About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Hawai`i State Legislature adjourns tomorrow.

HAWAI`I STATE LEGISLATURE HAS DECIDED THE FATE of many bills before it adjourns tomorrow: 

KA`U COFFEE GROWERS ARE GETTING HELP from the state in their battle against the coffee berry borer. The state Legislature passed House Bill 1514 yesterday, which appropriates $500,000 toward the purchase of Beauveria bassiana. The naturally occurring fungus kills the pest by causing called White-Muscardine disease, according to researcher Madeline Campbell. “When the spores of the fungus come into contact with the cuticle of the host insect, it slowly grows on the body of the insect, in its joints, through the cuticle, into the body and eventually kills the insect in a matter of days,” she said.
White-Muscardine disease on an insect similar to coffee berry borer.
Photo from Global Citizen Year
      The program allows the Department of Agriculture to disburse funds on an annual basis to coffee growers for up to 75 percent of the costs of the pesticide before July 1, 2016, and for up to 50 percent of their costs after June 30, 2016 and before July 1, 2019.
      Ka`u’s Rep. Richard Onishi co-introduced the bill.

FUNDING TO RESEARCH LITTLE FIRE ANTS has been rejected by the state Legislature. Senate Bill 2920 would have established and appropriated funds for an LFA pilot project administered by Hawai`i County Department of Parks & Recreation, for an LFA canine detection team pilot project and for a public awareness and education campaign to address the LFA threat in Hawai`i.
      Ka`u’s Sen. Russell Ruderman co-introduced the bill.

A BILL CALLING FOR LATE VOTER REGISTRATION has passed the state Legislature. The House and Senate approved House Bill 2590, which allows voters to register at early voting sites beginning in 2016 or at their assigned polling places on Election Day starting in 2018.

MINIMUM WAGES WILL INCREASE WITH APPROVAL by Gov. Neil Abercrombie. The final version of Senate Bill 2609 increases the state’s minimum wage to $10.10 over the next four years. For workers who earn at least $7 more than the minimum wage, businesses can deduct a 75 cents tip credit. The current tip credit is 50 cents.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Hawai`i PUC Chair Mina Morita
HAWAI`I PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION has announced major decisions and orders that collectively provide key policy, resource planning and operational directives to Hawaiian Electric Company and its subsidiaries. The orders require the HECO companies to develop and implement major improvement action plans to aggressively pursue energy cost reductions, proactively respond to emerging renewable energy integration challenges, improve the interconnection process for customer-sited solar photovoltaic systems and embrace customer demand response programs. 
      The PUC’s guidance and direction to the HECO companies were outlined in the following decisions and orders:
      Integrated Resource Planning (Docket No. 2012-0036, Order No. 32052, IRP Order) rejected the HECO companies’ Integrated Resource Plan submission and, in lieu of an approved plan, has commenced other initiatives to enable resource planning and proffered a white paper entitled, Commission’s Inclinations on the Future of Hawai`i’s Electric Utilities. The white paper outlines the vision, strategies, and regulatory policy changes required to align the HECO companies’ business model with customers’ changing expectations and state energy policy; and provides specific guidance for future energy planning and project review, including strategic direction for future capital investments.
      Reliability Standards Working Group (Docket No. 2011-0206, Order No. 32053, RSWG Order) makes various rulings regarding the final work product of the working group and provides the PUC’s observations and perspectives regarding integrating utility-scale and distributed renewable energy resources in a reliable and economic manner. It also directs the HECO companies, and in some cases, the Kaua`i Island Utility Cooperative, to take timely actions to lower energy costs, improve system reliability and address emerging challenges to integrate additional renewable energy.
      Policy Statement and Order Regarding Demand Response Programs (Docket No. 2007-0341, Order No. 32054, Demand Response Policy Statement) provides specific guidance concerning the objectives and goals for demand response programs and requires the HECO companies to develop a fully integrated demand response portfolio that will enhance system operations and reduce costs to customers.
      Maui Electric Company 2012 Test Year Rate Case (Docket No. 2011-0092, Order No. 32055, MECO Order) accepted the PUC consultant’s report reviewing MECO’s System Improvement and Curtailment Reduction plan and directs MECO to file a Power Supply Improvement Plan to address the SICR plan’s shortcomings.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

