About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, October 25, 2019

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Friday, October 25, 2019

Sulphur Cone (left), viewed toward southwest, from 3,480 m (11,420 ft) above sea level on Mauna Loa's southwest
rift zone. At right, an HVO geoscientist and technician rebuild volcanic gas monitoring equipment installed near
an outgassing fissure. See Volcano Watch below. USGS photo
REACTING TO REP. TULSI GABBARD'S DECISION TO CONCENTRATE ON HER PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDACY instead of running for reelection to Congress, state Sen. Kai Kahele, who is running for her seat, released a statement yesterday. The Democratic candidate for Hawaiʻi's Second Congressional District wrote:
     "Since announcing her Presidential candidacy in January 2019, Congresswoman Gabbard has worked hard visiting towns and cities across the United States. This dedication, while worthy of admiration, meant that her congressional district was often left without a voice in Washington, D.C. I wholly respect and appreciate the Congresswoman's decision not to seek re-election to the U.S. House of Representatives as she pursues the Presidency. I thank her for her service, and I wish her and her family the best going forward.
Kai Kahele takes the lead in running for the congressional
seat for rural Hawaiʻi after Tulsi Gabbard announce she
will focus on the presidency and declines to run
for reelection to the U.S. House of Representatives.
   "I remain fully committed to my campaign to become Hawaiʻi's next Congressman. While our opponent may change, the fundamentals of building our grassroots campaign will not. When I announced my candidacy earlier this year, I pledged that I would take nothing for granted. I am traveling to each island, engaging with every community and sitting down with our neighbors, friends and ʻohana to hear directly about their concerns and to see how I may best represent them in Washington, D.C. That's what I have been focused on for the last 10 months, and that's what I will continue to do until the primary election next August. I will continue to work hard to earn the faith, confidence and vote of every resident of the 2nd District."
     Kahele's statement noted that he serves as Majority Floor Leader and Chairman of the Committee on Water and Land in the Hawaiʻi State Senate, where he represents his hometown of Hilo. He is an 18-year combat veteran aviator who was recently promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Hawaiʻi Air National Guard.
     Former Hawaiʻi Governors John Waiheʻe, Ben Cayetano and Neil Abercrombie serve as Honorary Co-Chairs of the Kahele for Congress Campaign Committee. Honolulu City Council Chairman Ikaika Anderson formally endorsed Kahele's candidacy. The Kahele for Congress campaign has raised over half a million dollars since January 21, 2019.
     The Second Congressional District encompasses Hawaiʻi Island, Maui, Kahoʻolawe, Molokaʻi, Lānaʻi, Kaua'i, Niʻihau, and the rural parts of Oʻahu, including Waimānalo, Kailua, Kāneʻohe, the North Shore, and the Leeward coast.

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THE USE OF CONSERVATION CLASSIFIED LAND for urban purposes brought more testimony to yesterday's state Land Use Commission hearing in Hilo, which continued today.
     Cultural practitioner, educator, and attorney James Mauliola Keaka Stone, Jr. opposed the idea that the use of Maunakea for a telescope campus is invalid on its land that is classified conservation. During the public hearing, he referred to a challenge from the Kanakaole family, which states that the state Board of Land and Natural Resources has no right to allow industrial activity like the telescopes on Conservation land.
James Mauliola Keaka Stone, Jr.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     He said that Maunakea has long been viewed for scientific purposes "positively by our community and admired worldwide for its enormous contribution to humanity’s understanding of the cosmos.” He said that he is kanaka maoli, a Hawaiian who supports astronomy and the building of Thirty Meter Telescope on Maunakea.  He said those objecting to the permits for the telescopes, along with their positions and arguments "do not speak for me."
     He testified that "It is heartbreaking to witness how an entitled minority now feel that their personal beliefs give them the right to ignore legal process and the obvious benefits for current and future generations." He said that over ten years of hearings and a final ruling by the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court have made the facts of the development of TMT obvious. "What is clear to me, as I sat in the gallery waiting, what I was struck by the enormity of the genuine and heartfelt feelings of everyone here who testified before you. Those genuine heartfelt feelings make it different and sometimes difficult... We can fall into the trap of not listening  and embrace self-righteousness as if our positions somehow are superior to others."
     He said his legal view is that those questioning the classification are not legally able to compel a change. See more at bigislandvideonews.com and in Saturday's Kaʻū News Briefs.

