About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, November 30, 2015

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Monday, Nov. 30, 2015

Ka`u High Trojans' soccer team begins at home Wednesday. At a game last season, the team shut out HAAS 9-0. Photo by Dave Berry
THE FEMALE VICTIM OF A FATAL single-vehicle accident that occurred in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park Thursday night has been identified as 23-year-old Destanie Renon, of Waikoloa.
      National Park Service rangers are seeking witnesses to the crash that happened on Hwy 11 between mile marker 30 and the Pi`i Mauna Drive intersection in the park around 9:38 p.m.
      Renon was traveling south on Hwy 11 in a 1992 Honda sedan and was ejected from the vehicle after she crashed into a cluster of large `ohi`a trees. Park rangers and County of Hawai`i rescue personnel determined Renon did not survive, and her body was transported to Hilo Medical Center.
A magnitude-3.2 struck near the summit of Mauna Loa
last night. Image from USGS/HVO
      The cause of the accident is unknown, and an investigation is underway. Anyone with information is asked to call Park Dispatch at 985-6170.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

A 3.2-MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE struck near the summit of Mauna Loa last night at 8:15 p.m.
      Hawaiian Volcano Observatory said the minor quake was centered 3.6 miles south of the summit and 17.4 miles north-northwest of Pahala. It occurred 1.6 miles under the surface.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

FOUND ON HAWAI`I ISLAND, Aedes aegypti is a major transmitter of virsuses that cause dengue fever. Information from Hawai`i Department of Health reinforces the role that eliminating standing water plays in controlling the current outbreak of the disease.
      Aedes aegypti is a small, dark mosquito with white lyre-shaped markings and banded legs. It prefers to bite indoors and primarily bites humans.
      According to DOH, these mosquitoes can use natural locations or habitats (for example, tree holes and plant axils) and artificial containers with water to lay their eggs. They lay eggs during the day in water containing organic material (e.g., decaying leaves, algae, etc.), in containers with wide openings and prefer dark-colored containers located in the shade. About three days after feeding on blood, the mosquito lays her eggs inside a container just above the water line. Eggs are laid over a period of several days, are resistant to desiccation and can survive for periods of six or more months.
Aedes aegypti is a major tramitter of dengue fever.
Photo from Hawai`i DOH
      When rain floods the eggs with water, the larvae hatch. Generally, larvae feed upon small aquatic organisms, algae and particles of plant and animal material in water-filled containers. The entire immature or aquatic cycle (i.e., from egg to adult) can occur in as little as seven to eight days. The lifespan for adult mosquitoes is around three weeks. Egg production sites are within or in close proximity to households.
      Most frequently found in tropical and subtropical areas of the world, Aedes aegypti historically is considered to be a primary vector of viral diseases such as the dengue fever, chikungunya and yellow fever.
      Aedes aegypti is extremely common in areas lacking piped water systems and depend greatly on water storage containers to lay their eggs. Male and female adults feed on nectar of plants; however, female mosquitoes need blood in order to produce eggs and are active in the daytime.
      Eggs have the ability to survive drying for long periods of time, allowing eggs to be easily spread to new locations. Artificial or natural water containers (water storage containers, flower pots, discarded tires, plates under potted plants, cemetery vases, flower pots, buckets, tin cans, clogged rain gutters, ornamental fountains, drums, water bowls for pets, birdbaths, etc.) that are within or close to places where humans live are ideal larval habitats for this mosquito. This species has also been found in underground collections of water such as open or unsealed septic tanks, storm drains, wells and water meters.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

PUC Chair Randy Iwase opened evidentiary hearings on the proposed
HECO/NextEra merger this morning. Image from `Olelo
DEC. 27 IS THE DEADLINE for intervenors to respond to evidentiary hearing testimony, Public Utilities Committee Chair Randy Iwase said when opening the hearing today. The commission is holding 12 days of hearings about the proposed $4.3 billion merger of Hawaiian Electric Co. and Florida-based NextEra Energy.
      `Olelo 49 cablecasts the hearing live and in its entirety at olelo.org/olelo49. It will also be cablecast Hawai`i Island via Na Leo O Hawai`i.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

