About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, August 19, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs, Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017


"PRESIDENT TRUMP CAN REARRANGE THE DECK CHAIRS ON THE TRUMP TITANIC all he wants but the problem is him and his inability to focus, his continuing attacks on everyone who disagrees with him, so I am not holding out much hope that he is suddenly going to change how he behaves." Sen. Mazie Hirono was talking on MSNBC last night about possible changes in the White House with the Departure of strategist Steve Bannon.
      Hirono said that even the criticism of Trump by leading Republican Senators like Mitch McConnell, Jeff Flake, Lindsey Graham and John McCain "doesn't matter to him." Hirono said, "I am happy that there are some Republicans stepping up to criticize the President and basically his fitness and moral authority to be the President of the United States."
     Hirono is a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee.

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Joy Reid interviews Hawai`i Sen. Brian Schatz, who says Jews in Trump cabinet should resign.
SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ ALSO WEIGHED IN. MSNBC's Joy Reid talked about Shatz's earlier criticism of Trump after the violence in Charlottesville, VA., and asked Schatz about Steve Bannon's departure from the White House. "Does that change your view?"  Schatz replied, "No, it really doesn't. "            
     Schatz described Bannon as "obviously an outside character, a grandiose character and a dangerous person to have proximity to that much authority. But in the end, the failures of this presidency are the President's failures, and what happened in the wake of Charlottesville was a perfect example of that. What we saw was that by all accounts, the President had a script that he was supposed to read, where he met the basic moral test of being the leader of the free world, which is to say, that he knows the difference between Nazis and people who protest against Nazis. And he's the one that went off script. So as dangerous as Steve Bannon is and as thankful as many of us are that he's leaving the White House, I think the real problem is the President of the United States, and that's not going to change any time soon."
Schatz says Bannon's departure still leaves "the real problem," the President.
        When Reid asked Schatz whether Jewish members of the Trump cabinet "should resign in protest, particularly, given that Breitbart (Bannon's news network) is signaling that they're coming for them," Schatz said, "Yes. I think they have to. I think people of conscience can't pretend that this President is something that they had hoped he would be. That they were hoping he would be competent, that he would be a dealmaker in the middle, that he would be a pragmatist. I remember reading an article online at the very beginning of the presidency that he was going to function as sort of an executive chairman and allow each one of his cabinet officials to run the government as they see fit. None of that happened. And his ability to make deals, his ability to be a pragmatist, his ability to be a competent leader for the United States, none of it came through."
      Schatz said he has been heartened in the last few days by "Republicans who are patriots who are finally standing up and saying, enough is enough - Mitt Romney, both Presidents Bush, many of the leaders of the service branches of the Department of Defense," and some Republican Senators.
Pick up the August edition of The Ka`u Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka`u, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at www.kaucalendar.com
      "I think this is the beginning of the end of Republicans being able to hide behind some imaginary Donald Trump that clearly doesn't exist anymore. This person is not capable morally, politically or in terms of his competency to lead the free world," said the Hawai`i Senator.
       He said that in congress, "We have the beginning of the mouse that is the legislative branch beginning to roar."

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KA`U HIGH BEAT HAAS in girls volleyball at home on Friday night. The Trojans dominated Hawai`i Academy of Arts and Sciences with Jayvee winning 25-17 and 25-19. Varsity won with 25-10, 25-5, and 25-16.

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Free Guided 2.5 mile tour of the Kahuku Unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National park from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.  Modeerately difficult hike.

Ka‘ū High School Potluck Reunion, Sunday, Aug. 20, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Everyone is invited. Music, dance, food for all graduates and their friends and families.

Bon Dance, Pahala Hongwanji, Sunday, Aug. 20, with service at 4 p.m. and dancing and music at 5 p.m. Food and demonstrations.


Friday, August 18, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Friday, Aug. 18, 2017

The Hawaiian and U.S. flags fly together at most public places in Hawai`i as Statehood Day is a holiday
leading into a long weekend. Photo from Wikipedia
TODAY, FRIDAY, IS HAWAI`I STATEHOOD DAY, FORMERLY ADMISSION DAY. It is an annual holiday the third Friday of August, with public schools and state and county offices closed. Kamehameha Schools, the school for Native Hawaiians, remains open on Statehood Day.
     With the hot topic of the legitimacy of the U.S. annexing Hawai`i as a territory in 1898 and Hawai`i becoming a state on Aug. 21, 1959, Statehood Day is relatively quiet with few public celebrations and is considered the first day of a long weekend of rest and recreation.
      Celebrating the multiethnic fiber of Ka`u, the weekend includes the Volcano Rain Forest Runs on Saturday morning, beginning and ending at Cooper Center in Volcano Village; a spiritual retreat with native Hawaiians and Native Americans, with a lu`au and cultural celebration at Pahala Community Center on Saturday; the Ka`u High and Pahala School reunion on Sunday at Pahala Community Center,  with a potluck luncheon and entertainment open to everyone; and the traditional Bon Dance and celebration at Pahala Hongwanji, also open to everyone on Sunday evening.

