About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, October 08, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, Oct. 8, 2014

Ka`u Plantation Days continues its tradition of opening with a parade featuring pa`u riders this Saturday. Photo by Julia Neal
COFFEE BERRY BORERS HAVE AN ENEMY that enters cavities they make in coffee cherries and devours CBB eggs and larvae. Researchers at U.S. Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center videotaped the activity of square-necked grain beetles using a microscope.
Square-necked grain beetle feeds on coffee berry borer eggs and larvae.
      “We’re trying to learn everything we can about it,” entomologist Peter Follett told Bret Yager, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald. “Whether it will actually have an impact on CBB will require a lot more study. It’s a stored grain pest, so it’s easy to rear in large numbers in cracked corn,” increasing their potential as a biocontrol for CBB.
      Cathartus quadricollis is established in Hawai`i and has been found to assist in the control of Tropical Nut Borer on macadamia nut. TNB is a very close relative to CBB and is found in the same genus. They look very much alike. However, CBB is found on coffee, and TNB is found on macadamia nut.
      According to the story, the grain beetle is widely distributed.
      “We certainly need something to keep the numbers down on CBB,” said Kealakekua coffee grower Bob Nelson. “There’s no silver bullet that’s going to eliminate it. We’d like a number of tools to combat it.”
      People are going to ask, ‘what else is it going to do?’” he said. “But it’s already here. That means it’s going to do what it’s going to do anyway.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THREE HAWAIIAN GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES presented reasons why residents should vote for them in their opening statements during a debate on KHON yesterday.
      Republican Duke Aiona said, “You have two options. You can choose leadership that is part of a system that has throttled businesses, who have created an educational system structure that has produced a poor and under-performing educational system, and who has increased the cost of living yearly. Or you can choose a governor who is committed to, as I stated earlier, creating a business-friendly environment by just getting out of the way of businesses so that they can create jobs that will be affordable, that will present a livable wage for everyone, jobs that will bring other industries in here, an environment that will do that. You will also have a governor that is committed to restructuring the educational system so that we can produce students who are ready for the 21st century knowledge-based economy.”
      Independent Mufi Hannemann said, “You are actually trying to hire someone to be the chief executive of the state, and in doing so, please keep in mind that the most recent experience with a Democratic governor and a Democratic Legislature led to a change where Sen. Ige is now the nominee. The most recent experience with a Republican governor and a Democratic Legislature led to partisan gridlock. So in life, when something is not working, try something different. Try something new. Take someone who has executive experience in running the 13th largest city in America, place in his hands the ability to work with both sides as I’ve done throughout my career, work with business and labor, and ultimately do the will of the people. We’re in a status quo. We’re standing still. We’re going backwards. We need to imua and go forward. Les Chang and I humbly ask for your vote on Nov. 4.” 
      Democratic Sen. David Ige said, “As we’ve traveled around the state, I have heard the call. People want a change in leadership. People want a change in leadership style. They want a new leader that can bring our communities together, find common ground and move us forward. This election really is about the future of Hawai`i. It’s about the future that we define together. About the kind of Hawai`i that we want to leave to our children and our children’s children. I am the only candidate here with 35 years of private sector experience. I’m the only candidate here with 29 years of legislative experience. I’m the only candidate here who has balanced the budget, rejected tax increases and made tough decisions to cut the budget. I humbly ask for your vote for Shan Tsutsui and I to lead this state into the next future.”
      See khon2.com.
      Ka`u residents can see the candidates in person during a forum tomorrow at 6 p.m. at Sangha Hall in Hilo. The forum will also be live-streamed at hawaii247.com.

The Puna lava flow has advanced about 85 yards since yesterday.
Map from Hawai`i County Civil Defense
THIS MORNING'S ASSESSMENT BY COUNTY CIVIL DEFENSE of lava moving toward Pahoa showed that the flow front continues to be active and has advanced approximately 85 yards since yesterday. The narrow flow front is moving along a tree line, and the burning activity is producing a significant amount of smoke. Smoke conditions in the area were light to moderate with a light trade wind out of the northeast.
      See hawaiicounty.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

