About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, September 30, 2013

Ka`u News Briefs Monday, Sept. 30, 2013

Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is one of 401 National Park Service facilities subject to closure if the federal
government shuts down. Photo from HVNP facebook page

IF CONGRESS CAN’T AGREE ON A BUDGET BILL or a short-term resolution to fund the federal government before tomorrow, all 401 national park sites, including Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, would be shuttered. 
      In the event of a government shutdown, the National Park Service will take all necessary steps to close and secure national park facilities and grounds, according to John Garder, Budget & Appropriations Legislative representative. Day use visitors will be instructed to leave the park immediately. Wherever possible, park roads will be closed, and access will be denied. National and regional offices and support centers will be closed and secured, except where they are needed to support excepted personnel. These steps will be enacted as quickly as possible while still ensuring visitor and employee safety as well as the integrity of park resources.
      A shutdown would put nearly 87 percent of Park Service employees — more than 21,000 staff members — indefinitely out of their jobs.
      National parks are powerful economic engines, supporting $31 billion in private-sector spending annually. According to the Department of the Interior, the last government shutdown in 1995-1996 cost local businesses $14 million per day. A current analysis indicates the actual impact on businesses now could be closer to $30 million per day. Every federal dollar invested in national parks generates ten dollars in economic activity. National parks also mean good jobs around the country. The National Park Service employs approximately 20,000 people, and national parks support 252,000 private-sector jobs.
      Closing parks would not only deprive visitors of an experience of a lifetime, it would also prevent the park staff from monitoring and maintaining natural and historic resources throughout the park system, Garder said. Staff biologists, ecologists, and other resource professionals work to rid our parks of invasive species and to protect the threatened and endangered species that call our national parks home. Other staff members monitor grounds to prevent vandalism, illegal dumping, and other detrimental activities. While a shutdown would allow for the most critical staff to remain, much of this work would be severely hampered by a government shutdown.
      Citizens can urge members of Congress to avert a shutdown and support full funding for the Park Service by calling the Capitol switchboard at 202-224-3121 and asking to speak with their representatives. A list of representatives is available at National Parks Conservation Association’s website, npca.org.

Sen. Mazie Hirono
KA`U’S U.S. SEN. MAZIE HIRONO, through her campaign committee, released statements this morning regarding the congressional standoff and pointed to the next elections. 
      “In the last several days, we’ve had some pretty stark reminders about why it’s so important to defend our Democratic majority in the U.S. Senate.
      “If Republicans win back the Senate in the 2014 elections, the kind of dangerous stunts the GOP-controlled House has pulled – like threatening to shut down the government over Obamacare – will become commonplace. And people like tea party demagogue Ted Cruz could become part of Senate leadership.
      “Republicans only need to pick up six seats to take the majority – and they’re looking at two races particularly closely: Sen. Mary Landrieu’s in Louisiana and Sen. Kay Hagan’s in North Carolina.”

Sen. Brian Schatz
KA`U’S U.S. SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ said, “A government shutdown would harm the people of Hawai‘i, and it is irresponsible for unbending and intransigent Tea Party Republicans to continue to hold our economy hostage so that they can get their way. Enough is enough. While the Continuing Resolution is not perfect, it will keep the government from shutting down. We must now work to pass a budget that removes damaging sequestration cuts and represents the priorities of working families.” 
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard

KA`U’S U.S. REP. TULSI GABBARD voted against the House bill with the riders that include delaying Obamacare. She said that “this bill maintains harmful, across-the-board budget cuts and includes amendments which will not pass the Senate or get the President’s signature. We need a reasonable, workable solution, not partisan games that will hurt hard-working families all across Hawai`i and our country.” 
      To comment on or “like” these stories, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I COUNTY COUNCIL’S PUBLIC SAFETY & Mass Transit Committee continues its discussion about banning genetically modified organisms tomorrow at 1 p.m.
      Other committees meeting tomorrow are Finance at 8:30 a.m. and Planning at 9:30 a.m.
      The full Council meets Wednesday at 9 a.m. All meetings take place at Council Chambers in Hilo.
      Ka`u residents can participate in the meetings via videoconferencing at Ocean View Community Center. Agendas, available at hawaiicounty.gov, state that public testimony has been completed on topics before the Public Safety & Mass Transit and Planning Committees.
      To comment on or “like” these stories, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Sen. Russell Ruderman
A RECENT STORY IN CIVIL BEAT QUESTIONING whether the cutting down of 100 GMO papaya trees in Puna was an act of “ecoterrorism” brought comments about the situation farmers find themselves in when it comes to GMO crops. 
      Ka`u’s state Sen. Russell Ruderman said, “There has never been a bit of evidence to link GMO activists with these crimes. We all know farmers are to be supported, not targeted. No one has advocated such actions.
      “This implication without evidence casts an unfair shadow on those of us trying to regulate GMOs.”
      When one commenter said Council member Brenda Ford’s bill called for farmers to cut down GMO trees, another pointed out that Ford expected that her bill would be amended to exempt papaya, and the commenter said, “This act of vandalism has nothing to do with the bills before the Council.”
      Several commenters questioned writer Sophie Cocke’s use of the term ecoterrorism to describe the act of vandalism. Eco-terrorism is a bit of a sensationalist term, said one. Another asked, “This act of vandalism does nothing to promote the interests of the anti-GMO activists, so why would they do this?”
      See more at civilbeat.com.
      To comment on or “like” these stories, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

EVENTS AT HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK tomorrow are scheduled unless the park is closed due to a government shutdown.

Large Earthquakes in Hawai`i is the topic at After Dark in the Park
tomorrow. Photo from NPS
KA`U RESIDENT DICK HERSHBERGER brings Hawaiian Volcano Observatory founder Thomas Jaggar to life during A Walk into the Past. Programs begin at 10 a.m., 12 p.m. and 2 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center and then visit the Whitney Vault.
 
      WES THELEN, A SEISMOLOGIST WITH USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, presents an overview of damaging earthquakes in Hawai`i, including current theories on why they occur and what to know about future large earthquakes at After Dark in the Park tomorrow. He also talks about Hawai`i’s first Great ShakeOut, an earthquake drill on Thursday, Oct. 17, how to join the global effort to increase awareness of earthquake hazards and how to minimize their risks.
      The program begins at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. $2 donations support park programs; park entrance fees apply.

