About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, October 22, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Sunday, October 22, 2017

Isaiah Pilanca-Emmsely, No. 7, was leading passer/scorer in the championship game. Photo by Pam Taylor
TROJANS ARE THREE-TIME ISLAND CHAMPIONS IN EIGHT-MAN FOOTBALL. Ka‘ū High School took the title Saturday afternoon on home turf, pounding Pāhoa into a 38-24 submission. Trojan Coach DuWayne Ke led the way with two quarterbacks, freshman Isaiah Pilanca-Emmsley and senior Zachary Kai. The Trojans also earned the Big Island Sportsmanship Award from the Big Island Interscholastic Federation.
     The championship was the first at the newly named Lawerence Capellas Ballpark, honoring the late principal and career-inspiring athletics director, who helped to establish football and other sports such as swimming at the high school, generations ago.
     Eight Man Football on this island fits the smaller schools with fast running, high scoring games. It was the brainchild of current Ka‘ū Athletic Director Kalei Namohala. Ka‘ū won the championship in the inaugural season, in 2014, and again in 2016 and 2017. Here is the score-by-score report from Namohala, sourced from postings on her live twitter feed:
Pilanca-Emmsley holds on with Pāhoa's hands almost on him.
Photo by Pam Taylor
     In the the first quarter, Isaiah Pilanca-Emmsley threw a pass 25 yards to Janslae Badua for a touchdown, followed by two extra points by Pilanca-Emmsley. Ka‘ū lost two points to Pāhoa with a safety on a punt.
     In the second quarter, Badua ran for a touchdown with two points added on by Zachary Kai. At halftime, the score was Ka‘ū 16, Pāhoa 2.
     In the third quarter, Pāhoa's Correa ran two yards for the team's first touchdown. Pāhoa made an extra two points with a run by Harris taking the score to Ka‘ū 16, Pāhoa 10. However, the Trojans followed up quickly with Pilanca-Emmsley making a five-yard toss to Isaiah Naboa who ran for the touchdown, lifting the score for Ka‘ū to 22, Pāhoa 10. However, Pāhoa came back with a 31-yard pass from Correa to Harris for a touchdown. Harris also ran for the two extra points, making the score Ka‘ū 22, Pāhoa 18. With only five seconds left in the third, Trojans scored again with Kai's 15-yard pass to Pilanca-Emmseley who ran across the goal line and also scored the extra two points, giving the Ka‘ū 30 and Pāhoa 18.
Ka‘ū High Trojans Eight-Man Football team wins the Big
Island Interscholastic Federation title. Photo by Pam Taylor
     The first touchdown in the fourth went to Pāhoa with Correa passing to Ortega. With seconds left, Trojans scored again with Pilanca-Emmsley making the touchdown and two extra points -  final score Ka‘ū 38, Pāhoa 24.
     The line that kept Pāhoa under Ka‘ū included Josaiah Barrios, Weston Davis, Kanoa Kailiawa, Isaiah Naboa and Nainoa Ke.
    Another standout was Brandon Echalas, who rushed for 38 yards, with five carries and an interception.
     The season began on Aug. 26 at home with an 8-32 loss against Pāhoa, followed by a 36-6 win on Sept 2 at Kohala.
     After a shocking loss at Lana‘i, 58-90 - said to be the highest scoring game in high school football history in Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i Tribune Herald named Pilanca-Emmsley Player of the Week and the Trojans pushed through to a non-stop winning streak, stampeding to the end of the season.
Ka‘ū High's Eight-Man Football team wins Big Island
Interscholastic Federation Sportsmanship Award.
Photo by Pam Taylor 
     On Sept. 16, Ka‘ū beat Kohala 48-0. On Sept. 21, Ka‘ū beat Pāhoa 18-12. On Oct. 7, Ka‘ū beat Kohala with an historic 60-0 finish, leading to Saturday's final victory and championship game against Pāhoa, 38-24.
     Other team members supporting Trojan success were Ikaika Salmo Grace, Kahiau Medeiros, Kaimana Davis, Kun Mongkeya, Kaleopono Leffew-Palakiko, Jaisen Zion Garcia, Ziggy Rodrigues, Dustin Dancel, Deansen Grant Breithaupt, Logan Valez, Keala Liu, Chase Galdones-Keawe and Manu Kalua Keli‘ikoa.
       See more coverage and photos of Trojan sports on Ka‘ū Athletics twitter feed @KauAthletics.

