About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, March 31, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Saturday, March 31, 2018

Destruction caused by the 1868 great Kaʻū earthquake included the Waiʻōhinu Congregational Church. With a 
magnitude estimated at 7.9, the earthquake was the largest in Hawaii's recorded history. Photo by Henry L. Chase,
 published in Volcanoes of Kīlauea and Mauna Loa on the Island of Hawaiʻi  by W.T. Brigham, 
Bishop Museum Press, 1909. See story below.
SPINLAUNCH HAS WIDENED ITS SEARCH FOR A SPACE LAUNCH FACILITY. In a bill that would help raise $25 million for the company through tax incentives, the list of possible Hawaiian sites to locate the business has been broadened from Hawaiʻi Island to all of Hawaiʻi. Recently mentioned locations have included South Point, Molokaʻi and Kauaʻi. The possible use of Pohuʻe Bay in Kaʻū, for sale for $18 million, is in retreat.
      The Senator from Oʻahu who proposed the SpinLaunch Special Purpose Revenue Bond for the project, released a news statement on Friday. "I heard from the people in Kaʻū. I don't want to give residents the impression that any future launch site was destined for their neighborhood."
Hawaiʻi Island Economic Development Board posts "Respect for native culture" on its website. The organization
was retained by SpinLaunch to help with community outreach.
     Sen. Glenn Wakai chairs the Senate Committee on Economic Development, Tourism, and Technology, and looked at SpinLaunch as an economic development opportunity. He visited the SpinLaunch headquarters in California to see its model for a spinning machine. SpinLaunch aims to fling small satellites and packages into space at a much lower price than using solid fuel rockets, giving more access to space for research and commerce.
     However, the Aha Moku local Kaʻū advisory group to the state Department of Land & Natural Resources wrote to the legislature, objecting to funding the project before talking to the people here. 
     On Thursday, the Senate Ways and Means Committee recommended approval of HB2559. In his Friday press release, Wakai said that he asked SpinLaunch to search for sites other than Pohuʻe Bay. “I sincerely apologize for alarming the people of Kaʻū," he said. "I still believe Hawai‘i can play a role in the global aerospace industry, but not at Pohuʻe Bay.” 
Liz Kuluwaimaka, Council member Maile David, and Darlyne Vierra asked SpinLaunch
 to talk to Ka
ʻū before asking for funding. They are shown here with famed paniolo

 Winslow Vierra at a Kaʻū Multicultural event in 2014. Photo by Julia Neal
     Even with Pohuʻe Bay likely off the SpinLaunch radar, Wakai and SpinLaunch representatives plan to keep their meeting with the Kaʻū community on Saturday, April 14, at 10 a.m.
     Also expected to attend is Jacquie Hoover, Executive Director of the Hawaiʻi Island Economic Development Board, who works with private enterprise and is contracted by SpinLaunch for community outreach. The non-profit organization's website at hiedb.org  states that one of its values is "Respect for Native Culture."
     Hosting the meeting will be the Ahu Moku group, including Darlyne Vierra and Liz Kuluwaimaka, who head up the Kaʻū Multicultural Society and experienced long careers in Kaʻū with the Office of Economic Opportunity, which assists the underprivileged.