KA`U DEFEATED KOHALA in girls high school volleyball Saturday night 25-17, 25-20 and 25-15. Ka`u ranks third in the Division II Big Island Interscholastic Federation girls volleyball standings with game wins and losses to date: Hawai`i Preparatory Academy 9-17; Konawaena 8-2; Ka`u 5-5; Pahoa 4-6; Kohala 4-7; East-Pac 3-6; Honoka`a 2-8; Laupahoehoe 1-8; Parker 1-10; and Makua Lani 0-10. The next Trojan girls volleyball games are on Wednesday evening, Oct. 2 when Ka`u hosts Waiakea. 

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

ALSO SEE KAUCALENDAR.COM AND FACEBOOK.COM/KAUCALENDAR.

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Sunday, September 29, 2013

Ka`u News Briefs Sunday, Sept. 29, 2013

Access to trails, camping, driving, shopping and staying in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park will shut down unless
Congress ends its stalemate over the federal budget. Photo from HVNP facebook page

POSSIBLE SHUTDOWN OF THE FEDERAL government has Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, one of Ka`u's largest employers, planning to furlough 127 workers and close all recreational activities and facilities. Should Congress fail to pass a budget by midnight tomorrow, Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando said, only 13 employees will remain to protect the property and take care of essential services. They will staff gates and the campground, take care of infrastructure and respond to emergencies.
Overnight guests at Volcano House and Kilauea Military Camp will have to be out by Thursday and be unable to use the park from Tuesday until the National Park Service is funded. Volcano Art Center Gallery, Kilauea Military Camp restaurant and bar, stores inside the park, bowling alley all other facilities will lock up by Tuesday morning, she said. No camping, hiking, horse riding or other recreational permits will be allowed after Monday afternoon unless the stalemate in Congress is broken and a last-minute budget is passed for federal operations. The other federal agency with the most employees in Ka`u is the U.S. Geological Survey with its Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, which is also expected to be affected by the shutdown.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Cy Tamura grabs an interception deep in Kamehameha's end zone
during yesterday's game. Photo by Tim Wright, KHS '77
KA`U'S EIGHT-MAN FOOTBALL TEAM scored 29 points against Kamehameha in Kea`au yesterday. Trojan Pono Palakiko accomplished the first touchdown with a 77-yard dash after catching the ball from quarterback Chance Emmsley. The game was tied 13 to 13 at the halftime. After the half, the Trojans lost footing on a surface they rarely see - soaked in rain. The Warriors overcame the Trojans, giving Kamehameha the win with a final score of 37-29. One highlight of the game was Trojan Cy Tamura jumping high to intercept a Warrior ball deep inside Kemehameha's end zone. The team's facebook page describes more action: "Derrick Velez had some awesome tackles and assists, and so did Rigan Kaapana and RJ Kahele and Kaweni Ibarra....the whole team did awesome....But it was pouring rain and our Ka`u boys are not used to playing in the rain....but despite all that....did great."
      This week the Trojans take the plane to Maui and the ferry to Moloka`i to play the Moloka`i Farmers, who are members of the Maui County Eight-Man High School Football League. Trojans take on the Waveriders at Kealakehe on Friday, Oct. 25 and return for homecoming on Friday, Nov. 8, when Moloka`i comes to Ka`u.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

This week, Ka`u residents can vote for art to
grace the cover of The Directory 2014.
THE DIRECTORY, Ka`u business and community resource guide can be read online at
flipsnack.com/5B55ECEC5A8/fzpfg59c. The Directory will also be available at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union Monday - Thursday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday until 5 p.m during the Ka`u Chamber of Commerce's annual art show. The art show is also the place for the popular vote to choose The Directory 2014 cover. Entries into the art show are being accepted through Thursday. The are adult and keiki divisions and all forms of art from paintings to carvings, pottery, glass and photography are accepted. The theme is Ka`u.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

PLAINTIFFS CHALLENGING THE STATE Board of Land and Natural Resources’ decision to grant a permit for the Thirty Meter Telescope have filed their opening brief in Third Circuit Court.
      The plaintiffs, who say they are seeking to force BLNR to uphold its responsibility to protect natural and cultural resources, are Mauna Kea Anaina Hou, KAHEA: the Hawaiian-Environmental Alliance, Deborah J. Ward, E. Kalani-Flores, B. Pualani Case, Clarence Kukauakahi Ching and Paul Neves.
      “The summit of Mauna Kea is wao akua, a place of Gods,” said KAHEA president Jonathan Osorio in a statement. “It is a sacred place because of the sensitivity of that environment and its influence over all of the environments below it: forests, uplands, streams — everything,” he said.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Fountain grass colonizes young lava flows and creates fire hazards.
Photo from NPS
VOLUNTEERS REMOVED 560 FOUNTAIN GRASS PLANTS from the Ocean View area yesterday. The event took place on National Public Lands Day and was spearheaded by Ocean View Community Association and Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.
      Gil Robinson, president of the Ocean View Community Association, told West Hawai`i Today reporter Carolyn Lucas-Zenk that the association arranged the unique partnership because the park has staff members who can help HOVE residents get rid of the problematic weeds and maintain areas better. They can also train volunteers, who can then guide others. Robinson said such service projects bring the community together and can cause a ripple effect that amplifies the effectiveness of the effort.
      Park ecologist David Benitez told Lucas-Zenk that “the park has been very aggressive in keeping the numbers low in its Kahuku Unit (neighboring Ocean View). However, partnerships like this one in the HOVE community are equally as important.”
      Fountain grass is an invasive species that displaces native plants and colonizes young lava flows, creating fire hazards.
      See more at westhawaiitoday.com.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ IS CO-SPONSORING a number of bills to unlock Hawai`i students’ full potential by expanding early education, providing more counseling and after school opportunities, fostering excellent educators and modernizing schools.
      “In order to build a better future for Hawai`i, we must begin with our students,” Schatz said. “We know so much about how to help students achieve their full potential, and the federal government can do more to help states provide the conditions for students’ success. For example, we know that children who have access to early childhood education are much more likely to succeed in school and after they graduate. We also see real classroom results when we give our teachers relevant and timely training. These bills would give states more resources in the areas that really matter so that our kids have greater opportunities to succeed.”
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Free spay and neuter clinics are coming to Ka`u.
KOHALA ANIMAL RELOCATION AND EDUCATION SERVICE is coming to Ka`u in November and December. KARES offers free spay and neuter clinics for dogs Tuesday, Nov. 5 and Tuesday, Dec. 3 at St. Jude’s Episcopal Church on Paradise Circle in Ocean View.
      “Birth control for your dog can save many animal lives by preventing an excess of animals from being born in the first place,” said KARES vice president Elaine Anderson. “Our community does have a pet overpopulation problem, which means there are more dogs than the community can care for or can find homes for.
      “The most important thing you can do as a pet owner to save more lives is to spay/neuter pets that belong to all your family and friends.”
      Contact KARES to make an appointment at 328-8455 or pets@kohalaanimal.org.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Wes Thelen Photo from USGS/HVO
LARGE EARTHQUAKES IN THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS is the title of Tuesday's After Dark in the Park program. Weston Thelen, a seismologist with USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, presents an overview of damaging earthquakes in Hawai`i, including current theories on why they occur and what to know about future large earthquakes. He also talks about Hawai`i’s first Great ShakeOut, an earthquake drill on Thursday, Oct. 17, how to join the global effort to increase awareness of earthquake hazards and how to minimize their risks.
      The program begins at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, unless the park is closed due to a government shutdown. $2 donations support park programs; park entrance fees apply.