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"AS A JEW, AS AN AMERICAN AND AS A HUMAN," said Hawai`i Sen. Brian Schatz, "words cannot express my disgust and disappointment at the President’s comments about Charlottesville."
      Schatz was talking about Pres. Donald Trump's statements about violence and racial slurs during an Alt-Right gathering in Charlottesville, Virginia that led to the murder of a woman civil rights advocate last weekend.
     Trump blamed the violence not only on white supremacists, including anti-Jewish marchers. He also blamed the civil rights advocates opposing the alt-right. His remarks drew strong criticism all week long from Republicans and Democrats and led to the resignation of business leaders, experts in arts and culture and others from Trump's presidential councils. It also led to the departure of Chief White House strategist Steve Bannon who left today to retake his post as head of the right-wing Breitbart News Network.
     Today, Schatz was interviewed on CNN and said, "This is a President who has failed to do what we expect every President to do, which is to provide moral clarity and moral leadership. So in that moment, I was frankly mad and hurt as an American, as a person, as a person of the Jewish faith, that my president hadn't met even the most basic moral test. I'm not asking him to agree with me on all
Sam Clovis is Trump nominee for Chief Scientist of the USDA.
He is opposed by Hawai`i Sen. Brian Schatz.
Photo from Clovis YouTube Channel
the issues. I'm not asking him to be someone that I admire. I'm just asking that he understands the difference between right and wrong, the difference between Nazis and the people who protest against Nazis. So in that moment I said, what I think was on a lot of peoples' minds, which is, 'He's not acting like a President.'"
     Schatz also  called for more action in Congress. He said, "My colleagues have expressed 'concern' about the president’s words and actions before, but in this new era words are not enough. The true litmus test for courage is whether or not my Republican colleagues will repudiate white nationalism and supremacy on the Senate floor, not just on social media."
    Schatz also said he opposes the appointment of Sam Clovis as USDA Chief Scientist.  Clovis was co-chair of the Trump presidential campaign. Said Schatz,  "The Senate has a real opportunity to stand up against hate, when the President did not, by rejecting an unapologetic birther, Sam Clovis, from becoming the next USDA Chief Scientist. But I cannot win this fight alone. Add your name next to mine and tell the Senate to reject Sam Clovis, a non-scientist and birther, for USDA Chief Scientist.
     "Here’s the truth: Sam Clovis propagated the racist lie that President Obama was not born in Honolulu. He also called Attorney General Eric Holder a 'racist black,' Tom Perez a 'racist Latino,' and suggested Obama 'wants to enslave all who are not part of his regime.'
     "And he fails to meet the most basic requirement for the job, which of course is to actually be a scientist. Every single senator should easily vote against a birther and non-scientist for the Chief Scientist of the USDA. But this nomination could easily slip under the radar, so it’s up to us to make sure every senator knows their constituents are watching."