FORMER PUBLIC UTILITIES CHAIR Mina Morita sees the proposed merger of Hawaiian Electric Co. and NextEra Energy as a positive move. “It appears that the benefits could outweigh negatives with appropriate conditions,” Morita wrote at minamoritaenergydynamics.com. “I believe NextEra’s culture of continuous improvement can accelerate and enhance the transformation needed at the Hawaiian Electric Companies to improve its analytical capacity, performance and overall organizational culture as it evolves into the utility of the future.
Former PUC Chair Mina Morita
      “There are obvious issues like ring fencing to protect the Hawai`i ratepayer. With the HECO Companies’ important role to implement clean energy policies, I find the B-Corp model an interesting tool to benchmark the performance of the HECO Companies not only as a regulated entity but also to evaluate its social, environmental and economic performance given its formidable role as a corporate leader and responsible corporate citizen in Hawai`i.” (A benefit corporation is a type of for-profit corporate entity that includes positive impact on society and the environment in addition to profit as its legally defined goals.)
      “I believe the B-Corp model or a similar effort is needed to clearly define and articulate Hawai`i’s expectations, or what some have called our local values, and to help guide NextEra actions and reinvestment in their most valuable asset and the implementers of this transformation, the employees of the HECO Companies, to shape Hawai`i’s energy and economic future.”
      Morita compares the workings of Hawai`i’s utilities with Hawai`i’s rainforests.
      “As an island environment, our indigenous rainforest may be the best example to conceptualize how multiple competitive and cooperative transactions resulting from new technologies and services should interplay within Hawai`i’s electric systems to seamlessly optimize both individual and utility investments for mutual benefit.
      “Our rainforests are an example of a diverse, complex system where each native forest organism is distinct but, while unique, must rely on other native forest organisms for sustenance and optimum growing conditions. Therefore, each organism must work both interdependently and cooperatively to produce a productive and efficient ecosystem that is the primary source of our water supply. It is difficult to put a value on the required synergy and the role of each native forest organism’s contribution to capture rainfall, but the result, our reliable water supply, is priceless.
Sen. Russell Ruderman
      “In a rainforest environment, not all roles are equal, neither should we expect the same of our electric system.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

INCREASING LOCAL FOOD PRODUCTION by 10 percent is worth $300 million to Hawai`i, state Sen. Russell Ruderman told attendees at Hawai`i Farmers Union United’s convention this month. The amount includes savings based on improved health of residents and soil that natural farming and Korean Natural Farming could bring. He said we would look back on these advancements like we now look at Newton and Einstein.
      Ruderman said one of the contributors to the high cost of local food production is imported inputs, such as fertilizer. “They’re expensive for any farmer, but they’re much more expensive for farmers in Hawai`i,” Ruderman said. “So, the technologies that allow us to develop our own inputs will increase our capacity to grow our own food.”
      Ruderman, who owns Island Naturals health food stores, said food that is healthy and local is the biggest trend in the food business over the decades. “Our state completely ignores that trend,” he said.
      Ruderman said that while he was chair of the Senate Ag Committee, he was able to get legislation passed to help the local ag community. One bill allows more cottage industry, where residents can sell more locally made food products. Another begins a farm-to-school program in which local farmers can sell their products to the Department of Education, which he said is the largest customer in the state.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

KA`U RESIDENTS CAN PARTICIPATE in Hawai`i County Council meetings this week. Committees meet tomorrow. Finance Committee meets tomorrow at 9 a.m.; Planning, 10 a.m.; and Public Safety & Mass Transit, 11:30 a.m.
      The full council meets Wednesday at 9 a.m. and holds a special meeting about dengue fever at 1 p.m. All meetings take place at Council Chambers in Hilo.
      Videoconferencing is available at Na`alehu State Office Building. Meetings are streamed live, and agendas are available, at hawaiicounty.gov.

