About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, October 14, 2022

Kaʻū News Briefs, Friday, Oct. 14, 2022

The day before the M5.0 and 4.6 earthquakes near Pāhala. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory released its Volcano Watch,
focusing on preparation and safety during earthquakes and lava flows, as well as info on the Great Shakeout, coming up
Oct. 20. See more below. Images from Great Hawai'i Shakeout

M4.6 AND M5.0 EARTHQUAKES SHOOK KA'Ū FRIDAY, WITHIN SECONDS OF EACH OTHER, making them feel like one long, extended temblor. The epicenter of the 4.6 at 9:07 a.m. was just offshore, south of Pāhala. The 5.0 was on land, about half way between Pāhala and Punalu'u at Highway 11. They were 24 seconds apart.
    Both quakes were at shallower depths than most quakes in the ongoing swarm around Pāhala. The 4.6 was 8 miles deep and the 5.0 was 4 miles deep, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.

A few items fell off shelves and broke at Aun Tee's
at Pāhala Center during 4.6 and 5.0 earthquakes
Friday. Staff relocated other items onto the floor
 during the aftershocks. The coffee and gift shop
 reopened when electricity came back on.
Photo by Julia Neal
    Ken Hon, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist in Charge, said the cause could be the shear weight of the island releasing pressure on the southwest flank of Mauna Loa.
    The quakes prompted Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School Principal Sharon Beck to sound off the alarm, evacuating all students into the schoolyard. At the adjacent Robert E. Herkes Kaʻū District Gym, which is also the regional disaster shelter, some ceiling panels fell. Light fixtures fell inside Pāhala Post Office, which shut its front door and announced it would hand out packages out the back door, and continue to service the postal boxes, with no counter service until further notice.
     Items fell off shelves at Mizuno Superette and Aun Tee's coffee shop at Pāhala Center. Electricity went off for hours in Pāhala and both Bank of Hawai'i and Long's shut their doors. Mizuno's and Aun Tee's opened with the return of electricity. Kaʻū Hospital remained opened and was largely unscathed with inspectors making a check on structural stability.
     Residents talked about mirrors and artwork crashing onto floors along with dishes and other items, leaving a lot of glass to sweep up. Some residents reported leaks in water pipes.
    At Punalu'u, SeaMountain condominium guests and residents reported some shaking but no loss of power.  
Both the ATM and counter service shut down
at Bank of Hawai'i in Pāhala. Photo by Julia Neal
    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a statement saying, "These two larger earthquakes were followed by a string of aftershocks, mostly less than magnitude-3.0, but including some larger ones up to magnitude-4.0. The aftershock sequence is continuing, between 0–12 km (0–7 mi) depth, south of Pāhala. The aftershocks could continue for several days to possibly weeks and may be large enough to be felt.
    "The two larger earthquakes were reported by hundreds of people from the Island of Hawaiʻi and felt to a lesser extent across the entire State of Hawai’i. Shaking from the larger earthquakes may have been strong enough to do minor local damage, especially to older buildings. The two earthquakes occurred within 24 seconds of each other creating shaking of longer duration and possibly greater intensity than either of the earthquakes would have created on their own.
    "This sequence of earthquakes appears to be related to readjustments along the southeast flank of Mauna Loa volcano. There has been no immediate effect on the continuing unrest beneath Mauna Loa summit, which remains elevated at levels similar to the past week. On several occasions large earthquakes have
Longs Drugs shutdown after the 
earthquake due to power outage.
Photo by Julia Neal
preceded past eruptions of Mauna Loa, though these have typically been larger than today’s earthquakes. It is not known at this time if this sequence of earthquakes is directly related to the ongoing unrest on Mauna Loa.
    The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory will continue to closely monitor Mauna Loa for any changes. "

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.