DICK ROSENBLUM, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF HECO, issued the following response to the PUC’s decisions and orders: 
      “In this challenging, fast-changing energy environment, we welcome the PUC’s clear direction and roadmap. We’ve been working on many of these initiatives, and these directives confirm the energy policy priorities that will guide our strategies and implementation.
      “We have many of the building blocks already in place, including our grid modernization work, the initial phase of our smart grid project and our progress in renewable energy - now at more than 18 percent. We’ve begun deactivating older fossil fuel plants, such as Honolulu Power Plant and others on Maui and Hawai`i Island. And we’re taking other steps to lower costs to customers, such as use of low-cost liquefied natural gas as a transition fuel.
      “We understand the importance of moving quickly and see this as an unprecedented opportunity to move aggressively on a shared vision for the utility of the future and on our role in meeting the needs of our customers.
      “We look forward to working with the PUC and the Hawai`i State Energy Office as we move forward to develop and execute these comprehensive plans.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Many Ka`u Coffee Festival sponsors are participating in the Buy Local, It Matters prize
drawing at the Ho`olaule`a.
KA`U RESIDENTS HAVE A CHANCE TO WIN a $1,000 check at the Ka`u Coffee Festival Ho`olaule`a. It’s easy to enter the “Buy Local, It Matters” drawing. Bring in business cards, product labels or receipts from any participating Ka`u business by 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 10. “The more you collect, the better your chances,” said festival organizers. 
      Last year, Jeanette Howard took home a $1,000 check for winning the raffle, which is geared toward promoting the local economy.
      Winner must be present at the time of the drawing, scheduled for 4 p.m. at the Ho`olaule`a.
      A complete list of participating sponsors is available at kaucoffeefest.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

TODAY IS THE DEADLINE TO ENTER the Ka`u Coffee Festival’s Triple C Recipe Contest that takes place this Sunday at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Participants can earn up to $500 in prizes for the best recipes in adult and student categories. The registration form can be printed out from these Ka`u News Briefs or from kaucoffeefestival.com.
      For more information, call Ka`u Coffee Mill at 928-0550.

INTERESTED KA`U COFFEE GROWERS MUST SIGN UP today for CTAHR’s Spray Equipment Calibration and Calculation Field Day set for Saturday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Rusty’s Hawaiian Coffee Farm. The event covers available risk management measures to manage the coffee berry borer, demonstrates calibration of various types of spray equipment and shows growers how the establish field trials. 
      Contact Gina at 322-4892 or ginab@hawaii.edu.

HA`AO SPRINGS & MOUNTAIN HOUSE Agricultural Water Cooperative meets tomorrow at 4 p.m. at Wai`ohinu Park. Information about the organization is available at haaosprings.org.

FRIDAY IS THE PA`INA OPEN HOUSE at Pahala Plantation House. The Miss Ka`u Coffee Scholarship fundraiser includes music, hula, refreshments and house tours. Candidates for Miss Ka`u Coffee and Miss Peaberry are introduced. Performers include Bolo presenting his new CD, Keoki Kahumoku and his `Ukulele Kids and Halau Hula O Leionalani. New Ka`u products, including Ka`u Coffee Mill’s Ka`u Coffee Singles and Alan Moores’ Iki Art, are introduced. Co-sponsored by Ka`u Chamber of Commerce, the event takes place Friday from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. 

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park hosts a Dinner & Guitar Night Friday at 7:30 p.m. Dinner is available at Crater Rim Café, followed by Hawaiian slack key and Italian finger-style guitar playing at KMC Theater. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.