IN KA`U HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS, Ka`u varsity girls volleyball team won at home against Kohala 25-17, 25-20 and 25-15, while JV Trojans lost 25-22 and 25-23. Ka`u hosts Waiakea Wednesday at 6 p.m.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

ALSO SEE KAUCALENDAR.COM AND FACEBOOK.COM/KAUCALENDAR.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES




Saturday, September 28, 2013

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, September 28, 2013

Hula is one of the community activities that has led to better health among Native Hawaiians and other Pacific Islanders. Halau Lei
Hula O Leinoalani practices at the Old Pahala Clubhouse, with ceremonies at Punalu`u Black Sand Beach, and travels to Lana`i next week for a cultural exchange under Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder. Photo by Julia Neal
THE HEALTH OF PACIFIC ISLANDERS IN HAWAI`I has improved, according to a 20-year study released this week by the John A. Burns School for Medicine at University of Hawai`i. The research includes: Native Hawaiians, Filipinos, Samoans, Tongans, the Guamanian Chamorro, people from the Federated States of Micronesia, Palau, Marshall Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and Fijians, who represent a major portion of Hawai`i’s population.
      According to the study, many improvements have come from efforts embedded into local communities, such as:
      •Health improvement programs run by people the community knows and trusts.
      •Culture and science blending for successful outcomes. A cardiac health improvement study incorporated hula, and saw as much as a 20-point drop in blood pressure among participants.
      •Focusing on improving educational opportunities. The UH Community Colleges Pathways program shined: almost doubled enrollment of Native Hawaiians from 1992-2007.
     Dr. Keawa`aimoku Kaholokula, one of the study leaders, noted that obesity, diabetes and heart disease still plague the population. While statistics are improving, including longer life, challenges persist, from providing medical care to improvements in education and the ability to make a living and have secure housing. Kaholokula said that the study should not stay on a shelf, but inspire creation of Native Hawaiian health task force. See the full report Assessment & Priorities for Health & Well-Being in Native Hawaiians & Other Pacific Peoples at at http://blog.hawaii.edu/uhmednow/files/2013/09/AP-Hlth-REPORT-2013.pdf 
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE MISSING KAYAKER was discovered by Hawa`i Volcanoes National Park ranger on Thursday. Richard Gomez had been camping along the coast since Sunday when his kayak broke up in the surf while he was attempting to paddle ashore. According to the police report, the ranger gave him first-aid and assisted him to a campsite. The kayakers’ whereabouts, unknown for days, prompted an expensive search by air and land involving police, fire departments and the U.S. Caost Guard. A VHF radio or other communications device, could have saved search and rescue crew efforts that could have been necessary for more desperate situations, rescue personnel said. Among the search and rescue vehicles and crew deployed were the Kittiwake, an 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter, and an HC-130 plane from the Coast Guard Air Station at Barbers Point on O`ahu.
     The search began after friends of Gomez called in to report him missing.  
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

POLLUTED RUNOFF CONTROL PROGRAM is the name of a five-year effort by the state Hawai`i Department of Health with $2 million in federal Department of Health and Environmental Protection Agency funding. The plan is to help reduce damage to reefs and the coast from storm water runoff. The program, under Section 319 of the U.S. Clean Water Act, employs state and local community organizations to design and carry out watershed plans.
      The Environmental Protection Agency provided $1.1 million and DOH put up $746,000. An EPA news release yesterday quoted Jared Blumenfied, the agency’s Pacific Southwest administrator, saying, "Our goal, along with the Department of Health, is to protect coastal waters and coral reefs from the effects of polluted surface water," Blumenfeld said the funding is for "nonpoint" source water pollution control projects. It can be used for stabilizing eroding stream banks and restoring native vegetation to reduce sediment runoff. It can also be used to reduce agricultural runoff into gulches and streams. 
 To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

ART FOR THE COVER CONTEST FOR THE DIRECTORY 2014, the annual publication of the Ka`u Chamber of Commerce, is being accepted on weekdays until next Thursday, Oct. 3 at 4 p.m. at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na`alehu. At the end of the week, the popular vote will determine the winner of the cover contest. The art show is up all week during credit union hours and includes a keiki division. Art on display includes paintings, decorated ipu, Hawaiian weapons, photographs and many other visual arts. The theme is Ka`u. For more, call Ka`u Chamber of Commerce President Dallas Decker at 516-662-8789. Memberships and advertising are also being taken by the Chamber for The Directory 2014 ,which raises money for scholarships for Ka`u college students. Call 928-6471.