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READ A FIRST-PERSON ACCOUNT OF HIGH ALTITUDE STATION MAINTENANCE ON MAUNA LOA in this weeks' Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory technician Frank Younger:
     U.S. Geological Survey trucks pull off the shoulder of Mauna Loa Observatory Road before dawn. I park the Jeep at the helicopter staging area, a flat rubble strip flanked by a'a lava. The air is cool and thin at 3,048 m (10,000 ft) altitude. Our field crew of six from HVO keep warm unloading gear. We clear the landing zone for the inbound pilot. We organize packs, tools, and equipment by checklist for the helicopter.
     Today's flight plan will disperse us across Mokuʻāweoweo Caldera and the upper flank of the volcano to rebuild five remote Mauna Loa monitoring stations. Our team of technicians ensures the continuous transmission of seismic, deformation, and gas emission data from the active, but not currently erupting, volcano. Two geoscientists and I are heading to Sulphur Cone on the Southwest Rift Zone within the boundaries of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     The first light of day spreads over Hawaiʻi Island. The natural colors of Mauna Kea, Hualālai, and Kohala come alive in the warmth of the sun. Across the channel, the heights of Haleakalā rise above ocean clouds.
Cones, flows, and fissures mark the uppermost portions of Mauna Loa's northeast rift zone in the foreground of this aerial
image taken by Civil Air Patrol on Sunday, October 20. In the background, Moku‘āweoweo, Mauna Loa's summit caldera,
is visible. The highest point on Mauna Loa, the true summit, is in the upper right hand corner of the image. Sulphur Cone
is in the middle left. USGS photo
     I hear beating chopper blades approaching. The helicopter lands in a roaring downdraft. We load cargo for Sulphur Cone, and I strap myself in next to the pilot. He throttles for takeoff, keys coordinates on the GPS, and pulls rotor pitch with his control. The helicopter lifts into the trade wind, banks westward, and nods into forward acceleration.
     We navigate along the 10,000 ft (3,048 m) elevation contour of Mauna Loa, with an airborne perspective of the northwest flank. The long, jagged channel of the 1859 lava flow stretches 52 km (32 miles) down to the sea south of ʻAnaehoʻomalu Bay.
     Crossing the west flank, we fly above an atmospheric inversion layer. Cloud-swept pāhoehoe cradles patches of hardy native Pukeawe shrub. We hurtle over the trackless wilderness at 110 knots (126 mph). The dark ridgeline of the Southwest Rift Zone dominates the horizon ahead.
     The Sulphur Cone area stands out in bright contrast. It's a steaming section of the 1950 eruptive fissure at 3,480 m (11,420 ft) elevation. We are dropped off upwind of fumaroles emitting volcanic gases. The fumes have created crystals including snow-white calcite and canary-yellow sulfur that cover the surroundings.
     Our crew hikes over altered rock to monitoring equipment installed near an outgassing fissure. Station MG14_SCN clicks and whirs beneath protective rocks.
     The MultiGAS technology inside was developed by USGS Volcano Science Center researchers. It is a field-deployed gas laboratory the size of a suitcase.  Sensors measure sulfur dioxide (SO2), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), water vapor (H20), and carbon dioxide (CO2) gas concentrations. Automatic calibration is used to correct sensor drift.
     We bring in a replacement MultiGAS to relieve the veteran station instrument. It is scheduled for preventative maintenance at HVO's Keaʻau workshop, then redeployment to Mokuʻāweoweo Caldera.
     My colleague hunts around with a thermometer. She locates a 95 deg C (203 deg F) fumarole and wires a station thermocouple to continuously measure near-surface temperature.
An HVO field engineer and gas geochemist check the wire and tubing connections 
in the updated gas sensor equipment. USGS photo by P. Nadeau
     I tend the power station, cleaning solar panels. The wet rag comes away yellow with insoluble sulfur. The anemometer atop the mast gets a scrub, too.  I inspect the welded frame and antenna grid for any deterioration beneath a fine coat of crystals.
     Our team lead installs the new MultiGAS and communicates with it via laptop. She notes parameters and triggers a calibration cycle. We listen and test the plumbing of pumps and valves as they operate – all look and sound healthy. She swaps cylinders of calibration gases and replaces desiccant and scrubbing media. I check the tubing manifold connections and raise the sample intake pipe.
      I call HVO Hilo over satellite phone. Our flight follower verifies network connectivity and data quality. I get updates on the other crews' status around the summit. The mission is running smoothly. Confident in our work, we request helicopter extraction.
     Volcano Activity Updates
     