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Map of lava flows erupted from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō since 1983. Gray color
 shows area covered by lava flows erupted from many different vents
 between 1983 and June 2014. Pink shows the area covered by the June
 27th flow between June 2014 and June 2016. Red shows the area covered
 by the 61g flow between May 2016 and August 9, 2017. The vents that
 supplied lava to these flow fields are only 500 m (1/3 mile) apart.
THE LONGEST LIVED AND MOST VOLUMINOUS RIFT-ZONE ERUPTION of Kīlauea Volcano in more than 500 years—the ongoing Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruption—began in January 1983 and is fast approaching its 35th anniversary, This week's Volcano Watch from the USGS Hawi`i Volcano Observatory reminds the public:
     So many lava flows, cones, deltas, and other features have formed from eruptions at different vents for varying periods of time that nearly every day is an anniversary for Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō.
    Last month marked the first anniversary of the 61g lava flow's entry into the ocean at Kamokuna after traveling from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō nearly 11 km (6.8 mi) in two months.
     Three years ago this week, the infamous June 27th lava flow was erupting from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and spreading steadily eastward about 300 m (330 ft) per day. On August 18, 2014, lava spilled into the first of several deep ground cracks along the East Rift Zone.
     This set in motion intense scrutiny of the flow's day-to-day advance by HVO scientists, and contingency planning by Hawa‘i County and state government, businesses, and residents.
    The crack system is located about 10 km (6.2 mi) northeast of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. At the time, it seemed possible, perhaps likely, that the June 27th lava would keep moving northeast toward several communities in the Puna District.
     On August 20, HVO scientists discussed the progression of the flow and possible scenarios with the Hawai‘i County Mayor and Civil Defense Administrator, and their staffs and other interested parties should the same active vent at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō continue erupting lava for weeks to months, or longer.
Lava approaches homes and flows through gardens in 2014. HVO photo.
   On August 24, the first of 28 public meetings in Pāhoa and nearby communities was organized by the Mayor's office to share information about the current eruption, status of the flow, possible scenarios based on HVO's projected lava-flow paths, and the ways in which the County, State, and others were planning to mitigate the continued advance of the flow.
     On September 4, with lava advancing about 250 m/day (820 ft/day), HVO scientists estimated that the flow could reach Kaohe Homesteads subdivision within seven days—they raised the USGS Volcano Alert Level for Kīlauea Volcano from WATCH to WARNING.
    These one- and three-year anniversaries of events during the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō eruption are but two that help the public appreciate two very different outcomes based on the interplay of several factors. These include location of the vent, robustness of lava-tube systems that develop in lava flows, slope of the ground, longevity of an erupting vent, and the variability in lava discharge from the vent day-to-day and week-to-week.
     The June 27th and 61g vents are located only about 500 m (1/3 mile) from each other, but their associated lava flows spilled into different drainages that were constructed by earlier eruptions at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. This resulted in the June 27th flow spreading northeastward on the north side of the rift zone about 22 km (13.7 mi), and the 61g flow spreading south of the rift zone to the ocean in only 11 km (6.8 mi).
    The 61g flow has erupted for 15 months thus far, with most of the lava flowing through the tube system and entering the ocean. The June 27th lava flow was active for 23 months, but the tube system was not able to supply most of the lava to the active flow fronts for the entire time. Why not?
     The inconsistent lava discharge from the June 27th vent and the longer than 15 km (10 mi) tube system on gentle ground both combined to interrupt or reduce, and eventually cut off lava supply to the flow fronts, thereby limiting the ultimate length of the flow. After the first four months, the flow
fronts stalled at a distance of about 22 km (13.7 mi) from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, less than 1 km (0.6 mi) from Highway 130. After 9 months, in March 2015, the active parts of the flow retreated to less than 8 km (5 mi) from the vent, much to the relief of Puna residents.

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Eighth Annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs, Sat, Aug 19, 7 a.m., Cooper Center in Volcano. Staggered starts for Half Marathon, 10K & 5K. Zero-mile event, keiki runs, entertainment, food & crafts follow. Register at volcanorainforestruns.com.

A ZERO MILE  fundraising event across the Volcano Rainforest Runs Finish line on Sat. Aug. 18, will bring income to Friends of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. It will also celebrate the organization's 20-year anniversary. Participants can walk, roll or crawl across the finish line and receive a  medal celebrating Friends of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park's 20 Year Anniversary.
     The fundraiser takes place at Cooper Center in Volcano Village at the race place. Donations to enter are $20 for adults, $10 for those 14 and younger and free for children in strollers. CLICK HERE TO REGISTER
     Friends will have a booth at the Rainforest Run/Zero Mile  with new merchandise for sale. We now have keiki sizes, including babies, along with 10 color choices. The booth will be open from 8 a.m - 3p.m. 

Pick up the August edition of The Ka`u Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka`u, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at www.kaucalendar.com
Recycling at Nā‘ālehu School, Sat, Aug 19, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., Nā‘ālehu School Gym. Redeem your HI-5 sorted by type; receive 5 cents per container and additional 20 cents per pound on all aluminum. Atlas Recycling donates 20 cents per pound on all aluminum redeemed to the school. 939-2413, ext. 230

Pu‘u o Lokuana, Sat, Aug 19, 9:30 – 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about formation and various uses of this grassy cinder cone and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Ka‘ū on this free, moderately difficult 0.4-mile hike to the top.

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day: Lei MakingSat, Aug 19, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Cultural practitioner and teacher Aolani Ka‘ilihou teaches the traditional art of Hawaiian lei making. Ascend Pu‘u o Lokuana and learn about the history of the Ka‘ū lands seen from the top. Kids 17 and under and their families sign up by Fri, Aug 11 at 985-6019.

Hula Performance, Sat, Aug 19, 10:30 a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Nā Kumu hula Liana Aveiro & Keikilani Curnan with Hālau Waiau. Nā Mea Hula with Loke Kamanu & ‘ohana, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., gallery porch.

Ka‘ū High School Potluck Reunion, Sunday, Aug. 20, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Everyone is invited. Music, dance, food for all graduates and their friends and families.