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Ka‘ū Cheer at the islandwide cheerleading championships. Next stop was supporting Trojans in the
winning game that led Ka‘ū to the football championship on Saturday.
Photo from Kalei Namohala
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Three keiki challenge their vertical
climbing skills on a two story rock wall
at Ka‘ū police headquarters.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
Miss Ka‘ū Coffee 2017 Jami Beck
with retired police officer Bill Doar at the
 20th anniversary of Ka‘ū Police Station.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
COMMUNITY MEMBERS JOINED KA‘Ū POLICE OFFICERS on Saturday for a Fun Day Celebration to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the Ka‘ū Police Station in Nā‘ālehu.
A Star Wars Storm Trooper police
officer greeted event guests. 
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
     Families, retired and active police, and the staff of this regional headquarters converged at the station located just outside Nā‘ālehu along Hwy. 11, on the slope looking out toward Honu‘apo and Volcano.
    They enjoyed free food - hot dogs and chili and rice - while serenaded by the Backyard Braddahs and delighting in an array of activates. Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Jami Beck congratulated the police officers. ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou members helped put on the event, managed parking and offered shaved ice. County Council member Maile David was a sponsor.
Keiki waited patiently in a long line to cool off with a turn down the 
tall water slide. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
                         Throughout the day, keiki of all ages could be seen waiting patiently for temporary tattoos, face paint, keiki ID's and at turn of five minutes in the bounce house. Older keiki challenged themselves by climbing a two story simulated rock wall and splashing down a tall water slide of similar height to cool down from the heat of the day.
Face painting was in high demand
 with keiki at Ka‘ū Police event. 
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
   



     With the event taking place less two weeks before Halloween, an officer braved the heat in a Star Wars storm trooper costume.
     Representatives of The Food Basket handed out two large bags of food items to all those who would accept.
Backyard Braddahs entertained event attendees.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
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A HOLIDAY AFFAIR at Ocean View Community Center will be held on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 9 a.m. to noon. The event includes a tour of Ocean View galleries and artist workshops. Also called Make it an Art Day, A Holiday Affair will offer art purchases to include gift wrapping with boxes for easy mailing.
     Among the arts for sale will be woodwork, sumi-e, sculpture, pottery, oils and pastels, block printing, hand-made paper goods, furniture, jewelry, cards and Oven Treats baked goods to mail, take home or consume onsite with Golden Coffee.

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LĀ ‘OHANA, THE MILOLI‘I COMMUNITY celebration, held annually, has been announced for Saturday, Nov. 18, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The free, cultural, educational event is open to all and is co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.
     Auntie Diana Aki, Miloli‘i's famed falsetto Hawaiian songbird will sing. Also in the line-up are south Kona bands. Health screening and health insurance advice will be offered, along with local food and arts and crafts on display and for sale.
      Partners in putting on Lā ‘Ohana include Pa‘a Pono Miloli‘i, Kua O Ka Lā Charter School, Queen Lili‘uokalani Trust, Kalanihale, and Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy.
      For more information, contact Kumu Ka‘imi Kaupiko at 808-937-1310 or kkaupiko@gmail.com. Vendors are welcome.

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MISS KA‘Ū COFFEE 2018 COMPETITION IS OPEN FOR APPLICANTS. Pageant Director Trini Marques set the date for Saturday, April 21, 2018 at Ka‘ū District Gym, the first time for the pageant to be held in the new venue.
     Every applicant must be attending school and intend to further her education.
Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant
Director Trinidad Marques
     The crowns will go to:
     Miss Ka‘ū Coffee - 15 to 24 years of age, to be judged in Career Outfit, Talent, Evening Gown, Swimsuit and Interview;
     Junior Miss Ka‘ū Coffee - 11 to 14 years of age, to be judged in Hobby Outfit, Talent, Evening Gown and Interview;
     Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Peaberry - 6 to 10 years of age, to be judged in Character Outfit, Talent and Evening Gown;
    Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Flower - 3 to 5 years of age, to be judged in Character Outfit and Evening Gown.
     A Miss Photogenic and Miss Popularity will be awarded in each age group.
      Deadline to enter is March 10, 2018, at 6 p.m. However, those who sign up early will be offered more opportunity for training and sponsorships.
      For more details and to sign-up, contact Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant Director Trinidad Marques at 928-0606 or TrinidadMarques@yahoo.com or Facebook Trinidad Marques.

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HIKE TO THE TOP OF THE GRASSY CINDER CONE PU‘U O LOKUANA from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Saturday, Oct. 28, with a ranger in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The hike is a short 0.4 miles. Learn about the formation and various uses of this hill over time and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Ka‘ū. This hike will also take place on Nov. 5.

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Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com 
REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN EDIBLE HALLOWEEN CRAFT CLASS scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Pāhala Community Center. Register until Tuesday, Oct. 24. For more, call 928-3102.

HAWAIIAN OCEAN VIEW ESTATES ROAD MAINTENANCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS meet Tuesday, Oct. 24, at 10 a.m. at St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. For more, call 929-9910.