Kῑlauea Volcano is not erupting and its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at NORMAL. Kīlauea deformation and seismicity showed no notable changes over the past week. Sulfur dioxide emission rates are low at the summit and below detection limits at Puʻu ʻŌʻō and the lower East Rift Zone (LERZ). The water pond at the bottom of Halema‘uma‘u continues to slowly expand and deepen.
     At or near the 2018 LERZ eruptive fissures, elevated ground temperatures and minor releases of gas (steam, tiny amounts of hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide) persist. These are typical post-eruption conditions and are expected to be long-term.
     Hazards remain at the LERZ and summit of Kīlauea. Closures and warnings in these areas should be heeded. The 2018 lava flows are primarily on private property; please be respectful and do not enter or park on private property.
     Mauna Loa is not erupting. Its USGS Volcano Alert level remains at ADVISORY. This alert level does not mean that an eruption is imminent or that progression to an eruption is certain.
     This past week, about 80 small-magnitude earthquakes (all less than M2.2) were detected beneath the upper elevations of Mauna Loa. Deformation measurements show continued summit inflation. Volcanic gas emission and fumarole temperature readings have been slightly elevated from measurements several weeks ago due to maintenance on the instrument sensors in mid-September.
     There were two events with three or more felt reports in the Hawaiian islands during the past week.  A magnitude-3.0 earthquake 14 km (9 mi) S of Volcano at 2 km (1 mi) depth occurred on Oct. 17, at 8:55 p.m. A magnitude-3.4 earthquake 14 km (9 mi) SE of Volcano at 0 km (0 mi) depth occurred on Oct. 13 at 5:30 a.m.

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STRONG SENIORS CHAIR EXERCISE CLASS, Women's Fitness My Way with PK Mercado, begins Friday, Nov. 1, 10 a.m. – sharp – to 11 a.m. in Volcano; no late entry. Five classes for $45, must call to reserve one of 15 spots. No drop ins, no make-ups for missed classes. No prorating. No roll overs to the next month.
     All equipment provided. Attendees should bring water and a towel, and wear fitness wear and shoes. No Crocks, slippers, or sandals. For those who use a cane or walked, bring them to class. Those under a doctor's care must discuss medical concerns in advance of sign-up. Payment due in full at first session, check or cash in exact change only; no credit given.
     Contact Mercado at 315-9130. soulfitnesshawaiipksm.com