See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Dennis Kamakahi performs his Wahine `Ilikea for the hula of Erin Cole, of Ocean View, last November. Photo by Julia Neal

DENNIS KAMAKAHI LOVED KA`U. He planned to retire here, create a music studio and continue teaching local youth and people from afar his skills in slack key, `ukulele, harmonica, singing and songwriting. However, he lost a battle with lung cancer at age 61 yesterday. 
      Kamakahi is the composer of more than 500 songs and master of slack key guitar, music composition and harmonica. He spent a week each November in Pahala, where he taught local youth on scholarships and adults from around the world and provided the community with a free concert with his friends George and Keoki Kahumoku, Sonny Lim, John and Hope Keawe and many more. Kamakahi inspired many Ka`u young musicians to write songs, to tell stories and to approach life with humor and love.
Dennis Kamakahi, a Christian minister, famed composer and teacher to many Ka`u
youth, died on April 28. He had planned to retire and move to Ka`u.
Photo by Julia Neal
      Kamakahi was not only a musician but also a Christian minister, providing his fans with both a spiritual and Hawaiian musical journey.
      He said, each year when he was here, that his long-term plan was to move to Na`alehu where his wife grew up, and that he aimed to set up a recording studio there.
      Many of Kamakahi’s songs are standards of Hawaiian music. He composed Wahine `Ilikea, Pua Hone and Koke`e. He earned Na Hoku Hanohano Awards and brought home three Grammy awards. Formerly one of the Sons of Hawai`i, Kamakahi earned a Hawai`i Music Award, a Lifetime Achievement Award and induction into the Hawaiian Music Hall of Fame. Kamakahi was the first modern Hawaiian music composer with his six-string slack key guitar, albums, sheet music and personal photographs welcomed into the Smithsonian National Museum of American History’s permanent collection.
      His music is featured in films, including Lilo & Stitch 2 and the Oscar-nominated soundtrack from The Descendants.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A BILL TO BATTLE THE COFFEE BERRY BORER comes to a final vote this week at the state Legislature. House Bill 1514 originally called for $3 million in subsidies to help coffee growers purchase Beauveria bassania, a naturally occurring fungus that kills the pests. After making its way to the Senate and then to conference committee, the final bill seeks $500,000 for these purposes. 
      “Because it was not as good a year, financially, as we had hoped, and because we were asking for appropriations, it certainly made it more challenging,” Hawai`i Island Rep. Nicole Lowen told Colin M. Stewart, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald. “I was really pleased that this bill made it through conference.” Lowen introduced the bill.
State Rep. Nicole Lowen
      According to the bill, research has shown that subsidizing the cost of pesticides is an effective and necessary incentive to encourage farmers to adopt recommended pest management strategies.
      “I worked really closely with farmers and the Department of Agriculture in coming up with this bill to work together to find a solution,” Lowen told Callis. “There’s always sort of this dynamic of the neighbor islands pleading to O`ahu to take our problems seriously, and it’s been an uphill battle conveying this issue.”
      The program would allow the Department of Agriculture to disburse funds on an annual basis to coffee growers for up to 75 percent of the costs of the pesticide before July 1, 2016, and for up to 50 percent of their costs after June 30, 2016 and before July 1, 2019.
      The idea, Lowen said, is to encourage coffee growers to take up use of the pesticide as part of their coffee berry borer control program, reported Callis.
      Control of the pest relies largely on all growers in a given area following control measures, including use of pesticides, which can be especially expensive for small family farms, Lowen said.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

82 percent of Hawai`i students graduate.
Jaeneise Cuison graduated from Ka`u High
in 2011. Photo by Julia Neal
HAWAI`I’S OVERALL HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION rate is 82 percent, according to a report by GradNation. This compares to the slightly lower national average of 80 percent. The organization’s goal is to raise the national graduation rate to 90 percent by 2020. 
      The report highlights key developments in the effort to boost high school graduation rates during the past decade. It also outlines what it will take to get to 90 percent and identifies critical areas to help the nation reach its goal, including closing the opportunity gap between low-income students and their middle-to-high-income peers, solving “the big city challenge,” which pertains to low-income students, improving outcomes for students with disabilities and boosting graduation rates for young men of color in key states.
      See gradnation.org.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