INPUT FOR THE FUTURE OF HAWAI‘I COUNTY TRANSPORTATION SERVICES, including the Hele On Bus that takes many Ka‘ū residents to work, school and shopping, is invited at meetings outside Ka‘ū. Those unable to attend may contact Ka‘ū's County Council member Maile David at maile.david@hawaiicounty.gov or email the consultants at heleonsuggestions@ssfm.com.
     The final meeting is Tuesday, Oct. 24, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., at Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lū‘au Hale in Hilo.
     For more, call 808-356-1260.

EVENTS CELEBRATING WORLD FOOD DAY, presented by Hawai’i Island Food Alliance, KTA Super Stores, and The Kohala Center, are set for Tuesday, Oct. 24, at KTA locations - Puainako, Waimea, Waikoloa, and Keauhou - from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
     The Kohala Center describes the event as following, “Support local farmers showcasing their value-added products at this in-store event. Enjoy tastings, samples, and purchase a selection of products direct from farmers." The Kohala Center will distribute plant starts as supplies last. Farmers and value-added producers who would like to distribute samples at KTA for World Food Day, may contact Nicole Milne at nmilne@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411. See a short slide show called The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World by the Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

REGISTER KEIKI AGES 6-12 FOR A BAT FINGER PUPPET class at Kahuku Park scheduled for Friday, Oct. 27, from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. Register until Friday, Oct. 25. For more, call 929-9113.

SEN. RUSSELL RUDERMAN hosts a Town Hall Meeting at Volcano Art Center's campus on Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. A statement from the state Senator says it will be "An evening of legislative discussion and insight. Take advantage of this opportunity to weigh in on the 2018 Legislative Session. Additional information will be provided about participating directly in the legislative process."

LEARN ONE OF THE GREAT TRADITIONAL ARTS OF HAWAI‘I, ulana lau hala, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The free Lau Hala workshop takes place Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Hawaiians have used the hala (pandanus) tree to create many useful, artistic items for centuries. Those learning to weave lau hala can take home their own peice of lau hala art. The class in one of the ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Park entrance fees apply.

COFFEE TALK in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National park takes place Friday, Oct. 27, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Join rangers and other community members in an informal conversation on a wide variety of topics. Ka‘ū coffee, tea and pastries available for purchase. Free.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED TO HELP REMOVE INVASIVE, NON-NATIVE PLANT SPECIES that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This Stewardship at the Summit event will occur on Friday, Oct. 27, at 9 a.m.
     To join the efforts, meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the aforementioned dates. Volunteers should wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants and bring a hat, rain-gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools will be provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
CORP. meets Friday, Oct. 27, at 5 p.m. in Hawaiian Ranchos office.

VENDOR APPLICATIONS ARE DUE FRIDAY, OCT. 27, for community members interested in hosting a booth at the Ho‘okupu Hula No Ka‘ū Cultural Festival on Saturday, Nov. 4, at Pāhala Community Center, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. The event is sponsored by Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawai'i, Inc., the festival is directed by Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder, who teaches hula on Wednesday evenings to all ages at Pāhala Community Center.
     There are openings for craft vendors, food vendors, informational booths, and game vendors for children. Craft vendors fee is $50.00. Food vendors fee is $75.00. Game Vendors fee is $50.00. Informational booths are free. Call 649-9334 for an application.

A HALLOWEEN PARTY FOR ADULTS is offered at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Friday, Oct. 27, from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Attendees must be 21 years and older and must pay a cover charge of $5 per person. The event is open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8365 after 4 p.m.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY is accepting reservations for a volunteer day at the Ka‘ū Preserve for Saturday, Oct. 28, from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Reserving a spot in advance to go to the remote location in The Nature Conservancy's trucks is necessary. Anyone interested in more information, and/or to reserve a spot can contact Linda Schubert at lschubert@tnc.org, or call 443-5401.
     The following volunteer workday will be Saturday, Nov. 18. Details to come. 

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION IS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.




kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory_2017

Saturday, October 21, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Saturday, October 21, 2017