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THE SEISMIC EVENT THAT DEVASTATED KA‘Ū 150 YEARS AGO is the subject of this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates:
The Catholic church built by Sacred Heart fathers, including Saint Damien,
was destroyed by the Great Kaʻū Earthquake in 1868. The remains of the
building have been recovered. It is a garden for native Hawaiian
 and canoe plants.
     This week marks 150 years since the largest earthquake to strike Hawai‘i in the last two centuries. Estimated to have been at least magnitude-7.9, this earthquake struck near Pāhala in the Ka'ū District of the Island of Hawaiʻi on April 2, 1868.
     Known as the Great Kaʻū Earthquake, the event had the same maximum intensity as the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, defined as "extreme shaking" on the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale. It was felt as far away as Kauaʻi and stopped clocks on Oʻahu. In Kaʻū, where people were bounced like balls from shaking that went on for several minutes, the destruction was nearly total. Stone buildings and walls were destroyed as far away as Hilo.
     The shaking caused landslides from Kaʻū to Hawaiʻi Island's northern Hāmākua coast, and induced a small eruption on Kīlauea Volcano's Southwest Rift Zone. A mudslide in Wood Valley north of Pāhala buried 31 Hawaiians. A tsunami, consisting of at least eight waves over several hours, was estimated to be more than 6 m (20 ft) high in Kaʻū. The waves caused damage from South Point (Kalae) to Cape Kumukahi (Kapoho), destroyed more than 100 structures, and took 47 lives.
     If it happened today, the great Kaʻū earthquake would be one of the world's strongest earthquakes of this past year. Its size would also rival two of the most deadly events of the past decade: the magnitude-7.8 Nepal earthquake, which killed more than 8,000 people on April 25, 2015, and the magnitude-7.9 Sichuan, China, earthquake, which killed nearly 90,000 people on May 12, 2008. Because the Island of Hawaiʻi was sparsely populated in 1868, the loss of life from the Kaʻū earthquake was limited.
     In Hawaiʻi, the most destructive earthquakes occur along a gently sloping fault between the base of the volcanoes and the ancient ocean floor on which they are built. This fault, located at a depth of approximately 11 km (7 mi), is known geologically as a décollement, from the French word "décoller," which means "to detach from."
Left: This cross-section through the south part of the Island of Hawaiʻi illustrates the hypocenter of the 1868 great Kaʻū earthquake (red star), located
 on the décollement (bold black line) between Mauna Loa (brown) and the ancient ocean floor (tan). Earth's lithospheric mantle and the ocean are 
represented in green and blue, respectively. Right: The striped pattern on this map of Hawaiʻi Island indicates the areas of Mauna Loa and Kīlauea
that must have moved along the décollement to produce the magnitude-7.9 Kaʻū earthquake in 1868. Red lines depict the rift zones on Mauna 
Loa (left) and Kīlauea (right). The approximate epicenter of the earthquake is shown as a yellow dot, and the direction of slip along the 
décollement is shown with black arrows. Graphics are modified from Max Wyss, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 1988
     A large part of the Island of Hawaiʻi moved during the 1868 event. Based on measurements of how much the earth moved during Hawaiʻi's magnitude-7.7 Kalapana earthquake in 1975, which also occurred on the décollement, the entire island south and east of Mauna Loa's summit and rift zones moved seaward and subsided several yards during the great earthquake.
     The 1868 Kaʻū earthquake was part of a larger volcanic crisis that unfolded over 16 days. On March 27, an eruption quietly began in Mokuʻāweoweo, the caldera at the summit of Mauna Loa. Seismic activity increased through the day, and by the afternoon of March 28, a magnitude-7.0 earthquake occurred in Kaʻū, which caused extensive damage from its own very strong to violent shaking.
     During the following four days, nearly continuous ground shaking was reported in Kaʻū and South Kona. Earthquakes continued at rates of 50 to 300 per day, including a magnitude-6.0 each day, leading up to April 2, when the great Kaʻū earthquake, 15 times stronger than the magnitude-7.0 foreshock, occurred at 4 p.m. A severe aftershock occurred on April 4, and aftershocks of decreasing magnitudes continued for decades.
     The Great Kaʻū Earthquake unlocked Mauna Loa's Southwest Rift Zone, and on April 7, 1868, an eruptive fissure opened low on the mountain, just above today's Highway 11 and east of Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. This eruption and the lava flows it produced will be the focus of next week's Volcano Watch.
     Though scientists do not know how often events as large as the great Kaʻū earthquake occur, they do know that, in Hawai‘i, active volcanoes drive the stresses that generate the largest earthquakes. Mauna Loa's hazards, therefore, include eruptions, as well as large earthquakes along the décollement in Kaʻū and South Kona - for example, the magnitude-6.9 earthquake that occurred near Captain Cook in 1951.
     Because of this, Hawai'i Island residents are encouraged to be prepared for both volcanic eruptions and potentially damaging earthquakes.
     Visit HVO'swebsite for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea daily eruption updates, Mauna Loa weekly updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Call for summary updates at 808-967-8862 (Kīlauea) or 808-967-8866 (Mauna Loa). Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at kaucalendar.com
/janfebmar/februaryevents.htmlSee Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, 
February print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano. Also available free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE
Girls Softball: Monday, Apr 2, @ Kohala
   Saturday, Apr 7, Hawai‘i Prep @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 9, @ Pāhoa
   Wednesday, Apr 11 @ KSH
   Saturday, Apr 14, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
Boys Volleyball: Tuesday, Apr 3, @ Waiakea
   Wednesday, Apr 11, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
   Friday, Apr 13, Honoka‘a @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 16, @ Hilo
   Friday, Apr 20, Parker @ Ka‘ū

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SUNDAY, APRIL 1
EASTER BRUCH, Sun, Apr 1, 7 a.m. to noon. Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Main entrees: Ham, Beef Pot Roast, and Breakfast Veggie Stir Fry. No reservations required. $17/Adult, $9.50/Child (6-11 yrs). KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

EASTER EGG HUNT, Sun, Apr 1, 9 a.m., ‘Ōhi‘a Room, Kīlauea Military Camp, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Open to keiki 10 years and under. Registration accepted from 7:30 - 8:45 a.m. Bring a basket. KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. Pre-register children: 967-8352, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

FOURTH ANNUAL KA‘Ū COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT, Sun, Apr 1, 1 - 3 p.m., Nā‘ālehu Community Park. Over 6,000 candy filled eggs, over 300 prizes. Free chili & rice bowls. Donations welcome. Free; open to all ages, infants to adults. Pam/Lance, 929-8137, Henri, 464-5042

MONDAY, APRIL 2
SLOGAN/MOTTO CONTEST - Pāhala Public & School Library, continues through Mon, Apr 2. Submit ideas to Nā‘ālehu or Pāhala Library. $55 grand prize awarded on Fri, Apr 13. Friends of Ka‘ū Libraries President Sandra Demouruelle, naalehutheatre@yahoo.com, 929-9244

EASTER EGG HUNT, Mon, Apr 2, noon, Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee, CU Hawai‘i lawn, Nā‘ālehu. Judy Knapp, 640-4712

OCEAN VIEW VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETING, Mon, Apr 2, 4 - 6 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 3
SPECIAL MERRIE MONARCH FESTIVAL EVENTS, Tue, Wed, Thu, Apr 3, 4 & 5, 11 - 1 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Honoring 55th Merrie Monarch Hula Festival. Hawaiian cultural demonstrations, live music. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETINGS & TRAININGS, Tue, Apr 3 & 24, 4 - 6 p.m., Apr 17, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

KAʻŪ COFFEE GROWERS MEETING, Tue, Apr 3, 6 - 8 p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

HOW THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER WORKS, Tue, Apr 3, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Dr. Nathan Becker, Senior Oceanographer describes PTWC operations. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4
AdvoCATS, Wed, Apr 4, 7 a.m. - 5 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Free Cat Spay & Neuter Clinic. 895-9283