GOV. NEIL ABERCROMBIE HAS RELEASED more than $52.4 million for various capital improvement projects to improve state public housing facilities and address aging technology to increase the state’s work and energy efficiency.
      “These funds will help bring positive change to the lives of those in public housing and provide much-needed job opportunities,” Abercrombie said. “This administration has now released more than $3 billion for capital improvement projects that are helping to stimulate our economy. Hawai`i’s labor force is at an all-time high, and the state’s unemployment rate is at its lowest level since August 2008.”
      Allotment of funds for the following projects, identified by state legislators, has been approved by the governor:
  • $45,000,000 for Lump Sum Public Housing Development, Improvements and Renovations, statewide – Design, equipment and construction funds to develop, upgrade or renovate public housing facilities, including ground and site improvements, infrastructure, equipment, appurtenances and all related or associated project costs for public housing across the state. Hawai`i Public Housing Authority administers a public housing portfolio of 85 properties, consisting of 6,195 public housing units. 
  • $2,000,000 – Modernization of Eligibility Determination System, statewide – Design funds for plans to modernize the eligibility determination system for public assistance programs under the Benefits, Employment and Support Services Division, which will be integrated with Medicaid’s new eligibility system. 
  • $2,000,000 – Modernization of Case Management System, statewide – Design funds for plans to modernize the case management system for the Social Services Division. The new system will be partially integrated with Medicaid’s new Kauwale On-Line Eligibility Assistance System.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

TOMORROW IS THE DEADLINE TO ENTER the Ka`u Coffee Festival’s Triple C Recipe Contest that takes place this Sunday at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Participants can earn up to $500 in prizes for the best recipes in adult and student categories. The registration form can be printed out from these Ka`u News Briefs or from kaucoffeefestival.com
      For more information, call Ka`u Coffee Mill at 928-0550.

HA`AO SPRINGS & MOUNTAIN HOUSE Agricultural Water Cooperative meets Thursday at 4 p.m. at Wai`ohinu Park. Information about the organization is available at haaosprings.org.

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS BEGIN FRIDAY with a Pa`ina Open House at Pahala Plantation House.
      The Miss Ka`u Coffee Scholarship fundraiser includes music, hula, refreshments and house tours. Candidates for Miss Ka`u Coffee and Miss Peaberry are introduced. Performers include Bolo presenting his new CD, Keoki Kahumoku and his `Ukulele Kids and Halau Hula O Leionalani. New Ka`u products, including Ka`u Coffee Mill’s Ka`u Coffee Singles and Alan Moores’ Iki Art, are introduced. Co-sponsored by Ka`u Chamber of Commerce, the event takes place from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.

DINNER & GUITAR NIGHT IS FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m. at Kilauea Military Camp in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Dinner is available at Crater Rim Café, followed by Hawaiian slack key and Italian finger-style guitar playing at KMC Theater. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
 







See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.

Monday, April 28, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Monday, April 28, 2014

Hawai`i County Council considers the purchase of Kaunamano properties on the Ka`u Coast at its meeting Thursday.
  Photo from Hawai`i Pacific Brokers
PURCHASE OF KAUNAMANO IS ON THE AGENDA of Hawai`i County Council’s meeting on Thursday at 9:15 a.m. The Council takes up Resolution 351-14, submitted by Ka`u County Council Member Brenda Ford, authorizing the director of Finance to enter into negotiations for the acquisition of parcels with tax map keys 9-5-011:001, 9-5-011:004, 9-5-011:005 and 9-5-011:006 in the ahupua`a of Kaunamano and tax map key 9-5-012:001 in the ahupua`a of Poupouwela. 
      The more than 1,200-acre Kaunamano properties are listed as a key priority for purchase in the 2012 Annual Report of the Public Access, Open Space, and Natural Resources Preservation Commission. Cultural, archaeological and natural resources, along with education, recreation and preserving scenic vistas are reasons given in the nomination papers for Kaunamano.
      An archaeological survey of the property in 2004 reported 444 sites with more than 3,900 features, including enclosures, mounds, platforms, walls, salt pans, walled terraces, trails, petroglyphs, papamu, heiau, a refuge cave and other lava tubes, ceremonial sites and burial sites.

