About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Thursday, June 30, 2016

Keiki enjoy Pahala Community Center's new playground after yesterday's ribbon-cutting ceremony.
See more below. Photos by Ron Johnson
WITH THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW from Pu`u `O`o making its way over Pulama Pali along the western boundary of the former Royal Gardens Subdivision in lower Puna, Hawai`i County opens the area to lava viewing today.
Lava reaches a mango tree in a kipuka
on its way toward the Puna Coast.
Photo from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
      Lava viewing along the three-mile stretch of the county’s portion of an emergency road that leads to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is permitted between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily. The emergency road was built when lava threatened to cut off lower Puna in 2014. If lava had covered Hwy 130 near Pahoa, residents’ and emergency vehicles would have exited lower Puna by driving on the emergency road that hooks up with the national park road that climbs up the pali to Hwy 11 in Volcano. 
      For lava viewing, viewers will walk. No vehicles will be allowed.
      Security guards will be posted on the emergency road or Hwy 130 before the entrance to Kalapana Gardens to provide lava viewing information and to direct parking. As in previous lava viewing events, visitors will be asked to park in marked areas near the end of the paved portion of Hwy 130.
      Visitors are reminded that the emergency road is a gravel road that traverses over older lava flows and ends at the National Park Service boundary. Visitors are also reminded to prepare for the trek with proper footwear, sunscreen, warm clothing and water.
      The county has established lava flow viewing areas along Hwy 130 as far back as 2001 and most recently in Pahoa in 2014.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I COUNTY OFFICIALS JOINED Ka`u keiki, kupuna and other residents to celebrate two new playgrounds yesterday. Playgrounds at Na`alehu Park and Pahala Community Center feature a variety of slides, climbing walls and ropes and twirling bars, along with park benches. Artificial turf covers the grounds’ padded surfaces. 
Junior Miss Ka`u Coffee Karlee Fukunaga-Camba, First Junior Miss
Princess Calaysa Koi, Third Junior Miss Princess Helena Nihipali-Sesson
and Second Miss Peaberry Khloe Moses helped Mayor Billy Kenoi to
celebrate opening of the playgrounds.
      Leading the blessing was Mayor Billy Kenoi. He said his vision is to provide playgrounds as a way to bring communities together. He said that such facilities can help reduce the need for more police because they create safe places for children and families to enjoy activities together.
      Also attending were Hawai`i County Council members Maile David, Greggor Ilagan and Karen Eoff.
      David, Ka`u's council member, said the day was such an uplifting experience, being able to see keiki enjoy new experiences the playgrounds offer. She said the county pushed to have the Na`alehu playground ready in time for the Fourth of July celebration there this Saturday.
      Deputy County Parks Director James Komata, Pahala Park manager Nona Makuakane and Na`alehu Park manager Richard Karasuda were also on hand.
      Junior Miss Ka`u Coffee Karlee Fukunaga-Camba, First Junior Miss Princess Caylasa Koi, Third Junior Miss Princess Helena Nihipali-Sesson and Second Miss Ka`u Coffee Peaberry Klohe Moses joined the celebration, representing the Ka`u Coffee industry.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I ISLAND POLICE INFORM the public that operating a farm vehicle, such as a tractor, on county roadways or state highways is prohibited and in violation of numerous equipment and regulatory offenses.
Keiki can climb rock walls and ropes, twirl on bars and try
a variety of slides at the playgrounds.
      In addition, those vehicles are unable to maintain the minimum posted speed limit, which impedes traffic and is a danger for pedestrians and bicyclists using roadway shoulders.
      Exceptions are for construction and/or maintenance tractors used at construction or cleaning sites.
      The proper method of transporting farm vehicles on public roadways is with use of a properly inspected and registered vehicle and trailer.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TOTAL VISITOR ARRIVALS TO HAWAI`I rose 1.3 percent in May, and visitor expenditures declined 2.4 percent, Hawai`i Tourism Authority reported.
      “Visitor arrivals and expenditures year-to-date show that Hawai`i is still ahead of last year’s record-setting pace, with total arrivals up 3.1 percent and spending up one percent,” said George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of HTA. “Visitors from our two largest markets, the U.S. West and East, led arrivals in May and continues its positive course of year-over-year growth, despite a slight drop in arrivals last month due to travel around Easter holiday falling in March instead of April this year.
Ka`u residents greet Mayor Billy Kenoi and Hawai`i County
Council member Maile David.
      “On the international side, arrivals from Korea were strong in May, seeing a double-digit increase year-over-year. However, declines in arrivals and expenditures from the Japan and Canada markets can be attributed to a weaker exchange rate and the fact that Golden Week in Japan shifted travel to late April this year versus the first week of May in 2015.
      “We are also closely monitoring the situation in Europe and how that may affect travel. It’s too early to know precisely how the situation there will affect the global economy, including tourism related impacts. In 2015, 143,434 visitors from Europe came to Hawai`i, with 50,469 of that total coming from the United Kingdom. This represents less than two percent of the 8.6 million visitors who came to Hawaii last year.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

GOV. DAVID IGE HAS APPOINTED attorney Thomas Gorak to the state Public Utilities Commission. Since 2013, Gorak has worked closely with the PUC as its chief counsel, serving as chief legal and regulatory advisor.
      Gorak has practiced law since 1977, specializing in public utility regulation at both the federal and state levels for the past 37 years. He previously worked on utility regulatory matters in Maryland and practiced law in Washington, D.C., where he provided client services that included analyzing and addressing their positions in public utility matters.
Thomas Gorak Photo from Gov. Ige's office
      Gorak opened his solo practice in 1995 and moved his firm to Hawai`i in 2003, where he continued to represent clients in utility matters, both on the mainland and before the PUC.
      “Tom has years of national and international experience in utility regulatory matters,” Ige said. “He has been closely engaged with the PUC as its chief counsel for the past three years and will be able to step in immediately to participate in discussions and decision making on all matters pending before the commission. There will be no delay in addressing the many issues that must be resolved to meet our renewable energy goals.”
      “I very much appreciate the governor’s faith in me as the state moves forward on the path to a 100 percent renewable energy future,” Gorak said. “I believe my experience and background, along with the support of the superb staff of the Public Utilities Commission, will allow me to contribute to the commission’s efforts in meeting the challenges associated with achieving this goal.”
      Gorak replaces Michael Champley, whose term expires today. Gorak begins his term on tomorrow. His appointment is subject to Senate approval.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