THE DAY BEFORE THE 5.0 QUAKE, the weekly Volcano Watch column by USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory and scientists focused on preparedness for quakes and lava flows, particularly from Mauna Loa. It was written by geophysicist Jefferson Chang: 
   Feeling occasional earthquakes is part of the experience of living in the State of Hawai'i. Most of the
earthquakes are small, but the less common large earthquakes can be damaging, so it is important to be prepared.
   The U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory records tens of thousands of earthquakes beneath our islands every year. Luckily, most of these are less than magnitude-2, and are not felt. Over the past 30 years, Hawai'i has had four earthquakes of magnitude-6 or larger. Three of them were deep (greater than 12 miles or 20 kilometers) and likely the result of the stresses brought forth by the Hawaiian Islands sitting on top of the Pacific plate. A recent example was the magnitude-6.2 earthquake that struck 17 miles (27 kilometers) south of Nā‘ālehu, a few minutes before midnight on Oct. 10, 2021.
   Another was a magnitude-6.9 on May 4, 2018, which is the largest earthquake recorded in Hawai'i in the past 30 years. This event was much shallower (less than 9 miles or 15 kilometers) and was likely related to magma moving through the Kīlauea plumbing system at the start of the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption.
    It is a bit of a chicken or egg problem, whether these large, shallow earthquakes under volcanoes lead to eruptions, or if it is the magma shifting stresses along faults that trigger earthquakes. These are two end-member hypotheses, and in reality, it is most likely a combination of both. Earthquakes and volcanic eruptions go hand-in-hand.
    We see this kind of interplay between magma movement and seismicity with the ongoing swarm of earthquakes under Mauna Loa summit caldera (Moku'āweoweo) and the upper northwest flank. This elevated seismic activity is accompanied by slight ground inflation (or swelling), which suggests that the Mauna Loa magma reservoir is filling.
    Does this mean that Mauna Loa will erupt soon? Not necessarily.
    Mauna Loa has been in a period of prolonged unrest. The sleeping giant may just be snoring a little louder than it did a few years ago, but it does not necessarily mean that it will wake up soon.
    Scientists at HVO look at many different monitoring streams to document changes in Mauna Loa’s behavior. Some of these changes may alert scientists when an eruption is more likely. Large shallow earthquakes are one of the indicators that move the probability of an eruption of Mauna Loa from “not necessarily” to “highly likely”. For example, a magnitude-6.7 earthquake happened a few months before the last eruption of Mauna Loa in 1984. The 1950 eruption was also preceded by a large earthquake, but only 2 days prior to the onset of the eruption.
See shakeout.org for the Great
Hawai'i Shakeout event Oct. 20.
    However, not all Mauna Loa eruptions are preceded by large earthquakes. And some large earthquakes, such as the 1975 magnitude-7.7 Kalapana earthquake was not accompanied by a major eruption of Kīlauea volcano.
    Large shallow earthquakes are not just a potential precursor to volcanic eruptions, but can be a disaster on their own. Damage done by large earthquakes can be mitigated to reduce the hazards and risks associated with violent shaking. Modern building codes make houses much more resistant to damage. Efforts like securing tall heavy objects to the wall so they are less likely to tip over and fall will reduce the likelihood of damage and injury when a large earthquake hits. Earthquake safety drills for “Drop. Cover. Hold On.” should be practiced regularly so that instinct kicks in when the initial shaking is felt.
    Join us, and the rest of the world, on Thursday, Oct. 20 at 10:20 a.m. local time for the Great Hawai'i ShakeOut.
    Visit shakeout.org to sign-up and learn more about ways to prepare for large damaging earthquakes.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.

THE ROBERT E. HERKES KAʻŪ DISTRICT GYM WILL HOST GIRLS VOLLEYBALL FINALS for the Big Island Interscholastic Federation this Saturday afternoon. In football, the Trojans will host Kohala at 1:30 p.m.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.


 

In the mail, on stands and at www.kaucalendar.com




Kaʻū News Briefs, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2022

A memorial for Brandy Ebanez on the mainland, where she was murdered in an alleged
domestic abuse killing. Photo from the Tri-City Herald

MAN ARRESTED IN BRANDY EBANEZ MURDER CASE: Richard Michael Jacobson has been arrested in Portland, Oregon as a felony fugitive, related to the murder case of Brandy Ebanez, formerly of Pāhala. Ebanez's body was found on Sept. 27, floating in the Columbia River, southeast of Cable Bridge by Clover Island, near her home in Kennewick, WA. Her body was wrapped in plastic sheeting and a comforter, her legs tied together with rope attached to two rocks, according to local media reports in Washington and Oregon.
     Those reports said that she he was discovered by an off-duty policeman who was fishing.  Ebanez had been missing for about two weeks. The autopsy showed she suffered a broken neck and was also about 16 to 20 weeks pregnant.
The late Brandy Ebanez, whose
children are subject of a GoFundMe
 Campaign to help bring them to Pāhala.
https://www.gofundme.com/f/in-the-
loving-memory-of-brandy-ebanez
    A Gofundme page has been set up to help bring Ebanez's nine and 12 year old daughters to live with their grandmother, who has filed for custody. As of Thursday night, $11,717 is raised toward a $20,000 goal.
     Ebanez's family members, including her older sister, have described the murder as one of domestic violence and an example of weak laws and weak enforcement of protection for women and children. They said they had long hoped that Ebanez could have extricated herself from the dangerous relationship and moved back home to Pāhala. They said they hope the future will include the children being cared for with their family members in Pāhala. Ebanez worked in the health care field in Washington and colleagues described her as very caring.
    A statement from the Kennewick Police Department, released Wednesday, said, "Kennewick PD detectives have identified a suspect in the murder of 34-year-old Brandy Ebanez. This suspect was known to Brandy and has been taken into custody in the State of Oregon on an arrest warrant and a no bail order related to charges in the City of Kennewick. The suspect is currently awaiting extradition to Washington State. Kennewick PD will provide an update once the suspect arrives to the Benton County Jail."
     The suspect was identified by media in Washington state as Jacobson and as being held in the Portland's Multnomah County Jail. He is also 34 years of age, according to the media reports, as well as the father of Ebanez's children.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.