Open Mic Night, Wed, Apr 4, 6 - 10 p.m., Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Singers, Bands, Comedians, etc. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests 21 years and older. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 5
Veteran's Center & VA Medical Services, Apr 5 & 19, Thu, 8:30 - noon, Ocean View Community Center. No appointment needed to visit w/ VA counselor & benefit specialist. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org


Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu, Apr 5, 6 - 7 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

SATURDAY, APRIL 7
Ocean View C.E.R.T. Training, Sat, Apr 7, 14, 21 & 28, 8:15 - 5 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Hawai’i County Civil Defense Agency Community Emergency Response Team training. Free, limited seating, open to public. Bill Hanson, 937-2181. Pre-register online, certkau.eventbrite.com

Stewardship at the Summit, Apr 7, 13, 21 (fee-free day), & 27, 8:45 a.m., meet Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers help remove invasive, non-native, plant species. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sat, Apr 7, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Discover the Hawaiian goddesses and the natural phenomena they represent on this free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/HAVO

Hawai‘i Democratic Pre-Convention Meeting, Sat, Apr 7, 11 - 3 p.m., Waimea Elementary School cafeteria. hawaiidemocrats.org

ONGOING
ONE COMMUNITY AND ONE PARENT REPRESENTATIVE are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. Nominations will be accepted from April 2 through April 16 at 3 p.m. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee.
     The campaign for the positions starts April 16. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.

TŪTŪ AND ME OFFERS HOME VISITS to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 646-9634.

VOLCANO ART CENTER GALLERY PRESENTS HO’OKU’I I NĀ KIKO, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., from Saturday, Mar. 31, to Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Friday, March 30, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Friday, March 30, 2018

The Ka‘ū Valley Farm team invites the public to visit during Ka‘ū Coffee Festival Week on Thursday, May 3. Front and center
is President and CEO Xiaoyuan Liu. Among others shown are VP Louis Leong, Managing Director Joshua Wang, 
General Manager John Cross, Farm Manger Lee Segawa, Farm Advisor Richard Loero and Executive Assistant to the 
President Hanfeng Wu. See story below. Photos from Ka‘ū Valley Farm
KAʻŪ LEARNING ACADEMY COULD SHUT DOWN SOON, AT THE END OF THE YEAR, OR NOT AT ALL, according to discussions at the state Public Charter School Commission on Thursday. During the Commission meeting on Oʻahu, with no Kaʻū Learning Academy staff or board members invited, the Charter School Commission decided to confer with the state Attorney General for help in deciding what to do.
     The Commission concluded that late last year, four of six board members operated with conflicts of interest, having worked for the school or being related to those currently or formerly employed by the school. The rules allow for only 30 percent of the board to work for the school or have relatives working there.
       Current KLA Board Chair Jack Richard said today that one board member mentioned was the cousin of an employee, and resigned when the relationship became an issue. Three new community members with no relatives or jobs at the school have become members of the board, he said, with another expected to join the board soon.
     Conflict of interest can happen when board members try to help and sometimes draw in their families to improve the school. Richard himself is a general contractor and said that before he was named chair, he volunteered his labor by helping with permits, inspections, and other aspects of building handicapped restrooms. He said he was reimbursed for materials and that other persons working on the project were paid by the school. Nevertheless, he has asked for a waiver from the Commission to remain on the board.
     "We are working with the board and I am in contact with them every week and I think these things can be resolved," he said. "They have checks and balances and they have to follow them. We are here - all about the kids - and we are going to work to clear this up."
       Richard said minutes of board meetings, when new board members were named, minutes were recorded and turned over to the commission. 
     A report from the Charter School Commission administration is available online. 
     During the Commission meeting on March 29, the immediate closure of the school was discussed. Objections were made, contending it could be harmful to the students. A decision was reached to delay action until the Attorney General is consulted on the next steps with KLA. The next Commission meeting is April 12.
     Issues regarding the board were brought up after response was made by KLA about the audit last year. KLA board members were not asked to attend the meeting.
     The meeting is documented in an hour-long audio-only recording.

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Photo from Hawaii Public Radio
THE COUNTY WILL HAVE TO REMOVE ABANDONED VEHICLES ON PUBLIC ROADS WITHIN TEN DAYS OF NOTIFICATION, if state House Bill 2442 passes a final Senate vote. It made it through the Judiciary Committee March 29.
     Removing abandoned vehicles in Hawai‘i currently has no time limit placed on the counties.
     Currently, registered owners of abandoned vehicles are sent a letter by their county. Under the new law, owners would only be notified if the vehicle was reported as stolen.
     Once picked up from the side of the road, the counties dispose of abandoned vehicles at auction. The bill does not specify how these vehicles would be dealt once the new law is passed. The definition of an abandoned vehicle would change to include a vehicle owner not transferring title to their name within 30 days of notice to the county of purchase. Any vehicle not registered for more than a year would also be considered abandoned.
     William Kucharski, Hawai‘i County's Environmental Management director, stated: "Requiring (Hawai‘i County) to take all abandoned vehicles into custody within 10 business days of abandonment imposes a burden on us to meet this timeline, while juggling manpower and budgetary constraints."