TROJANS’ SOCCER SEASON begins Wednesday. Ka`u High hosts Pahoa at 3 p.m.
      With one exception, December’s matches are all at home. On Saturday, Dec. 5, the Trojans play Kealakehe; Tuesday, Dec. 8, Waiakea; Saturday, Dec. 12, Makua Lani; and Saturday, Dec. 19, Kohala. Trojans travel to Kamehameha on Tuesday, Dec. 15.
      All matches begin at 3 p.m. except for Makua Lani at 12 p.m.

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Sunday, Nov. 29, 2015

Hurricanes and tropical storms swirled all around Hawai`i this season, the composite created by Kevin Kodama from the Central Pacific Hurricane Center, of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Santa and sleigh are added by The Ka`u Calendar art director Tanya Ibarra.
HAWAI`I COUNTY COUNCIL HOLDS two meetings on Wednesday.
      Dengue fever is the topic of a special meeting. State Department of Health and County Civil Defense officials are expected to present briefings. Also, Sen. Josh Green and Rep. Richard Creagan have been invited to present their ideas.
Aaron Chung
      In his request for the special meeting, South Hilo Council member Aaron Chung said, “Although I am fully aware that the state and county have been working jointly on a community outreach program consisting of, among other things, public informational meetings and websites, I also believe that redundancy in terms of disseminating information is a good thing in this particular situation.”
      Chung said he wants to understand the operational aspects of their efforts and whether they would be able to offer a prognosis regarding the outbreak.
      A county tax on medical marijuana is on the council’s regular meeting agenda. Kohala Council member Margaret Wille introduces a resolution urging the state Legislature to amend state law and allow a county sales tax of up to five percent of dispensaries’ gross sales.
      “Based on the experience of municipalities that currently permit medical marijuana dispensaries, the operation of medical marijuana dispensaries and production centers will create a significant new burden on the social and emergency services that are provided by the counties,” Resolution 339-15 states.
      Held in Hilo, the regular meeting begins at 9 a.m., and the special meeting begins at 1 p.m.
      Ka`u residents can participate via videoconferencing at Na`alehu State Office Building.
      Meetings are streamed live, and agendas are available, at hawaiicounty.gov.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Ignacio and Jimena menaced Ka`u late August and early September.
Map from NOAA
HURRICANE SEASON ENDS TOMORROW, and the holiday season begins on the back of a rainy summer and fall. Kevin Kodama, of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration in Honolulu, created the composite at the top of today’s Ka`u Calendar News Briefs showing the record number of hurricanes that swirled around Hawai‘i this year, and The Ka`u Calendar added expectations of another visitor soon to arrive. 
      Climate conditions pointed to an above-normal hurricane season in the Central Pacific Basin this year, according to NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center. Hurricane season began on June 1. The outlook called for a 70 percent chance of an above-normal season, a 25 percent chance of a near-normal season and a five percent chance of a below-normal season. NOAA expected five to eight tropical cyclones to affect the central Pacific this season. An average season has four to five tropical cyclones, which include tropical depressions with winds of up to 38 miles per hour, tropical storms with maximum winds up to 73 mph and hurricanes of higher wind speeds.
      The outlook was based on El Nino continuing and possibly strengthening as the hurricane season progressed. El Nino decreases vertical wind shear over the tropical central Pacific, favoring development of more and stronger tropical cyclones. It also favors more westward-tracking storms from the eastern Pacific. This combination typically leads to an above-normal Central Pacific hurricane season, according to NOAA.
      Category-three Olaf was the most recent hurricane to head toward Ka`u. Olaf turned northeast and bypassed Hawai‘i several hundred miles to the east in late October. Once Olaf gained enough northern latitude, a drier environment with an increase in southerly or south-southwesterly shear resulted in weakening.
Ka`u was in Ignacio's cone of uncertainty in late August, but the storm
passed to the north. Map from NOAA
