About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, September 28, 2013

Hula is one of the community activities that has led to better health among Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Halau Lei
Hula O Leinoalani practices at the Old Pahala Clubhouse, with ceremonies at Punalu`u Black Sand Beach, and travels to Lana`i next week for a cultural exchange under Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder. Photo by Julia Neal
THE HEALTH OF PACIFIC ISLANDERS IN HAWAI`I has improved, according to a 20-year study released this week by the John A. Burns School for Medicine at University of Hawai`i. The research includes: Native Hawaiians, Filipinos, Samoans, Tongans, the Guamanian Chamorro, people from the Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, Marshall Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Fijians, who represent a major portion of Hawai`i’s population.
      According to the study, many improvements have come from efforts embedded into local communities, such as:
      •Health improvement programs run by people the community knows and trusts.
      •Culture and science blending for successful outcomes. A cardiac health improvement study incorporated hula, and saw as much as a 20-point drop in blood pressure among participants.
      •Focusing on improving educational opportunities. The UH Community Colleges Pathways program shined: almost doubled enrollment of Native Hawaiians from 1992-2007.
     Dr. Keawa`aimoku Kaholokula, one of the study leaders, noted that obesity, diabetes and heart disease still plague the population. While statistics are improving, including longer life, challenges persist, from providing medical care to improvements in education and the ability to make a living and have secure housing. Kaholokula said that the study should not stay on a shelf, but inspire creation of Native Hawaiian health task force. See the full report Assessment & Priorities for Health & Well-Being in Native Hawaiians & Other Pacific Peoples at at http://blog.hawaii.edu/uhmednow/files/2013/09/AP-Hlth-REPORT-2013.pdf 
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THE MISSING KAYAKER was discovered by Hawa`i Volcanoes National Park ranger on Thursday. Richard Gomez had been camping along the coast since Sunday when his kayak broke up in the surf while he was attempting to paddle ashore. According to the police report, the ranger gave him first-aid and assisted him to a campsite. The kayakers’ whereabouts, unknown for days, prompted an expensive search by air and land involving police, fire departments and the U.S. Caost Guard. A VHF radio or other communications device, could have saved search and rescue crew efforts that could have been necessary for more desperate situations, rescue personnel said. Among the search and rescue vehicles and crew deployed were the Kittiwake, an 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter, and an HC-130 plane from the Coast Guard Air Station at Barbers Point on O`ahu.
     The search began after friends of Gomez called in to report him missing.  
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POLLUTED RUNOFF CONTROL PROGRAM is the name of a five-year effort by the state Hawai`i Department of Health with $2 million in federal Department of Health and Environmental Protection Agency funding. The plan is to help reduce damage to reefs and the coast from storm water runoff. The program, under Section 319 of the U.S. Clean Water Act, employs state and local community organizations to design and carry out watershed plans.
      The Environmental Protection Agency provided $1.1 million and DOH put up $746,000. An EPA news release yesterday quoted Jared Blumenfied, the agency’s Pacific Southwest administrator, saying, "Our goal, along with the Department of Health, is to protect coastal waters and coral reefs from the effects of polluted surface water," Blumenfeld said the funding is for "nonpoint" source water pollution control projects. It can be used for stabilizing eroding stream banks and restoring native vegetation to reduce sediment runoff. It can also be used to reduce agricultural runoff into gulches and streams. 
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ART FOR THE COVER CONTEST FOR THE DIRECTORY 2014, the annual publication of the Ka`u Chamber of Commerce, is being accepted on weekdays until next Thursday, Oct. 3 at 4 p.m. at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na`alehu. At the end of the week, the popular vote will determine the winner of the cover contest. The art show is up all week during credit union hours and includes a keiki division. Art on display includes paintings, decorated ipu, Hawaiian weapons, photographs and many other visual arts. The theme is Ka`u. For more, call Ka`u Chamber of Commerce President Dallas Decker at 516-662-8789. Memberships and advertising are also being taken by the Chamber for The Directory 2014 ,which raises money for scholarships for Ka`u college students. Call 928-6471.

OCEAN VIEW, NA`ALEHU AND PAHALA POST OFFICES are apparently safe - for now -from the federal cutbacks that aim to close five facilities around the state. The only Hawai`i Island post office on the chopping block is the tiny Kukuihaele, near Waipio Valley, which is about five miles from the Honok`a Post Office, federal officials announced this week. The others around the state are at Hanama`ulu, near Lihu`e on Kaua`i and branches atr Kapolei, Kaimuki and Ewa, which are all near other post offices. Ocean View, Na`alehu and Pahala, as well as the Volcano Post Office are much longer distances from the nearest post offices although Volcanoes National Park post office and Volcano Village post officer are closer together.
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FUNDING FOR HAWA`I WILDLIFE FUND can be raised through Monday, Sept. 30 through Foodland’s Give Aloha Program. Foodland is matching any contribution up to $249 from those checking out with a Maka`i Card and disignating Hawai`I Wildlife Fund as the recipient with its code number 77187. Hawai`i Wildlife Fund is known for raising awareness of marine debris with education through major international television news netsworks. It is known statewide for its anchialine pool restoration work in Hoo`onoua, marine debris removal not only in Ka`u bur also Ke`ehu on Maui, traditional taro and fish farming restoration, hawksbill sea turtle recovery monitoring and research, Honu watch and , monk seal conservation and rehabilitation. For more information contact Megan Lamson at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com or 808-769-7629.  
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A Kamilo Beach cleanup earlier this month drew 57 volunteers to the Ka`u Coast during the Get the Drift & Bag It coastal cleanup to
 pick up approximatley 1,873 lbs. of debris. Some of the debris will be up-cylced to make containers. Photo from HWF 
THE MISSING KAYAKER was discovered by Hawa`i Volcanoes National Park ranger on Thursday. Richard Gomez had been canping along the coast since Sunday when his kayak broke up in the surf while he was attempting to paddle ashore. According to the police report, the ranger gave him first-aid and assisted him to a camp site. The kayakers’ whereabouts, unknown for days, prompted an expensive search by air and land involving police, fire departments and the U.S. Caost Guard. A VHF radio or other communications device, could have saved search and rescue crew efforts that could have been necessary for more desperate situations, rescue personnel said. Among the search and rescue vehicles and crew deployed were the Kittiwake, an 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter, and an HC-130 plane from the Coast Guard Air Station at Barbers Point on O`ahu. The search began after friends of Gomez called in to report him missing.

THIS IS NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY and Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is waiving entrance fees. Volunteers are removing invasive Himalayan ginger and fountain grass in the Kahuku, Ocean View and Volcano sections of the park. National Public Land Day is sponsored by the National Environmental Education Foundation.
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KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park hosts an open house in conjunction with National Park Public Lands Day on Saturday. KMC invites the public to experience how the camp serves U.S. troops by enjoying all facilities and services. Call 967-8371 for more information.  To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U HIGH SPORTS: Today, Ka`u Girls Volleyball is hosts Kohala. at home. Ka`u bowling traveled to the BIIF Individual Bowl at Hilo Lanes. Cross Country made the long trek to Waimea for races at Hawai`I Preparatory Academy. Air Riflery team drove to Kamehameha School in Kea`au. and Ka`u eight-man football plays Kamehameha junior varsity in Kea`au at 4 p.m.
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