths, with 20 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


OCEAN VIEW SWAP MEET is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks required.


BUY LOCAL GIFTS ONLINE, IN-PERSON


VOLCANO ART CENTER ONLINE, in person. Shop at Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. See volcanoartcenter.org/events, call 967-8222.


Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, Dec. 17, 2021

Families Drive Keiki Through Rain for Holiday Light Show
The Drive Thru Holiday Light Show at Pahala Elementary carried keiki through the rain for gifts from the school and a show for the season. It was sponsored by the school, Kaʻū High Athletics, County Parks & Recreation and O Kaʻū Kakou. The event was held for the second time. Cars and trucks rolled through the campus on shimmering streets among colorful decorations.
Photo by Julia Neal
A COVID WARNING FOR THE ENTIRE STATE came from Gov. David Ige on Friday, as cases nearly doubled to 797, following 395 on Thursday. Most of them were on O'ahu. Statewide, the positivity rate in testing jumped in the last ten days from 1.4 percent to 4.2 percent.Ige called in the increase alarming, saying "something that can help slow the spread of the virus is something that we have done for the past two years: get vaccinated, from keiki to kūpuna. For those who are fully vaccinated and yet to get their boosters, please do so. Wear your masks. Especially as required indoors and in crowded spaces outdoors.”
Sparkling road into the school where keiki enjoyed
the Holiday Light Show. Photo by Julia Neal
     State Department of Health officials reminded the public that the new surge represents a double whammy - more Delta and Omicron variants coming on at the same time. DOH Director Libby Char, Md., said, “COVID is surging worldwide and across the United States, and we are seeing more and more Omicron variant." She noted that “Omicron appears to be more easily transmitted and it appears right now that it is less virulent. But don’t be fooled into thinking that it won’t affect our hospitals and our families. Perhaps the numbers in the hospitals may end up being worse than Delta.” 
Santa and other characters led the way. Photo by Julia Neal
     Also reacting to the sudden surge was state Department of Defense leader Adjunct General  Kenneth Hara. He put off Friday's  Hawaiʻi National Guard ceremony to mark the ending of its Joint Task Force response to the COVID crisis. He predicted that additional support will be required for testing, contact tracing, and vaccinations. “We must organize again and resource ourselves to meet the needs of the counties and the state.”
School staff handed out gifts to the keiki during the drive-thru.
Photo by Julia Neal
     The governor said, “We are continuing the research to understand what we’re dealing with, and our best researchers and medical experts are working on this. The mayors and I are discussing what type of protocols might be required going forward. The bottom line is this: Your life matters. Our mission is to stop the spread. It will take all of us to do that.” 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar/. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


CONTINUED RECOVERY FROM THE LOWER EAST RIFT ZONE ERUPTION and summit collapse is the topic of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates:
A snowman comes to campus.
Photo by Julia Neal
     During the events of 2018, HVO instruments were lost, monitoring infrastructure was impacted, and HVO staff had to evacuate the observatory, which was damaged beyond repair.
Hawaii’s Congressional delegation worked hard to secure funding for both a field station within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and a research center on the University of Hawai‘i at Hilo campus, which will replace the Reginald T. Okamura building. HVO will share both of these facilities with the USGS Pacific Islands Ecosystem Research Center.
    Thanks to dedicated disaster relief funding, HVO is not just rebuilding, but is gaining new capabilities and scientific knowledge in order to continue its mission better than ever.
    The USGS received funding through the Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019 (H.R. 2157) to support recovery and rebuilding activities in the wake of 2018. Three main activities were funded: bolstering volcano monitoring and eruption response capabilities, conducting scientific investigations, and building new HVO facilities.

Families roll up to the gift-giving staff and other volunteers at Pahala Elementary on Friday. Photo by Julia Neal

HVO is replacing much of its network with newer and better real-time monitoring instruments to improve early detection of magma movement, which supports more accurate and timely characterization of hazards to island communities. Improvements include new broadband seismometers to better locate and record earthquakes, higher resolution GPS/GNSS stations and tiltmeters to more accurately measure ground movements, and a new absolute gravimeter that can measure subsurface mass changes due to magma movement. Other field instruments include new gas sensors to detect sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and other emissions, a laser rangefinder that has been used since last January to make continuous measurements of lava lake depth, and higher resolution visual and thermal cameras to monitor surface activity and provide situational awareness.

USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) scientists monitor the Halema‘uma‘u lava lake using state-of-the-art
 instruments acquired through the Additional Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Act of 2019.
Supplemental funds are supporting HVO’s recovery and rebuilding in the wake of Kīlauea’s 2018 lower East
Rift Zone eruption and summit collapse. Three main HVO activities are funded: bolstering volcano monitoring
and eruption response capabilities, conducting scientific investigations, and building new facilities.
USGS photo by D. A. Phillips

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar/. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE COUNTY RELEASED AN ANIMAL CONTROL REPORT ON FRIDAY, showing that it was able to return a monthly average of 28 percent of animals to their owners. Fifty-eight percent went to partner agencies and 16 percent were euthanized. The stats go back to July when the county took over for a private contractor and placed Animal Control Services in the Police Department. "While the Hawai‘i County Code allows contracting of Animal Control Services, the County has undertaken an Animal Control Services pilot project, expected to last for at least two years. During this time, it will house and perform Animal Control Services. Towards conclusion of the pilot, the County will decide whether to contract any future Animal Control Services."
https://lost.petcolove.org/
    The county report describes Services Offered and Who to Call: Calls received regarding Animal Control services continue to be categorized as Priority One, Two, or Three. Animal Control staff continue to respond to Priority One calls 24 hours a day island-wide. 
    Since July 1, the Animal Control staff has responded to 30-50 calls a day, with an average of 20 of those calls requiring an immediate response.
    Priority One calls include those for injured animals, any animal that is a public safety risk, animal cruelty, and situations in which an animal’s owner has been arrested or died with no family to pick up the pet. Police ask that the public call police dispatch at (808) 935-3311 for Priority One, or emergency requests for assistance.
    For Priority Two calls, those pertaining to lost or found pets and non-emergency issues, the public is asked to call Animal Control staff at (808) 327-3558 or email at hpdanimalcontrol@hawaiicounty.gov. When leaving a message, clearly state name, and repeat contact information so that staff can make contact promptly. The staff answers the phones and return calls during normal business hours.
    For Lost & Found Healthy Pets: People who find a healthy stray animal or who lose a pet are encouraged to post it as lost / found on https://lost.petcolove.org/. Petco Love Lost is a searchable national database that uses patented facial recognition technology to make finding lost pets quicker and easier. This simple-to-use tool will be easily accessible to participating animal organizations nationwide, as well as any pet parent or person who finds a lost pet. Uploaded photos of a missing dog or cat are immediately scanned to determine whether the lost pet is at a participating shelter or with a neighbor in the community. The technology scans photos at the shelters every two hours to reunite lost pets and their owners as quickly and efficiently as possible.
County of Hawai'i is working to return lost pets to their owners and to run two shelters on
the island, partnering with non-profits that also take care of animals. Photo from Humane Society

After finding a healthy stray animal, contact Animal Control Services at (808) 327-3558. Shelter capacity is still limited and averages 135 animals per day. However, County Animal Control has, and continues to, admit healthy strays as their capacity for care allows.
    Regarding Animal Control Facilities: Animal Control Services currently leases a shelter facility in east

Hawai‘i and maintains use of a County-owned facility in west Hawai‘i with kennel staff caring and feeding the animals. Plans are underway to make significant improvements to the Kona shelter, which is in need of repairs. Additionally, the County is exploring options to purchase a permanent shelter facility in east Hawai‘i in addition to the current leased facility.
    Spay/Neuter Services: "Recognizing that pet overpopulation is a substantial issue on Hawai’i Island, says the County statement. "County Animal Control Services ensures that those animals that are transferred to our partner agencies are spayed and neutered before they are available for foster or adoption."
    Animal Control is Hiring: Under the direction of HPD, Animal Control is seeking experienced kennel techs and Animal Control Officers in both east and west Hawai‘i and states that recruitments for these contract positions will be forthcoming. See the County Website under Job Opportunities where interested persona can apply. In the interim, those interested in applying for positions may submit a resume to HPDAnimalControl@hawaiicounty.gov.
    The report from HPD says, "Hawaiʻi Police Department would like to thank Hawai‘i Island residents for their patience during the recent months as the County assumed responsibility for Animal Control Services. The department also thanks the animal welfare organizations around the island that have assisted with animal transfers and fostering during this time."
    Any non-profit animal organizations that may want to work with County Animal Control Services as partners are invited to inquire via email at hpdanimalcontrol@hawaiicounty.gov. Information on Animal Control Services can be found online at https://www.hawaiipolice.com/services/animal-control-services.