      Olaf followed thunderstorms from remnants of Tropical Depression Nora that battered Ka`u on Oct. 16. Nora zigzagged her way toward South Point before tracking south of Hawai‘i Island. Many residents reported lightning and thunder that appeared to be directly overhead. Lightning struck a transformer in Pahala, causing power outages to several residents.
      Oho was the first of three tropical storms spawned in the Central Pacific that threatened Ka`u. Hurricane Oho packed maximum sustained winds near 85 miles per hour with higher gusts in early October. Rain moved into the area as the storm passed offshore, parallel to the Ka‘ū Coast.
      Tropical Storm Niala, also born in the Central Pacific, tracked south of Ka`u in late September, bringing heavy rain with it.
      Although Tropical Storm Jimena passed far north of Hawai‘i, it brought hot and humid conditions to Ka`u in early September.
      Gov. David Ige signed an emergency proclamation in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane Ignacio. Ignacio was a category-four hurricane as it approached Hawai`i in late August and early September. The proclamation activated the Major Disaster Fund set aside by the Legislature for disaster relief for the entire state. It also allowed easier access to emergency resources at state and federal levels, along with the ability to suspend certain laws as needed for emergency purposes. The storm skirted the state to the north.
      The Central Pacific Tropical Storm Kilo passed south of Ka`u in late August. Warm sea surface temperatures and relatively weak shear contributed to its strengthening into a hurricane as it tracked toward Kaua`i. In advance of Kilo’s possible landfall in the state, Gov. David Ige signed an emergency proclamation making Major Disaster Funds available for disaster relief.
Hilda drenched Namakanipaio Campground in mid-August. Photo from NPS
      In mid-August, Hilda was downgraded to a tropical depression and passed far enough to the south of Hawai‘i to avoid any wind impacts. However, the associated moisture plume north of the system triggered heavy rainfall over portions of the state, especially over the Big Island. On the morning of Aug. 11, its forecast track showed landfall at Pahala, but Central Pacific Hurricane Center moved the forecast path further south later that day.
      Guillermo passed to the north of Hawai‘i Island in early August. The hurricane was the seventh named Pacific tropical storm that developed in the Eastern Pacific. Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park closed all backcountry areas. In addition, Mauna Loa Road from Kipukapuaulu to the Mauna Loa Lookout and Namakanipaio Campgrounds and A-frame cabins closed. Visitor centers, restrooms, Thurston Lava Tube, front-country trails, steam vents and other popular features remained open.
      Although hurricane season ended Nov. 30, forecasters said that because El Nino conditions continue, tropical storms could develop during the winter months.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
“MY RESPONSIBILITY IS TO THE PEOPLE of Hawai`i and the American people to stand up and fight for what is right and what is in the best interest of our country,” U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard told Emmarie Huetteman, of The New York Times, as reported on MSN. “That has nothing to do with party politics.” 
      Gabbard’s comments relate to her defiant remarks regarding fellow Democrat Pres. Obama’s strategy in Syria. Gabbard wants to defund America’s efforts to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad, saying that keeping him in power would keep ISIS from becoming more powerful.
      See msn.com.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI Tour & Sale continues until 4 p.m. today. Meet artists in their studios throughout the village. For a map and more information, call 987-3472 or 985-7487, or see VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com.

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY events continue at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park today.
     From 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Christine Taylor Sprowl Tetak signs copies of her children’s book, Legend of The Hula Moose. This fictional book contains many true facts, along with illustrations by Diane Lucas. Parents and grandparents will enjoy sharing this story with their keiki.
      From 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Gretchen Grove helps participants make holiday cards and gift-wrap to accompany gifts purchased at VAC Gallery. Supplies are provided; no purchase necessary.
      The gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
      Events are free; park entrance fees apply.