Bon Dance, Pahala Hongwanji, Sunday, Aug. 20, with service at 4 p.. and dancing and music at 5 p.m. Food and demonstrations.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs, Thursday, Aug. 17, 2017

Volcano Rain Forest Runners get ready with packet pick-up and late registration Friday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
at Cooper Center. The races take place on Saturday. See below. Photo from Sharon Faff
IN VIOLATION OF FIRST AMENDMENT privacy protections afforded under the Constitution is how Rep. Tulsi Gabbard characterized the Department of Justice's recent request for a search warrant for IP addresses and personal information stored on the server of a private company who helped organize protests during President Donald Trump’s inauguration. The search warrant, filed by the federal government in the D.C. Superior Court, is trying to force DreamHost to provide the DOJ with the user information for anyone who visited their site in an effort to identify anyone involved in Inauguration Day protests. 
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and the Fourth Amendment
Caucus. Photo from Tulsi Gabbard
      Said Gabbard, in a statement released tonight, “The Justice Department’s politically motivated probe to collect personal information on its own citizens exercising their legal right to express dissenting political views is nothing short of a constitutional violation and is wholly un-American. It reeks of actions that Presidents Nixon and Johnson took against Americans protesting the war in Vietnam. Our country was founded on the rule of law which protects our right to free speech and prohibits the government from violating our personal privacy with baseless warrants. These fundamental rights and protections separate our democracy from dictators around the world who seek to silence and intimidate their political opponents to maintain power. The Justice Department’s witch hunt serves as a reminder that we must take a stand to defend our constitutional rights and ensure our government is not allowed to violate our constitutional rights and civil liberties." 
     Gabbard has advocated for reforms that address the government's responsibility to protect civil liberties. She is a founding member of the Fourth Amendment Caucus and has been a champion for strengthening privacy and civil liberties protections in the digital age. She has introduced legislation to strengthen the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board  and cosponsored legislation like the Electronic Communications Privacy Amendments Act and Email Privacy Act to modernize electronic privacy laws.

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MUMPS INFECTIONS have been confirmed among students at Na`alehu School. According to a release from the state Department of Health, there is an increasing number of cases of mumps statewide. The disease has been confirmed in children and adults both vaccinated and unvaccinated.   Approximately half the cases have been in adults aged 18 years and older. Since the beginning of the year, 257 cases have been confirmed in Hawai`i, with five on the Big Island, one on Maui, 22 on Kaua`i and 229 on O`ahu.
     The Department of Health recommends the following to help prevent the spread of mumps in the community:
     Ensure family members are fully vaccinated with the MMR vaccine. According to DOH, all children should receive two doses of the MMR vaccine which protects against three diseases: measles, mumps, and rubella. The first dose is given at age 12–15 months and the second dose routinely at four to six years of age. However, due to the continued circulation of mumps in Hawai`i, DOH recommends that children between one and four years of age should receive their second dose a minimum of four weeks after the first dose.
        For adults, the health department recom-mends that all born in or after 1957, without evidence of immunity to mumps, who cannot verify previous MMR vac-cination, should receive one MMR dose. "Indi-viduals with only one documented MMR dose, are strongly encouraged to consider receiving a second MMR vaccine dose," says a DOH statement. "In general, although it is not ideal, receiving extra doses of vaccine poses no medical problem. Patients suspected or diagnosed with mumps should self-isolate and avoid going out and exposing others for nine days after onset of parotitis (swelling of the salivary glands).
     "People who have been exposed to mumps and are not vaccinated should not attend school, work or travel from day 12 through day 25 after exposure." says the DOH statement.
     Symptoms include: fever, headache, muscle aches, tiredness, loss of appetite, swollen and tender salivary glands under the ears on one or both sides.

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KUPU INTERNS WORKING WITH AMERICORPS gain a meaningful service opportunity and education that "benefits our `aina and Hawai`i's native plants and animals," said Sen. Mazie Hirono on Thursday when she met with KUPU interns and leaders. She encouraged them to "continue their good work, serving their communities through conservation."
        KUPU, an AmeriCorps program, provides young people with service learning and educational opportunities through maintaining and preserving Hawai`i’s natural resources.
        “I continue to advocate for AmeriCorps funding that supports programs like KUPU that help train Hawai`i’s workforce and provide career pathways for young conservationists,” Hirono said.
      “For the past decade, KUPU has helped develop the next generation of Hawai'i's environmental leaders,” said John Leon, Chief Executive Officer of KUPU. “AmeriCorps funding ensures that Hawai'i's youth can pursue careers in conservation and sustainability, allowing them to play a vital role in protecting Hawai'i's fragile environment. I'm honored to join with Senator Hirono and the rest of the Hawai‘i congressional delegation to support programs that help Hawai‘i's youth discover their strengths and allows them to give back to a cause greater than themselves while pursuing career pathways to propel them forward in life.” 
      Suzanne Case, chair of the state Department of Land & Natural Resource, said that “Building a bridge for Hawai`i’s future conservation workforce, the KUPU internship program trains our youth to become environmental stewards and connects them to future job opportunities at DLNR and across the state.”
Logo and t-shirt art for Volcano Rain Forest Runs is
by local artist Dietrich Varez.
      In June, Senator Hirono announced that Hawaii had received $4.2 million in AmeriCorps funding from the Corporation for National and Community Service, the federal agency for volunteering and service programs. Earlier this year, Senator Hirono cosponsored S.Res.86, a bipartisan resolution recognizing the contributions of AmeriCorps members and alumni and the significant impact their efforts have on our lands and natural resources The Senate passed this resolution on March 9, 2017, during national AmeriCorps Week.