OCEAN VIEW, NA`ALEHU AND PAHALA POST OFFICES are apparently safe - for now -from the federal cutbacks that aim to close five facilities around the state. The only Hawai`i Island post office on the chopping block is the tiny Kukuihaele, near Waipio Valley, which is about five miles from the Honok`a Post Office, federal officials announced this week. The others around the state are at Hanama`ulu, near Lihu`e on Kaua`i and branches atr Kapolei, Kaimuki and Ewa, which are all near other post offices. Ocean View, Na`alehu and Pahala, as well as the Volcano Post Office are much longer distances from the nearest post offices although Volcanoes National Park post office and Volcano Village post officer are closer together.
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

FUNDING FOR HAWA`I WILDLIFE FUND can be raised through Monday, Sept. 30 through Foodland’s Give Aloha Program. Foodland is matching any contribution up to $249 from those checking out with a Maka`i Card and disignating Hawai`I Wildlife Fund as the recipient with its code number 77187. Hawai`i Wildlife Fund is known for raising awareness of marine debris with education through major international television news netsworks. It is known statewide for its anchialine pool restoration work in Hoo`onoua, marine debris removal not only in Ka`u bur also Ke`ehu on Maui, traditional taro and fish farming restoration, hawksbill sea turtle recovery monitoring and research, Honu watch and , monk seal conservation and rehabilitation. For more information contact Megan Lamson at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com or 808-769-7629.  
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A Kamilo Beach cleanup earlier this month drew 57 volunteers to the Ka`u Coast during the Get the Drift & Bag It coastal cleanup to
 pick up approximatley 1,873 lbs. of debris. Some of the debris will be up-cylced to make containers. Photo from HWF 
THE MISSING KAYAKER was discovered by Hawa`i Volcanoes National Park ranger on Thursday. Richard Gomez had been canping along the coast since Sunday when his kayak broke up in the surf while he was attempting to paddle ashore. According to the police report, the ranger gave him first-aid and assisted him to a camp site. The kayakers’ whereabouts, unknown for days, prompted an expensive search by air and land involving police, fire departments and the U.S. Caost Guard. A VHF radio or other communications device, could have saved search and rescue crew efforts that could have been necessary for more desperate situations, rescue personnel said. Among the search and rescue vehicles and crew deployed were the Kittiwake, an 87-foot Coast Guard Cutter, and an HC-130 plane from the Coast Guard Air Station at Barbers Point on O`ahu. The search began after friends of Gomez called in to report him missing.

THIS IS NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY and Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is waiving entrance fees. Volunteers are removing invasive Himalayan ginger and fountain grass in the Kahuku, Ocean View and Volcano sections of the park. National Public Land Day is sponsored by the National Environmental Education Foundation.
 To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park hosts an open house in conjunction with National Park Public Lands Day on Saturday. KMC invites the public to experience how the camp serves U.S. troops by enjoying all facilities and services. Call 967-8371 for more information.  To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U HIGH SPORTS: Today, Ka`u Girls Volleyball is hosts Kohala. at home. Ka`u bowling traveled to the BIIF Individual Bowl at Hilo Lanes. Cross Country made the long trek to Waimea for races at Hawai`I Preparatory Academy. Air Riflery team drove to Kamehameha School in Kea`au. and Ka`u eight-man football plays Kamehameha junior varsity in Kea`au at 4 p.m.
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.
              
           SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND        KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

                 ALSO SEE KAUCALENDAR.COM AND FACEBOOK.COM/KAUCALENDAR.

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Friday, September 27, 2013

Ka`u News Briefs, Friday, September 27, 2013

Ulu Makuakane will represent Ka`u and the Hawaiian Islands in the Miss South Pacific Pageant in the Solomon Islands in December.
ULU MAKUAKANE, who reigned as Miss Ka‘ū Coffee, is on her way to the Solomon Islands in December to compete in the Miss South Pacific Pageant. Makuakane, daughter of Nona and Paul Makuakane of Nā‘ālehu, is current holder of the title Miss Hawaiian Islands. She is a student at University of Hawai‘i at Manoa.
A Miss Ka`u Coffee and Miss Hawaiian
Islands, Ulu Makuakane was captain of
the water polo team at Ka`u High School
        “I am honored to represent Hawai‘i and of course the district of Ka‘ū and be a contestant in the Miss South Pacific Pageant. Unlike other pageants whose categories include swimsuits and evening gowns, the Miss South Pacific Pageant will have categories such as a sarong wrap and traditional attire. Although the pageant is held on one day of the week, the judging begins once the contestants arrive to the Solomon Islands. We will take part in community events, visits to local schools and hospitals and even a parade held just for the Pageant,” Makuakane said.
      Makuakane is raising funds to travel to the Solomon Islands for herself and her chaperone. Pageant activities take place the week of Dec. 1 – 7. She said she will hold a fundraiser in Ka’u and will have a booth at Plantation Days on Saturday, Oct. 12 at Pahala Plantation Managers House. She can be reached at 808-640-9694.
        The Miss South Pacific pageant is held on different islands each year, with last year’s event in American Samoa won by Janine Tuivaiti, of Samoa. The 2011 Miss South Pacific was held in Samoa , with the winner Alisi Rabukawaqa, of Fiji and the 2010 event was held in Papua New Guinea, with the winner Joyana Meyer, from Cook Islands. Other winners have come from American Samoa, Tahiti, New Zealand, Tonga and Niue. The last winner from Hawai‘i was in 1988.
       Another connection between Ka`u and the Miss South Pacific pageant is the award-winning film Miss South Pacific: Beauty & the Sea, directed by Mary Lambert and produced by Teresa Tico who owns a home in Pahala. See www.misssouthpacificthemovie.com
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