HAWAI`I WILDLIFE FUND HOLDS its final Ka`u Coast Cleanup of the year this Saturday. Volunteers gather at Wai`ohinu Park at 7:45 a.m. to carpool to Kamilo Beach. Register at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.






See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.



Saturday, November 28, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015

In honor of the late Drake Fujimoto, who sponsored numerous community events and programs, Hana Hou and `O Ka`u Kakou will continue his Keiki Christmas event on Wednesday, Dec. 9 in Na`alehu. Fujimoto enjoyed last year's keiki gift giving and feasting. See more below. Photo by Julia Neal
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE RANGERS are seeking witnesses to a fatal single-vehicle accident that occurred on Hwy 11 near mile marker 30 and the Pi`i Mauna Drive intersection in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park on Thursday night. 
      At approximately 9:38 p.m., a female driver traveling south on Hwy 11 crashed into a cluster of large `ohi`a trees and was ejected from the vehicle, a 1992 Honda sedan. Park rangers and County of Hawai`i rescue personnel determined the victim did not survive, and her body was transported to Hilo Medical Center.
      The identification of the victim is unknown, and an investigation is underway.
      Anyone with information regarding the accident is asked to call Park Dispatch at 985-6170.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

U.S. Supreme Court has halted announcement of Native
Hawaiian convention delegates.
U.S. SUPREME COURT JUSTICE Anthony Kennedy issued an order enjoining the counting of ballots cast and certifying the winners in the Native Hawaiian election for convention delegates. Though the injunction is indefinite pending further action from Justice Kennedy or the full Court, it will prevent the Na`i Apuni election from proceeding with the scheduled ballot count on Nov. 30. 
      Filed in August, the lawsuit argued that it’s unconstitutional for the state to be involved in a race-based election. Last month, U.S. District Court Judge J. Michael Seabright ruled that the election may take place as scheduled, saying the election is a private poll not run by the state.
      “This is a significant victory for us,” said Keli`i Akina, Ph.D., President of the Grassroot Institute and one of the plaintiffs in the case brought by Judicial Watch. “After a full briefing, Justice Kennedy decided that the issue was worthy of further examination and issued the injunction we requested. We are confident in our position and excited at the possibility that it could go before the full Court.
      “We are very grateful for the wisdom of the Court in upholding the Constitution. Today’s ruling from Justice Kennedy is not just a victory for us, but a victory for the many Native Hawaiians who have been misrepresented and overridden by government and special interests determined to create a government-recognized tribe. It’s a victory for all Hawaiians – and all Americans – in its affirmation of racial equality. Finally, it is a victory for the Aloha Spirit which enables people of all backgrounds to live and work together in harmony.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Joe Elm, of the State Department of Health, explains steps taken
in a dengue fever investigation. Image from DOH
