About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, November 30, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Sunday, Nov. 30, 2014

Lanterns with their messages for those who have passed fill a pond at Punalu`u yesterday at sunset. Photo by Julia Neal
HURRICANE SEASON ENDS IN KA`U today, leaving months of threats, damage and heavy weather events. The eye of Iselle came ashore at the Kamahame hawksbill turtle preserve at 2:30 a.m. on Aug. 8. The power of Iselle’s leading edge dashed Puna, then circled back on Ka`u, slamming Wood Valley as mauka-makai winds laid down thousands of macadamia and coffee trees, destroyed a bridge on Wood Valley Road and broke huge albizia, silver oak and eucalyptus trees onto roads. At least one tree fell on a resident’s car. Wood Valley residents, cut off from Pahala, reported deafening thunder and lightning. Wood Valley roads were impassable for days, and residents lost power and water. Shelters opened in Pahala, and the county delivered water to farms and homesteads. Electricity was restored nearly a week later.
Hurricane Ana created spectacular sites as streams fell over cliffs
between Pahala and Na`alehu. Photo by Julia Neal
      Beach parks reopened after a day of caution. Schools, medical clinics, community centers, banks and credit unions were closed as county and state road crews cleaned up remnants of trees and debris and as Hawaiian Electric Light Co. attempted to restore electricity.
      Hwy 11 reopened Friday evening after floodwaters receded at low-lying Kawa between Punalu`u and Honu`apo. The detour used for most of the day was the old sugar cane haul road between Na`alehu and Pahala along the mountainside. One Pahala resident described it as somewhat daunting with gorges, waterfalls and new waterways cut by Iselle, but also incredibly beautiful.
      Following Iselle was powerful Hurricane Julio, which passed north of the state. Before Iselle, Genevieve threatened the islands but ended up staying to the south as she moved northwest.
      After forming in the central Pacific, Tropical Storm Ana gained strength and became a category-one hurricane as it approached Hawai`i Island south of South Point Friday, Oct. 17. While spared of strong winds due to the center of the storm being about 115 miles from South Point, Ka`u got pounded with rain for hours.
Ka`u took a direct hit from Tropical Storm Iselle as she came ashore.
Image from Weather Underground
      The constant downpours flooded Hwy 11 in the Kawa area, filled streams – some to overflowing – and created waterfalls in the mountains above Hwy 11 and in Wood Valley. The falls are so intermittent that some tumble without names. One resident said one of the waterfalls was Kawaileleonuuanu, and another identified one as Hilea.
      Wood Valley residents were once again cut off when water covered the road at the Kapapala Ranch intersection. A tree branch on Center Road fell across electric lines, taking out power to some homes in the valley.
      Aikane Plantation Coffee Farm on Ka`alaiki Road reported 5.5 inches of rain. “Thank God for no wind,” said owner Merle Becker. “Trees are heavy with cherries and a little bent over from all the rain, but we got through it.”
      On Friday night a rain gauge at Kapapala Ranch showed rain falling at two to three inches per hour as bands or precipitation from the storm reached the slopes of Mauna Loa, with heaviest amounts from Volcano to Pahala and Wood Valley. National Weather Service reported that Kapapala recorded 7.5 inches in a 24-hour period.
      Legend was that a hurricane would never come on shore on the Big Island, the big mountains pushing them away and spinning them off to places like Kaua`i, which has seen the most hurricane devastation in the past half century. Hurricane Flossie in 2007 seemed to prove the point. She hung off the cliffs of Ka Lae and spun herself out, never hopping up onto the island. Iselle, however, once a category four, blew straight ashore on the Big Island, slightly weakening from a hurricane to a tropical storm just before landfall.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