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Camelia sinensis tea, grown at Ka‘ū Valley Farms.
KA‘Ū VALLEY FARMS OPENS UP TO LOCALS AND VISITORS on May 3, with a new event in the Ka‘ū Coffee Festival lineup.
     Tour the nursery where Ka‘ū Valley Farms grows hydroponic vegetables for local restaurants and public sale. See the plantings of Ka‘ū Coffee and tea, Camelia sinensis. Proceed up the slopes of Kahilipali Ahuapua‘a, to view the expansive green pastures above Nā‘ālehu. Enjoy lunch provided from a local restaurant, which includes farm-produced vegetables from the soils of Nā‘ālehu.
Farm manager Lee Segawa slicing into an avocado.
     At the summit of Pu‘u Ho‘omaha (Hill of Leisure), listen to stories of the Ahupua‘a and land tenure from the times of the Kingdom to present, and gaze upon the coastline of Ka‘ū from Puna to South Point. Look mauka, and see the hills of the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park in the distance, and the Makino Valley fields on the Ka‘ū Valley lands. Makino is relatively unknown to many, as it lies hidden from below by the summit of Ho‘omaha.
     The tour includes visiting the water system being developed from the old Kahilipali and Kapuna Tunnels, from old sugar plantation days. The tour ends with a brief walk into the 85-acre Native Forest upon the lands. This forest area was never converted into sugarcane and provides a glimpse into original, pristine native Hawaiian forest.
     The tour costs $35 per person, and will include lunch and transportation through the property. Participants will meet at the Ka‘ū Valley Farms Nursery at 9 a.m. to park their private vehicles. To reach the site, turn mauka in Nā‘ālehu at Ka‘alaiki Road at the intersection of H-11 and Punalu‘u Bake Shop. Proceed up Ka‘alaiki Road to just beyond the County cemetery, and then follow the signs to the nursery. The tour is expected to finish back at the nursery by 2 p.m. at the latest.
     Reservations can be made by calling John Cross at 987-4229 or Brenda Iokepe-Moses at 731-5409.
    See more Ka‘ū Coffee Fest events at www.kaucoffeefest.com

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COUNTY OF HAWAII MASS TRANSIT AUTHORITY MASTER PLAN community meetings being held in April. Public comments are open through April 30, and can be submitted in person at the meetings listed below, or online, where the full plan is available for view.
     The MTA is presenting for public review a plan whose goal is to improve transit and paratransit for the island, so that is it safe, reliable, and accessible to all users.
     Ocean View Community Center hosts the OV meeting on April 8, from 3 to 5 p.m. Other meetings are being held in Pāhoa on April 7, Waimea on April 10, Kona on April 12, Keaau on April 15, and Hilo on April 16.

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JAZZ IN THE FOREST for Saturday, April 14, will be celebrating the creative gifts of trumpet icon Miles Davis, and the different chapters of his amazing productivity which did so much to add to the history of American jazz music. Davis' compositions extend from the 40's with classics such as "Four" and "Round Midnight" , to the 80's when Miles followed - or led - more pop-oriented styles. He was a leader in most of the styles he chose.
     The Jazztones will feature pianist Loren Wilken, trumpet master and vocalist Andrea Lindborg, Jean Pierre Thoma on winds, Matt Spencer on bass - both electric and acoustic - and percussionsit Noa Eads.
Jazz in the Forest to celebrate Miles Davis. 
     Concerts will be at 4:30 and 7 p.m., and refreshments will be available for purchase. Admission is $18 for VAC members, $20 for the general public. Info at volcanoartcenter.org.
     "We apologize for the confusion of last month, and hope to see you all again next month," states the notice for the event. The next event is May 12, when the Django Reinhardt Hot Club of Volcano will return with irrepressible French classic swing stylings.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at kaucalendar.com
/janfebmar/februaryevents.htmlSee Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, 
February print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano. Also available free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE
Girls Softball: Saturday, Mar 31 @ Honoka‘a
   Monday, Apr 2, @ Kohala
   Saturday, Apr 7, Hawai‘i Prep @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 9, @ Pāhoa
   Wednesday, Apr 11 @ KSH
   Saturday, Apr 14, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
Boys Volleyball: Tuesday, Apr 3, @ Waiakea
   Wednesday, Apr 11, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
   Friday, Apr 13, Honoka‘a @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 16, @ Hilo
   Friday, Apr 20, Parker @ Ka‘ū

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SATURDAY, MARCH 31
LAST 2018 SANCTUARY OCEAN COUNT, Sat, Mar 31, 8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; arrive 30 min. prior for orientation. Four locations near/in Ka‘ū: Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park, and Ka‘ena Point - hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov for directions; park entrance fees apply. Bring sun protection, water, snacks, and a cushion to sit on. Pre-registration required: sanctuaryoceancount.org
STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT Sat., March 31. Meet Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center8:45 a.m. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants, and bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks, and water. Gloves and tools provided. Parental or guardian accompaniment, or written consent, required for volunteers under 18. Visit park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm

VOLCANO ART CENTER GALLERY PRESENTS HO’OKU’I I NĀ KIKO, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., from Saturday, Mar. 31, to Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222
     A free lecture titled "The Last Truth," offered by Lucia Tarallo, takes place at 3pm on the opening day of the exhibition. The lecture will be followed by an opening reception where the public is invited to meet the artists.

SECOND ANNUAL KA‘Ū WELLNESS FAIR, GET YOUR SPRING, Sat, Mar 31, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., multi-purpose room at Ka‘ū District Gym in Pāhala. The event features an Egg Hunt and Healthy Fun-Run-Walk, both of which begin at 9:30 a.m. - registration begins at 9 a.m. Also offered are a Blue Zones Purpose Workshop, from 10 a.m. to 11 a..m., and Book Time - Read A-Loud with Friends of the Ka‘ū Libraries, starting at 10 a.m. P.A.T.H. makes a presentation at 10:30 a.m. Vision Screenings, Keiki I.D.s, and Biometrics from Ka‘ū Public Health will be available. Several organizations will also provide information booths for the event: Bay Clinic, Ka‘ū Rural Health Clinic, Ka‘ū Rural Hospital, Project Aware - Your Mental Health First Aid, HSTA, Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool and Home Visitor Program, and more.