THE NUMBER OF CONFIRMED cases of dengue fever continues to rise. As of yesterday, Hawai`i Department of Health reported a total of 107 cases, of which 93 are residents and 14 are visitors. The latest date of onset of illness so far is Nov. 18. According to DOH, symptoms usually start five to seven days after being bitten by infected mosquitoes, but the onset can range from three to 14 days.
      State epidemiology specialist and field investigator Joe Elm gives an overview of the steps taken in a dengue fever investigation. When DOH is notified of a suspected case, an investigator is assigned to interview the person regarding expose, signs, and onset of symptoms.  Information is then passed to a lab for testing and to Vector Control, which sprays to reduce mosquito populations.
      The lab then educates the infected person about how to help control the outbreak and reinforce mosquito control measures.
      See health.hawaii.gov.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Ahi will be available through the holidays under an agreement reached
with fishermen and National Marine Fisheries Service.
HAWAI`I’S LONGLINE FISHERMAN can continue to catch ahi. Audrey McAvoy, of Associated Press, reported that the National Marine Fisheries Service is allowing fishermen to attribute 1,000 metric tons of their bigeye tuna catch to Guam. Fishermen in turn agreed to support development of the fishing industry in Guam with $200,000. 
      “We want to inform the public that fish will continue to be available through the holidays,” Mike Tosatto, National Marine Fisheries Service regional administrator for the Pacific Islands, told McAvoy.
      In August, Hawai`i fishermen met their annual quota but resumed catching tuna in October when NMFS instituted a rule allowing fishermen to report some of their catch as from the Northern Mariana Islands.
      David Henkin, an attorney for Earthjustice, told McAvoy, “There’s just absolutely no way to reconcile that behavior with what the science says, which is that all fishing nations – including the United States — need to show some restraint and need to reduce catch, not increase catch, which is what the fisheries service is allowing to happen here.”
      Earthjustice represents several environmental groups that are suing NMFS to stop attributing catches to U.S. territories.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Chefs Dave Anderson and Rod Ducosin swirl through the kitchen
as they prepare Thankgiving dinner for more than 450 people.
Photo from OVCA
OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION served over 450 people at its annual Thanksgiving dinner on Thursday. More than 50 of those were take-out trays for other folks that couldn’t make it to the center. 
      “Captain Dave Anderson and Chef Rod Ducosin did a wonderful job,” OVCA President Sandi Alexander said, “with very moist turkey (even the white parts), along with stuffing, mashed potatoes, corn, green beans, fruit salad, green salad, cornbread and especially Chef Rod’s made-from-scratch turkey gravy that went on everything!” Dessert included pumpkin pies, cookies, cakes, apple pies, pumpkin souffle and “tons of Cool Whip,” Alexander reported.
      Volunteer decorators made the place look beautiful with yellow, orange and red table cloths, with matching napkins and lots of donated flowers.
      “We cannot thank enough all the volunteers that helped out,” Alexander said. This event would not be such a success for the whole community without all these helpers.”
      Volunteer pianist Kirk serenaded diners softly in the background. Donations poured into OVCA’s ‘need a new roof fund for the CC’ at over $400.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

