About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, December 18, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Monday, December 18, 2017

Humpback whale season in Hawai‘i has begun. The public is invited to sign up for upcoming whale count events at sanctuaryoceancount.org after the majority of humpback whales are expected to arrive in January.
Photo from N.O.A.A.
HAWAI‘I’S HUMPBACK SEASON IS UNDERWAY. N.O.A.A.'s Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary reminds the public that athough the number may vary from year to year, scientists estimate that as many as 12,000 humpback whales migrate from their feeding grounds off Alaska to breed, calve and nurse their young in Hawai‘i's warm waters. While some whales have already arrived, the majority will be in Hawai‘i between January and March.
According to N.O.A.A. as many as 12,000 humpback whales migrate from
Alaska to Hawai‘i. Photo from N.O.A.A. 
     Hawai‘i's iconic humpback whales are protected by state and federal agencies. Approaching humpback whales when on or in the water within 100 yards or within 1,000 feet by air is illegal.
     "Collisions between whales and vessels occur annually, presenting serious risks to boaters as well as the whales," said Edward Lyman, large whale entanglement response coordinator for the sanctuary. "Whale calves are particularly vulnerable because they are difficult to see and surface more often."
     Humpbacks can also get entangled in fishing gear, which can result in starvation, physical trauma and infections, and may contribute to vessel strikes since the animals are less mobile.
A humpback whale entangled in a discarded fishing net swims near the
surface, making it more vulnerable to vessel strikes. Photo from N.O.A.A.
     The Hawaiian Islands Large Whale Entanglement Response Network, a community-based effort led by the sanctuary, supports large whale response efforts statewide. The network involves many state and federal agencies, including Hawai‘i's Department of Land and Natural Resources, N.O.A.A. Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office and the U.S. Coast Guard, as well as private non-governmental organizations, fishermen, researchers and other individuals.
     Those who see an injured or entangled marine mammal are urged to keep a safe and legal distance and call N.O.A.A.'s Marine Mammal Stranding and Entanglement Hotline at 888-256-9840 or the U.S. Coast Guard on VHF channel 16 immediately. Those reporting a vessel coming too close to a whale, call the N.O.A.A. Fisheries Enforcement Hotline at 800-853-1964 or email respectwildlife@noaa.gov. Additional guidelines and safety tips can be found at: hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov/res/ocean_etiquette.html.
 Humpback whales are known to feed in Alaska and then migrate to
 Hawaiian waters to breed, calve and nurse their young.
Photo by N.O.A.A.
     Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary is administered by a partnership of N.O.A.A.'s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and the State of Hawai‘i through the Department of Land and Natural Resources. The sanctuary works to protect humpback whales and their habitat through research, education, conservation and stewardship. Those interested can join on Facebook.
     N.O.A.A.'s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. N.O.A.A. offers Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social media channels.