Helicopter with a line to a container, dumping water, in the smokey fire above Pāhala on Friday, near coffee farms,
pastures and macadamia orchards. Photo by Julia Neal
FRIDAY'S FIRE ABOVE PĀHALA shut down Ka‘alaiki Road, the old cane haul route to Nā‘ālehu, as it burned grass and charred eucalyptus trees on Kamehameha Schools land near Ka‘ū Coffee and macadamia plantations.
The fire could be seen from Pāhala Village and Keaīwa Road.
Photo by Julia Neal
     A helicopter made water drops until sunset and started again Saturday morning, dousing the flames most of the day. County and volunteer fire crews worked through Friday night to protect the town and its surrounding agriculture. They made constant runs to fire hydrants in Pāhala to refill their trucks as the fire burned on land away from any domestic water sources.
     The fire department reported that the fire site was near the long abandoned Keaīwa and Higashi sugar camps.
     Police blocked Ka‘alaiki Road late Friday afternoon as coffee farmers living in Pāhala drove to Moa‘ula and Pear Tree coffee farms to pay and retrieve their coffee pickers. The farmers gained permission to travel on the otherwise blocked road to prevent coffee pickers from being stranded and to take them away from smoke and the fire area.
Grass fire through the eucalyptus farm on Kamehameha Schools
land above Pāhala on Friday. Photo by Julia Neal
     About 30 acres had burned by Friday evening. Firefighters saved coffee and macadamia orchards and smoke above Pāhala was gone by Saturday morning though remnants of the fire still burned and firefighters remained on duty.
      The west side of Hawai‘i Island remains dry and in above-risk conditions for wildfires. The fire department reminds people to refrain from throwing cigarettes out the windows of vehicles and to report any information on any clues to the possibility of arson for any of the recent fires.
     Call Crimestoppers at 329-8181 or 961-8300.


Hawai‘i and California have something in
common, an above normal risk for wildfires.
Image from National Interagency Fire Center
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   MORE ON THE NEW FILM ON KĪLAUEA'S SUMMIT ERUPTION is revealed in this week's Volcano Watch, written by USGS scientists at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. The article includes the volcanic events leading up to the video production which can be seen online:
     In March 2008, a new volcanic vent opened within Halema‘uma‘u, a crater at the summit of Kīlauea in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park on the Island of Hawaiʻi. The eruption continues today, with continuous degassing, occasional explosive events, and an active, circulating lava lake.
      Due to volcanic hazards associated with Kīlauea’s summit vent, the area around Halemaʻumaʻu was closed to the public by the National Park Service in early 2008 and remains closed today. The hazards include high levels of sulfur dioxide gas and explosive ejection of molten lava and solid rock fragments onto the crater rim, which could cause serious injury (or worse) to anyone venturing into the closed area.
     The summit eruption can, however, be safely viewed from vantage points on the rim of Kīlauea Crater, such as the National Park’s Jaggar Museum overlook. From these points, the gas plume emitted from the summit vent is nearly always visible (unless obscured by fog or rain), and, on most nights, a beautiful orange glow from the incandescent lava lake can be seen. Depending on the level of the lava lake, spattering from gas bubbles bursting through the lake surface is sometimes visible from the Jaggar overlook.
Lava lake within Halemaʻumaʻu, a crater at the summit of Kīlauea, was about
30 m (98 ft) below the vent rim on the day of this photo, Jan. 7, 2016. Orange
 lines on the lake surface were the result of lava lake circulation; as lava
moved from left to right, sections of the dark-colored,semi-solid lake surface
pulled apart, revealing incandescent molten lava beneath the crust. Vigorous
 spattering (bright yellow area at right) often occurs where circulating 
lava sinks back into the lake.  USGS photo by T. Orr
     The U.S. Geological Survey documentary, Kīlauea Summit Eruption–Lava Returns to Halemaʻumaʻu, tells the story of the eruption, and to share imagery of the inaccessible lava lake with the public. This new 24-minute video includes historical photos of past Halemaʻumaʻu eruptions and stunning high-resolution footage of Kīlauea’s summit lava lake—now one of the two largest lava lakes in the world.
     The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, which is responsible for monitoring Kīlauea eruptions and assessing volcanic hazards, was the driving force behind the documentary. HVO staff appear in on-camera interviews about the science of the summit eruption and were actively involved in behind-the-scenes production of the video.
      People outside of USGS-HVO also helped bring the project to fruition. For example, an interview with a Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park ranger offers insights on the cultural aspects of the eruption. Additionally, the video features the voices of two well-known Island of Hawaiʻi educators, as well as images taken by Hawaiʻi photographers. HVO appreciates the time and talent these and other friends and colleagues contributed to the documentary.
Dr. Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele opens the film with a chant. Image from
the film Kīlauea Summit Eruption: Lava Returns to Halema‘uma‘u.
      The video begins with a chant about Halemaʻumaʻu by Dr. Pualani Kanaka‘ole Kanahele, the kumu hula who taught Hawaiian studies at Hawaiʻi and Maui Community Colleges and the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo and remains an icon of Hawaiian culture today. The chant expresses traditional observations of an active lava lake and reflects the connections between science and culture that continue on Kīlauea today.
     The documentary then recounts the eruptive history of Halemaʻumaʻu and describes the formation and continued growth of Kīlauea’s current summit vent and lava lake. Narration is provided by Jackie
Pualani Johnson, a recently retired Drama Professor and Chair of the Performing Arts Department at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo.
Christina Neal, USGS Scientist in Charge at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
Image from Kīlauea Summit Eruption - Lava Returns to Halema‘uma‘u
     As the story unfolds, six USGS-HVO scientists share their insights on the summit eruption. Topics include how they monitor Kīlauea’s summit lava lake, how and why the lake level rises and falls, why explosive events occur, the connection between the volcano’s ongoing summit and East Rift Zone eruptions, and the impacts of the summit eruption on the Island of Hawaiʻi and beyond.
      The summit lava lake is one of two ongoing eruptions on Kīlauea. The other is on the volcano’s East Rift Zone, where vents have been erupting nearly nonstop since 1983. The duration of these simultaneous summit and rift zone eruptions on Kīlauea is unmatched in at least the past 200 years.
      Kīlauea Volcano’s summit eruption will reach its 10th anniversary in March 2018.  Even now, it is the longest-lasting summit lava lake since 1924, and there are no signs that it’s slowing down. But, as noted in the video, how long it will last, remains to be seen.
      The new video documentary can be viewed on the USGS YouTube channel (youtube/gNoJv5Vkumk). It is also published as USGS General Interest Product 182 (pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/gip182).
USGS scientists worked on the film. Here they are seen measuring
rocks thrown out of Halema‘uma‘u Crater. Image from
the film 
Kīlauea Summit Eruption: Lava Returns to Halema‘uma‘u.