At right, opponents of the Thirty Meter Telescope address dignitaries gathered for
yesterday's aborted groundbreaking and blessing. Photo from Big Island Video News
OPPONENTS OF THE THIRTY METER TELESCOPE interrupted yesterday’s planned groundbreaking and blessing. Protesters blocked the access road, keeping dignitaries, including Mayor Billy Kenoi and many from foreign countries, away from the site. They also made their way to the site and succeeded in stopping the ceremony.
      One protester asked attendees to “please listen. … This mountain is sacred to us. She protects us. … A lot of us are mixed cultures; we’re not just Hawaiian.”
      See video of the events at bigislandvideonews.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U PLANTATION DAYS IS WELCOMING MORE representatives of ranches, farms and dairies to participate in the annual pa`u parade on horseback, foot, car, truck or float. Frank Lorenzo, Jr., Jesse Lorenzo, Jenny Castenada, John Kalahiki, Dietrich and Tiara Souza, Kiana Kuluwaimaka and La`a Ke, Kirsha Derasin and Lorie Lee Lorenzo are each representing an island on horseback. Horses and riders will be wearing lei.
Rodeo Queen Caliya Silva Kamei will be a pa`u
rider in the parade. Photo by Julia Neal
      Leaders in ranches, dairy and sugar will be honored. The Derasins will represent rancher Gabriel Hanoa. Jesse Lorenzo will represent sugar man Stanley Lorenzo, Sr. Frank Lorenzo will represent sugar man Thomas Kailiawa. Keanu Kuluwaimaka will represent sugar man Melvin Kuluwaimaka. Tiana and Dietrich Souza will represent dairyman Ernest Souza, of S&S Dairy.
      Miss Ka`u Coffee Amery Silva will ride along with Ka`u Roping and Riding Association Rodeo Queen Caliya Silva Kamei.
      Ethnic foods and dances will be presented, including Japanese and Filipino offerings. Historic displays from plantation days will be presented by families and heritage groups. Emcee is Clyde Silva.
      Participants include Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka`u, Friends of Kahuku Park, Boys and Girls Club, Pahala Filipino Association, Aikane Plantation Coffee, Na`alehu Hongwanji, Pahala Karate Dojo, Wong Yuen Chinese family, Kauaha`ao Church, Ka `Ohana O Honu`apo, The Nature Conservancy, Friends of Ka`u Libraries, Ka`u Chamber of Commerce, Halau Hula O Leionalani, Keoki Kahumoku and the Center for Hawaiian Music Education, `O Ka`u Kakou and several nutrition and health organizations.
      Free cell phones will be available for people with low incomes.
      The event, sponsored by Ka`u Multicultural Society and chaired by Darlyne Vierra and Liz Kuluwaimaka, is this Saturday along the streets of Pahala and on the grounds of the old sugar company manager’s manor – Pahala Plantation House – beginning at 9 a.m.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar

THE HAWAI`I POLICE DEPARTMENT WILL OFFER an active shooter presentation during an afternoon meeting in Na`alehu on Oct.21. The presentation will take place from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Na`alehu Community Center.
      It is designed to help individuals increase their survivability should they encounter an active shooter or other type of active violent incident.
      Police will provide information on previous incidents of mass violence, recent events, best practices for those caught in such situations, law enforcement’s response and how to work together as a community toward prevention. They will also provide additional resources for participants so they can continue their education on this topic, followed by a question-and answer segment.

Petrel monitoring is the purpose of an upcoming
national park flight plan. Photo from Jim Denny
HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK ANNOUNCES the following upcoming flight plans for October and November:
  • Wednesday, Oct. 8 and Thursday, Oct. 9, between 6 a.m. and 11 a.m. for ungulate surveys in Kahuku between 3,000-ft. and 7,000-ft. elevation;

  • Thursday, Oct.16, between 8 a.m. and noon, from the summit of Kilauea to Mauna Loa at about 9,000-ft. elevation for petrel monitoring;
 
  • Thursday, Oct. 16 and Friday, Oct. 17 for fountain grass monitoring and control from Ka`aha to the Great Crack along the Southwest Rift Zone of Kilauea;
 
  • Monday, Nov. 3 and Wednesday, Nov. 5 to transport camp supplies from Hilina Pali Road to Kamo`oali`i for fountain grass monitoring and control;
 
  • Tuesday, Nov. 4, between 6 a.m. and 8 a.m. for ungulate surveys and control work in Kahuku between 3,000-ft and 7,000-ft. elevation
; 
  • Monday, Nov. 10, between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. for mullein surveys on Mauna Loa
; 
  • Monday, Nov. 24 and Tuesday, Nov. 25, between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. from the summit of Kilauea to Mauna Loa at about 9,000-ft. elevation for petrel monitoring. 
      In a statement, the park said it regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather.
      Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources and to maintain backcountry facilities.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.





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