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MONEY FOR INFRASTRUCTURE, HOUSING AND EDUCATION are in Monday's request by Gov. David Ige who unveiled his Supplemental Budget proposal, which will be taken up by the 2018 session of the Hawai‘i Legislature beginning in January. His statement asks "the State Legislature to continue supporting programs that tackle many of the challenges our communities face."
When viewing humpback whales, unless in possession of a special
government issued permit, everyone is required to keep a distance of at
least 100 yards when on or in the water.
Photo from N.O.A.A.
     Said Ige, “Last year’s biennium budget invested in programs that have helped us address our state’s biggest problems. Evidence shows that we've made progress in many of our high priority areas, while being smart about managing taxpayer dollars.”
    The governor reported that housing production is up. Homelessness is down nearly 9 percent across the state. "Our classrooms are cooler. Hawai‘i is a recognized national and international leader in sustainability and clean energy. And Moody’s Analytics reports that Hawai‘i is one of only 16 states with enough cash reserves to weather the 'stress test' of another recession."
     The governor's Fiscal 2019 amendments total $85.5 million – an increase of 0.6 percent over F.Y. 19 operating appropriations in the biennium budget (all revenue sources).
     He said that the state’s improved G.O. bond ratings and lower interest rates make it a favorable time to invest in the state’s infrastructure. "These capital projects have broad economic impact, supporting about 14,000 jobs of which 5,520 will be in the construction industry," said Ige.
Those who see an injured or entangled marine mammal are urged to keep a
safe distance and call N.O.A.A.'s Marine Mammal Stranding and
Entanglement Hotline or U.S. Coast Guard immediately.
Photo from N.O.A.A.
     EDUCATION: "The future begins with investing in education and improving school facilities to make a difference for generations of students," said the governor, who listed budget highlights for schools and colleges: $2.8 million for the Hawai‘i Keiki program that provides school-based health services; $1 million for the Early College High School initiative; $700,000 for the Hawai‘i Promise Scholarship Program; $15 million for full-time positions and $1.2 million to support underserved regions and populations at U.H. Mānoa and the community colleges; $150 million in capital improvement projects to improve public school facilities; and $120 million in total CIP for the University of Hawai‘i.
     HOUSING: "We are asking for a cash infusion of more than $100 million," announced Ige. This includes a $25 million C.I.P. for the Dwelling Unit Revolving Fund statewide and $50 million C.I.P. for the Rental Housing Revolving Fund statewide. Ige said that the Department of Hawaiian Homelands is helping in the effort to produce more housing. The governor is also asking for a $10 million C.I.P. for repairs and maintenance of existing infrastructure and a $15 million C.I.P. for lot development.
     “Our efforts are paying off. Since I’ve been in office, 5,300 units have been completed, 40 percent of them affordable. There are another 1,400 under construction and 4,500 units in the planning stages. Let’s build on our momentum,” Ige said. 
Humpback whale calves are particularly vulnerable to vessel strikes because
they are difficult to see and surface more often than adults.
Photo from N.O.A.A.
     HOMELESSNESS: The governor is asking for $15 million for Housing First, Rapid Re-Housing, housing subsidies, homeless outreach services, and other homeless initiatives (this includes $5 million for property storage and trash/debris removal) $800,000 for homeless outreach and counseling services for chronically homeless persons experiencing severe substance use disorders.
     To maintain safety in public areas, Ige is asking for eight full time equivalent permanent positions and $419,302 for deputy sheriffs positions to support homeless and illegal camping operations. He is also requesting $300,000 for staff time and equipment to support homelessness policy reinforcement statewide for the Department of Land and Natural Resources.
     “For the first time in eight years, there are fewer homeless people across the state – a decline of nearly nine percent. We hope the State Legislature continues to support our efforts to put more families in homes and drastically reduce our homeless population,” Ige said.
     FOR A SUSTAINABLE HAWAI‘I: the governor is asking for $5 million for cash infusion for the Agricultural Loan Revolving Fund; $2.8 million for agricultural infrastructure improvements; $8.3 million for watershed protection; $7 million for land acquisition for forest reserve expansion on O‘ahu and Maui; $8.7 million for state parks infrastructure and improvements.
    “We are asking for this funding to continue support of the initiatives announced at last year’s I.U.C.N. World Conservation Congress – protecting our natural resources, doubling local food production, and growing our economy,” said Ige. 
Humpback whales are protected by state and federal agencies. Photo from N.O.A.A.
     OTHER HIGHLIGHTS include $4.5 million for Kūpuna Care and Caregivers programs; $69 million in revenue bonds for Kona International Airport permanent federal inspection station; and $16.5 million C.I.P. for the Tax System Modernization project.
    “We see progress on complex issues, and this budget aligns our values and programs with those actions we know will make a difference. My administration remains focused on doing things the right way to achieve the best outcomes for the State of Hawai‘i,” said the governor.
     See his supplemental budget request at budget.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/Budget-in-Brief-FY-19-BIB.2eM.pdf.

When approaching humpback whales, unless in possession of a special
government issued permit, everyone is required to keep a distance of at
least 1,000 feet while in the air.
Photo from N.O.A.A.
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CATHERINE CRUZ will soon be on the radio waves in Ka‘ū on H.P.R.1 at 89.1FM. The veteran newswoman is Hawai‘i Public Radio's newest staff member. Cruz will be co-host of H.P.R.'s statewide weekday talk program The Conversation at 11 a.m. along with Chris Vandercook. She makes her first appearance on the show this Tuesday, Dec. 19. Cruz will also do some reporting for H.P.R. News.
     "We are delighted to welcome one of the strongest journalists in the state to our growing newsroom," said H.P.R. News Director Bill Dorman. "We look forward to Catherine's continuing contributions to the community."
     Cruz has been a television reporter in Hawai‘i since 1983 and has won a number of awards and respect from a statewide audience. She spent more than 30 years at K.I.T.V., covering beats from government to education and health.
Catherine Cruz will be on 89.1FM in Ka‘ū, Hawai‘i Public
Radio at 11 a.m. daily, starting Tuesday. The show is
called The ConversationPhoto from H.P.R.
     Originally from Guam, Cruz is also a co-founder and former Board member and programming chair of Pacific Islanders in Communication. The Hawaiʻi-based organization is primarily funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, with a mission to bring stories "to support, advance, and develop Pacific Island media content and talent that results in a deeper understanding of Pacific Island history, culture, and contemporary challenges." Since its founding in 1991, P.I.C. has grown a significant pool of video producers from Hawai‘i, Guam and Samoa, many who have provided culturally-diverse programs to P.B.S.
     Cruz is a graduate of San Francisco State University. She holds a degree in Broadcast Journalism.
     H.P.R. currently has a news and talk staff of 12, plus three contributing reporters from the Neighbor Islands.