PLASTICS GATHERED BY VOLUNTEERS on Ka`u beaches will soon go an upcylcing company making plastic bottles, under a partnership Hawai`i Wildlife Fund, Recycle Hawai`i, a bottle manufacturer named Method and the state Department of Land & Natural Resources.
      Funding comes through Recycle Hawai'I, under a $20,000 grant from the state Department of Health to help address Japan Tsunami Marine Debris and keep Hawai`i’s shorelines clean. Recycle Hawai`i is a 501(c) 3 educational organization and one of six Hawai`i non-profits to receive a grant.
      “The six grants totaling $100,000 complement ongoing efforts by community groups that are already working to address marine debris, including debris originating from the Japan tsunami,” said Gary Gill, deputy director of the state Environmental Health Administration. “For years Hawai`i has depended on volunteers to keep marine debris off our beaches. We are providing a little support for the very big job they do.”
      Recycle Hawaii’s approach supports ongoing collection efforts to ensure that the materials collected along local beaches are recycled to the fullest extent. “Just getting the stuff off the beaches is a herculean task and Hawai'i Wildlife Fund deserves a great deal of credit for the work they do. We wanted to match their efforts in our own area of expertise,” stated Kristine Kubat, grants specialist for Recyle Hawai`i.
CNN's Kyung Lah interviewed Megan Lamson in March. Now the marine debris
plastics will become new containers. Photo from Hawai`i Wildlife Fund
      "Hawai'i Wildlife Fund is excited to partner with Recycle Hawai'i on this upcoming DOH marine debris removal grant,” said Megan Lamson, project coordinator for HWF. “We look forward to this opportunity to turn some of the material collected during cleanup events into a resource." 
      Under the Hawai`i Island program, HWF volunteers will gather marine debris along a 10-mile stretch of coastline from Ka Lae to Waiohinu, which includes Kamilo Point in Kau, one of the world’s largest accumulation points for ocean trash. High density plastic suitable for remanufacture into bottles will be separated and shipped to Method, a manufacturer of naturally-derived, biodegradable household. The company already collects marine debris from beaches on O`ahu to make containers under the brand name Ocean Plastic.
       An educational and cultural component of the program features local talent, Hawane Rios, who will travel to the schools to teach students about the relationship between life on the land and life in the sea. "We all have an innate divine connection to the land, ocean, wildlife and each other. It is our responsibility to make decisions that will be in the highest good for our Earth. This next generation of children will be the one to make the great changes so we must teach and lead them well," said Rios. Once the students develop an understanding of how marine debris impacts ocean creatures, they will track the cycle that turns the plastic washing up on their shores into new bottles.
Plastics collected from the Ka`u Coast will be up-cycled into new containers.
Photo from Method
      Recycle Hawai'i Executive Director Paul J. Buklarewicz expressed gratitude for the additional program support coming from the Matson Navigation Company. “We’ve worked in the past with Matson’s Ka Ipu Aina program to remove litter from Hawaii Island roadways; we’re very grateful to get their help in removing these materials from the beaches,” he said. 
      Adam Lowry, co-founder and chief greenskeeper at Method, expressed excitement over expanding the company’s collection efforts in Hawai`i. “This program serves the dual purpose of cleaning up more beaches in Paradise and giving us a greater supply of material to make into recyclable packaging. Making the world a cleaner place for everyone is one of Method’s core values.”
      Over the next year, the grant funds will support four clean-ups; the next one is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 14 and Saturday, Nov. 23. For more information contact Megan Lamson at kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com.
      The funding, which will be administered by the state Department of Health, was provided by a $50,000 grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program and another $50,000 of matching funds contributed by DLNR.
      To date, there have been eight confirmed Japan tsunami debris items in Hawai`i and over 1,700 reports in the U.S. and Canada. The public is urged to report findings of potential JTMD to DLNR at (808) 587-0400 or dlnr.marine.debris@hawaii.gov and to NOAA at disasterdebris@noaa.gov
      For guidance on “what to do if you see debris in Hawai`i’s ocean or beaches” go to http://dlnr.hawaii.gov/wp-content/uploads/ 2013/01/JTMD-Guideline3.pdf.
      For the latest information on tsunami debris, visit http://dlnr.hawaii.gov /marine-debris/ or the NOAA Marine Debris Program website at http://marinedebris.noaa.gov/tsunamidebris/.  To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Thich Nhat Hanh's Living Without Fear or
Stress will be taught at Na`alehu Hongwanji.
  LIVING WITHOUT STRESS OR FEAR is a weekly class that begins Wednesday, Oct. 2 at Nā‘ālehu Hongwanji Mission. The six week meditation course is an audio learning presentation by Thich Nhat Hanh, a Zen Master, scholar, poet and peace activist who was nominated for the 1967 Nobel Peace Prize by Martin Luther King, Jr. Sessions start each Wednesday at 4:15 p.m. for approximately one hour. Classes begin after 3 p.m. yoga. Comfortable and casual dress is recommended.
      For more information call Marla McCasland at 929-9737. Dropping in and out of sessions is allowed. Donations are accepted at the door but not necessary. Everyone is welcomed.
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY is tomorrow with Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park waiving entrance fees. The public is invited to volunteer by removing invasive Himalayan ginger in the park or fountain grass in Ocean View.
      Stewardship at the Summit takes place from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., when volunteers remove Himalayan ginger along park trails. Volunteers should wear closed-toe shoes and long pants and bring a hat, raingear, snacks and water. Loppers and gloves are provided. No advance registration is required. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      Fountain grass removal takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Ocean View. For more information and to register, contact David Benitez at 808-985-6085 or david_benitez@nps.gov.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park hosts an open house in conjunction with National Park Public Lands Day on Saturday. KMC invites the public to experience how the camp serves U.S. troops by enjoying all facilities and services. Call 967-8371 for more information.

UPCOMING KA`U HIGH SPORTS: On Saturday, Ka`u Girls Volleyball will host Kohala at 10 a.m. at home. Ka`u bowling attends the BIIF Individual Bowl at Hilo lanes at 8 a.m., Cross Country races at HPA at 12 p.m., Air Riflery shoots at Kamehameha at 10 a.m. and Ka`u eight-man football plays Kamehameha junior varsity in Kea`au at 4 p.m.
To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

            
           SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND        KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

                 ALSO SEE KAUCALENDAR.COM AND FACEBOOK.COM/KAUCALENDAR.