      Funding for the video was provided by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Volcano Science Center, Volcano Hazards Program, and Office of Communications and Publishing.
     Visit the HVO website (volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo) for past Volcano Watch articles, volcano updates and photos, recent earthquake info, and more. Call for summary updates at 808-967-8862 (Kīlauea) or 808-967-8866 (Mauna Loa). Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

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COFFEE TALK in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National park takes place Friday, Oct. 27, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. Join rangers and other community members in an informal conversation on a wide variety of topics. Ka‘ū coffee, tea and pastries available for purchase. Free.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP. meets Friday, Oct. 27, at 5 p.m. in Hawaiian Ranchos office.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

A HALLOWEEN PARTY FOR ADULTS is offered at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Friday, Oct. 27, from 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. Attendees must be 21 years and older and must pay a cover charge of $5 per person. The event is open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8365 after 4 p.m.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

VENDOR APPLICATIONS ARE DUE FRIDAY, OCT. 27, for community members interested in hosting a booth at the Ho‘okupu Hula No Ka‘ū Cultural Festival on Saturday, Nov. 4, at Pāhala Community Center, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. The event is sponsored by Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawai'i, Inc., the festival is directed by Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder, who teaches hula on Wednesday evenings to all ages at Pāhala Community Center.
     There are openings for craft vendors, food vendors, informational booths, and game vendors for children. Craft vendors fee is $50.00. Food vendors fee is $75.00. Game Vendors fee is $50.00. Informational booths are free. Call 649-9334 for an application.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com 
EXPLORE THE PALM TRAIL WITH A GUIDED HIKE in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
     Palm Trail is a moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traversing scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures.
     The hike will also be offered on Nov. 26, Dec. 3 and Dec. 23. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN EDIBLE HALLOWEEN CRAFT CLASS scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Pāhala Community Center. Register until Tuesday, Oct. 24. For more, call 928-3102.

HAWAIIAN OCEAN VIEW ESTATES ROAD MAINTENANCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS meet Tuesday, Oct. 24, at 10 a.m. at St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. For more, call 929-9910.

INPUT FOR THE FUTURE OF HAWAI‘I COUNTY TRANSPORTATION SERVICES, including the Hele On Bus that takes many Ka‘ū residents to work, school and shopping, is invited at meetings outside Ka‘ū. Those unable to attend may contact Ka‘ū's County Council member Maile David at maile.david@hawaiicounty.gov or email the consultants at heleonsuggestions@ssfm.com.
     The final meeting is Tuesday, Oct. 24, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., at Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lū‘au Hale in Hilo.
     For more, call 808-356-1260.

EVENTS CELEBRATING WORLD FOOD DAY, presented by Hawai’i Island Food Alliance, KTA Super Stores, and The Kohala Center, are set for Tuesday, Oct. 24, at KTA locations - Puainako, Waimea, Waikoloa, and Keauhou - from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
     The Kohala Center describes the event as following, “Support local farmers showcasing their value-added products at this in-store event. Enjoy tastings, samples, and purchase a selection of products direct from farmers." The Kohala Center will distribute plant starts as supplies last. Farmers and value-added producers who would like to distribute samples at KTA for World Food Day, may contact Nicole Milne at nmilne@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411. See a short slide show called The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World by the Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

REGISTER KEIKI AGES 6-12 FOR A BAT FINGER PUPPET class at Kahuku Park scheduled for Friday, Oct. 27, from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. Register until Friday, Oct. 25. For more, call 929-9113.