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KA`U HIGH BEAT KEA`AU on Wednesday
night in girls volleyball at Ka`u District Gym, under Coach Josh Ortega. Ka`u JV's won with 26-24 and 25-20. Ka`u Trojans also took the varsity win with 26-24, 16-25, 25-19 and 25-20.

Volcano Rain Forest Runs Packet Pick-up & Late Registration, Fri, Aug 18, 1 – 5 p.m., Cooper Center in Volcano.

Eighth Annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs, Sat, Aug 19, 7 a.m., Cooper Center in Volcano. Staggered starts for Half Marathon, 10K & 5K. Zero-mile event, keiki runs, entertainment, food & crafts follow. Register at volcanorainforestruns.com.
Pick up the August edition of The Ka`u Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka`u, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at www.kaucalendar.com
Recycling at Nā‘ālehu School, Sat, Aug 19, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., Nā‘ālehu School Gym. Redeem your HI-5 sorted by type; receive 5 cents per container and additional 20 cents per pound on all aluminum. Atlas Recycling donates 20 cents per pound on all aluminum redeemed to the school. 939-2413, ext. 230

Pu‘u o Lokuana, Sat, Aug 19, 9:30 – 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about formation and various uses of this grassy cinder cone and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Ka‘ū on this free, moderately difficult 0.4-mile hike to the top.

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day: Lei MakingSat, Aug 19, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Cultural practitioner and teacher Aolani Ka‘ilihou teaches the traditional art of Hawaiian lei making. Ascend Pu‘u o Lokuana and learn about the history of the Ka‘ū lands seen from the top. Kids 17 and under and their families sign up by Fri, Aug 11 at 985-6019.

Hula Performance, Sat, Aug 19, 10:30 a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Nā Kumu hula Liana Aveiro & Keikilani Curnan with Hālau Waiau. Nā Mea Hula with Loke Kamanu & ‘ohana, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., gallery porch.

Ka‘ū High School Potluck Reunion, Sat, Aug 19, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Everyone is invited.


Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, Aug 16, 2017

Extreme high tides like this one reaching high into the skeleton of the old Honu`apo Pier, are expected
to continue through the weekend and the National Weather Service has issued a warning.
Photo by Ron Johnson
NINE YEARS OF WORKING ON THE KA`U COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN has led to its presentation to the County Council Planning Committee for its review before going to the full council and Mayor Harry Kim for his signature.
      County Planning Director Michael Yee told the Council Planning Committee in a presentation on Tuesday that Ka`u residents have shown a "lot of dedication, tenacity, resilience to push this forward and they had a very diverse group of folks working on this and I am very proud of the piece of work that they put forward to you."
The Ka`i Community Development Plan recommends a quarter mile
setback for development on the coast. 
     Yee told the County Council Planning Committee that he personally has a love for community engagement. Concerning the Ka`u Community Development Plan, he said, "There is a question over what's the intent and what's the implications and I understand that and we have to work in those parameters; but in the end this is the dreams and wishes of a group of folks that have really poured their heart and soul into this over many, many years. And it is our job to try to make it real for them.          "Whether or not that takes a little more work, or not, I'm not sure, but I would hope that you would take into account that there has been a lot of work from a lot folks to get to this point to present it to you today," said the Planning Director who has been learning about Ka`u since he was appointed during the current term of Mayor Harry Kim.
     Planner Ron Whitmore, who has worked on the project for nine years and is now working for the county Department of Research & Development, made the presentation. He said the Ka`u community was "incredibly involved" in the crafting of the plan.
        He explained the evolution of County of Hawai`i community planning. He said there were general plans in the past but that the General Plan in 2005 called for "a meaningful public role in planning." He said the scope involves three pillars of sustainability, covering "Protecting Natural & Cultural Resources, Strengthening Infrastructure & Services, Building a Resilient Local Economy and Directing Land Use - zoning, growth, development and design.
       Specific Regional Actions to implement goals of the General Plan are also included the the Ka`u Community Development Plan, said Whitmore.
      During the nine year process,  community Steering Committee members representing Ocean View were Patti Barry, Bob DaMate and Loren Heck; Ka`ma`oa to Waiohinu - Leina`ala Enos, Puna`lu`u - Ron Ebert, and Pahala - Simon Torres, Jr. and Marino Ramones. The non-voting member was John Cross.
      Whitmore said the plan attempts to balance three critical perspectives: "Local knowledge, in all its diversity - keep it grounded. Local planner and developer knowledge- keep it practical; and best practices - use the planner's toolbox."
      Whitmore said that to stay anchored in an open process, the approach was that "the community is more than meetings; to focus on objective analysis;  and understand that there's an element of truth in every perspective, so everyone wears a learner's hat."
       Recommendations in the CDP include a Ka`u Land Use Policy Map with Urban Growth Boundaries; a Shoreline Setback Policy and Scenic Impact Anaylsis and Mitigation."
      Whitmore showed a photo of the shoreline looking toward Kamehame - the hawskbill turtle preserve, and said " if you haven't spent much time in Ka`u, it's hard to understand how important open space, natural resources, cultural resources, and in particular the shoreline is for the people of Ka`u, for the psyche of Ka`u, for the way of life.
     "It was absolutely critical from the community's perspective that development be set back from the shoreline. For students of land use law, that's a difficult thing to do. We grappled with different ways to do it, tried not to supersede the authority of the director, the commission or the council, as the case may be, to establish those setbacks while at the same time being very clear about the need to keep structures away from the shoreline. There are very few structures on Ka`u's 80-mile shoreline that are anywhere near the shoreline. There's just a few exceptions and the community thinks it is very important for a number of cultural and natural resource management perspectives as well as just general way of life to keep it that way."
    He noted that preserving the shoreline is very much an economic issue for the people of Ka`u. He said that Steering Committee member Michelle Galimba pointed out during deliberations that "while a house near the shoreline in Ka`u provides next to zero economic benefit to the community, the open shoreline provides tremendous economic benefit, in terms of the draw for tourism, the subsistence access for people to fishing, for gathering, to name just a few. They really see this not just as a preservation strategy but as an economic development strategy," said Whitmore.
     The Ka`u Community Development Plan recommends a quarter mile (1,320 feet) development setback from the coast.
     See the presentation at www.bigislandvideonews.com. Also see http://www.hawaiicountycdp.info/kau-cdp to read the entire document and prepare comments for the County Council.