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Thursday, September 26, 2013

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, Sept. 26, 2013

Ka`u Rural Health Community Association will add onto its many services, such as a free blood pressure check for Kazu Suenobu,
by assisting Ka`u residents with their health insurance options. Photo by Nalani Parlin
KA`U RURAL HEALTH COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION, INC. is partnering with the Hawai`i Health Connector to help extend health insurance to the uninsured. KRHCAI is one of 34 community organizations participating in the Connector’s Hi`i Ola Marketplace Assister program. 
      Open enrollment for the Connector begins in October, and KRHCAI has received a $125,000 grant for marketplace assister. The Kokua role for KRHCAI is to reach and educate individuals, families and small business owners. The grant also supports providing jobs in the local community and providing impartial information about health insurance plan options.
      “Partnering with Hawai`i Health Connector allows us to work directly with our community to provide critical health coverage information, said Jessie Marques, KRHCAI executive director.”
     See more at krhcai.com.
     Bonnie `Anela McAfee-Torco, Hawai`i Health Connector’ Hi`i Ola program manager, said, “With these partner organizations we are taking outreach efforts deeper into each community and connecting individuals, families and small businesses with the health insurance and financial assistance options available to them. The Kokua will provide in-person assistance to empower our families and communities to make the best health care decisions possible.” In addition to the marketplace assister program, the Connector is also building a customer support center, which will receive inquiries from
multiple communication channels, including telephone, postal mail, web chat and fax.
     The customer support center will operate from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week during the open enrollment period.
      For more information, visit hawaiihealthconnector.com.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Vickie Crosby
Photo from KRHCAI
THE HEART OF THE COMMUNITY, the newsletter of the Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, says aloha to its board president, Vickie Crosby, “who will be moving to California to care for her ailing mother. A certified family nurse practitioner, Vickie, along with her husband Rick, owned and operated the Ocean View Family Health Clinic since 2006. This was a full service family practice where she has served as a primary care provider since 2006 for many patients in the Ocean View and surrounding areas.” Crosby holds a master’s degree as a family nurse practitioner and was awarded the Hawai`i state Nurse Practitioner of the Year award in 2012 for outstanding clinical practice. 
     See more at krhcai.com.
     Members of her staff, including nurse practitioner Cindy Cohen and several patients, told The Ka`u Calendar that they hope that a medical group will buy Crosby’s practice and continue with the 4,000 patient visits a year at the clinic in Ocean View. The clinic is for sale, with all of its permits and equipment and a three-bedroom, two-bath home. 
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

LIFEGUARDS, POLICE AND RESCUE PERSONNEL are asking everyone to be on the lookout for a kayak that may be along the Ka`u Coast. Police report that Richard Gomez, a 48-year-old Hilo man, may have taken off from Hilo to Kalae on Wednesday in his kayak and is now a missing person. The police report identifies Gomez as six feet tall, 175 pounds, bald, with green eyes. The U.S. Coast Guard and Hawai`i Fire Department are assisting in the search.
     Anyone with information on Gomez’s whereabouts is asked to call the police non-emergency line at 935-3311 or the Coast Guard Command Center on O`ahu at 808-842-2600. Those who prefer to remain anonymous can call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Humpback whales may scar their sides and flukes by rolling over on
the bottom of the ocean. Photo from NOAA
NEW HUMPBACK WHALE RESEARCH reveals some of the filter feeding habits of the giant mammals when they spend summers in northern waters. While humpback whales take in little nutrition during winters in Hawai`i Pacific waters and warm waters in the Atlantic, they bulk up on food in the summer in northern waters. The research, done on the East Coast of Massachusetts, documented whales rolling on their sides on the bottom of the ocean to scoop up small fish and krill. The method of rolling over to shovel in the food may account for scars on the sides of the humpbacks and their vulnerability to entanglement in fishing gear on the ocean floor. The feeding habit of humpbacks most familiar to the public is called bubble-net, when whales join together to blow a net of bubbles around small fish and other organisms to catch them. The research was done by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in cooperation with National Geographic and its Crittercam camera equipment.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION CONTINUES TO RECEIVE public testimony regarding the `Aina Koa Pono project, which would involve constructing a refinery off Wood Valley Road and harvesting trees, brushes and grasses between Pahala and Na`alehu to burn in a microwave facility to create biofuel for Hawai`i Electric Light Co. and Hawaiian Electric to use in power plants.
      Pahala resident Lynn Hamilton asks questions about biochar, a byproduct of AKP’s microwave catalytic depolymerization process:
      “`Aina Koa Pono has stated that it expects its biofuel refinery to generate 180-270 tons of biochar byproduct per day, which would be deposited on land here in Ka`u as a soil amendment. What would be the volume of that biochar?
Biochar from agricultural waste. Photo from biochar.org
      “What would be the specific components of the biochar? Would they help or hurt farming and ranching? Would they be safe for people? Would there be any metal, metalloids, polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons and/or volatile organic compounds contained in the biochar?”
      Hamilton also has questions regarding storage at AKP’s site:
      “What is the volume and footprint on the land of inputs, byproducts and biofuel that would be stored on the proposed refinery site for AKP in Ka`u? Would there be storage for raw biomass hauled in from cutting trees, brush and grasses? Would there be the storage of dried pellets made from the biomass before the pellets are used in the AKP microwave refinery? In what quantity would the additive zeolite used for the refining process be stored at the refinery site? Would there be a need to store hydrogen for the refining process and in what quantity? What quantity of biofuel would be stored at the refinery before being trucked to the electric plant in Kona?
      “At AKP’s estimated quantities, what would be the estimated risk for air and ground water pollution in dust or chemicals through daily activities, accidents and natural disasters? What would be the risk for fire that could destroy nearby farm buildings and homes?
      “Will AKP’s biochar be studied? Will there be a study of biochar actually produced by AKP? Will the study include the actual feedstock used in APK’s project? Will a study be more than a lab-scale analysis since such a study would be inadequate?
      “As AKP plans to spread between 180 – 270 tons of biochar per day over the land or burn it, what are the emissions and the pollutants if they burn biochar for power? Has that been tested? Are there hazards from breathing biochar kicked up by the wind? Has AKP tested for aromatics, furans, and/or dioxins in air emission in wastewater? Could the water supply be compromised?
      “Hopefully, the questions surrounding biochar are addressed before commitments are made,” Hamilton concludes.
      This and other testimony is available at puc.hawaii.gov. Docket number is 2012-0185.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY is Saturday. Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park honors the day by waiving entrance fees. The park encourages the public to volunteer by removing invasive Himalayan ginger in the park or fountain grass in Ocean View. 
      Stewardship at the Summit takes place from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., when volunteers remove Himalayan ginger along park trails. Volunteers should wear closed-toe shoes and long pants and bring a hat, raingear, snacks and water. Loppers and gloves are provided. No advance registration is required. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      Fountain grass removal takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Ocean View. For more information and to register, contact David Benitez at 808-985-6085 or david_benitez@nps.gov.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park offers an open house in conjunction with National Park Public Lands Day on Saturday. KMC invites the public to experience how the camp serves our troops by enjoying all facilities and services. Call 967-8371 for more information.