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A CHRISTMAS CONCERT AT OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER will be Friday, Dec. 22, from 7:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. A young Spanish choir form San Carlos, California will perform. Also on the program are popular Christmas carols, a skit and hula, followed by refreshments. Santa Claus will appear. Call Ron Gall at Ocean View Community Association, 939-7033, or email ovcahawaii@gmail.com.

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ST. JUDE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH ANNOUNCES A CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICE for all on Sunday, Dec. 24, at 5 p.m. The schedule includes carols and bells at 5 p.m., main service at 6:15 p.m., with a potluck after. For more details, visit stjudeshawaii.org or call 939-7000.

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See public Ka‘ū events, meetings entertainment at 
 kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/decemberevents.html
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/decembercommunity.html.
December print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Girls Basketball: Wednesday, Dec. 20, Waiakea @ Ka‘ū.

Boys Soccer: Wednesday, Dec. 20, Honoka‘a.

Boys Basketball: Tuesday, Dec. 19, Hilo @ Ka‘ū.

Swimming: Saturday, Dec. 23, @ Hilo.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HOLIDAY FAVORITES IS PERFORMED BY THE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA OF KONA on Tuesday, Dec. 19, starting at 7 p.m. at the Sheraton Kona Resort & Spa.
     The orchestra, under the direction of Bernaldo Evangalista, will present Christmas at the Movies, Sleigh Ride, Carol of the Bells, Santa at the Symphony, Festive Sounds of Hanukah, Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy and many more. Ursula Vietze is the orchestras concert master. Among those performing are Susan McGovern from Volcano on viola and Ocean View residents Arlene Arai on trumpet, Steve Moon on trumpet, Michael Cripps on cello and Peter Bosted on oboe.
     Tickets are $10/$20. Free entry is given to those under 18 years old. Purchase tickets at the door starting at 6 p.m. or visit chamberorchestraofkona.com/concerts.html.
     Beer, wine and champagne are served before the concert and during the break. Validated parking on the Sheraton's grounds.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8, FOR A MINI GINGERBREAD HOUSE craft class that has been announced for Wednesday, Dec. 20, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., at Pāhala Community Center. Register until Tuesday, Dec. 19. For more, call Nona Makuakāne or Elijah Navarro at 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETS Wednesday, Dec. 20, from noon to 1 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY COUNCIL MEETS Wednesday, Dec. 20. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. See agendas and more at hawaiicounty.gov.

HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK HOST A FREE CONCERT featuring award-winning musical artist Ken Makuakāne on Wednesday, Dec. 20, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium. Makuakāne has won 15 Nā Hōkū Hanohano Awards, the Nā Hōkū Hanohano Lifetime Achievement Award, and six Big Island Music Awards. Park entrance fees apply.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA‘Ū meets Thursday, Dec. 21, at 6:30 p.m. at United Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. For more, call Pres. Berkley Yoshida at 747-0197.

MAKE LEI WITH TROPICAL AG FARMER KAIPO AHCHONG at Aloha Friday, Dec. 22, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Volcano Art Center. AhChong's experience marries the science of agriculture with Hawaiian lei and hula traditions. For more visit volcanoartcenter.org or call 967-7565.

A CHRISTMAS CONCERT AT OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER will be held on Friday, Dec. 22. Sponsored by Lamb of God Baptist Church, it begins at 7 p.m. The event is free to all and highlights include refreshments and gifts for children in attendance.

VOLUNTEER WITH HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK to help remove invasive non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in at two remaining Stewardship at the Park events that take place this December. The upcoming event is Saturday, Dec. 23, with the event also taking place Dec. 30. Volunteers should meet leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 8:45 a.m. Free; park entrance fees apply. Fore more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

JOIN A GUIDED HIKE ALONG THE PALM TRAIL in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Saturday, Dec. 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
     Palm Trail is a moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traversing scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures.
     For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

REGISTER BY SUNDAY, DEC. 31, FOR THE 2018 MASTER GARDENER VOLUNTEER TRAINING PROGRAM which begins Saturday, Jan. 23, and continues for 13 weeks. The program is open to Ka‘ū applicants through the U.H. Cooperative Extension Office.
     Classes are held at The Kona Cooperative Extension Service office in Kainaliu, with field trips and workshops in the area. The next program will be held for three hours every Tuesday morning through April 17. Classes will be involved with current Master Gardener projects and will include hands-on orientation to the Helpline and Outreach programs.
     Apply online by googling West Hawai‘i Master Gardeners. For more information, call the UH Cooperative Ext. Office at 322-4884.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION OFFERS EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.

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