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FIT & FIRM VOLCANO MEDIUM INTENSITY COED STRENGTH EXERCISE CLASS, Women's Fitness My Way with PK Mercado, begins Friday, Nov. 1, 8 a.m. – sharp – to 9 a.m. in Volcano; no late entry. Four classes for $36, must call to reserve one of 15 spots. No drop ins. No make-ups for missed classes. No prorating. No roll overs to the next month.
     Strength, balance, core, and agility exercise conditioning classes for ages 30 and older. Low to Medium exercise intensity, including but not limited to squats, planks, shoulder presses, lunges, and more. Geared towards full body functional fitness to compliment one's active lifestyle. Most fitness equipment provided.
     Attendees should bring exercise ball, exercise mat, water and a towel, and wear comfortable fitness wear. No Crocks, slippers, or sandals – shoes of bare feet only. For those who use a cane or walked, bring them to class. Those under a doctor's care must discuss medical concerns in advance of sign-up. Payment due in full at first session, check made out to Soul Fitness Hawaii, LLC or cash in exact change only; no credit given.
     Contact Mercado at 315-9130: to sign up; to learn if this is the appropriate fitness level; if hoping to attend with medical concerns. All physical therapy must be complete before attending class. soulfitnesshawaiipksm.com
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See public Kaʻū events, meetings, entertainmentSee Kaʻū exercise, meditation, daily, and weekly 
events. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Kaʻū, from 
Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on stands throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar.
2019 Kaʻū High School Fall Athletics Schedule
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates

Football, Division II:
Sat., Oct. 26, 1 p.m., Kohala hosts Kaʻū
Fri. and Sat., Nov. 1 and 2, Div II BIIF Championship
Fri. and Sat., Nov. 15 and 16, HHSAA Div II Semifinals
Fri., Nov. 29, HHSAA Div II Championship

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
SATURDAY, OCT. 26
Free Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs offered by KARES in Ocean View on Saturday, Oct. 29. For info and to register, 328-8455.

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Oct. 26, 9a.m.-12:30p.m., Volcano Art Center. Students complete one 8"x 53" scarf. $45/VAC member, $50/non-member, plus $10 supply fee per person. All materials supplied. Beginner and intermediate artists welcome. Register - 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Nature & Culture, Saturday, Oct. 26, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate hike, approx. 2 miles. nps.gov/havo/

Kimchi & Kombucha/Jun, Hands-On Fermented Foods Workshop with Jasmine Silverstein of HeartBeet Foods, Saturday, Oct. 26, 10a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $15/person supply fee (includes organic ingredients). Pre-registration required. No cooking skills necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Chicken Skin Stories, Saturday, Oct. 26, 7-9p.m., Kīlauea Military Camp's Theater, in HVNP. DJ KTA. $20/person in advance, $25/person at the door. Open to eligible patrons; certain Terms of Service. Free; park entrance fees apply. Purchase online at bigisland.ticketleap.com (+$2 fee online). mariner@kimurabrands.com

SUNDAY, OCT. 27
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sunday, Oct. 27, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/havo/

MONDAY, OCT. 28
Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ‘Āina, the fabric of Hawai‘i with Puakea Forester, Monday, Oct. 28, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

TUESDAY, OCT. 29
Trail Less Traveled, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 10:30a.m.-12:30p.m., Devastation Trail Parking Lot, HVNP. Moderate, 2 mile, 2 hour roundtrip hike. $40/person. Register online. Family friendly. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Oct. 29, 11:30a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30
Kōkua Kupuna Project, Wednesday, Oct. 30 – last Wednesday, monthly – 9-11a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Seniors 60 years and older encouraged to attend, ask questions, and inquire about services offered through Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i – referral required, 961-8626 for free legal services. Under 60, call 1-800-499-4302. More info: tahisha.despontes@legalaidhawaii.org, 329-3910 ext. 925. legalaidhawaii.org

THURSDAY, OCT. 31
Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Oct. 31, 11a.m.-noon, multipurpose room, Ka‘ū District Gym, Pāhala.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Oct. 31, 4-6p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

Trunk or Treat at Kaʻū District Gym will be held Thursday, Oct. 31, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Organized by Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary school, the free event offers a haunted house, healthy recipes, a family-friendly atmosphere, and Trunk or Treat, where keiki and youth go from parked car to car, asking for treats.
     For those interested in participating in Trunk or Treat, distributing goodies, prizes will be awarded for the best decorated car: Most Beautiful, Most Original, Spookiest, and a special awards for teachers or staff who decorate; decoration not required. Contact Nona at 928-3102 or Angie Miyashiro at 313-4100.