Gov. Neil Abercrombie participated in groundbreaking for Ka`u's Gym & Shelter
alongside Ka`u High School students. Photo by Julia Neal
TODAY IS GOV. NEIL ABERCROMBIE’S last day on the job. Gov.-elect David Ige takes over as Hawai`i’s highest elected official tomorrow. 
      During a confirmation ceremony on the steps of Pahala Plantation House in December 2010, Abercrombie said he knew from early in his campaign when he stood on those same steps that change was coming. “I am merely a catalyst,” he said. “It’s nothing – I’m a bridge, I’m a means - a vehicle,” stated the governor.
     He said we all have in our hearts the vision of Pupukahi Kehola Moa: “United we will move forward for Hawai`i Nei. That is what we are going to do, starting here today in Ka`u,” he said.
     “The duty of the kia`aina is to protect Hawai`i,” said Abercrombie. He called his visit to Pahala “a happy day. Yes. There are tears in my eyes. I can’t help it. I am so grateful,” he said, stating that for the first time in his life he understands in his na`ao (his gut) what the word humble is supposed to mean. “Every breath I take will be for Hawai`i. Everything we do together will be for Hawai`i and for each other. Lokahi. All will be pono,” he promised.
     “Everything will blossom in Ka`u. All of the hopes and dreams of Ka`u are going to come to fruition,” he promised. “We are going to make it happen,” he said.
Russell Kokubun, Dwight Takamine, Gov. Neil Abercrombie and former Lt. Gov.
Brian Schatz at Pahala Plantation House in December 2010.
Photo by Julia Neal
      “All of us in the canoe, paddling together, to reach the shore…. We will not let you down: Imua Hawai`i, Imua Ka`u,” he proclaimed.
      Abercrombie worked to get the Ka`u Gym & Shelter funded and built. When he found out about the groundbreaking being scheduled, he said he thought of it as “no big deal,” meaning that, “I didn’t give a second thought to getting up at 4:30 a.m. this morning” to fly from O`ahu and come to Ka`u” for the important event. This is the beginning of Hawai`i’s future.”
      Following his mandate of not having an O`ahu-centric cabinet, Abercrombie chose Volcano resident Russell Kokubun to lead the state Department of Agriculture. He was followed by Hilo Native Scott Enright becoming chair of the Board of Ag when Kokubun left.
      Both Kokubun and Enright worked on funding to restore old plantation water tunnel systems in Ka`u for a new use – irrigation for ag. They were formerly used for transporting cane down flumes to the mills.
      Abercrombie appointed the late Bob Herkes to Hawai`i Tourism Authority’s board of directors after legislative district boundaries changed and Herkes lost the Senate election to Russell Ruderman, of Puna.
      New buildings for Volcano School of Arts & Sciences are a go after Abercrombie released $618,000 to be used for planning, architectural, permitting and engineering fees for construction of 15 new classrooms, a new restroom and a multi-purpose building on the old Keakealani Outdoor Education Center campus on Haunani Road in Volcano Village. The school has a 60-year lease from the Department of Education.
Ella Louis remembers her late husband Ralph.
Photo by Julia Neal
      Abercrombie appointed Na`alehu resident Richard Creagan to the state House of Representatives following the resignation of Rep. Denny Coffman. “Richard’s diverse experience as a physician, researcher, farmer, Peace Corps volunteer and educator will contribute greatly to his service to the people of Hawai`i,” Abercrombie said.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

FLOATING LANTERNS SET SAIL on Punalu`u shoreline yesterday at dusk. Decorated with art and messages, the rafts and their candles carried thoughts for loved ones who passed away. Tiny boys remembering their late father and a daughter remembering a mom who lived nearly a century were among those who participated in a ceremony sponsored by Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, its founder Jessie Marques and its president Donna Kekoa. Money raised from donations for the floating lantern ceremony will go to nursing scholarships, said Marques.
      KRHCAI’s stated purpose “is to support and promote community empowerment, capacity building, collaborative partnerships and a healthy community by focusing on Health, Education, Research Opportunities and Economic Sustainability.”
      Participants at the ceremony received dinner and tools to decorate their floating lanterns. The ceremony began at Punalu`u in 2011, and plans are to continue next year. Participants represented the hearts of Ka`u from every cultural background. Music and praise came from Demetrius Oliveira, Keoki Kahumoku and friends.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI’S annual sale and tour of studios continues today until 4 p.m. Maps are distributed at Volcano stores, and shoppers can go from artist home to artist home in Volcano Village.

Jessie Marques, left, started the Floating Lantern Ceremony
at Punalu`u in 2011. Photo by Julia Neal
A CRECHE FESTIVAL with more than 100 nativity scenes from around the world continues from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. today at Na`alehu Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. The Ka`u Ward hosts the second annual islandwide event. Along with the crèche display, the event features live music performed by local musicians and choir and activities for children. Visitors are welcome to the free holiday festival. For more information, call ‪‪808-895-0491‬‬. 

