About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, December 23, 2022

Kaʻū News Briefs, Friday, Dec. 23, 2022

Snow on Mauna Kea leading into Christmas weekend. Photo by Bob Martin

LETTERS TO SANTA drew keiki to Pāhala Post Office on Friday to pick up the gifts they asked for. Children wrote to Santa, in care of Pāhala Post Office where Jana Kaniho organized the program to
She wrote Santa, he brought the
gift. Photo by Michelle Andrade
purchase the gifts the kids desired, and wrap them and give them with the assistance of Santa and Santa's helper Michelle Andrade. Sponsors of the gifts also included Kaniho, Wayne Kawachi and his O Kaʻū Kakou community organization, along with The Kaʻū Calendar newspaper.
    Kaniho said this is the third Letters to Santa program in Kaʻū and next year's event is already being planned. More than 50 children received gifts this year.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SEISMOLOGY IS THE FOCUS OF VOLCANO WATCH in this week's column written by scientists and affiliates of U.S.G.S. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory:
    Seismology is one of several critical elements used at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) to assess volcanic unrest and hazards. Often, the earliest signs of volcanic unrest, before lava is seen, are provided by earthquake activity occurring deeper within the Earth than where other volcano monitoring capabilities can reach.
    Seismologists, or earthquake specialists, look at their data in a variety of ways to interpret the story of volcanic processes occurring underground. As a first step, HVO notes earthquake rates, locations, and magnitudes, as these attributes can be quickly recognized to reflect times, general locations, and strength of the unrest.
Young paniola meet Santa
Photo by Julia Neal
    We also study details of the recorded earthquakes to infer how the Earth moved and shook the ground. Human-generated noise (like helicopters and quarry blasts) and atmospheric signals (like thunder and wind) can make volcanic signals difficult to identify.
    As an analogy, think about the different sounds that you hear when you turn on and use a garden hose. First there is squeaking when the pressure first builds up. Then, as water pushes on the air within the hose, there are gurgling and crackling sounds. Finally, there is steady humming as water streams smoothly out the end of the hose. At HVO, our seismic instruments are our ears as we track the magma within the volcanoes and the lava as it erupts.
    Seismologists, or earthquake specialists, look at their data in a variety of ways to interpret the story of volcanic processes occurring underground. As a first step, HVO notes earthquake rates, locations, and magnitudes, as these attributes can be quickly recognized to reflect times, general locations, and strength of the unrest.
    We also study details of the recorded earthquakes to infer how the Earth moved and shook the ground. Human-generated noise (like helicopters and quarry blasts) and atmospheric signals (like thunder and wind) can make volcanic signals difficult to identify.
Keiki on the left received dinosaurs.
Photo by Julia Neal
    As an analogy, think about the different sounds that you hear when you turn on and use a garden hose. First there is squeaking when the pressure first builds up. Then, as water pushes on the air within the hose, there are gurgling and crackling sounds. Finally, there is steady humming as water streams smoothly out the end of the hose. At HVO, our seismic instruments are our ears as we track the magma within the volcanoes and the lava as it erupts.  
O Ka'u Kakou's Wayne Kawachi, Santa and Jana Kaniho
of Pāhala Post Office provided gifts for keiki on Friday through
their Letters to Santa program. Photo by Julia Neal
    Seismologists, or earthquake specialists, look at their data in a variety of ways to interpret the story of volcanic processes occurring underground. As a first step, HVO notes earthquake rates, locations, and magnitudes, as these attributes can be quickly recognized to reflect times, general locations, and strength of the unrest.
    We also study details of the recorded earthquakes to infer how the Earth moved and shook the ground. Human-generated noise (like helicopters and quarry blasts) and atmospheric signals (like thunder and wind) can make volcanic signals difficult to identify.