ONGOING
Help Shape Hawaiʻi Island at upcoming SpeakOuts and workshops on the General Plan. The community is encouraged to "come share your manaʻo," opinion.
     A Topic Workshop will be held in Hilo at County of Hawaiʻi Office of Aging on Saturday, Oct. 26, on Infrastructure from 9 a.m. to noon and Natural Resources from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
     Submit feedback online by Thursday, Oct. 31. See more Info on the Draft General Plan at hiplanningdept.com/general-plan/.


Trunk or Treat at Kaʻū District Gym will be held Thursday, Oct. 315:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Organized by Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary school, the free event offers a haunted house, healthy recipes, a family-friendly atmosphere, and Trunk or Treat, where keiki and youth go from parked car to car, asking for treats.
     For those interested in participating in Trunk or Treat, distributing goodies, prizes will be awarded for the best decorated car: Most Beautiful, Most Original, Spookiest, and a special awards for teachers or staff who decorate; decoration not required. Contact Nona at 928-3102 or Angie Miyashiro at 313-4100.

Nationwide 2019 Congressional App Challenge submissions from middle and high schoolers are open through Friday, Nov. 1. Submit to Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, CongressionalAppChallenge.us, apps "designed to promote innovation and engagement in computer science." All skill levels, all devices and platforms, and all programming languages, accepted.

Hoʻokupu Hula No Kaʻū Cultural Festival Booths can be reserved. The free event on Saturday, Nov. 2, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., at Pāhala Community Center, will feature cultural practitioners and demonstrators; workshops; crafts; food; music and entertainment from artists such as Bali Hai from Mexico, Vero Cruz Folklore Dancers, taiko drummers, UH-Hilo Filipino/Samoan dancers; and hula from Mexico, Japan, Virginia, ʻOahu, and Hawaiʻi Island. Interested vendors can apply for food, craft, or information booths. Email leionalani47@hotmail.com or call 808-649-9334. See hookupukau.com.

Tiny Treasure Invitational Exhibit at Volcano Art Center gallery in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park runs through Sunday, Nov. 3. Open to the public, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Free; Park entrance fees apply. The exhibition also celebrates VAC's 45th anniversary, Oct. 21.
     Artists include Daniel Rokovitz, Stone O'Daugherty, Kristin Mitsu Shiga, Pat Pearlman, and Amy Flanders, Karen and Mark Stebbins. Also on display, small works from the annual Volcano Art Collaboration from June, featuring Rose Adare, Nash Adams-Pruitt, Lisa Louise Adams, Ed Clapp, Amy Flanders, Bill Hamilton, Liz Miller, Joe Laceby, and Erik Wold. volcanoartcenter.org

Vendor Booth Space is Available for the Kamahalo Craft Fair. The 12th annual event will be held Thanksgiving weekend, Friday, Nov. 299 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 30, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Cooper Center. Booths are open for crafters with quality homemade and homegrown products. Food vendors must prepare all food items in a certified kitchen and must have a Department of Health permit displayed prominently at their booth. Application online at thecoopercenter.org. Direct questions to 936-9705 or kilaueatutu@gmail.com.

King Cab 2016 Nissan Frontier for Sale by Holy Rosary Church of Pāhala and the Sacred Heart Church of Nāʻālehu. The parishes are selling the truck to raise funds to benefit both churches. The truck is a great 6 cylinder, 2WD automobile. The churches are asking for $21K or best offer. Only cash or cashier's check will be accepted. Anyone interested should contact the parish secretary Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at 928-8208.


Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call Tata Compehos and Melody Espejo at 808-938-1088.

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