OCTOBER IS SAFE SLEEP AND SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME AWARENESS MONTH, and the state Department of Health reminds all parents and caregivers of the importance of making sure their infant is sleeping in a safe environment.
    "There are about 3,500 sleep-related deaths among US babies each year, many of which are preventable," said Sage Goto, head of Safe Sleep Hawai'i, a public-private initiative led by DOH. "The death of an infant affects everyone—parents, grandparents, siblings, and others—who all experience the grief of losing a baby."
   The American Academy of Pediatrics recently updated its recommendations for the first time since 2016, urging parents to make sure babies sleep on a flat, non-inclined surface and discouraging bedsharing.
    The AAP's Updated 2022 Recommendations for parents/caregivers can help reduce the risk of sleep-related infant deaths in Hawaiʻi and includes the following:
    Always place babies on their backs for naptime and bedtime, or whenever they sleep.
    Never put any soft objects such as pillows, blankets, toys, or crib bumpers where babies are sleeping.
Infants should sleep in the parent's room and close to the bed, but on a separate surface designed for infants, ideally for at least the first six months.
    Always have babies sleep on a firm, flat surface like a mattress with a fitted sheet. This surface must not have an incline larger than 10 degrees.
    Breastfeed and/or feed human milk to both term and preterm infants for at least the first six months if possible.
    Offer babies pacifiers at naptime and bedtime to reduce the risk of SIDS.
Never smoke or use substances around babies or let anyone smoke or use substances around babies. Smoking and using substances such as alcohol, marijuana, opioids, or other illicit drugs should be avoided during pregnancy and after birth.
    To learn more about safe sleep, attend a virtual workshop, or download an informational Safe Sleep Guide for Parents, visit TheParentLine.org/SafeSleep.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.

A  KAʻŪ COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN ACTION COMMITTEE MEETING is set for Wednesday, Oct. 19 at noon at the Kaʻū District Gym Multipurpose Room in Pāhala. There is no zoom option for the public meeting. The meeting will include election of a Chair and Vice-Chair for the Action Committee.
    The agenda from the Action Committee also lists "Project Prioritization Discussion: Action Committee members will engage in an exercise to establish priority implementation projects and interests. Discussion will include exploring mutual interests between Action Committee members to create investigatory subcommittees and community liaison groups, as applicable. Joint Intitiatives with community members or partner organizations are encouraged." The agenda refers to a "Kumu Map of Action Committee member networks" and a "Community-Based Collaborative Action Guide."
    More is available through an online Community Development Plan Action Committee folder in the County of Hawai'i Public Documents Repository at https://records.hawaiicounty.gov/weblink/1/fol/88959/Row1.aspx. The documents may also be requested from the Planning Department by calling (808) 961- 8288 or emailing cdp@hawaiicounty.gov.
    Kaʻū Community Development Plan Action Committee is comprised of Kaʻū citizens tasked with helping move forward the Kaʻū CDP, in partnership with the Hawai'i County Planing Department and other community stakeholders. Kaʻū's Action Committee members are: Leina'ala Enos, Babette Morrow, Catherine Williams, Kaohinani Mokuali'i, Pernell Hanoa, Jason Masters, Kaweni Ibarra and Jessie Ke. See story at http://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022_08_22_archive.html

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.

THE ROBERT E. HERKES KAʻŪ DISTRICT GYM WILL HOST GIRLS VOLLEYBALL FINALS for the Big Island Interscholastic Federation this Saturday afternoon. In football, the Trojans will host Kohala at 1:30 p.m.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see www.facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at wwwkaucalendar.com. See upcoming events at https://kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com/2022/04/upcoming-events-for-kau-and-volcano.html.


 

In the mail, on stands and at www.kaucalendar.com