PU‘U LOKUANA, Sat, Mar 31, 9:30 - 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Short, moderately difficult, 0.4-mile hike to the top of the grassy cinder cone, Pu‘u Lokuana. Learn about the formation and various uses of this hill over time, and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Kaʻū. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

SUNDAY, APRIL 1
EASTER BRUCH, Sun, Apr 1, 7 a.m. to noon. Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Main entrees: Ham, Beef Pot Roast, and Breakfast Veggie Stir Fry. No reservations required. $17/Adult, $9.50/Child (6-11 yrs). KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

EASTER EGG HUNT, Sun, Apr 1, 9 a.m., ‘Ōhi‘a Room, Kīlauea Military Camp, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Open to keiki 10 years and under. Registration accepted from 7:30 - 8:45 a.m. Bring a basket. KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. Pre-register children: 967-8352, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

FOURTH ANNUAL KA‘Ū COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT, Sun, Apr 1, 1 - 3 p.m., Nā‘ālehu Community Park. Over 6,000 candy filled eggs, over 300 prizes. Free chili & rice bowls. Donations welcome. Free; open to all ages, infants to adults. Pam/Lance, 929-8137, Henri, 464-5042

MONDAY, APRIL 2
SLOGAN/MOTTO CONTEST - Pāhala Public & School Library, continues through Mon, Apr 2. Submit ideas to Nā‘ālehu or Pāhala Library. $55 grand prize awarded on Fri, Apr 13. Friends of Ka‘ū Libraries President Sandra Demouruelle, naalehutheatre@yahoo.com, 929-9244

EASTER EGG HUNT, Mon, Apr 2, noon, Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee, CU Hawai‘i lawn, Nā‘ālehu. Judy Knapp, 640-4712

OCEAN VIEW VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETING, Mon, Apr 2, 4 - 6 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 3
SPECIAL MERRIE MONARCH FESTIVAL EVENTS, Tue, Wed, Thu, Apr 3, 4 & 5, 11 - 1 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Honoring 55th Merrie Monarch Hula Festival. Hawaiian cultural demonstrations, live music. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO
DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETINGS & TRAININGS, Tue, Apr 3 & 24, 4 - 6 p.m., Apr 17, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

KAʻŪ COFFEE GROWERS MEETING, Tue, Apr 3, 6 - 8 p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

HOW THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER WORKS, Tue, Apr 3, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Dr. Nathan Becker, Senior Oceanographer describes PTWC operations. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4
ADVOCATS, Wed, Apr 4, 7 a.m. - 5 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Free Cat Spay & Neuter Clinic. 895-9283

OPEN MIC NIGHT, Wed, Apr 4, 6 - 10 p.m., Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Singers, Bands, Comedians, etc. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests 21 years and older. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 5
VETERAN'S CENTER AND VA MEDICAL SERVICES, Apr 5 & 19, Thu, 8:30 - noon, Ocean View Community Center. No appointment needed to visit w/ VA counselor & benefit specialist. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org

OCEAN VIEW NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETING, Thu, Apr 5, 6 - 7 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

ONGOING
ONE COMMUNITY AND ONE PARENT REPRESENTATIVE are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. Nominations will be accepted from April 2 through April 16 at 3 p.m. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee.
     The campaign for the positions starts April 16. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.
TŪTŪ AND ME OFFERS HOME VISITS to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 646-9634.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Thursday, March 29, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Thursday, March 29, 2018