SEN. RUSSELL RUDERMAN hosts a Town Hall Meeting at Volcano Art Center's campus on Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. A statement from the state Senator says it will be "An evening of legislative discussion and insight. Take advantage of this opportunity to weigh in on the 2018 Legislative Session. Additional information will be provided about participating directly in the legislative process."

LEARN ONE OF THE GREAT TRADITIONAL ARTS OF HAWAI‘I, ulana lau hala, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The free Lau Hala workshop takes place Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Hawaiians have used the hala (pandanus) tree to create many useful, artistic items for centuries. Those learning to weave lau hala can take home their own peice of lau hala art. The class in one of the ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Park entrance fees apply.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED TO HELP REMOVE INVASIVE, NON-NATIVE PLANT SPECIES that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This Stewardship at the Summit event will occur on Friday, Oct. 27, at 9 a.m.
     To join the efforts, meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the aforementioned dates. Volunteers should wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants and bring a hat, rain-gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools will be provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.

Iwa Decanter by Emily Herb.
Photo from Volcano Village Artists Hui
THE 31ST ART STUDIO TOUR & SALE hosted by the Volcano Village Artists Hui over Thanksgiving weekend is set for Friday, Nov. 24 through Sunday, Nov. 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day.
     See artwork in a wide variety of media, from paintings, prints and photography to hand blown glass, metal and wood sculpture, pottery, jewelry, fiber art and more.
     Meet artists and view the artworks displayed, which are available for purchase, at six studios and galleries in the heart of the Village.
     This years participating Hui members: Erik Wold, Ira Ono, Misato & Michael Mortara, Elizabeth Miller, Zeke Israel, Emily Herb, Pam Barton, Margaret Barnaby and Lisa Louise Adams, along with guest artists Joan Yoshioka, Randy Sutton, Ricia Shema, Scott Pincus, Tim Freeman, Charlotte Forbes Perry and Nash Adams-Pruitt.
     A special drawing for artwork contributed by each of the artists will be held at the end of the sale. For more information, call 987-3472. Maps to the artists' studios will be available at local businesses and galleries in Volcano Village and at: VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION IS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.


Friday, October 20, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Friday, October 20, 2017

The last Eight-Man Football game of the season will be Saturday at Ka‘ū High School. The Trojans
play Pāhoa at 1 p.m. Photo by Pamela Taylor
USA FOOTBALL HEADS UP PROGRAM FOR KA‘Ū HIGH SCHOOL has been approved, reports Athletic Director Kalei Namohala. She said she is proud that the school has been accepted and that parents are now eligible for free USA Football accounts with access to a digital parent guide, parent courses and newsletters that focus on "making your student's sports experience truly great." She recommends it for families with students in all sports, not just football.
Ka‘ū High Athletic Director Kalei Namohala
recommends that parents and student athletes
learn from the HeadsUp Program of
USA Football online.
     The website offers a guide for parents with such subjects as nutrition for athletes. "Eating and drinking right are just as important as improving skills and practicing plays to be successful on the field." The guide recommends foods to avoid and timing for consuming the foods that fuel the athlete. Dealing with weather, particularly heat, is reviewed with tips on best hydration practices. Treating minor injuries and protecting against concussions are additional topics covered. Others include how parents can help student athletes to remain inspired, particularly when they lose a competition or sit on the bench. Suggestions on parent interaction with coaches are also given.
     The guide also explains the values of student being sports that teach teamwork, foster perseverance, develop and improve cognitive skills, affect future career success, instill time-management skills, encourage goal setting, and nurture a healthy lifestyle.
    For the athletes, there are sections on sports psychology, strategy in athletic performance, training and opportunities to take classes.
     See more at USAfootball.com.
     
LAST GAME OF THE SEASON for Ka‘ū High School Trojans Eight-Man Football is tomorrow, Saturday, Oct. 21, on the home field at the Pāhala campus. Game time against Pāhoa is 1 p.m.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

FIRE SEASON IN HAWAI‘I IS YEAR ROUND, warns the state Department of Land & Natural Resources which issued a media advisory this week warning that drought conditions have become more severe since mid summer. “Residents and visitors are urged to prevent fire ignitions from starting. Be careful with equipment that may spark, do not park or idle cars on dry grass, and completely extinguish all campfires.”
Waikapuna Fire in September near the Ka‘ū Coast.
    Given the Waikapuna wildfire that burned more than 1,600 acres last month in Ka‘ū and the devastating examples on the mainland this month, DLNR warns that "a wildfire can quickly turn into a subdivision fire, such as the recent and devastating wildfires in California and other states. This can happen in Hawai‘i too, but residents can take action to protect their homes and prevent the spread of fire.”
       DLNR recommends the following precautions: Plant noncombustible ground cover, or gravel and brick within 5 feet of each house; maintain 6 inches of clearance between siding and the ground. Clear debris from roof and gutters. Use noncombustible building materials where possible.
       Conditions can be made safer for firefighters by creating a defensible space within 30 feet of the house, trimming overgrown grass and shrubs, pruning tree branches that hang low to the ground or over the house. Take away debris piles and other combustible materials. “Have a family evacuation plan and practice it,” recommends DLNR.