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED AS MAILE MEDEIROS DAVID gets sworn in to represent Ka`u, Volcano and South Kona on Hawai`i County Council tomorrow at noon at Ah Fook Chinen Civic Auditorium in Hilo. Mayor Billy Kenoi is keynote speaker.

KA`U CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL MEETING & DINNER is Thursday, Dec. 4 at Gilligan’s Restaurant in Discovery Harbour at 6 p.m. Dinner is $15 a person for pizza or spaghetti, salad and dessert. Beverages include beer, wine or soda. Money will be collected at the door.
      The public is invited to learn more about the Chamber, which publishes The Directory for Ka`u, provides scholarships for students from Ka`u, hosts the annual art contest and selection for The Directory cover at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na`alehu and assists in funding Ka`u Food Pantry. Memberships with a listing in The Directory are $35 and will be accepted at the meeting.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.











Saturday, November 29, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs, Saturday, Nov. 29, 2014

Ka`u Gym & Shelter is one of the largest gyms connected with a public school in the state, with more than 22,000 square feet of
 hardwood playing floor and designed to withstand a category three hurricane. Photo by Julia Neal
THE NEW KA`U GYMNASIUM & SHELTER is gaining the reputation for being one, if not the largest gyms in the state that is connected with a public school. The 42,000 square-foot facility will be operated by the County of Hawai`i for Ka`u High School and the intermediate and elementary schools on the campus in Pahala.
     Specialists are installing some 22,000 feet of maple for the hardwood gymnasium floor, the roofing is nearing completion and the plastered exterior taking on its final beige coloring with green roof and trim. The facility, which will also serve as a disaster shelter, drawing $16.7 million in state and federal funding, has been hardened by filling all of the masonry blocks rather than leaving many of them hollow. It is designed to withstand a category three hurricane. While the new gym and activities rooms will be able to hold more than 1,900 people as a regional disaster shelter, two of the activities rooms, holding a maximum of 317 people will have vog filtration and one of them, holding 192 people will be air-conditioned, according to the plans for the facility.
Gold shovels broke ground on Oct. 3, 2012 for the Ka`u Gym & Shelter.
Photo by Julia Neal
     Groundbreaking was held Oct. 3, 2012, with Gov. Neil Abercrombie and other state and county officials on hand, including the late Bob Herkes who served for many years representing Ka`u and Volcano in the Hawai`i State Legislature. The County Council and county administration are considering naming the shelter for Herkes, who lobbied for the gym and many health related initiatives in Ka`u. The  gym is slated to be named for former principal Laurence Capellas, who was known for starting many of the athletic programs in Ka`u, from eight-man football to building the swimming pool.
     Kamehameha School volleyball coach and former County Council member Guy Enriques, along with Principal Sharon Beck, lobbied for the new gym during his council term. He said yesterday that he looks forward to the gym’s completion and plans to help organize volleyball tournaments to draw athletes to Ka`u from around the island, state and beyond. A possible economic contributor to Ka`u’s economy, the gym will seat some 1,000 people and will be set up to be available for concerts, festivals and other activities. It will also expand and improve the ability for the school’s athletic department to host games on regulation size playing courts. Its size will accommodate multiple courts for basketball, volleyball and other sports, while the current gym, built in the 1930s will remain available for play.

Artist studios in Volcano Village are open today and tomorrow from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
TODAY IS SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY, a time promoted around the country as the alternative and addition to yesterday’s busy Black Friday. Small Business Saturday focuses on visiting and supporting local shops and getting to know the owners.      One event today, and continuing tomorrow is the Volcano Village Artists Hui’s annual sale and tour of studios. Maps are distributed at Volcano stores and shoppers can go from artist home to artist home in Volcano Village. Hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. today and tomorrow. 
     Participating artists are:  Eric Wold with high fired functional pottery, stoneware and porcelain jewelry; Pam Barton with fiber work; Zeke Israel with raku, jewelry and cards; Randy Sutton with raku; Norman Carby with jewelry, giclee prints and cards; Ira Ono with fine arts and gifts; Elizabeth Miller with metal repousse', prints, paintings and sculpture; Tim Freeman with pit-fired volcano landscape vessels; Margaret Barnaby with woodblock prints; Lisa  Louise Adams with quilts, paintings, pottery and books; Mike and Misato Mortara with hand blown art glass; Nash Adams-Pruitt with lampworked glass and ceramics; Mary Goodrich with photographs; Cynee Gillette-Wenner with ethnic textiles clothing and accessories; Scott Mitchell with antique, ethnic and contemporary jewelry; Emily Herb with pottery and sculptural clay vessels and Debra Serrao with paintings, prints and cards.