      Ka`u residents can participate and offer testimony at this and other Hawai`i County government meetings via videoconferencing at Ocean View Community Center. 
      County Council committees meet Wednesday. Human Services & Social Services Committee meets at 9 a.m.; Public Works & Parks & Recreation, 9:30 a.m.; Planning; 9:45 a.m.; and Finance, 10:45 a.m.
Kathryn Matayoshi
      The Finance Committee reconvenes on Thursday at 9 a.m., followed by the full Council meeting.
      All meetings take place at West Hawai`i Civic Center in Kona.
      Agendas are available at hawaiicounty.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

AN ARBITRATION PANEL HAS ISSUED AN AWARD for educational officers of the state Department of Education who are members of the Hawai`i Government Employees Association. The decision affects DOE school principals and other educational officers. 
      “Our principals do tremendous work in leading their schools towards student and staff success, as seen in recent student achievement gains,” said School Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “We are pleased that the arbitration has concluded and we can move forward in supporting our educators to prepare students for college and careers.”
      Major highlights of the arbitration award include annual across-the-board salary raises of 4.5 percent for four years beginning July 1, a 90-day vacation cap that is consistent with other 12-month educational officers and other 12-month employees and a rewards and recognition program for the last two years in which a joint committee of DOE and HGEA representatives led by an outside professional facilitator will determine how to best reward and recognize educational officers based on their performance evaluation rating.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I ELECTRIC LIGHT CO. IS ONE OF THE TOP TEN 2013 utility solar leaders, according to the national Solar Electric Power Association. The organization’s report lists HELCO as third in annual interconnections (24 projects) per 1,000 customers and as seventh in number of annual watts (182) per customer.
      Statewide, Hawai`i ranked as sixth in the Top Ten Solar States, producing 301 megawatts of electricity. California was number one, with 5,537 megawatts.
      See solarelectricpower.org.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE COST OF INSTALLING SOLAR ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS in Ka`u may increase. The State Board of Electricians & Plumbers has issued new guidelines regarding installation of solar panels that call for more involvement of licensed electricians to ensure the safety of installers and customers. They specify what a licensed journeyman or supervising electrician can do, as well as what other trades can do, during photovoltaic system installations.
      In a Honolulu Star-Advertiser story, Leslie Cole-Brooks, President of Hawai`i Solar Energy Association, told reporter Alan Yonan, Jr. that the guidelines “will make installations more expensive. … “And it will certainly slow things down and make the licensed electricians less available for the whole construction industry, not just the solar industry.”
      Gladys Marrone, a Building Industry Association of Hawai`i executive, told Yonan she is also concerned about potential increases in cost. “From the building industry’s perspective, our mission (is) to keep construction costs down for homeowners.”
      The guidelines focus on grounding and bonding, which prevent electrical shock. Cole-Brooks told Yonan that “the technology and installation process have evolved to the point where much of the grounding and bonding occurs when the panels are clipped together, requiring no handling of electrical wiring.”
      According to Yonan, the guidelines represent the board’s “informal interpretation” of an information request made by an affiliate of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1186. He reports that the board will begin to formally revise the rules at its next meeting on June 17.
      See staradvertiser.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Gov. Abercrombie calls for reauthorization of the Brown Tree Snake Control &
Eradication Act. Photo from wikipedia
THE ABERCROMBIE ADMINISTRATION HAS RELEASED a 2014 Hawai`i Biosecurity Resolutions Package to federal agency heads at the U.S. Departments of Agriculture, Defense, Interior and Transportation as well as the Council on Environmental Quality at the White House that consists of resolutions adopted by the cabinet-level Hawai`i Invasive Species Council in recent years regarding federal invasive species policies. 
      On the topic of state and federal coordination, Abercrombie said, “This administration is committed to working with federal partners to maximize resources available in addressing invasive species issues at both the state and federal level. Our Hawai`i Biosecurity Resolutions Package identifies … areas of great importance to Hawai`i where we can and should collaborate with the federal government, and we look forward to strengthening our federal-state partnerships in these areas.”
      The letter from Abercrombie references recent HISC resolutions that highlight key federal invasive species issues impacting Hawai`i.
      One requests federal recognition of Hawai`i’s unique biosecurity needs to better regulate pest species of state concern, and the ability to share information between federal and state inspectors.
      Another calls for reauthorization of the Brown Tree Snake Control and Eradication Act and continuation of intensive pre-departure interdiction efforts on Guam that help minimize the risk of accidental transport of snakes to Hawai`i.
      The state of Hawai`i supports the recommendation of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to add a number of constrictor snake species to the list of injurious species under the Lacey Act, which prohibits transportation, acquisition, sale or purchase of species listed as injurious wildlife.
      According to the resolutions package, The state of Hawai`i “recognizes and appreciates” the U.S. Department of Defense’s development of the Micronesian Biosecurity Plan, a risk assessment of potential invasive species pathways in the Pacific and a set of recommendations for enhancing Pacific biosecurity. 
      See hisc.hawaii.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