Miss Kaʻū Coffee Flower, shows off entries at the 2017 Ka‘ū Coffee Recipe Contest at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Registration is now open for the 2018 contest on Sunday, April 29. See story, below. Photo by Julia Neal
OPPOSITION TO THE SPINLAUNCH BILL CAME FROM MAILE DAVID TODAY. The County Council member who represents Ka‘ū sent testimony to the Hawai‘i Legislature saying she objects to SpinLaunch attempting to raise money through elected officials before going to the communities where the space launch facility might be positioned. One of the locations being considered is the land around Pohue Bay in Ka‘ū.
      Wrote Medeiros, "I strongly oppose this measure for the fundamental and obvious reason that funding a project that has immeasurable adverse impacts upon a culturally significant historic and pristine area surrounded by rural communities without first obtaining input from the people directly impacted, is absolutely unacceptable. The process and manner by which this legislation was initiated is inappropriate, inexcusable and, from a grass-roots native Hawaiian and community advocate's perspective, extremely disrespectful.
Ka‘ū's County Council Member
Maile David. 
     "I strongly and humbly suggest that the honorable members of the Committee on Ways and Means vote no on HB2559 HD1. I would also encourage that our Hawai‘i island senators and representatives join Senator Wakai and SpinLaunch representatives at an April 14, 2018 community meeting at the Nā‘ālehu Community Center in Ka‘ū. Please note I have also received numerous emails from constituents opposing HB2669 HD1 expressing their serious concerns as well. I will be in attendance and look forward to seeing you."
     The meeting, called for by Ka‘ū members of the The Aha Moku Advisory Committee to the state Department of Land & Natural Resources - Darlyne Vierra, Liz Kuluwaimaka, Jefferey Kekoa, and Aloha Beck - is set for Saturday, April 14, at 10 a.m., Nā‘ālehu Community Center.     The Aha Moku Advisory Committee also asked the state Senate to hold the bill until the group speaks to legislators, County Council members, and developers of the plan. "We have fought for decades to keep Kaʻū - Kaʻū."
     Local residents submitting testimony include Peter E. Bosted of the Ocean View Ranchos community next to the Pohu‘e Bay property. He holds a Ph.D in physics from MIT; has a long academic career in physics research, with over 200 articles in refereed physics journals; is a Fellow of the American Physical Society; and is an Adjunct Professor of Physics at the College of William and Mary in Virginia. He wrote testimony about SpinLaunch technology, stating that its g-forces could be very damaging to delicate payloads.
    He predicts that costs will be higher than the current cost of sending small satellites and packages into space, as the design "calls for enormous developments in engineering." He also questions energy requirements, stating that SpinLaunch would need to "store the energy in some way that could be released very quickly for the actual launch. There are no such storage systems in Hawai‘i at present."
     He points to noise impacts: "As the vessel propagates through the atmosphere at hypersonic speeds, it will make a tremendously loud sonic boom."
     Bosted also mentions safety: "In the event of malfunction, the energy stored in the system would be dissipated over a wide area with devastating consequences to people and buildings."
     Ann Bosted, of Ocean View Ranchos, also submitted testimony. She contends that more than an electrical launch system will be needed for SpinLaunch: "Electrical power would be used only for the initial stage of the launch. No complex delicate rocket engines that use clean fuels could survive the initial accelerations (Gs) in the centrifuge. Hence more robust solid propellant boost motors would be required and those are intrinsically polluting."
     Bosted points to the U.S. Army exploring then rejecting a similar idea in 2006: "Based on limited information, SpinLaunch appears to be a reincarnation of the 1997 Derek Tidman Slingatron proposal." She says that project calls for launch from a mountain. "Which Hawaiian mountain will be used? If Mauna Kea is used, won't this conflict with the established use by observatories on its summit?" and "Why did the military show no further interest in this technology? May I respectfully suggest that the Legislature obtain a copy of the army's findings?"
     Bosted also calls for careful study of the energy and financial costs. She finishes her statement with: "I understand that SpinLaunch is not forthcoming with details about this project due to patents pending. May I respectfully suggest that after SpinLaunch has secured the patents needed for this project, the state should then hold an open forum where experts in space technology can offer considered opinions on the feasibility of the project and evaluate the need for loads of bulk materials in low orbit. Without expert advice, I advocate that the legislature should not support this bill at this time."
Peter Bosted, center right, studies the volcanic risks of development
in the Pohu`e Bay and othe lands on the slopes ofMauna Loa.
A physicist, he submitted testimony this week on
SpinLaunch technical issues.
     Shawn Lohay, of Ocean View, predicts "unknown and unconsidered environmental damage to the ‘Aina," and "encroachment on endangered Hawksbill turtle nesting sites at Pohu‘e Bay." He points out the significance of the location being near the site where Polynesians first landed at Ka Lae (South Point) - with its multitude of culturally significant, historical, and archeological artifacts, petroglyphs, and grave sites - and suggests has not been visited by those suggesting Pohuʻe as a possible site.
     "Please let me also mention if it has not already been discussed, the proposed building site is in LAVA ZONE 2, makai of the ever more active Mauna Loa volcano," Lohay states. "Please, by whatever means necessary kill the bills.... This is not the way to generate more income for the State of Hawai‘i. Find another path to progress and away from Tourism if that's your goal, but do not do this to the Big Island."
     See more testimony in yesterday's and earlier Ka‘ū News Briefs.

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THE STATE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES BILL TO ISSUE A $25 MILLION SPECIAL PURPOSE REVENUE BOND to SpinLaunch for a Hawaiʻi space launch facility, HB2559, unanimously passed the Senate Ways and Means Committee, on March 29. The companion bill, SB2703, awaits a hearing with the House Financial Committee, which has yet to be scheduled.

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Raina Whiting and Bernie Sanders
during the last election season.
RAINA WHITING CHALLENGES REP. RICHARD ONISHI for his seat to represent Pāhala through Volcano into Hilo. The teacher at Nāālehu Elementary School announced today that she pulled papers for the 2018 election and will run for the sate House of Representatives to serve District 3. She lives on a producing vegetable farm above Pāhala town.
     Whiting's voteraina.com website says, "Since moving to Hilo in 2005 and graduating from the University of Hawaii in 2009, Raina has been a tireless advocate for environmental, social, and economic justice on both the Big Island and Oahu. Her studies in literature, peace and conflict studies, and educational leadership have prepared her well for public service. Additionally, her work and volunteer experience have shown her strong commitment to improving the lives of working class people and her fellow community members. She currently teaches kindergarten at Nāālehu Elementary School and is an active member of Hawaii State Teachers Association."
 i; graduate studies in Peace and Conflict Resolution from the Spark M. Matsunaga Institute for Peace & Conflict Resolution at University of Hawaii.
Raina Whiting ran for County Council two years ago.
Now she is runing for the state House of Representatives.
   Whiting's education includes a Master of Science in Educational Leadership form Johns Hopkins School of Education; a Bachelor of Arts degree in Spanish Literature, with minor in Latin American and Iberian Studies from University of Hawai
     Her work experience includes being a Legal Advocate and AmeriCorps member; Legal Aid Society of Hawaii; a union organizer with Unite Here Local 5; a legislative aid for the Office of Sen. Russell Ruderman; a kindergarten teacher and Teach for America Corps member, Nāālehu Elementary School.
     Her volunteer experience includes being an officer of the Ka‘ū Chapter of Hawai‘i Farmers Union United; founding member and director of In The Streets, a human rights advocacy organization; environmental advocate for Keep the Country Country Defend Oahu Coalition; and community organizer for the Aikea Movement. She was an active supporter of Bernie Sanders in the last Presidential election.

