About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, December 22, 2015

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Tuesday, Dec. 22, 2015

Santa and Frosty the Snowman greet Pahala residents and visitors as they enter the village on Kamani Street. Photo by Julia Neal
GOV. DAVID IGE SUBMITTED his supplemental budget to the state Legislature yesterday. The proposal covers the Supplemental Fiscal Year. 
      “When I ran for governor, I made a promise to the people of Hawai`i,” Ige said. “I said that we would get our government house in order, honor our obligations and commitments and act to improve the lives of Hawai`i’s people. The budget I am submitting this year keeps that promise.
      “This is a supplemental budget year, a year when we make targeted changes to the budget adopted last year. We are focused on areas where government can make a real difference in the lives of Hawai`i’s citizens.”
Gov. David Ige presented his supplemental budget yesterday.
Photo from Office of the Governor
      The budget provides additional amounts of $729 million for to improve basic infrastructure and economic development to support the keys to the economy; $161 million to support affordable housing; $247 million to address critical health care needs, particularly for those among us least able to help themselves; and $248 million for education, which Ige said remains one of his highest priorities and on which a lot more needs to be done in the years ahead. 
      In addition, substantial monies are being set aside to honor financial commitments and to keep the state’s fiscal house in order. The administration is proposing to act aggressively, while the economy is healthy, to pay down debts used to fully fund employee retirement obligations.
      “This is the part of my work that is not glamorous or exciting; it is however the only responsible act to take.
      “I look forward to working with the Legislature on this budget in the 2016 session, to a healthy exchange of views on these and other issues, and to my upcoming State of the State Address which will allow me to place this budget in the larger context of the bills we will introduce and the administrative actions we are taking,” said Ige.
      Supplemental budget highlights include $31 million in capital improvement funds to make improvements to public housing and 64 staff positions supported by $4.5 million in revolving funds, $26.5 million in operating funds for the Weighted Student Formula to allow public school principals to decide how to spend this portion of the Department of Education’s budget and how to best meet the needs of their students, $6 million in operating funds for Preschool Open Doors to help families who need it most send their children to preschool, $30 million in capital improvement funds heat abatement in public schools and $60 million in capital improvement funds for renewal and deferred maintenance at UH campuses.
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Katsu Goto Photos from Baron Sekiya
DANNY MILLER, DIRECTOR & EDITOR of Saving Ka`u’s Coast and The Punalu`u Experience, is working on a new film about Katsu Goto, an early Japanese immigrant who came to Hawai`i in 1885 aboard the City of Tokio, the first ship of the Kanyaku Imin (contract laborers), to work on sugar plantations in Hawai`i. 
      After enduring a three-year labor contract at Soper, Wright & Co. along the Hamakua Coast, Goto became a successful businessman and labor leader. He was killed via a lynching in Honoka`a in 1889 while helping Japanese sugar plantation workers.
      Bringing the Legacy of Katsu Goto to Life is the first documentary of his story presented by the Katsu Goto Memorial Committee of Honoka`a Hongwanji Mission.
      A 25-minute preview as well as a behind-the-scenes look at the making of the documentary on features a fundraising campaign to document the story on film. The preview will run four times on Nippon Golden Network Channel 677 on Saturday, Jan. 2 at 9:35 p.m. and on Sunday, Jan. 3 at 12 a.m., 6 a.m. and 3:15 p.m.
      The previews are airing during Nippon Golden Network’s Freeview period when NGN will be available for free to all Oceanic Time Warner subscribers in Hawai`i. Interviews will be captioned for Japanese and English speakers. 
      The preview features interviews with Goto’s descendants, academic and historical scholars, community members and the film’s production team.
      “As a film director, you look for those really beautiful stories that come together to make a movie, and I think we really have those powerful stories in this film,” Miller said.
      “We still have new immigrants coming to Hawai`i all the time, so it is important for us to remember our history so we do not repeat some of the mistakes we have made in the past, producer and writer Baron Sekiya said. 