FRIENDS OF VOLCANO SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES BOARD holds an informational community meeting Saturday, May 10 at 2 p.m. at Cooper Center. Members give updates on the Keakealani Campus Development Project, for which Gov. Neil Abercrombie recently released funding.
      For more information, call Daryl Smith at 938-5565.

WEDNESDAY IS THE DEADLINE TO ENTER the Ka`u Coffee Festival’s Triple C Recipe Contest. The contest takes place on Sunday, May 4 at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Participants can earn up to $500 in prizes for the best recipes in adult and student categories. The registration form can be printed out from these Ka`u News Briefs or from kaucoffeefestival.com
      For more information, call Ka`u Coffee Mill at 928-0550.

THIS WEEK, KA`U SCHOOL OF THE ARTS caps off its usual busy schedule with the Spring Fling on Saturday at Punalu`u Bake Shop gardens in Na`alehu. The event features entertainment and Ka`u artists sharing their creativity from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
      KSA has many ongoing programs throughout the week. Ka`u Community Chorus rehearses Monday from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Discovery Harbour Community Hall and Wednesday from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Pahala Plantation House.
      Hawaiian Language classes take place Tuesday from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at St. Jude’s Episcopal Church in Ocean View.
      Ka`u `Ohana Band rehearses each Wednesday and Thursday at 4 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Instruments are provided, and no experience is necessary.
      Also each Thursday, participants learn Hula Kahiko from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. The classes offer opportunities to learn more about Hawaiian culture, dance, chant and spiritual beliefs, including preparing costumes and making hula implements.
      For more information, contact KSA at 854-1540 or kauarts.org.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.







See kaucalendar.com/Directory2104.swf.