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MORE ELECTRIC VEHICLES IN HAWAI‘I WILL CREATE DEMAND FOR MORE ROOFTOP SOLAR, says the plan released today by Hawaiian Electric Companies.
     The Electricfication of Transporation Strategic Roadmap was filed today with the state Public Utilities Commission. It describes near- and long-term actions to "create a clean energy future and reduce dependence on imported fossil fuel for transportation as well as electricity."
     A statement from the utility says,  "Hawaiʻi poised to be leader as global shift to EVs accelerates," with promises of "broad economic, environmental benefits." Hawaiian Electric predicts that 
some of the world's largest vehicle manufacturers will introduce dozens of all-electric models with extended battery range over the next decade, and that through the actions of its utilities, public agencies, and private industry, "Hawai‘i is uniquely positioned to be a leader in the clean transportation revolution."
     "In coming years," the plan says, "charging cars, trucks, buses and heavy equipment is expected to make room on the grid for nearly 200,000 more private rooftop solar systems and many grid-scale renewable projects."
     Specifics include the cost benefit for "every customer of Hawaiian Electric, Maui Electric and Hawai‘i Electric Light," including $200 million on the improvement in O‘ahu's total 'energy wallet'; an analysis of potential savings for customers of Maui Electric and Hawai‘i Electric Light "will be available in the near future."
Example of EV charging. Photo from electric-vehiclenews.com
     The plan "lays the foundation for future actions to realize these benefits for customers and the state," states the release. Some will require regulatory review and approval. The plan cites these key near-term steps:
     1. Boost EV adoption by working with automakers, dealerships, and advocates to lower the purchase price and educate customers on vehicle options and benefits.
     2. Partner with third-party charging providers and others to facilitate the buildout of charging infrastructure, especially in workplaces and multi-unit dwellings. Expand the network of utility-owned fast-chargers and public Level 2 chargers in gap areas to reduce range anxiety.
     3. Support customers to transition to electric buses with targeted efforts to reduce the upfront cost and provide practical charging options. From buses, efforts can move to trucks and other heavy equipment.
Example of rooftop solar panels. Photo from HELCO
     4. Create grid service opportunities with incentives for demand response participation and charging aligned with grid needs to reduce costs and save drivers money.
     5. Coordinate with ongoing grid modernization to ensure smooth integration of EVs into energy delivery networks and optimum use of renewable resources.
     "This is a global movement that is transforming the way that individuals, families and businesses use vehicles and we have to be ready," said Brennon Morioka, Hawaiian Electric's general manager of electrification of transportation. "This roadmap lays out the steps for meeting the changing needs of our customers and communities and adapting to the new technologies we know are coming.
     "Hawaiian Electric first promoted electric vehicles more than 100 years ago," Morioka said. "Today, the urgency has never been greater to reduce our use of oil for moving people and goods on the way to our clean energy future. This roadmap will guide our actions. The timing and precise route may change, but our destination and determination to reach it are clear."
     Hawaiʻi already has nearly 7,000 EVs registered, the report notes. The roadmap is available at www.hawaiianelectric.com/GoEV

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A 2017 Ka‘ū Coffee Recipe Contest entry.
REGISTRATIONS FOR THE ANNUAL KAʻŪ COFFEE RECIPE CONTEST are open through Friday, April 20. The contest with cash prizes brings together youth and adult chefs to use Ka‘ū Coffee in making three kinds of foods: pūpū, entrée, and dessert. The public is invited to witness the judging and enjoy the tasting and entertainment.
     There is a limit of one entry per category, per contestant, with no more than 20 entries per category allowed in the competition. Recipes will be judged Sunday, April 29, 11 a.m., at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Youth and adult submissions will be judged separately. All recipes must be made with (any) Ka‘ū Coffee.
     Two printed, legible copies of each recipe for each entry must be submitted with entry form. Entries must be plated and presented at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill no later than 10 a.m. Sunday, April 29. No cooking facilities are provided. Contestants must be present to win. There is no entry fee.
     Free tasting. Meet Miss Ka‘ū Coffee and her court. Find contest entry info at www.kaucoffeemill.com or www.kaucoffeefestival.com, or call 808-928-0550. Entry forms can also be found at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill or Mizuno Market, and viewed below. Email for info or with questions to sales@kaucoffeemill.com

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ONE COMMUNITY AND ONE PARENT REPRESENTATIVE are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. Nominations will be accepted from April 2 through April 16 at 3 p.m. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee.
     The campaign for the positions starts April 16. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.