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Discovery Harbour Volunteer Firefighters were honored by County Council member Maile David. praised by
Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park ranger Greg Funderburk and representatives of Mayor Harry Kim and
the Hawai‘i Fire Department last weekend during their dinner that celebrated 30 years of history.
CELEBRATING 30 YEARS OF THE DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT was the focus of the evening gathering last weekend. The dinner and history night at Discovery Harbour Community Center began with Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Department Captain Kenneth B. Shisler telling the story, starting with the first volunteers in 1986. A wall of honor was filled with photos of Fire Chiefs, from Chief Chuck Horran to Chief James Masters, Chief Joe Klecak, Captain Wolf Morschl and Captain Terry James. 
     The Wall of Honor displayed two of the original fire helmets, one donated by Masters and the other by firefighter James Anderson.
      County Council member Maile David presented a Certificate of Appreciation, with lei presented by her assistant Dawn Magano. Assistant Hawai‘i Fire Department Chief Glen Honda thanked the volunteers and presented Mayor Harry Kim's Certificate of Appreciation. 

Fun Day is tomorrow, Saturday, at Ka‘ū Police
Station in Nā‘ālehu from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. See event below.
       Hawai‘iVolcanoes National Park ranger Greg Funderburk praised the Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Department for devotion and service.
       A Red Thin Line Flag was presented to Pāhala Volunteer Fire Department Capt. Ron Ebert and his wife Nadine; Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Capt. Mack Goddard and his wife Debbie; and Assistant Rick Ward.
      Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Capt. Ken Shisler announced that a second fire truck, this one with four-wheel drive to help with brush fires, will be added to Discovery Harbour equipment. In addition, three new recruits are in training.
     Dina Shiler thanked everyone who assisted with the event, including Retired Training Captain Lloyd Narimatsu, who helped put on the history display and shared the stories of 30 years of protecting Discovery Harbour through its Volunteer Fire Department.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

THE FEDERAL BUDGET RESOLUTION PASSED CONGRESS yesterday. Hawai‘i Sen. Mazie Hirono voted against the resolution for federal fiscal year 2018, contending that it will severely cut Hawai‘i's education, criminal justice and transportation funding, as well as increase taxes for many 
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RIDE FOR POLIO.
households in this state. The budget resolution passed on a 51-49 vote. Hirono explained that while the budget resolution does not become law, it outlines the budget and tax priorities that Congress will pursue in the coming year.
     "This budget reflects Donald Trumps misplaced priorities—giving tax cuts to the richest in our country and paying for it by inflicting pain on virtually everyone else. It's yet another broken Trump promise to the middle class," Hirono said.
    She said that the Republican tax plan would raise taxes for 123,000 Hawai‘i households in 2018. The budget's "cuts to Medicaid funding would mean that the State of Hawai‘i would be forced to cut K-12 education funding by 22 percent, higher education funding by 32 percent, criminal justice by 146 percent, and transportation by 32 percent."
     Hirono charged that the Republican budget includes "reconciliation instructions" that would allow Republicans to pass tax cut legislation that increases the federal deficit by over $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years, as well as legislation to approve drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, with only simple majorities.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com 
THE OCEAN VIEW DEEP CLEAN project is gearing up for Saturday, Oct. 21. Supported through a grant from Matson Navigation, it will provide containers for large items being disposed of, including broken appliances and furniture. The event begins at 8 a.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Those who would like to volunteer can call 939-7033, Mondays through Fridays from 8 am. to noon and 217-7982 in afternoons and evenings, said Ocean View Community Association President Ron Gall.
     Volunteers need to wear sturdy shoes and gloves, sunscreen, long pants/jeans and hat. OVVC will provide bottled water and lunch for volunteers. "The Community Association is seeking a tire recycler to haul off the many tires dumped in the community," Gall said.
     In addition to Matson, the Hawai‘i County Solid Waste Division is providing some assistance.