Sunday, April 27, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Sunday, April 27, 2014

Ka`u High boys volleyball team won the Big Island Interscholastic Federation Division II title Friday. Photo by Pamela Fernandez Taylor
KA`U HIGH BOYS VOLLEYBALL TEAM has won the school’s first ever Big Island Interscholastic Federation Division II boys volleyball title. The team defeated Honoka`a Friday afternoon in five sets to get the title. Cameron Enriques contributed 29 kills, Larry-Dan Al-Navarro had 14 kills, and Brian Gascon served five aces. 
      Scores were 26-28, 25-17, 25-20, 16-25 and 15-13.
      Ka`u Athletic Department is receiving congratulatory messages from other schools. “Congratulations on this awesome accomplishment,” says a message from Konawaena High School. “Represent our island with pride in the state tourney.”
      A message from Kamehameha Schools athletic department in Kea`au says congratulations in Hawaiian: “Ho`omaika`i `Ana!”
      Hawai`i High School Athletic Association Division II volleyball championship begins Thursday, May 8.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Tiani Castaneda-Naboa goes to the state judo tournament in May.
Photo from KHPES
KA`U HIGH STUDENT TIANI CASTANEDA-NABOA is runner-up in Big Island Interscholastic Federation Judo. She will participate in the state tournament Saturday, May 10 at Stan Sheriff Center on O`ahu.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