KEIKI CHRISTMAS at Hana Hou Restaurant in Na`alehu will be held this year on Wednesday, Dec. 9 in honor of its founder Drake Fujimoto. The Christmas gathering, with gifts for keiki, music, food and fellowship, is co-sponsored by Patty Fujimoto and the Hana Hou staff, as well as the community group `O Ka`u Kakou and its president Wayne Kawachi. Music led by Uncle Ernie Kalani and Santa will greet the crowd. Santa will pose for photos with the keiki, who will also receive gifts. Police will offer families photo IDs for keiki. Everyone can enjoy a free meal. It begins at 5 p.m. 
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard supports Small Business Saturday.
U.S. REP. TULSI GABBARD ENCOURAGES Hawai`i residents to buy local. “In Hawai`i, small businesses are the heart of our economy and our community,” Gabbard said. “Overall, they represent over 90 percent of employers and provide jobs for over 50 percent of our private sector workforce. #ShopSmall today to show support for them on Small Business Saturday – and the rest of the year too!” 
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

SEN. MAZIE K. HIRONO JOINED other U.S. lawmakers in introducing the Minority-Serving Institution Fairness Act in the Senate and House of Representatives, legislation that would make Minority-Serving Institutions eligible to compete for and receive multiple federal grants for the purpose of serving a wider range of minority students.
      Currently, there are seven grants available to MSIs, each targeted towardsa specific ethnic minority student population. However, under current law, while an MSI may have a diverse student body made up of different ethnicities, most are limited to receiving grants that serve one population at a time. For example, institutions with both a high Hispanic and Asian population currently have to choose which population to serve with MSI funding. The Minority-Serving Institution Fairness Act would allow MSIs to compete for funding for both types of grants for which they qualify, improving educational opportunities for a wider range of students on their campuses.
      “Hawai`i’s colleges and universities serve diverse populations of students, and they shouldn’t be limited to supporting just one student population with MSI funding,” Hirono said.
      “Targeted outreach to minority students is proven to work. The University of Hawai`i system and other Minority-Serving Institutions are currently forced to make the difficult decision of choosing which student population to serve. Our bipartisan legislation will allow these colleges and universities to improve student success by better serving the needs of multiple, diverse student populations.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI Tour & Sale continues through tomorrow, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Meet artists in their studios throughout the village. For a map and more information, call 987-3472 or 985-7487, or see VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY continues at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.
      Tomorrow, Christine Taylor Sprowl Tetak signs copies of her children’s book, Legend of The Hula Moose. This fictional book contains many true facts, along with illustrations by Diane Lucas. Parents and grandparents will enjoy sharing this story with their keiki.
      Also tomorrow from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Gretchen Grove helps participants make holiday cards and gift-wrap to accompany gifts purchased at VAC Gallery. Supplies are provided; no purchase necessary.
      The gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily.
      Events are free; park entrance fees apply.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_November2015.pdf.


See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.

Friday, November 27, 2015

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Friday, Nov. 27, 2015

A June 27th lava flow breakout near Pu`u O`o began on Thanksgiving eve. Image from video by Nick Calber posted
at Big Island Video News 
AFTER MONTHS OF DILIGENT PLANNING, deliberating and strategizing, Blue Zones Project East Hawai`i committee members are now in full engagement mode, armed with a plan that will help guide the community toward its very own, custom-made Blue Zones Project vision of transforming the environment to make the healthy choice, the easy choice where residents live, work and play. East Hawai`i’s Blue Zone stretches from Hamakua through Ka`u.
      Blue Zones Project committees are comprised of members of East Hawai`i’s community who are volunteering their time, energy, expertise and efforts into implementing Blue Zones Project over the next two to three years, with the goal of becoming a Blue Zones Community.
      To achieve Blue Zones Project Certification status, East Hawai`i will put into action well-being improvement strategies in thirteen community pillar areas focusing on people, places, and policy: Built Environment and Active Living, Food Policy, Tobacco Policy, Schools, Walking School Bus/Safe Routes to Schools, Restaurants, Grocery Stores, Worksites, Faith-Based Organizations, Individual Pledges, Moai Participation, Purpose, Volunteering and Public Awareness/Media.
      Learn more at bluezonesproject.com.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

A BREAKOUT WITHIN FOUR MILES of Pu`u `O`o began Wednesday. It is associated with the June 27th lava flow that had previously threatened Pahoa before stalling. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported that the breakout was prominently visible on a nearby webcam beginning Wednesday afternoon and continuing through the night. The lava flow is not currently threatening any communities.
Matson is raising shipping rates. Wikipedia Photo
by Brett
 Neilson 
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

MATSON IS RAISING SHIPPING PRICES in January. Kathleen Gallagher reported in Pacific Business News that new prices increase by $225 per westbound container and $110 per eastbound container on Jan. 3. 
      Matson is building two new “Aloha Class” ships to travel between Hawai`i and the mainland. “Matson remains committed to investing in our service to ensure that Hawai`i continues to have a modern, reliable and efficient ocean transportation infrastructure,” the company’s senior vice president of Ocean Services told Gallagher.
      See bizjournals.com/pacific.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