A HOLIDAY PARADE OF LIGHTS will be hosted on Saturday, Dec. 18. It starts at Discovery Harbour Community Center at 5:30 p.m. for photos and rolls into the neighborhood beginning at 6 p.m.
    Noisemakers, bells, boomboxes are welcome to help spread the cheer, along with candy for the spectators. The parade will be followed by cookies, punch and caroling at Discovery Harbour Community Center.
    See www.discoveryharbour.net and Discovery Harbour Owners facebook for route map. Participants are urged to follow all CDC and County of Hawai'i COVID rules.

Discovery Harbour Parade of Lights begins at 6 p.m. on Saturday. Meet at Discovery 
Harbour Community Center at 5:30 p.m. for photos. Photo by Julia Neal


See the December and past issues of The Ka`u Calendar
at www.kaucalendar.com.


















































KAʻŪ COFFEE MILL & VISITOR CENTER. Buy online at kaucoffeemill.com and in person at 96-2694 Wood Valley Road, daily, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.


PUNALUʻU BAKESHOP online at bakeshophawaii.com and in-person 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., seven days a week in x.


ALIʻI HAWAIʻI HULA HANDS COFFEE. Order by calling 928-0608 or emailing alihhhcoffee@yahoo.com.


AIKANE PLANTATION COFFEE COMPANY. Order online at aikaneplantation.com. Call 808-927-2252


MIRANDA'S FARMS KAʻŪ COFFEE. Order online at mirandafarms.com or, in person at 73-7136 Mamalahoa Hwy. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com..


KUAHIWI RANCH STORE, in person. Shop weekdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sunday, 11 am to 3 p.m. at 95-5520 Hwy 11. Locally processed grass-fed beef, live meat chickens, and feed for cattle, goats, sheep, chickens, horses, dogs, and pigs. Call 929-7333 of 938-1625, email kaohi@kuahiwiranch.com.


DEPRESSED, ANXIOUS, NEED SOMEONE TO TALK TO? Call Department of Health's expanded Hawai‘i C.A.R.E.S. program at 1-800-753-6879 – the same number previously used by Crisis Line of Hawai‘i. Individuals in crisis can also text ALOHA to 741741, available 24/7.


LEARN SELF-CARE THROUGH Big Island Substance Abuse Council's Practice Self-Care Series. For additional series that feature refreshing wellness tips, follow the Behavioral Health & Homelessness Statewide Unified Response Group at facebook.com/bhhsurg



WOMEN'S COLLECTIVE OFFERS HEALTH PROGRAMS. Piko focuses on reproductive health; increasing access, respect, cultural competence, education, and choice. Pilina aims to grow membership and establish a culture of collaborative decision-making. Follow @kau_womens_health_collective. Contact rootsmedieshawaii@gmail.com. Call 808-450-0498.


YOGA WITH EMILY Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222.


CHOOSE ALOHA FOR HOME is available to families, to provide a healthy way to grow together using neuroscience and positive psychology. Program uses a series of self-guided videos, activities, and "dinner table discussion topics." Sign up at chooselovemovement.org/choose-love-home.


EDUCATION


Register for Boys & Girls Club Mobile Outreach and Tutoring Programs at rb.gy/o1o2hy. For keiki grades 1-6. Contact Boys & Girls Club of the Big Island Administrative Office, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at (808) 961-5536 or email mobiletutoring@bgcbi.org or info@bgcbi.org.


ʻOhana Help Desk offers online How-To Guides for Chromebooks and iPads at rb.gy/8er9wm. ʻOhana Help Desk also available by phone, weekdays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m., Sundays from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m.


Invite Park Rangers to Virtually Visit Classes, through connecting with teachers and home-schoolers with distance learning programs and virtual huakaʻi (field trips). Contact havo_education@nps.gov.


Public Libraries are open for WiFi, pick-up, and other services. Nāʻālehu open Monday and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala open Tuesday, noon to 7 p.m., Thursday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., limited entry into library with Wiki Visits. Schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. Open for library card account help and reference assistance from the front door. WiFi available to anyone with a library card, from each library parking lot. See librarieshawaii.org.


Free Book Exchanges, at laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu, provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Open to all. Keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them. Selection of books replenished weekly at both sites.


Read Report on Public Input about Disaster Recovery from damage during the 2018 Kīlauea eruption.View the Civic Engagement and Comment Analysis Report at rb.gy/awu65k.


Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through Papakilo Database, papakilodatabase.com.


Virtual Workshops on Hawaiʻi's Legislative Processes through Public Access Room. Sign up by contacting (808) 587-0478 or par@capitol.hawaii.gov. Ask questions and discuss all things legislative in a non-partisan environment. Attend Coffee Hour with PAR: Fridays at 3 p.m. on Zoom, meeting ID 990 4865 9652 or click zoom.us/j/99048659652. PAR staff will be available to answer questions and to discuss the legislative process. Anyone wanting to listen in without taking part in discussions is welcome. Learn more at lrb.hawaii.gov/public-access-room.


Online Directory at shopbigisland.com, co-sponsored by County of Hawai‘i, has a signup sheet for local businesses to fill in the blanks. The only requirement is a physical address on this island.
COMMUNITY

Food Assistance: Apply for The Volcano School of Arts & Sciences COVID-19 Family Relief Funds. Funded by Volcano Community Association, and members of the VSAS Friends and Governing Boards, who have donated, the fund supplies KTA or Dimple Cheek Gift Cards, or gift cards to other locally owned business, to VSAS families in need. Contact Kim Miller at 985-8537, kmiller@volcanoschool.net. Contributions to the fund can be sent in by check to: VSAS, PO Box 845, Volcano, HI 96785 – write Relief Fund in the memo. See volcanoschool.net


ENROLL CHILDREN, from first through eighth grade, in Kula ʻAmakihi, a program from Volcano School of the Arts & Sciences. It started Aug. 3. Call 808-985- 9800 or visit www.volcanoschool.net.


WALK THROUGH A GUIDED NATURE TRAIL & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. www.volcanoartcenter.org. Call 967-8222.


KAʻŪ ART GALLERY is open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. in Nāʻālehu. It features and sells works by local artists and offers other gift items. "We are always looking to collaborate with local artists in our community," said assistant Alexandra Kaupu. Artists with an interest in being featured at Kaʻū Art Gallery and Gift Shop, contact gallery owner and director Corrine Kaupu at kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz.


GOLF & MEMBERSHIPS for Discovery Harbour Golf Course and its Clubhouse: The Club offers Social Memberships, with future use of the clubhouse and current use of the pickleball courts as well as walking and running on specified areas of the golf course before 8 a.m. and after 3 p.m. to enjoy the panoramiocean views. Golf memberships range from unlimited play for the avid golfer to casual play options. Membership is required to play and practice golf on the course. All golf memberships include Social Membership amenities. Membership fees are designed to help underwrite programs and improvements to the facilities.Call 808-731-5122 or stop by the Clubhouse during business hours, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily at 94-1581 Kaulua Circle. Email clubatdiscoveryharbour@gmail.com. See The Club at Discovery Harbour Facebook page.


ALOHA FRIDAY MARKETPLACE, hosted by Main Street, is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., grounds of The Old Shirakawa Estate in Waiʻohinu. It features: Made in Hawai'i Products, Organic Produce, Creative Crafts, ARt, Flower and Plants, Food, Ka`u Coffee, Gluen Free Low Carb Goodies, Wellness Services and Products, Clothing, Hand Crafted Treats, Music and more. Vendor and customer inquiries: AlohaFridayMarket@gmail.com.


VOLCANO FARMERS MARKET, Cooper Center, Volcano Village on Sundays. 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, baked goods, food to go, island beef and Hawai‘i Coffee. Cooper Center's EBT Machine, used at the Farmer's Market, is out of service until further notice. EBT is used for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly Food Stamps. Call 808-967-7800.


OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY MARKET, open Saturdays and Thursdays, 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., on the corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Managed by Mark Council. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at 5:30 a.m., $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in upper lot only. Vendors must provide own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling encouraged.


O KAʻŪ KĀKOU MARKET, in Nāʻālehu, open Wednesday, and Saturday, 8 a.m. to noon. Limit of 50 customers per hour, 20 vendor booths, with 20 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing required, social distancing enforced. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


OCEAN VIEW SWAP MEET is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks required.


BUY LOCAL GIFTS ONLINE, IN-PERSON


VOLCANO ART CENTER ONLINE, in person. Shop at Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village, Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Virtual Shopping Appointments offered via Skype or FaceTime. Book at volcanoartcenter.org/shop for $5. Shop online gallery 24/7. Orders shipped or free local pickup available. See the VAC Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. See volcanoartcenter.org/events, call 967-8222.