A HULA KAHIKO PERFORMANCE will be given on the hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Saturday, Oct. 21, starting at 10:30 a.m. Nā Kumu hula Micah Kamohoaliʻi and Hālau Na Kipuʻupuʻu will perform. Also see Nā Mea Hula with Halauolaokalani from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE KA‘Ū POLICE DEPARTMENT headquarters in Nā‘ālehu will be celebrated this Saturday, Oct. 21, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Nā‘ālehu Police Station.
    "Join us for a day of fun and community. Mahalo to County Councilperson Maile David, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou and the Hawai‘i County Police Department," states the event flyer.
     Food - Chili and rice, hot dogs and shave ice - will be served. A water slide, bouncing castle, rock climbing, face painting, and keiki I.D.s will also be available at the event. Backyard Braddahs will provide music.
    The Food Basket will also give out food baskets to families at the event.

RECYCLING WILL BE ACCEPTED AT NĀ‘ĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL GYM on Saturday, Oct. 21, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. by Atlas Recycling. Redeem HI-5 sorted by type; receive 5 cents per container and additional 20 cents per pound on all aluminum. Atlas Recycling donates 20 cents per pound on all aluminum redeemed to the school. For more, call 939-2413, ext. 230.

AUDITION SATURDAY, OCT. 21, FOR A GILBERT & SULLIVAN CHRISTMAS CAROL, at 10 a.m. in Kīlauea Military Camps's Kīlauea Theatre. Auditioners prepare a song that best features vocal ability. There are parts for all ages, from Scrooge to Tiny Tim.
     The December play by Kīlauea Drama & Entertainment Network will be performed for one weekend, Dec. 14 through 17, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m. For more information, read the Ka'ū News Briefs from September 13, call 982-7344 or email kden73@aol.com.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place tomorrow, Saturday, Oct. 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. The hike will be offered again on Nov. 25. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

WRITING ON THE WILD SIDE, a workshop at Volcano Art Center will take place Saturday, Oct. 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tom Peek’s techniques and exercises help students explore their creative minds and unique voices. The class is $75 per person or $65 per person for VAC members. For more, call 967-8222.

JOIN A GUIDED HIKE ALONG THE PALM TRAIL in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The hike will also be offered on Nov. 26, Dec. 3 and Dec. 23.
     Palm Trail is a moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traversing scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures.
     For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN EDIBLE HALLOWEEN CRAFT CLASS scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Pāhala Community Center. Register until Tuesday, Oct. 24. For more, call 928-3102.

HAWAIIAN OCEAN VIEW ESTATES ROAD MAINTENANCE BOARD OF DIRECTORS meet Tuesday, Oct. 24, at 10 a.m. at St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. For more, call 929-9910.

INPUT FOR THE FUTURE OF HAWAI‘I COUNTY TRANSPORTATION SERVICES, including the Hele On Bus that takes many Ka‘ū residents to work, school and shopping, is invited at meetings outside Ka‘ū. Those unable to attend may contact Ka‘ū's County Council member Maile David at maile.david@hawaiicounty.gov or email the consultants at heleonsuggestions@ssfm.com.
     The final meeting is Tuesday, Oct. 24, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., at Aunty Sally Kaleohano’s Lū‘au Hale in Hilo.
     For more, call 808-356-1260.

EVENTS CELEBRATING WORLD FOOD DAY, presented by Hawai’i Island Food Alliance, KTA Super Stores, and The Kohala Center, are set for Tuesday, Oct. 24, at KTA locations - Puainako, Waimea, Waikoloa, and Keauhou - from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
     The Kohala Center urges everyone to “Support local farmers showcasing their value-added products at this in-store event. Enjoy tastings, samples, and purchase a selection of products direct from farmers." The Kohala Center will distribute plant starts as supplies last. Farmers and value-added producers who would like to distribute samples at KTA for World Food Day, may contact Nicole Milne at nmilne@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411. See a short slide show called The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World by the Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

REGISTER KEIKI AGES 6-12 FOR A BAT FINGER PUPPET class at Kahuku Park scheduled for Friday, Oct. 27, from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. Register until Friday, Oct. 25. For more, call 929-9113.

SEN. RUSSELL RUDERMAN hosts a Town Hall Meeting at Volcano Art Center's campus on Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. A statement from the state Senator says it will be "An evening of legislative discussion and insight. Take advantage of this opportunity to weigh in on the 2018 Legislative Session. Additional information will be provided about participating directly in the legislative process."

LEARN ONE OF THE GREAT TRADITIONAL ARTS OF HAWAI‘I, ulana lau hala, at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The free Lau Hala workshop takes place Wednesday, Oct. 25, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Hawaiians have used the hala (pandanus) tree to create many useful, artistic items for centuries. Those learning to weave lau hala can take home their own peice of lau hala art. The class in one of the ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Park entrance fees apply.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION IS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.