COUNCIL WOMAN ELECT MAILE MEDEIROS DAVID will be sworn in to represent Ka`u, Volcano and South Kona on Monday at noon in Hilo at the Ah Fook Chinen Civic Auditorium. Mayor Billy Kenoi will be keynote speaker. The public is invited. David grew up in a South Kona coffee growing family and said she will visit with coffee farmers in Ka`u to discuss their future after she takes office next week. She has worked on land preservation along the coast in Kona, helping with the establishment of beach parks and protection of fishponds and other native Hawaiian cultural sites.

The floating lantern ceremony takes place today at Punalu`u from
3 p.m. to 6 p.m. Photo by Julia Neal
THE FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY to remember loved ones who have passed away is from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. today at Punalu`u Beach Park. The public is invited to decorate floating lanterns that are released into the waters of Punalu`u. Meet at the Punalu`u Beach Park pavilions. The ceremony has been sponsored by  Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, Inc. since 2011.

A CRECHE FESTIVAL with more than 100 nativity scenes from around the world, opens its doors for everyone today from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. and also on Sunday at the Na`alehu Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints. The Ka`u Ward hosts this second annual islandwide event at the Mormon Church at 95-5682 Mamalahoa Hwy. The crèche festival also offers live instrumental and choir music and activities for children. For more information, call ‪895-0491‬‬.

Hana Hou Christmas with a sitting with Santa is this
Thursday in Na`alehu. Photo by Tamryn Fyvie
THE ANNUAL HANA HOU KEIKI CHRISTMAS is Wednesday, Dec. 10 at Hana Hou restaurant in Na`alehu. The annual event, sponsored by Drake and Patty Fujimoto with volunteers from O Ka`u Kakou and donations from many businesses and community members, features a visit with Santa, a feast for all and gifts for the keiki. It begins at 4 p.m.

THE KA`U CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL MEETING & DINNER is next Thursday, Dec. 4 at Gilligan’s Restaurant in Discovery Harbour at 6 p.m. Dinner is $15 a person for pizza or spaghetti, salad and dessert. Beverages include beer, wine or soda. Money will be collected at the door. The public is invited to learn more abut The Chamber, which publishes The Directory for Ka‘u, provides scholarships for students from Ka‘u, hosts the annual art contest and selection for The Directory cover at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na‘alehu, and assists in funding Ka‘u Food Pantry. Memberships with a listing in The Directory are $35 and will be accepted at the meeting. 

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY with unique holiday wreaths for sale at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park continues through Sunday, Jan. 4 . Handmade ornaments by local artists, artist demonstrations, book signings are features. See volcanoartcenter.org.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

















































Friday, November 28, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Friday, Nov. 28, 2014

Colorful kabocha grown on the hillsides of Ka`u at farms and family gardens. Photos by Julia Neal
     HAWAI`I FARMERS UNION, which has a new Ka`u Chapter, sent out a Thanksgiving message yesterday from its president describing a movement with leaders who have “spoken and stood up for Aloha `Aina and Malama `Aina in their representation of ecological practices in growing agricultue here in Hawai`i.” Farmers Union President Vince Mina writes that the eight chapters statewide focus on regular membership meetings clebrating “the growing, harvesting and preparation of locally produced food, coupled with legislative, educational and collaborative initiatives, with an intention to support an abundant and resilient agricultural system here in Hawai`i Nei."
     Mina writes that  Farmers Union Vice President and legislative chair Simon Russell “has been building with our legislators to educate and advocate for infrastructural support for existing and new family farmers to be able to produce a consistent food supply for our islands."
Popcorn from a Ka`u farm above Pahala.
     Mina also states that “Since our values align with ecological, restorative and regenerative practices in growing our agricultural future, we must also grow our organization in order to be recognized as a viable farming organization as bills and resolutions go through the legislative process." He also points to Farmers Union members' involvement in a food summit at the 2015 Hawai`i State Legislature on Jan 5.