KA`U HIGH GIRLS junior varsity and varsity volleyball teams fell to the Kamehameha Warriors Wednesday, at Ka`u High School gym. Junior varsity scores were 25-7 and 25-23. Varsity scores were 25-23, 25-18 and 25-18. Toni Beck led the Trojans with 16 kills, and Kamalani Fujikawa had five kills. Ka`u High girls volleyball hosts the Kohala Cowgirls on Saturday, at 10 a.m. 

UPCOMING KA`U HIGH SPORTS: On Saturday, Ka`u bowling attends the BIIF Individual Bowl at Hilo lanes at 8 a.m., Cross Country races at HPA at 12 p.m., Air Riflery shoots at Kamehameha at 10 a.m. and Ka`u eight-man football plays Kamehameha junior varsity in Kea`au at 2 p.m.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

ALSO SEE KAUCALENDAR.COM AND FACEBOOK.COM/KAUCALENDAR.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES



Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Ksa`u News Briefs, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2013


Are ranching, coffee and food farming a better economic use of Ka`u lands targeted by AKP for biofuel crops? asks residents writing into the PUC. Photo by Julia Neal
THE `AINA KOA PONO ISSUE is receiving more public testimony from Ka`u, which is posted on the Public Utilities Commission online docket. The proposal, which would involve constructing a refinery off Wood Valley Road and harvesting trees, brushes and grasses between Pahala and Na`alehu to burn in a microwave facility, is opposed by Hawai`i County. The county has asked the PUC to hold evidentiary hearings unless it turns down the proposal for a 20-year contract for Hawai`i Electric Light Co. and Hawaiian Electric to buy biofuel from AKP to use in power plants.
      Yesterday, the PUC posted a letter from Dr. Linda-Jane Irwin, a physician living in Volcano. She said she is concerned about the proposed transportation plan for biofuel that would be made at the refinery and trucked up to a power plant in Kona. “One issue that I have not heard answers to is that of their fuel and supply trucks traveling on our two-lane roads, the only means of transportation for almost everyone on the island. I have heard of the possibility of their taking both the southern route through Kona or of course the only other route through Hilo and possibly the newer Saddle Road. I suspect the southern route makes more sense, even though it is two lanes over heavily traveled mountain roads, which will not only be a regular traffic nightmare but also very hard on the roads. I also worry that the resulting road rage could result in terrible accidents as people try to pass.” She stated that she has “heard that fuel trucks will go every two hours or so.”
Horses for cattle ranching are part of the economic and cultural
landscape of Ka`u. Photo by Julia Neal
      The physician also asked about hauling additives and other supplies to the refinery. “Will the supply trucks come from Hilo?”
      Irwin also stated that she suspects “that most people living outside of Pahala do not understand the tremendous impact this venture would have on our citizens as they try to get wherever they are going.”
     Dorothy Kalua, of Pahala, said she has “questions about using a microwave catalytic polymerization process which has never been used commercially before and ask you to find out what could be the effects on our land, our air and our water?
       “I also question why AKP keeps arguing that Ka`u needs AKP for economic development? Does AKP think these lands are not currently being used productively for agriculture? Even ranching with its lower per-acre value is thriving. Any land that is put up for lease for coffee, macadamia, vegetables, flowers or ranching is snapped up?”
      She asks the PUC to find out “if coffee, tea, macadamia and other food crops and ranching are worth more to the economy than taking over ranch and prospective lands to clear trees and brush and try to grow grass for a refinery to make fuel for another part of the island?”
     Kalua asks, “What happens to those people currently using the land productively when they are thrown out by AKP?
     “Is it wiser for people of Ka`u to continue to grow their post sugar economy slowly and surely and lead the lifestyle they value, rather than risking the possibility of becoming hired hands of AKP?” asks Kalua. Kalua grew up in Pahala, moved away and worked for Aloha Airlines in accounting for more than 40 years and returned home to retire.
      This and other testimony is available at puc.hawaii.gov. Docket number is 2012-0185.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