    As an analogy, think about the different sounds that you hear when you turn on and use a garden hose. First there is squeaking when the pressure first builds up. Then, as water pushes on the air within the hose, there are gurgling and crackling sounds. Finally, there is steady humming as water streams smoothly out the end of the hose. At HVO, our seismic instruments are our ears as we track the magma within the volcanoes and the lava as it erupts.     
    Seismicity helps tell the story of a seemingly quiet volcano. Especially when the stories of these volcanoes and their seismicity have been told in the past.
    Kīlauea has provided HVO with many opportunities to observe relationships between earthquakes and volcanic activity. We have identified established earthquake source regions that show increases in seismic activity as the volcano gets closer to erupting. We also recognize the earthquake types that suggest magma movement. At times, it has been possible to forecast where and when eruptions started, based on patterns of earthquake activity.
    Mauna Loa is also an active volcano. Through the past two centuries, we have seen intervals between successive eruptions change. Between 1832 and 1950, Mauna Loa erupted, on average, every 3 to 7 years. Since 1950, the intervals have been much longer. After 1950, it was 25 years until the 1975 Mauna Loa summit eruption, and then another 9 years until the 1984 eruption. Then, 38 years passed until the most recent eruption in 2022 from Mauna Loa’s Northeast Rift Zone.
    HVO’s modern seismic observations of Mauna Loa are relatively sparse compared to those of Kīlauea. In addition, improvements in monitoring technology have significantly boosted HVO data recording and analysis capabilities. Still, the observations of 1975 and 1984 provide some helpful clues toward learning how Mauna Loa works.
Aerial photo of lava fountains along a fissure on Mauna Loa's Northeast
 Rift Zone at approximately 9:30 a.m., Nov. 28. The photo was taken
 looking toward the north. USGS photo by K. Lynn.
    In the Spring of 1974, HVO seismologists noted an increase in earthquake activity beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa. They installed additional seismometers and, without computers, counted and located earthquakes by hand. The compiled observations could be viewed as a successful eruption forecast.
    HVO’s current capabilities allow earthquake detection and location to levels far surpassing those of 1975 and 1984. To better compare current earthquakes patterns to these previous eruptions, seismologists hand counted tiny earthquakes in September 2022 that were too small to be recorded by modern computer processing. This comparison showed a similar uptick in seismic activity and led to community meetings in ensuing months to emphasize awareness, preparedness, and safety.
    Further increases in seismicity in October 2022 reflected rapid stress changes within the volcano, but the only imminent precursor to lava appearing in the summit caldera was an hour-long tremor-like burst of numerous small, shallow earthquakes just before the eruption started.
    Each eruption provides new observations and data, adding to our ability to, ideally, learn and understand beyond the basic numbers.
     Next time you look up at one of the volcanoes around the island, think about the different types of activity occurring and the stories being told beneath the surface. Not just in the form of earthquakes you are feeling, but also in the other subtle signals faintly picked up by the sensitive instruments listening in.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Wilderness wildfire is out. NPS photo
THE FIVE ACRE WILDFIRE sparked by lightning in a remote wilderness area of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park has been fully extinguished. National Park Service fire fighters continued to mop up hot spots, patrol the fire edge, extinguish burning vegetation and backhaul equipment through Friday afternoon.
    The fire was declared 100% contained at 4 p.m.Hilina Pali Road, Kaʻaha Trail and the Hilina Pali Lookout will reopen today at 6 p.m. The fire burned through remnant dryland 'ōhiʻa trees and native shrubs in a remote wilderness area dominated by alien grasses that can promote fire spread and increase fire severity, contributing to the loss of native species in the area.
    Park staff spotted a plume of smoke at 9:50 a.m. Tuesday below Hilina Pali Lookout at the 2,000-foot elevation. Lightning from the recent storm sparked the fire, a rare occurrence in the park and throughout Hawaiʻi. Most wildfires in Hawaiʻi are caused by humans, states NPS.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar. See latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