"FARMERS CAN BE RELATIVELY WEALTHY IN HAWAI`I," writes Simon Russell, Vice President and Legislative Chair for Hawai`i Farmers Union United. The opinion piece was carried in Civil Beat earlier this week. It states:
     “Prior to the Great Mahele and the abolition of the ancient Kapu system (a very effective land use regime), family farming was the only economy in Hawai`i. People lived on the land, and they lived off the land. Some of us would like a return to that concept, and in that process, build a food secure Hawai`i.
     "We as a society should take the wisdom of the ancestors from this special place many of us call home, and use it to our advantage. The ahupua’a and aha moku systems worked to feed the population, and today, one does not have to look too hard to see Hawai`i imports 50 percent of the kalo we consume.
Peppers, from yellow to orange and red.
   “Consider, dear reader, what that says about the priorities of our political establishment. One half of one percent of our agriculture production (measured in dollars) is in kalo (Taro) production. According to the Taro Task Force there are about 600 acres of Kalo production in Hawai`i including subsistence and commercial production as well as at cultural sites. In 1880 there were around 30,000 acres of kalo production. Cost of living, and availability of land and water are the primary cause of this sad paradigm. We can do better, and we will.
     ‘“The rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer’ has never applied to society at large as it does today. Farming is considered a loss leader across the state in many agri-tourism business models. This need not be the case, with some political leadership and hard work; the family farmer can have a prosperous future in our beautiful island chain.
     “Let’s take a brief look at the Webster’s definition of wealth: 'A large amount of money and possessions [or]: the value of all the property, possessions, and money that someone or something has.'
     “To me that is a shallow definition, as the cleanliness of the environment has a component of wealth in it, the way you feel when you wake up in the morning (Your health and vitality) have intrinsic wealth factors, and of course your ability to care for and house your family also does.
     “But what about income thresholds? Are they a true measurement of a person’s wealth? In this writer’s opinion, the answer is no.
     “Humans need to redefine what the meaning of wealth is, if we would like a future we all can live with. Stuff does not equal wealth. If a person is very contented, loves where they live, has no debt and is able to care for their family in every material sense of the word, then I ask you, dear reader, do you think that person to be relatively wealthy?
     “What I propose is to generate a statewide consensus in support of agriculturalists living on the land, rent free and debt free, being empowered to grow the food Hawai`i needs grown.
     “As a farmer, I can say that the concept of relative wealth intrigues me, and believe that this idea should be explored by society at large. Measuring wealth in U.S. dollars is not working out so far.
     “Hawai`i should undergo a race to the moon type support for local agriculture (think back to the John F. Kennedy administration), that keeps as much of its capital in the Hawai`i economy as possible. It should not be overly subsidized (like commodity crops are today), as that is subject to failure in the long-term, but it should be supported by public and private sector entities in a coordinated and well considered way. 
Vine ripened tomatoes grown in Ka`u.
     “Agriculture lands have a recent history of regulatory abuse in Hawai`i, so regulators need all the staff they can get to prevent known and obvious abuse, and maintain the credibility of the farmers that will feed us when we give them the tools to avoid the pitfalls that are preventing this economic sector from realizing its full potential today.
    “What I propose is to generate a statewide consensus in support of agriculturalists living on the land, rent free and debt free, being empowered to grow the food Hawaii needs grown. What if a farmer could lease a piece of land for free, live on it, have all of the organic matter they needed, as well as spend minor amounts of cash (>$1,000/year) on biological farming inputs, and share a facility to process and distribute the output? How many people in the state would commit to living in this way, sort of like the old ahupua’a system, but with a 21st century twist? Inquiring minds want to know. In essence, those ideas are at the core of the Hawai`i Farmers Union United legislative package for 2015.
     “With adequate public and private support our fragile agriculture sector can blossom when it is asked to support institutional consumers, i.e. military, schools, hospitals and other large scale customers. When we can get our farmers growing at scale using regenerative techniques that enrich the land, by always putting fertility back in, food production will get to a point that market demand will begin to drop the price of locally grown foods, then the possibility of price parity with cheap imports will be more likely and the average person will begin to buy local. The key is to make it affordable for people to farm here in the most expensive place in the USA.
     “Personally, I almost never have a disposable income, it takes everything I have to raise my family and pay my bills, but I have no debt. As a farmer, I look forward to being part of growing long-term food security for the state of Hawai`i by being an active component in the robust network of regional food systems we are currently building. This food system hinges on the crucial element that is the capability of the farmer to build equity in a farm that is leased for life, with the ability to pass it on to their heirs, or the ability to liquidate it for the value of the equity investment made, as the maintained value would be documented.
     “Pride of ownership is the cornerstone of the American Dream. Without ownership, where is the incentive to malama ‘aina? Why not just extract the fat of the land and move on to other land once soil fertility is depleted? Add chemicals when nutrients are depleted, and spray for pests, when plant health declines and nature attempts to remove the weak from the gene pool.
Red ribbed chard with its many nutrients.
     “The answer is there are other ways to do agriculture, ones that utilize the forces of nature to accelerate plant and animal health, require less imported inputs and cost next to nothing. The catch is that they are hands-on methods; the farmer needs to be there every day, living on the land to live off the land.
     "A sure way to get a majority of farmers to care for the land is to give them lifetime leases of it. Oversight from the owner/Land Trust who enforces production thresholds and monitors agricultural non-compliance would be standardized. Owner farmers will have the incentive they need to make the right choices for the future, maintain their investment, and leave it better for the next generation. Tennant farmers do not have these types of incentives.
     "What I am talking about here is called an agricultural land trust, and it will own large chunks of ag lands and leases to farmers for life. We all know that farming is not super profitable in the monetized sense of say, a Morgan Stanley or Citibank, but we can all agree that it is a necessary and elementary component in a sustainable economy, and it creates a lot of jobs. The beauty of this agricultural model is that it creates housing for low income people as well. In our pricy housing market, this is a real political winner with the people, and a great incentive to grow some food.
     "Be a part of our agricultural future, be wealthy in ways that you may not have considered before, join the Hawaii Farmers Union United for a solutionary and sustainable approach to building food security across the state, join us in creating the 21st century ahupua’a system.
     "We are in a time where we have the ability to put robots on mars, but in Hawaii, for economic reasons, it is increasingly difficult to get a farmer in the field. Let’s make the changes needed to incentivize farming, and bring food security to Hawai’i Nei.
     "The (relatively) wealthy family farmer needs to be nurtured, supported and honored. When this is the case, we can grow the new agriculture paradigm and have the sustainable food production with regional food systems that stabilize local economies in rural areas all across the state. Food security will then be a reality. For now it is a dream, so let’s wake up and make it happen!" See more at www.hawaiifarmersunionunited.org.

FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER AT OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER drew about 250 people yesterday to enjoy the traditional meal of turkey, mashed potatoes, green bean casseroles and a variety of desserts. Ocean View Community Association President Fortune Otter said that 30 volunteers put together the celebration, with many monetary and food donations. OVCA will host a Keiki Christmas on Saturday, Dec. 20 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.. with a visit from Santa Claus, food, gifts and activities. Free to all.

Ocean View Community Association President Fortune Otter with her father, son and
daughter at yesterday's Thanksgiving Dinner. Photo from OVCA
TODAY IS THE START OF THE ANNUAL VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI Studio Tour & Sale. The opportunity to visit artist studios and to purchase for the holidays is Friday, Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artwork on sale represents a wide variety of media Maps are available at village businesses and at volcanovillageartistshui.com.

FRIENDS OF HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK hosts a holiday fundraiser tomorrow from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1943 Pukeawe Circle, Volcano Golf Course, off Pi`i Mauna Drive. Featured are baked goodies and poinsettias.

THE ANNUAL KA`U FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY is tomorrow at Punalu`u Beach Park from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is invited to remember loved ones by decorating floating lanterns that are released into the waters of Punalu`u. Meet at the pavilions. Registration is available through Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, Inc. at 928-0101. 

A CRECHE FESTIVAL with more than 100 nativity scenes from around the world, is open to the public from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Na`alehu Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints. The Ka`u Ward hosts the second annual islandwide event. The address is 95-5682 Mamalahoa Highway. Along with the crèche display, the event features live music performed by local musicians and choir and activities for children. Visitors are welcome to the free holiday festival. For more information, call ‪‪808-895-0491‬‬.  