SHE GROWS FOOD, an online Hawai`i journal of women in agriculture, has published a new essay by Kuahiwi rancher Michelle Galimba, who also represents Ka`u on the state Board of Agriculture. On shegrowsfood.com, Galimba writes that what keeps her going day after day “is culture. Not the kind of culture that you go to museums and theaters to experience, nor even the kind of culture that distinguishes the way of life of an Italian, or a Thai, or an American. What interests me is the culture - the values and beliefs - that structure the relationship between us human people” and non-humans, she states, referring to the living beings that become food for people. 
Michelle and Ua Galimba represent Ka`u ranching at Plantation Days.
Photo by Julia Neal
      “What interests me is the intelligence that is embedded in the food that I produce. A lot of us are interested in knowing where our food comes from, in knowing the story of the food that we are eating: who raised it and where, and what were the methods used. And that is exactly the story of the intelligence that went into the making of that food, the culture, the values, the relationships that were cultivated and shaped between human, plant, animal, soil, air and water.”
     Galimba writes that she hopes “that in the future more people will be interested in actually be involved in, rather than just knowing about, the intelligence that makes food. Despite what we might tell ourselves about the absolute dominance of human will and technology, it takes more than human intelligence to make food, it takes partnerships with the non-human realm....
     “If we treat cows like dumb eating and meat or milk-making machines, we miss out on their capacity to restore soils that have been deleted by monoculture cropping, to eat forages that humans can't digest; we miss out on that species multi-million year relationship with the grasses. If we treat plants like dumb solar-energy-converting, calorie-making mechanisms (which is miracle enough) we miss out on their ability to process waste materials, to build soil, to create microclimates, to form the complex web of relationships that they can form with microbial, animal, and other plant species.”
      See more at shegrowsfood.com.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Pam Mizuno, of Wood Valley, with
her show dog.
WOOD VALLEY RESIDENT PAM MIZUNO is planning a big birthday bash for a 350-pound celebrity. His name is Namaste, and he is among the residents of Mizuno’s working place, where she is manager at Panaewa Rainforest Zoo & Gardens. Ka`u residents are invited to the Bengal tiger Namaste’s fifteenth birthday to be held at the zoo this Saturday. The tiger has lived there since he was eight months old.
     Mizuno makes more than an hour drive to Panaewa several times a week from the farm she shares with her husband Ray Mizuno in Wood Valley. Coming from Wood Valley makes caring for plants and animals natural for the administrator of Panaewa Zoo. She also trains and shows canines on- and off-island, including border terriers and labradors.
      Mizuno invites the Ka`u community to join in the tiger’s birthday celebration this Saturday starting at 9:30 a.m., when Namaste receives a birthday cake made of cattle bones frozen in a block of ice. His catnip pillow will be provided to him at 10 a.m. Hawai`i County Band plays from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Those who attend can enjoy free cake and ice crème from noon to 1 p.m. while the PUKA `Ukulele Band entertains, followed by Energy & Motion Dance Company, followed by the Petting Zoo from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. The Carousel of Aloha will demonstrate the carving of wooden animals. There will be face painting and keiki games.The tiger’s birthday dinner comes at 3:30 p.m.
     Also on full display this month has been the giant corpse plant, called Stinky 2. The Amorphophallus titanium species is the world’s largest unbranched cluster of flowers and originates in western Sumatra. Zoo officials say the blossoming is complete, and the terrible smell is no longer wafting through the Panaewa Rain Forest Zoo. The zoo is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily, except Christmas and News Year's days. Tiger feeding is daily at 3:30 p.m. The location is 800 Stainback Highway, Hilo.
      Call 959-9233 for more information.
      To comment on or “like” this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Ka`u residents are invited by Wood Valley resident Pam Mizuno to
Panaewa Zoo this Saturday for the fifteenth birthday party for
Namaste, the 350-pound Bengal tiger. Photo from Panaewa Zoo
WATER USER AGREEMENT is on the agenda when Ha`ao Springs and Mountain House Ag Water Co-op meets today at 4 p.m. at Wai`ohinu Park. For more information, email katywhite@hawaiiantel.net.

PAHALA PUBLIC & SCHOOL LIBRARY invites the public to learn more about its resources Friday at 11 a.m. Learn how to search the library’s catalog, check library accounts, request books and use  many free electronic resources Hawai`i State Public Library System has to offer. Computer basics or prior knowledge of mouse and keyboard use is required. The library has numerous computers for public and student use. To sign up, call 939-2442.

KAHUKU JUNIOR RANGER DAY IS SATURDAY from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., and today is the deadline to register. Keiki of all ages join park rangers for a day of activities to take a closer look at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Free lunch is provided. Call 985-6019.

Volunteer Marilyn Nicholson helps eliminate invasive Himalayan
ginger near Halema`uma`u Trail. Photo from NPS

NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY is Saturday. Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park honors the day by waiving entrance fees. The park encourages the public to volunteer by removing invasive Himalayan ginger in the park or fountain grass in Ocean View.
     Volunteers can join Paul and Jane Field in removing invasive Himalayan ginger during Stewardship at the Summit from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. The invasive species displaces and replaces the native rainforest understory, making it impossible for many native plants to grow, including pa`iniu (a Hawaiian lily), `ama`u fern and others. Volunteers should wear closed-toe shoes and long pants and bring a hat, raingear, snacks and water. Loppers and gloves are provided. No advance registration is required. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
Volunteers can help remove fountain grass, dominating this lava
landscape in Ka`u. Photo from NPS
     Fountain grass removal takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in Ocean View. The grass is especially problematic in leeward areas on Hawai`i Island, such as Ocean View, because it increases the risk of wildfire. Volunteers will work with Ocean View Community Association, Friends of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and park ecologist David Benitez. Bring lunch, water, hat and sunscreen. The first 30 volunteers get a free pass to return another day and enjoy the park at their leisure. For more information and to register, contact David Benitez at 808-985-6085 or david_benitez@nps.gov.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park offers an open house in conjunction with National Park Public Lands Day. KMC invites the public to experience how the camp serves our troops by enjoying all facilities and services. Call 967-8371 for more information.

KAHUKU UNIT OF HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK offers free, guided hikes this weekend. On Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., participants bring lunch and learn about the vital role of `ohi`a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, the many forms of the `ohi`a lehua tree and its flower. Palm Trail Hike takes place Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. This relatively easy, guided, 2.6-mile loop crosses scenic pasture along an ancient cinder cone with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer.
      For more information, call 985-6011 or see nps.gov/havo.

UPCOMING KA`U HIGH SPORTS this week: today Ka`u bowling team meets the Hilo Vikings at Hilo Lanes at 1 p.m. and girls volleyball hosts Kamehameha at 6 p.m. On Saturday, Sept. 28, Ka`u bowling attends the BIIF Individual Bowl at Hilo lanes at 8 a.m., Cross Country races at HPA at 12 p.m., Air Riflery shoots at Kamehameha at 10 a.m., and Ka`u girls volleyball hosts Kohala at 10 a.m. Ka`u eight-man football plays Kamehameha junior varsity in Kea`au at 2 p.m. this Saturday.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

ALSO SEE KAUCALENDAR.COM AND FACEBOOK.COM/KAUCALENDAR.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL BUSINESSES