LATE VOTER REGISTRATION HAS GOTTEN APPROVAL of state House and Senate conferees. HB2590 would allow voter registration at absentee polling places beginning in 2016 and late voter registration, including on election day, beginning in 2018. It also would allow voter registration at absentee polling places beginning in 2016.
      “Eleven states have already adopted Election Day voter registration, and we are excited with the optimistic possibility that Hawai`i could be next,” Carmille Lim, executive director of Common Cause Hawai`i, told Civil Beat. “With Hawai`i’s consistent low voter turnout, coupled with several mishaps that occurred in the 2012 election cycle, more people have recognized the need to continue to streamline our election registration system and proactively modernize our voting systems.”
      The bill would appropriate $100,000 to the Office of Elections for implementation of the program.
      Rep. Kaniela Ing, the bill’s sponsor, told Civil Beat, “We’ve spent years working toward a win-win piece of legislation. Our final revision takes into account the burden on poll workers by providing adequate resources and updated technology.”
      He said the program “will initiate simultaneous with online voter registration in 2016 and is estimated to increase voter turnout by five to eight percent.”
      See civilbeat.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A story in today's Hawai`i Tribune-Herald includes this photo of possible Japanese
tsunami debris that washed onto the Ka`u Coast in Oct. 2012.
IDENTIFYING DEBRIS FROM THE TSUNAMI that followed an earthquake in Japan on March 11, 2011 may become more difficult soon, according to University of Hawai`i researchers. “It’s becoming difficult to tell with time because the marine debris deteriorates,” Jan Hafner told Colin M. Stewart, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald. The researchers used a variety of methods to confirm whether items were from the tsunami, including part numbers, writing and identifying the species of wood that were used to build them. 
       “We’re approaching that time that we won’t be able to tell if its just general debris or tsunami debris, unless we can find a specific registration number, like on boats, or license plates.”
      Stewart reports that, on Hawai`i Island, most of the tsunami debris ended up on windward facing shores — mainly in areas commonly known to be magnets for marine debris, including Ka`u’s Kamilo Beach, “which earned a reputation for debris and is often the focal point of community clean-up projects.”
Computer-generated image shows projected path of Japanese tsunami debris.
Image from IPRC
      The International Pacific Research Center website, iprc.soest.hawaii.edu, lists tsunami debris sightings, including the 12-foot-tall, 20-foot-diameter yellow metal object found on the Ka`u Coast below Na`alehu. Hafner told Stewart that there have probably been many more items that have washed ashore on Hawai`i Island, “but the list is limited mainly by how many people reported their findings.”
      “On the Big Island, the first items we started seeing were made of wood, construction lumber. We have confidence it was from Japan because of the species of the tree, the tsuji, a type of Japanese cedar using in home construction in Japan and grown in Southeast Asia. It’s only found in a few places,” Hafner said.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
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GOV. NEIL ABERCROMBIE HAS ISSUED a statement applauding state legislators for advancing minimum wage bill. “I commend our legislators for advancing the proposal to raise Hawai`i’s minimum wage to $10.10 an hour,” Abercrombie said. “It is imperative to provide our lowest paid workers with the economic stability and security they deserve. Hawai`i’s minimum wage earners have not had a raise from $7.25 an hour since 2007. I look forward to working with the Legislature to bring fairness to the people of Hawai`i.” 
      The final version of Senate Bill 2609 would increase the state’s minimum wage to $10.10 over the next four years. For workers who earn at least $7 more than the minimum wage, businesses can deduct a 75 cents tip credit. The current tip credit is 50 cents.
      If passed during a final floor vote before the Legislature adjourns on Thursday, the bill would go to Abercrombie for his approval.
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Hoku Subiono introduced Miloli`i Hipu`u Virtual Academy on PBS' Hiki No.
Image from PBS
LAST THURSDAY’S HIKI NO PROGRAM ON PBS is available online at pbshawaii.org/hikino. The program features segments produced by students at Kua O Ka La Public Charter School’s Hipu`u Virtual Academy at Miloli`i, Ka`u High School and Volcano School of Arts & Sciences. 
      Miloli`i students who produced the segment there include Lanakila Caldwell, Dazza Kuahuia, Hoku Subiono and David Watai-Simeona. Subiono said the goal of the academy is to provide “a rigorous, online-blended curriculum for students on the Big Island from grades three to 12.” Caldwell highlighted Kaimi Kaupiko and Leivallyn Kaupu, who started the academy. Watai-Simeona discussed Miloli`i’s history as a fishing village.
      Students at Ka`u High & Pahala Elementary School who participated were Glaiza Biason, Kamrie Koi, Siena Okimoto, Jeazelle Sebastian, Lomon Silk and Travis Taylor. Taylor gave a history of Ka`u High & Pahala Elementary School, saying workers at one of the largest sugar plantations in the state “wanted their children to have a high school education, making our school the oldest school on the Big Island, and one of the third oldest school in the state of Hawai`i.” Okimoto talked about how, because of the size of Ka`u, “a large percentage of our students have to travel long distances to get to school every day.”
Travis Taylor is before the camera for Hiki No's segment at Ka`u High &
Pahala Elementary School. Image from PBS
      Nowell Matabishop and Emma Reed were anchors for the Volcano School of Arts & Sciences segment. Other students who produced it were Lenaia Andrade, Keanu Beddow, Keahi Coakley, Emma-Jade Reyes Dawson, Joah Gacayan, Jakob Garcia, Amaya Hirata, Echo Hirata, Annie Judd, Laakea Judd, Cherish Kailiawa, Malakai Lurker, Daniel Savage and Kalani Scheffler. Matabishop gave a tour of Volcano Village, which he says is “made up of artists, scientists and other creative people who find inspiration on our unique `ohi`a forest.”
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HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK has announced the following upcoming flight plans:
  • April 28, May 12 and May 26, between 8 a.m. and noon, to transport fencing material from the summit of Kilauea to an area near the top of Mauna Loa Road. 
  • April 29, morning flight to Kahuku for wildlife management. 
  • May 16: flying camp supplies and equipment from end of Chain of Craters Road to `Apua Point, Keauhou, and Halape campsites for annual monitoring of hawksbill turtle nesting season.
Nowell Matabishop started his Hiki No tour at VSAS' Keakealani campus.
Image from PBS
      “The park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather,” according to a park statement.
      “Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources and to maintain backcountry facilities.”
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KA`U RESIDENTS CAN PARTICIPATE in this week’s Hawai`i County government meetings via videoconferencing at Ocean View Community Center. County Council committees meet Wednesday. Human Services & Social Services Committee meets at 9 a.m.; Public Works & Parks & Recreation, 9:30 a.m.; Planning; 9:45 a.m.; and Finance, 10:45 a.m.
      The Finance Committee reconvenes on Thursday at 9 a.m., followed by the full Council meeting Thursday at 9:15 a.m.
      All meetings take place at West Hawai`i Civic Center in Kona.
      Agendas are available at hawaiicounty.gov.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.








See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.