MAILE MEDEIROS DAVID will be sworn in to represent Ka`u, Volcano and South Kona on the County Council on Monday at noon in Hilo at the Ah Fook Chinen Civic Auditorium. Mayor Billy Kenoi will be keynote speaker. The public is invited.

THE KA`U CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL MEETING & DINNER is next Thursday, Dec. 4 at Gilligan’s Restaurant in Discovery Harbour at 6 p.m. Dinner is $15 a person for pizza or spaghetti, salad and dessert. Beverages include beer, wine or soda. Money will be collected at the door. The public is invited to learn more abut The Chamber, which publishes The Directory for Ka‘u, provides scholarships for students from Ka‘u, hosts the annual art contest and selection for The Directory cover at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na‘alehu, and assists in funding Ka‘u Food Pantry. Memberships with a listing in The Directory are $35 and will be accepted at the meeting. 
SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

  

















Thursday, November 27, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014


College student Tiare Lee Shibuya and her partner Bradley Llanes are two supporters of Ka`u Learning Academy
among those who perform weekends at Gilligan's Cafe, which hosts an anniversary celebration Saturday, Dec. 13 and rolls
out applications for the 2015 school year. Photo by Julia Neal
KA`U LEARNING ACADEMY, a tuition-free, public charter school, has announced that it will accept applications beginning in December for open enrollment lottery for school year 2015-2016, which begins in August for grades 3 to 6. Classes will be held at the old Discovery Harbour Golf Course Clubhouse, now operated as Gilligan’s Café to benefit the school.
     Unlike traditional public schools, KLA will provide an individual education plan for every student, allowing each to work at their own ability level, said Kathryn Tydlacka, founder and executive director, who has nearly 20 years of experience in public and private education and holds a Master’s Degree in Education Administration. “KLA holds high academic expectations and also offers electives such as theatre arts, agriculture, computer, art and music,” she said.
     Transportation and lunch will be provided to KLA students. Enrollment meetings will be held throughout the district starting in January. “We want to thank a number of local residents and private foundations that have made significant monetary contributions to the charter school. It is a testament to KLA’s strong academic plan that it was the only charter school applicant approved for 2015 under Hawai‘i’s tough new charter school law,” Tydlacka said. For more information and to enroll a child, see www.kaulearning. com or call 213-1097.
Aaron DeLos Santos supports Ka`u Learning Academy as a regulae host at
Gilligan's Cafe. He is seen here at Science Camps of America this summer.
Photo from Science Camps of America
       Tydlacka also said that Ka‘u Learning Academy thanks patrons of Gilligan’s Café for continued support every Friday and Saturday night. Founders of KLA opened Gilligan’s in December of 2013 as a nonprofit business to help fund the school.
     The one-year anniversary celebration will be Saturday, Dec. 13 from 11a.m. to 9 p.m. Enjoy food and live music all day, along with craft and info booths, a silent auction, giveaways and other surprises. Musicians include Solomn & Tiger, Lucky Lizardz, `Ukulele Boyz and Mark Chopot.
    KLA enrollment applications and information will be featured. For Gilligan’s menu, music line-up and location, see www.bigislandgilligans.com
To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A FEDERAL MAGISTRATE RULED AGAINST HAWAI`I COUNTY’S NEW GMO LAW yesterday. U.S. Magistrate Judge Barry Kurren stated that county law is preempted by state law, a decision similar to the one he handed down, preventing Kaua`i County from regulating pesticides and Genetically Modified Organisms. Pro GMO companies and citizens groups are also challenging a GMO moratorium that passed in a Maui referendum on Nov. 4.
   An analysis by Civil Beat stated yesterday that the decision deals “another blow to Hawai`i’s growing movement against genetically modified organisms. Judge Barry Kurren ruled Wednesday that Ordinance 13-121 is invalid because it is fully preempted by state law and partially preempted by federal law.
   “The lawsuit, filed in June by several Big Island farmers and flower growers, along with a national trade organization representing the biotech industry, challenged the Hawai`i County ordinance that banned genetically engineered farming with the exception of existing crops.
     “The lawsuit is one of several filed over the past year challenging county regulations of the state’s $243 million seed industry. Less than two weeks ago, Monsanto and Dow AgroSciences filed a lawsuit to overturn Maui County’s new moratorium on GMO farming.”
    Civil Beat pointed out that “In Wednesday’s decision, Kurren argued that although the state does not specifically regulate genetically modified crops, Ordinance 13-121 still conflicts with the work of state agencies.
     “He said the state Department of Agriculture and state Board of Agriculture comprise a ‘comprehensive statewide framework’ governing plants that may ‘injure or harm agriculture, the environment or public health.’
     ‘Clearly, the state legislature intended this network of the HDOA, the HBOA, and the advisory committee to have extensive and broad responsibilities over agricultural problems spanning the various counties to form a coherent and comprehensive statewide agricultural policy,’ he wrote. 
 