Danny Miller and Patsy Iwasaki
      It was Goto’s knowledge of the English language and Western laws that thrust him into his role as a bridge between Japanese contract laborers and plantation management as he fought for workers’ rights. “I feel that my life is in danger by being here, but I am not afraid,” Goto said while meeting Japanese laborers accused by plantation management of arson of a canefield, according to court documents. Goto was ambushed then lynched from a telephone pole in Honoka`a after this late night meeting.
      KGMC is seeking individual, foundation, corporate or organizational sponsors to provide production and completion funds and welcomes public participation to bring this story to film. Executive producer and writer Patsy Iwasaki strongly believes “his story has become a legacy. It’s a Hawai`i story, it’s an immigrant story, it’s a national story, it’s a story that needs to be told,” she said.
      To make a tax-deductible contribution, make checks payable to Katsu Goto Memorial Committee, c/o Honoka`a Hongwanji Mission, PO Box 1667, Honoka`a, HI 96727 or make a contribution via Paypal at KatsuGotoMovie.org.
      For more information, email patsy@KatsuGotoMovie.org.
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HAWAI`I ISLAND POLICE ARE CONDUCTING islandwide DUI checkpoints throughout the holiday season. The effort is part of a national and statewide Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over campaign. The campaign runs through Jan. 3. 
      Sergeant Robert Pauole, head of the Hawai`i Police Department’s Traffic Services Section, points out that drugs, or a combination of alcohol and drugs, have been factors in nearly 65 percent of the 17 traffic fatalities so far this year. Pauole also points out that motor vehicle fatalities are among the leading causes of death in the state over the past 15 years. Other leading causes are suicide (2,330), drowning (997) and firearms (616). Traffic fatalities over the past 15 years for the state stand at 1,868, which is more than drowning and firearms deaths combined.
      Hawai`i Police Department wishes everyone a happy and safe holiday season.
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HAWAI`I DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH added four new cases of dengue fever on Hawai`i Island yesterday, bringing the total to 167. The latest onset of illness was Dec. 13. As many as three of the confirmed cases are potentially infectious to mosquitoes. All others are no longer infectious.
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POHAKULOA TRAINING AREA OFFERS several opportunities for young hunters to hone their skills over the holiday weekends. 
      Youths ages 10 to 15 are invited to participate in bird hunting or bow hunting of mammals on Dec. 26-27 and Jan. 2-3. Bird hunts will be offered in the Ahi unit (training areas 9, 12-16 and 18), and bow hunting will be open in the Humu`ula and Menehune units (training areas 1-6) for both weekends. Hunters must check in at the Army check station across from Mauna Kea State Park.
      All youth hunters must have a valid state hunting license and must be accompanied by an adult with a valid state hunting license. Adults will participate in a mentor capacity, only, and are not permitted to harvest any animals during this hunt.
      Reservations are required for bow hunting. A maximum of 15 youth bow hunters will be allowed each day. Reservations are not required for bird hunting. To make a reservation, call 315-1545. Callers should have the names and hunting license numbers for each youth hunter and adult mentor and a contact number ready when calling.
      The initiative is part of the Army’s ongoing efforts to enhance its local hunting program, according to John Polhemus, manager of the U.S. Army Garrison-Pohakuloa’s public hunting program.
      “There hasn’t been much focus on youth hunting in the past, but that’s something we want to change,” Polhemus said. “Our goal is to offer more opportunities for youths to apply safe hunting techniques and experience hunting in a low-pressure, uncrowded environment.”
      Adult hunting activity will resume on Jan. 9-10 pending availability of hunting areas.
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Artistic wreaths are on display at Volcano Art Center Gallery.
Photo from VAC
VOLCANO ART CENTER GALLERY’S annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit continues through Jan. 3 during Christmas in the Country. The exhibit presents one-of-a-kind wreaths in a variety of imaginative media, techniques and styles, from the whimsical to the traditional. 
      “You’ll be amazed at what some artists choose to include in their highly creative concepts of ‘wreath’,” Gallery Manager Emily Catey said. “Those looking for truly original wreaths will want to be among the first to see and choose from the exhibit.”
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PARTICIPANTS LEARN HOW TO TRANSFORM coconut fronds into fun items and take home creations tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. on the lanai of Kilauea Visitor Center Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Free; park entrance fees apply.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.