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KING TIDES ARE EXPECTED OVER THE WEEKEND, according to the National Weather Service, which issued a coastal flood warning.  “The greatest potential for coastal flooding impacts will be during the peak daily high tide, which will occur during the mid- to late-afternoon hours the next several days.”
     “Impacts may include flooding of beach areas that are normally dry, salt water inundation of typically vulnerable low-lying roads, docks, boat ramps and other coastal infrastructure. The potential for coastal flooding will diminish early next week as the peak daily tides diminish,” said the statement from NWS.

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Volcano Rain Forest Runs Packet Pick-up & Late Registration, Fri, Aug 18, 1 – 5 p.m., Cooper Center in Volcano.

Eighth Annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs, Sat, Aug 19, 7 a.m., Cooper Center in Volcano. Staggered starts for Half Marathon, 10K & 5K. Zero-mile event, keiki runs, entertainment, food & crafts follow. Register at volcanorainforestruns.com.
Pick up the August edition of The Ka`u Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka`u, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at www.kaucalendar.com


Recycling at Nā‘ālehu School, Sat, Aug 19, 9 a.m. – 1 p.m., Nā‘ālehu School Gym. Redeem your HI-5 sorted by type; receive 5 cents per container and additional 20 cents per pound on all aluminum. Atlas Recycling donates 20 cents per pound on all aluminum redeemed to the school. 939-2413, ext. 230

Pu‘u o Lokuana, Sat, Aug 19, 9:30 – 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about formation and various uses of this grassy cinder cone and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Ka‘ū on this free, moderately difficult 0.4-mile hike to the top.

Kahuku ‘Ohana Day: Lei Making, Sat, Aug 19, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Cultural practitioner and teacher Aolani Ka‘ilihou teaches the traditional art of Hawaiian lei making. Ascend Pu‘u o Lokuana and learn about the history of the Ka‘ū lands seen from the top. Kids 17 and under and their families sign up by Fri, Aug 11 at 985-6019.

Hula Performance, Sat, Aug 19, 10:30 a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Nā Kumu hula Liana Aveiro & Keikilani Curnan with Hālau Waiau. Nā Mea Hula with Loke Kamanu & ‘ohana, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., gallery porch.

Ka‘ū High School Potluck Reunion, Sat, Aug 19, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Everyone is invited.



Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017

The last haul sugar truck is often the symbol for  Ka`u Plantation Days, organized by the Ka`u
Multicultural Society.
2015 Ka`u Queen Lori-Lee Lorenzo represented Maui.
KA`U FIFTH GRADE GIRLS are invited to start registering for GEMS, Girls Exploring Math and Science. The annual all day event has been set for the  Crown Marriot King Kamehameha Kona Beach Hotel for Nov. 9. Registration deadline is  Sept. 15.
Princess Addie represented Ni`ihau.
Photo provided by Lorilee Lorenzo
     Registration forms have been sent to area schools. This event is sponsored by the American Association of University Women, Kona Branch, whose mission is to advance equity for women and girls though advocacy, education, and research.
     Registration is on a first come, first served basis, and space is limited.  Registration fee is $20 and scholarships are available. No girl will be turned away because of financial need.
    This annual day of discovery features hand-on workshops and exhibits led by local women volunteers who work in math and science- oriented careers and who show the girls how they use math, science, and technology in their daily work. The program is designed to stimulate interest and bolster the confidence of girls in these fields, as well as provide positive female role models, and may also stimulate a girl’s interest in a new career goal. Last year over 300 girls from West Hawaii attended the program, and as many as 30 girls from Ka’u have attended in previous years.
    The girls attending will receive a GEMS t-shirt, a healthy breakfast , view various hands-on exhibits prior to attending three different workshops, have lunch at the resort, and also participate in a lunchtime Zumba activity, which is always a big hit .  
2016 Pa`u Queen Teani Souza represented
Hawai`i Island. Photo provided by Lorilee Lorenzo
      Some of the workshops this year are: Underwater Adventure, Marine Science , Slime Time, Robotics, Anchialine Pools, Energy, Art and Science of Food, Animal Doctors, Dig into the Past, Hawaiian Monk Seals, Light and Reflection, Creative Computer Programming, How Rainbows Solve Mysteries , Art and Science of Dermatology, Discovering the Isle of Gems, Zumba Breaks the Mold and Body Shop. 
Retired Ka`u school teachers were honored as
they rode in the parade.
Photo provided by Gloria Camba
     Some impressions after the event from girls learned in prior years: “ We need to protect fish and animals and keep oceans clean”;” Stay fit and live longer”; “ People litter and trash is harming animals”; “Women can do stuff men can do”; ”Always follow your dream”; “We do physics everyday”; “Cooking uses math”; “Girls are awesome”; “Save money”; “How archeologists work.”
     All fifth grade girls residing in the West Hawai`i School complex in public, private, or home schooled are welcome. Sponsorship of girls by individuals or businesses will be accepted. For more information about GEMS , to sponsor a girl, or to request a registration packet, contact Cindy Armer, GEMS chairperson at cbarmer@hotmail.com or 808-896-7180. Remember GEMS registration from must be postmarked by 9-15-17.

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Princess Kailee represents O`ahu.
Photo provided by Lorilee Lorenzo






Hawai‘i International Music Festival, Wed, Aug 16, 7 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. Metropolitan Opera Soprano Amy Shoremount Obra, daughter-in-law of Lorie Obra, of Rusty’s Hawaiian Coffee, raises awareness of efforts to restore buildings to host a living heritage and education center and to curate and honor the history of Pāhala. Also performing will be violinist Also performing will be Virtuoso Violinist Eric Silberger, Esteemed Pianist Carlin Ma, Hawai`i Symphony Orchestra Cellist Sun Chang Yang, Mexican Tenor Manuel Castillo, Young Artist Mexican Soprano Sandra Aldaz Meraz, and World Renowned Argentinean Bandoneon Player JP Jofre. 
      Tickets are available at the door or at www.HIMusicFestival.com.

Kainani Kahaunaele Performs, Wed, Aug 16, 6:30 – 8 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Enjoy the mele of Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning Kainani Kahaunaele, who shares songs from her albums. Free; park entrance fees apply.

Family Reading Night, Thu, Aug 17, 5 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Aug 17, 5:30 p.m. 929-9731 or 936-7262

OVCA Board Meeting, Thu, Aug 17, 6 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033

Volcano Rain Forest Runs Packet Pick-up & Late Registration, Fri, Aug 18, 1 – 5 p.m., Cooper Center in Volcano.

Eighth Annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs, Sat, Aug 19, 7 a.m., Cooper Center in Volcano. Staggered starts for Half Marathon, 10K & 5K. Zero-mile event, keiki runs, entertainment, food & crafts follow. Register at volcanorainforestruns.com. 



Tango and classical music are among the offerings at the Hawai`i International 
Music Festival concert at Pahala Plantation House on Wednesday, Aug. 16 at 7 p.m.


