About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, January 16, 2023

Kaʻū News Briefs, Monday, Jan. 16, 2023

Queen Lili'uokalani and Jacki Pualani Johnson. Johnson presents her one woman show on Tuesday on the anniversary of the 1893 overthrow of the Hawaiian Kingdom. The venue is After Dark in the Park at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium at 7 p.m.
Queen Lili'uokalani image from HVNP. Jackie Pualani Johnson photo by Ku'uehu Mauga



Nexamp estimates about 15 percent in savings
on Hawaiian Electric bills through its
Nāʻālehu Solar program. Image from Nexamp
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NEXAMP IS AIMING FOR NA'ALEHU SOLAR FARM TO GO ONLINE by June 2025. The project on agricultural land goes to a community meeting from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Thursday Jan. 26 at Nā'alehu Community Center, and requires permitting from the county. On 176 acres west of Nā'alehu and South of Hwy 11, the solar farm would serve about 500 households that would save an average of 15 percent on Hawaiian Electric Bills. At least 60 percent of those served must be low to moderate income households, as established by U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development. The remaining customers would be non-profits, including government agencies. Nexamp's Nāʻālehu Solar is one of seven projects recently chosen by Hawaiian Electric for a shared solar program, to offer savings through solar energy for those unable to install solar panels. Nexamp also operates in Illinois, New York, Minnesota, Maine and other locations. Nexamp representatives said the site was chosen to minimize cultural and environmental impacts and visibility.
    Nāʻālehu Solar is planned to be a 3.5 MG plus battery facility.  Nexamp's website says, "Hawai'i is
Location of the planned Nāʻālehu Solar Farm.
Image from Nexamp
 moving away from fossil fuels and into a renewable future. Nāʻālehu Solar is designed to support the island’s goal of being 100% renewable by 2045. The project, located south of Mamalahoa Highway, will generate clean power, build grid reliance, and lower electricity costs..... Nexamp will finance, construct, own and operate the project. We plan to use local labor at prevailing wages for construction and ongoing maintenance and have already established relationships with local contractors."
    Nexamp calls its program the "Utility of the Future" and says, "We’re working with communities, businesses, and municipalities to democratize clean energy and support U.S. energy independence." See more at nexamp.com/naalehu-solar.

Nexamp's plan for community outreach, government approvals and construction.




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HAWAI'I IS ONE OF THE SAFEST STATES FOR DRIVING BUT THE WORST TO DRIVE IN,
according to the latest WalletHub study. The study concludes that Hawai'i is the sixth safest state to drive in. However, when ranking the states on cost of buying and maintaining vehicles, cost of fuel and insurance, repairs, and the condition of roads and bridges, along with other metrics, Hawa'i ranks dead last.
    Hawai'i ranks 50th in Cost of Ownership & Maintenance, 43rd in Traffic & Infrastructure (heavily weighted by conditions on O'ahu), and 38th in Access to Vehicles & Maintenance. Another metric included in the study was days with least and most precipitation. Hawai'i has the second most days with precipitation in the country, according to WalletHub.

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A FISHER SAID A FISHING PARTNER WENT OVERBOARD AFTER HOOKING A BIG AHI and

Missing Mark Knittle
Photo from Hawai'i Police Department
police have launched a missing person investigation. A report from Hawai‘i Island police on Monday said that 63-year-old Mark Knittle was fishing on a boat off Hōnaunau on Sunday morning.
    Knittle, of Captain Cook, is described as 5 feet 10 inches tall, 185 pounds, with curly brown hair with a white mustache and beard.
    The police announcement says, "It was reported to police that on Sunday, January 15, 2023, at 5 a.m., Knittle and a friend were fishing near the C buoy, four miles outside of the Hōnaunau Boat Ramp, when Knittle hooked an ahi. The friend heard Knittle say, 'the fish is huge,' then saw Knittle go overboard into the water. The friend attempted to grab the line but was unsuccessful. Knittle was seen on the surface and disappeared within seconds. The friend attempted to jump in after Knittle but could not see him anywhere."
    Hawai‘i Fire Department and Coast Guard personnel were called out to conduct a 72-hour search.
    Police ask that anyone with information regarding this incident call the police department’s non-emergency line at (808) 935-3311 or email Officer Melani Cline at melani.cline@hawaiicounty.gov.

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FREE FOOD

St. Jude's Hot Meals are free to those in need on Saturdays from 9 a.m. until food runs out, no later than noon. Volunteers from the community are welcome to help and can contact Karen at pooch53@gmail.com. Location is 96-8606 Paradise Circle Drive in Ocean View.  Those in need can also take hot showers from 9 a.m. to noon and use the computer lab from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.


Free Meals Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are served from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Nā'ālehu Hongwanji. Volunteers prepare the food provided by 'O Ka'ū Kākou with fresh produce from its gardens on the farm of Eva Liu, who supports the project. Other community members also make donations and approximately 150 meals are served each day, according to OKK President Wayne Kawachi.



OUTDOOR MARKETS

Volcano Evening Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, Thursdays, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., with live music, artisan crafts, ono grinds, and fresh produce. See facebook.com.


Volcano Swap Meet, fourth Saturday of the month from 8 a.m. to noon. Large variety of vendors with numerous products. Tools, clothes, books, toys, local made healing extract and creams, antiques, jewelry, gemstones, crystals, food, music, plants, fruits, and vegetables. Also offered are cakes, coffee, and shave ice. Live music.


Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village on Sundays, 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with local produce, baked goods, food to go, island beef and Ka'ū Coffee. EBT is used for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly Food Stamps. Call 808-967-7800.


'O Ka'ū Kākou Market, Nā'ālehu, Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Contact Nadine Ebert at 808-938-5124 or June Domondon 808-938-4875. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.


Ocean View Community Market, Saturdays and Wednesdays, 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at 5:30 a.m., $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in the upper lot only. Vendors must provide their own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling is encouraged.


Ocean View Swap Meet at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks required.


The Book Shack is open every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Kauaha'ao Congregational Church grounds at 95-1642 Pinao St. in Wai'ōhinu.