See The Ka'ū Calendar in the mail and in stands from Volcano through Miloli'i. Also see stories daily on Facebook and at www.kaunewsbriefs.blogspot.com.
UPCOMING EVENTS


Christmas Lights & Icons Show brightens up the corner of Lehua and Palm in Ranchos at Ocean View every evening. Santa will be there on Christmas Eve to give 300 gifts, with a drawing for bikes to be given on Christmas Day. See story at kaucalendar.com.

Holiday Lighting and Decor are dressing up the cottages at Kīlauea Military Camp for the public to see. See story at kaucalendar.com.

Christmas in the Country is ongoing until the New Year at Volcano Art Center Gallery and VAC's Ni’aulani Campus. See story at kaucalendar.com.

The Hiking Incentive Program at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park wraps up at the end of year. For the Kūkini Challenge, hikers, and walkers can turn in miles, recording them at the Visitor Contact Station for a chance to win a silver water flask and accolades for the fourth quarter of 2022.

Pictures with Santa at Ocean View Community Center on Christmas Eve from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Showers, soup, haircuts, and decorating of St. Jude's Church in Ocean View on Christmas Eve from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., with carols at 3 p.m. and Christmas Eve Service at 4 p.m., followed by Aloha Hour.

FREE FOOD

St. Jude's Hot Meals are free to those in need on Saturdays from 9 a.m. until food runs out, no later than noon. Volunteers from the community are welcome to help and can contact Karen at pooch53@gmail.com. Location is 96-8606 Paradise Circle Drive in Ocean View.
   Those in need can also take hot showers from 9 a.m. to noon and use the computer lab from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Masks and social distancing required.

Ka'ū Food Pantry Distribution, Tuesday, Dec. 27, 9:30 a.m. until pau at St. Jude's Episcopal Church above Kahuku Park in Ocean View. Sponsored by Hawai'i Island Food Basket.

'O Ka'ū Kākou Pantry Food Distribution, Tuesday, Dec. 27, 10 a.m. until pau at Ka'ū District Gym in Pāhala. Sponsored by Hawai'i Island Food Basket.

Cooper Center Community Pantry Food Distribution, Wednesday, Dec. 28, 9:30 a.m - 11 a.m. at 19- 4030 Wright Road in Volcano. Sponsored by Hawai'i Island Food Basket.

Free Meals Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays are served from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Nā'ālehu Hongwanji. Volunteers prepare the food provided by 'O Ka'ū Kākou with fresh produce from its gardens on the farm of Eva Liu, who supports the project. Other community members also make donations and approximately 150 meals are served each day, according to OKK President Wayne Kawachi.

OUTDOOR MARKETS

Volcano Evening Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village, Thursdays, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m., with live music, artisan crafts, ono grinds, and fresh produce. See facebook.com.

Volcano Swap Meet, 2nd and 4th Saturdays of the month from 8 a.m. to noon. Large variety of vendors with numerous products. Tools, clothes, books, toys, local made healing extract and creams, antiques, jewelry, gemstones, crystals, food, music, plants, fruits, and vegetables. Also offered are cakes, coffee, and shave ice. Live music.

Volcano Farmers Market, Cooper Center, Volcano Village on Sundays, 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with local produce, baked goods, food to go, island beef and Ka'ū Coffee. EBT is used for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, formerly Food Stamps. Call 808-967-7800.

'O Ka'ū Kākou Market, Nā'ālehu, Wednesdays, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Contact Nadine Ebert at 808-938-5124 or June Domondon 808-938-4875. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

Ocean View Community Market, Saturdays and Wednesdays, 6:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., corner of Kona Drive and Highway 11, where Thai Grindz is located. Masks mandatory. 100-person limit, social distancing required. Gate unlocked for vendors at 5:30 a.m., $15 dollars, no reservations needed. Parking in the upper lot only. Vendors must provide their own sanitizer. Food vendor permits required. Carpooling is encouraged.

Ocean View Swap Meet at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks required.

The Book Shack is open every Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on the Kauaha'ao Congregational Church grounds at 95-1642 Pinao St. in Wai'ōhinu.

See daily, weekly, and monthly events, and more, on page 8 and page 9 of the monthly print edition.