Monday, August 14, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Monday, Aug. 14, 2017

Hawai`i Solar Energy Association objects to proposed tariffs on Chinese imported solar panels,
saying that 1,200 jobs of those installing them in Hawai`i would be threatened.
Photo from Hawai`i Solar Energy Association.
HAWAI`I SOLAR ENERGY ASSOCIATION sent a letter to Congress recently saying new tariffs on Chinese solar panels, if approved, could drive up prices and threaten 1,200 jobs in Hawai`i. It would also halt growth of the American solar industry, "dead in its tracks," says the letter addressed to U.S. House of Representatives member Colleen Hanabusa. It contends that  tariffs would threaten "thousands of American workers."
      The tariffs are being considered on Tuesday by the U.S. International Trade Commission.
      The letter, written by Hawai`i Solar Energy Asociation President Rick Reed, asks Hanabusa to object to a petition filed in May by a Chinese-owned U.S. solar cell manufacturer called Suniva, Inc., which filed for bankruptcy in April for its U.S. operations. To protect its U.S. operation, Suniva asks the U.S. government to levy tariffs on imported solar cells and to require minimum prices on imported solar panels. Another American based, foreign owned, bankrupt company also asked for the protection through tariffs. No U.S. owned solar manufacturer is asking for the tariffs, reports Reed.
      The majority of the jobs in solar are in the installation, rather than manufacturing of solar panels - with China already producing 80 percent of panels used worldwide. Opponents of the tariffs claim that keeping out the less expensive panels will reduce the number of jobs across the U.S. by two thirds. At the same time Congress has
passed a law reducing tax benefits for installing solar.
     Inside Climate News quotes Dan Reicher, executive director of Stanford University's Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance. "We could see a double 
whammy of higher prices and declining subsidies, which could have a pretty serious effect on U.S. solar deployment."
      A story by H.J. Mai in Pacific Business News on Monday stated that 69 members of the U.S. Congress sent letters to the International Trade Commission opposing the tariffs. It also reported: "Small-scale solar generation, which includes residential rooftop photovoltaic systems, almost doubled between 2014 and 2016, based on data from the Energy Information Administration. In Hawai`i, residential PV systems account for more than a third of renewable energy generation. A downturn, especially in the small-scale solar market, could therefore have a negative impact Hawai`i’s goal of achieving a
100 percent renewable portfolio standard by 2045."
     The current number of people employed statewide in the solar industry is about 3,195, reports Pacific Business News. Also see Hawai`i Solar Energy Association.
TODAY, MONDAY, IS THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT and one in six people in Hawai`i depend on Social Security,  U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa reminded the public in a statement.
Hanabusa urges protection of the Social Security Act.
Image from Rep. Colleen Hanabusa
     She said that Social Security has "become the very foundation for retirement and provides a crucial lifeline for many seniors and vulnerable Americans." However, "for many of the recipients, they end up needing additional assistance because their benefits do not allow for them to continue taking care of daily expenses and retire comfortably."
     Hanabusa said she is concerned about a move to privatize Social Security, raise the retirement age and cut benefits earned through years of work. "The peole of Hawai1i have worked hard to pay into Social Security and they deserve to retire knowing the benefits they have earned will be there."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.


Pick up the August edition of The Ka`u Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka`u, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at www.kaucalendar.com
Statehood Flag Craft, Wed, Aug 16, 3:30 – 5 p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Grades K – 8 register Aug 7 – 15. 928-0312

Hawai‘i International Music Festival, Wed, Aug 16, 7 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. Metropolitan Opera Soprano Amy Shoremount Obra, daughter-in-law of Lorie Obra, of Rusty’s Hawaiian Coffee, raises awareness of efforts to restore buildings to host a living heritage and education center and to curate and honor the history of Pāhala. 
      Also performing will be Virtuoso Violinist Eric Silberger, Esteemed Pianist Carlin Ma, Hawai`i Symphony Orchestra Cellist Sun Chang Yang, Mexican Tenor Manuel Castillo, Young Artist Mexican Soprano Sandra Aldaz Meraz, and World Renowned Argentinean Bandoneon Player JP Jofre. 

Kainani Kahaunaele Performs, Wed, Aug 16, 6:30 – 8 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Enjoy the mele of Nā Hōkū Hanohano award-winning Kainani Kahaunaele, who shares songs from her albums. Free; park entrance fees apply.


Family Reading Night
, Thu, Aug 17, 5 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Aug 17, 5:30 p.m. 929-9731 or 936-7262

OVCA Board Meeting, Thu, Aug 17, 6 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033

Volcano Rain Forest Runs Packet Pick-up & Late Registration, Fri, Aug 18, 1 – 5 p.m., Cooper Center in Volcano.

Eighth Annual Volcano Rain Forest Runs, Sat, Aug 19, 7 a.m., Cooper Center in Volcano. Staggered starts for Half Marathon, 10K & 5K. Zero-mile event, keiki runs, entertainment, food & crafts follow. Register at volcanorainforestruns.com.

Tango and classical music are among the offerings at the Hawai`i International 
Music Festival concert at Pahala Plantation House on Wednesday, Aug. 16 at 7 p.m.