HAWAI`I’S CONSUMER ADVOCATE CONTINUES to oppose the proposed merger between Hawaiian Electric Co. and Florida-based NextEra Energy.
      “The Consumer Advocate does not support Commission approval of this merger in the form proposed by Applicants because it does not provide tangible and substantial net benefits to Hawai`i’s consumers,” the agency wrote in its pre-hearing brief to the Public Utilities Commission. “The Consumer Advocate proposed a detailed rate plan and a series of other conditions that, if adopted in total by the Commission, could support a finding that NextEra is fit, willing and able and the merger is in the public interest.
Hawai`i Consumer Advocate Jeffrey Ono
      “Applicants have represented that the merger offers vast public interest benefits in many forms, including potentially large cost savings for ratepayers, expanded access to capital on better terms, deeper management expertise and relevant technical experience. When carefully analyzed, it is obvious that the applicants failed to provide sufficient support and enforceable commitments that truly guarantee customer benefits while mitigating the many costs and risks arising from the Merger. …
      “The Consumer Advocate proposed a reasonable and balanced rate plan to provide the Applicants an opportunity to firm up claimed cost savings through guaranteed rate savings for customers, while mitigating the identified costs and risks that are created by the merger. Applicants, however, rejected or ignored the Consumer Advocate’s proposed conditions and rate plan and have held steadfast to speculative promises of potential customer benefits while offering only temporary and limited rate relief to ratepayers and numerous but largely inadequate new merger commitments.
      “Throughout the record, applicants forego many opportunities to address or remedy concerns with the Proposed Transaction. The Commission should not approve the proposed merger because Applicants fail to satisfy their burden of proof pursuant to the standards of review set forth.”
      Evidentiary hearings on the proposed merger begin Monday. They are to be televised on `Olelo channels and olelo.org.
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MARK KARAN, FROM RATDOG and The Other Ones, performs Sunday, Dec. 6 at 3 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Players joining Karan are Tedd Heilmann, Wolfgang Rehmert and Will Divine. 
      A party beginning at 12 p.m. is a toy and food drive featuring food, raffles, music, Santa Claus and more.
      More musicians on the schedule include JPGS, Full Tilt with Tom Martin, and Foggy.
      The party is free; suggested donation for the concert is $15.

COOPER CENTER HOLDS a craft sale today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. with about 25 crafters selling their wares.
      In conjunction with Halau Hula Kalehuaki`eki`eika`iu’s wreath sale, there will be a special drawing for a Takefuton comforter sewn by halau member Tom Kaua Hoots.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI Tour & Sale starts today and continues through Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Meet artists in their studios throughout the village. For a map and more information, call 987-3472 or 985-7487, or see VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com.

VOLCANO ART CENTER PREVIEWS upcoming workshops, events and classes today and tomorrow in Volcano Village.
      The exhibit also features work by artists who are scheduled to show at VAC Gallery next year.
      VAC’s Hale Ho`omana is on the Volcano Village Artists Hui Tour.
      Friends of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park sell poinsettias, and VAC logo-wear and holiday treats will also be on sale.
      Call 967-8222 for more information.

The author signs her book Sunday.
CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY continues at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. 
      Tomorrow from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Dietrich Varez returns for a meet-and-greet. He will personalize his books and prints.
      On Sunday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Gretchen Grove helps participants make holiday cards and gift-wrap to accompany gifts purchased at VAC Gallery. Supplies are provided; no purchase necessary.
      Also on Sunday, Christine Taylor Sprowl Tetak signs copies of her children’s book, Legend of The Hula Moose. This fictional book contains many true facts, along with illustrations by Diane Lucas. Parents and grandparents will enjoy sharing this story with their keiki.
      The gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. daily.
      Events are free; park entrance fees apply.

KA`U RURAL HEALTH COMMUNITY Association’s fifth annual Floating Lantern Celebration is tomorrow from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Punalu`u Beach Park.

KMC's Holiday Challenge continues through Dec. 31. Photo by Dave Berry
DANCES OF UNIVERSAL PEACE take place tomorrow from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. at Mark Twain with fun, easy-to-learn movements and songs from around the world, evoking peace. Last Saturday of each month. Call 430-1356 or 939-9461.

A STONE COTTAGE CHRISTMAS VILLAGE draws visitors to Kilauea Military Camp as staff decorates for the season. The lights and Christmas displays are along the walkway fronting the historic stone cottages at KMC near the restaurant, bowling alley and Lava Lounge. The public is asked to take a wintery evening stroll and to vote for their favorite decorated cottage through Dec 31. 

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.