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ADVOCATS OFFERS FREE CAT AND SPAY SERVICES at the Ocean View Community Center on Wednesday, Apr. 4, from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more details, call 895-9283.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at kaucalendar.com
/janfebmar/februaryevents.htmlSee Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, 
February print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano. Also available free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE
Girls Softball: Saturday, Mar 31 @ Honoka‘a
   Monday, Apr 2, @ Kohala
   Saturday, Apr 7, Hawai‘i Prep @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 9, @ Pāhoa
   Wednesday, Apr 11 @ KSH
   Saturday, Apr 14, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
Boys Volleyball: Tuesday, Apr 3, @ Waiakea
   Wednesday, Apr 11, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
   Friday, Apr 13, Honoka‘a @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 16, @ Hilo
   Friday, Apr 20, Parker @ Ka‘ū

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

FRIDAY, MARCH 30
COFFEE TALK, Fri, Mar 30, 9:30 - 11 a.m.Kahuku Park. Join park rangers in an informal conversation on a variety of topics. This month: Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death. Ka‘ū coffee, tea, and pastries available for purchase. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

SATURDAY, MARCH 31
LAST 2018 SANCTUARY OCEAN COUNT, Sat, Mar 31, 8 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.; arrive 30 min. prior for orientation. Four locations near/in Ka‘ū: Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park, and Ka‘ena Point - hawaiihumpbackwhale.noaa.gov for directions; park entrance fees apply. Bring sun protection, water, snacks, and a cushion to sit on. Pre-registration required: sanctuaryoceancount.org
STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT Sat., March 31. Meet Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center8:45 a.m. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants, and bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks, and water. Gloves and tools provided. Parental or guardian accompaniment, or written consent, required for volunteers under 18. Visit park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm

VOLCANO ART CENTER GALLERY PRESENTS HO’OKU’I I NĀ KIKO, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., from Saturday, Mar. 31, to Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222
     A free lecture titled "The Last Truth," offered by Lucia Tarallo, takes place at 3pm on the opening day of the exhibition. The lecture will be followed by an opening reception where the public is invited to meet the artists.

SECOND ANNUAL KA‘Ū WELLNESS FAIR, GET YOUR SPRING, Sat, Mar 31, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., multi-purpose room at Ka‘ū District Gym in Pāhala. The event features an Egg Hunt and Healthy Fun-Run-Walk, both of which begin at 9:30 a.m. - registration begins at 9 a.m. Also offered are a Blue Zones Purpose Workshop, from 10 a.m. to 11 a..m., and Book Time - Read A-Loud with Friends of the Ka‘ū Libraries, starting at 10 a.m. P.A.T.H. makes a presentation at 10:30 a.m. Vision Screenings, Keiki I.D.s, and Biometrics from Ka‘ū Public Health will be available. Several organizations will also provide information booths for the event: Bay Clinic, Ka‘ū Rural Health Clinic, Ka‘ū Rural Hospital, Project Aware - Your Mental Health First Aid, HSTA, Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool and Home Visitor Program, and more.

PU‘U LOKUANA, Sat, Mar 31, 9:30 - 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Short, moderately difficult, 0.4-mile hike to the top of the grassy cinder cone, Pu‘u Lokuana. Learn about the formation and various uses of this hill over time, and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Kaʻū. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

SUNDAY, APRIL 1
EASTER BRUCH, Sun, Apr 1, 7 a.m. to noon. Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Main entrees: Ham, Beef Pot Roast, and Breakfast Veggie Stir Fry. No reservations required. $17/Adult, $9.50/Child (6-11 yrs). KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

EASTER EGG HUNT, Sun, Apr 1, 9 a.m., ‘Ōhi‘a Room, Kīlauea Military Camp, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Open to keiki 10 years and under. Registration accepted from 7:30 - 8:45 a.m. Bring a basket. KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. Pre-register children: 967-8352, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

FOURTH ANNUAL KA‘Ū COMMUNITY EASTER EGG HUNT, Sun, Apr 1, 1 - 3 p.m., Nā‘ālehu Community Park. Over 6,000 candy filled eggs, over 300 prizes. Free chili & rice bowls. Donations welcome. Free; open to all ages, infants to adults. Pam/Lance, 929-8137, Henri, 464-5042

MONDAY, APRIL 2
SLOGAN/MOTTO CONTEST - Pāhala Public & School Library, continues through Mon, Apr 2. Submit ideas to Nā‘ālehu or Pāhala Library. $55 grand prize awarded on Fri, Apr 13. Friends of Ka‘ū Libraries President Sandra Demouruelle, naalehutheatre@yahoo.com, 929-9244

EASTER EGG HUNT, Mon, Apr 2, noon, Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee, CU Hawai‘i lawn, Nā‘ālehu. Judy Knapp, 640-4712

OCEAN VIEW VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETING, Mon, Apr 2, 4 - 6 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, APRIL 3
SPECIAL MERRIE MONARCH FESTIVAL EVENTS, Tue, Wed, Thu, Apr 3, 4 & 5, 11 - 1 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Honoring 55th Merrie Monarch Hula Festival. Hawaiian cultural demonstrations, live music. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETINGS & TRAININGS, Tue, Apr 3 & 24, 4 - 6 p.m., Apr 17, 4:30 - 6:30 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

KAʻŪ COFFEE GROWERS MEETING, Tue, Apr 3, 6 - 8 p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

HOW THE PACIFIC TSUNAMI WARNING CENTER WORKS, Tue, Apr 3, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Dr. Nathan Becker, Senior Oceanographer describes PTWC operations. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 4
AdvoCATS, Wed, Apr 4, 7 a.m. - 5 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Free Cat Spay & Neuter Clinic. 895-9283

Open Mic Night, Wed, Apr 4, 6 - 10 p.m., Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Singers, Bands, Comedians, etc. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests 21 years and older. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, APRIL 5
Veteran's Center & VA Medical Services, Apr 5 & 19, Thu, 8:30 - noon, Ocean View Community Center. No appointment needed to visit w/ VA counselor & benefit specialist. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu, Apr 5, 6 - 7 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

ONGOING
TŪTŪ AND ME OFFERS HOME VISITS to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 646-9634.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.