Maile Medeiros David (center) will be sworn into the County Council seat for Ka`u
on Monday. She attended Ka`u Plantation Days this Fall and plans to
meet farmers, business owners and other constituents in December.
Photo by Julia Neal
 ‘In light of the comprehensive statutes and the network designed to address statewide agriculture problems, the Court concludes that the legislative intent for an exclusive, uniform and comprehensive state statutory scheme on the precise subject matter addressed by Ordinance 13-121 preempts the County’s ban on genetically engineered organisms.”’  See more at civilbeat.com. 
To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

COUNTY COUNCIL MEMBER ELECT MAILE MEDEIROS DAVID will be sworn into office to serve Ka`u, Volcano and South Kona on Monday, Dec. 1 at noon in Hilo. The ceremonies for all nine council members for Hawai`i County who are each elected for two-year terms will be held at the Ah Fook Chinen Civic Auditorium and the public is invited.    
       Master of Cermonies will be Sherry Bracken, of Hawai`i Public Radio. The Honorable Judge Ronald Ibarra will administer the Oath of Office and Mayor Billy Kenoi will deliver the keynote speech. The event is free to the public.
     David said she will visit with community groups, farmers, small business owners and other constituents throughout her County Council District 6 during December.  She replaces County Council member Brenda Ford who was unable to run again due to term limits.  To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.
Pahoa Village Road reopened yesterday along the half mile that was closed during
the lava threat, now providing easier access to local businesses. Photo by Julia Neal
THE HALF- MILE SECTION OF PAHOA VILLAGE  ROAD, which had been closed in expectation of a lava flow, reopened at noon yesterday. Lava, which flowed down to the edge of the village, taking out one house, part of a cemetery and part of the county trash transfer station, reached as close as 430 feet from the road on Oct. 30. 
     The lava flow, which started June 27 upslope at Pu`u O`o, has since slowed, hardened and became inactive near the town. Some Pahoa businesses closed in fear they would be destroyed, but others remained open despite some visitors and residents keeping away from them.  
To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER IS TODAY AT OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER at 1 p.m. It is open to all Ka`u residents. To offer help during the event, call 939-7033.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI hosts its annual Studio Tour & Sale tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artwork on sale represents a wide variety of media Maps are available at village businesses and at volcanovillageartistshui.com.

FRIENDS OF HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK hosts a holiday fundraiser Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1943 Pukeawe Circle, Volcano Golf Course, off Pi`i Mauna Drive. Featured are baked goodies and poinsettias.
KA`U FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY is Saturday at Punalu`u Beach Park from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Registration is available through Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, Inc. at 928-0101.

A CRECHE FESTIVAL with more than 100 nativity scenes from around the world, is open to the public from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Na`alehu Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints. The Ka`u Ward hosts the second annual islandwide event. The address is 95-5682 Mamalahoa Highway. Along with the crèche display, the event features live music performed by local musicians and choir and activities for children. Visitors are welcome to the free holiday festival. For more information, call ‪‪808-895-0491‬‬.

THE KA`U CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL MEETING & DINNER is next Thursday, Dec. 4 at Gilligan’s Restaurant in Discovery Harbour at 6 p.m. Dinner is $15 a person for pizza or spaghetti, salad and dessert. Beverages include beer, wine or soda. Money will be collected at the door. The public is invited to learn more abut The Chamber, which publishes The Directory for Ka‘u, provides scholarships for students from Ka‘u, hosts the annual art contest and selection for The Directory cover at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na‘alehu, and assists in funding Ka‘u Food Pantry. Memberships with a listing in The Directory are $35 and will be accepted at the meeting. 

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.