JOIN STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Volunteers cut invasive Himalayan ginger on Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park trails. Loppers and gloves are provided. Participants are encouraged to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and closed-toe shoes. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      See nps.gov/havo.

Pa`u riders return to Na`alehu's Fourth of July Parade this Saturday.
Photo by Peter Anderson
NA`ALEHU INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE and celebration is Saturday. The parade begins at 11 a.m. at Na`alehu School and travels up Hwy 11 to Na`alehu Hongwanji. Pa`u riders will again grace the highway, along with school groups, nonprofits, motorcyclists, classic-car owners, businesses, politicians and more. 
      `O Ka`u Kakou sponsors the parade and activities at Na`alehu Park, including keiki treats, bounce houses and senior Bingo and lunch.
      Call 929-9872 for more information.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.


Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Thursday, June 30, 2016

Keiki enjoy Pahala Community Center's new playground after yesterday's ribbon-cutting ceremony.
See more below. Photos by Ron Johnson
WITH THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW from Pu`u `O`o making its way over Pulama Pali along the western boundary of the former Royal Gardens Subdivision in lower Puna, Hawai`i County opens the area to lava viewing today.
Lava reaches a mango tree in a kipuka
on its way toward the Puna Coast.
Photo from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
      Lava viewing along the three-mile stretch of the county’s portion of an emergency road that leads to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is permitted between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily. The emergency road was built when lava threatened to cut off lower Puna in 2014. If lava had covered Hwy 130 near Pahoa, residents’ and emergency vehicles would have exited lower Puna by driving on the emergency road that hooks up with the national park road that climbs up the pali to Hwy 11 in Volcano. 
      For lava viewing, viewers will walk. No vehicles will be allowed.
      Security guards will be posted on the emergency road or Hwy 130 before the entrance to Kalapana Gardens to provide lava viewing information and to direct parking. As in previous lava viewing events, visitors will be asked to park in marked areas near the end of the paved portion of Hwy 130.
      Visitors are reminded that the emergency road is a gravel road that traverses over older lava flows and ends at the National Park Service boundary. Visitors are also reminded to prepare for the trek with proper footwear, sunscreen, warm clothing and water.
      The county has established lava flow viewing areas along Hwy 130 as far back as 2001 and most recently in Pahoa in 2014.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I COUNTY OFFICIALS JOINED Ka`u keiki, kupuna and other residents to celebrate two new playgrounds yesterday. Playgrounds at Na`alehu Park and Pahala Community Center feature a variety of slides, climbing walls and ropes and twirling bars, along with park benches. Artificial turf covers the grounds’ padded surfaces. 
Miss Ka`u Coffee princesses joined Mayor Billy Kenoi to open
Ka`u's new playgrounds yesterday.
      Leading the blessing was Mayor Billy Kenoi. He said his vision is to provide playgrounds as a way to bring communities together. He said that such facilities can help reduce the need for more police because they create safe places for children and families to enjoy activities together.
      Also attending were Hawai`i County Council members Maile David, Greggor Ilagan and Karen Eoff.
      David, Ka`u's council member, said the day was such an uplifting experience, being able to see keiki enjoy new experiences the playgrounds offer. She said the county pushed to have the Na`alehu playground ready in time for the Fourth of July celebration there this Saturday.
      Deputy County Parks Director James Komata, Pahala Park manager Nona Makuakane and Na`alehu Park manager Richard Karasuda were also on hand.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I ISLAND POLICE INFORM the public that operating a farm vehicle, such as a tractor, on county roadways or state highways is prohibited and in violation of numerous equipment and regulatory offenses.
Keiki can climb rock walls and ropes, twirl on bars and try
a variety of slides at the playgrounds.
      In addition, those vehicles are unable to maintain the minimum posted speed limit, which impedes traffic and is a danger for pedestrians and bicyclists using roadway shoulders.
      Exceptions are for construction and/or maintenance tractors used at construction or cleaning sites.
      The proper method of transporting farm vehicles on public roadways is with use of a properly inspected and registered vehicle and trailer.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TOTAL VISITOR ARRIVALS TO HAWAI`I rose 1.3 percent in May, and visitor expenditures declined 2.4 percent, Hawai`i Tourism Authority reported.
      “Visitor arrivals and expenditures year-to-date show that Hawai`i is still ahead of last year’s record-setting pace, with total arrivals up 3.1 percent and spending up one percent,” said George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of HTA. “Visitors from our two largest markets, the U.S. West and East, led arrivals in May and continues its positive course of year-over-year growth, despite a slight drop in arrivals last month due to travel around Easter holiday falling in March instead of April this year.
Ka`u residents greet Mayor Billy Kenoi and Hawai`i County
Council member Maile David.
      “On the international side, arrivals from Korea were strong in May, seeing a double-digit increase year-over-year. However, declines in arrivals and expenditures from the Japan and Canada markets can be attributed to a weaker exchange rate and the fact that Golden Week in Japan shifted travel to late April this year versus the first week of May in 2015.
      “We are also closely monitoring the situation in Europe and how that may affect travel. It’s too early to know precisely how the situation there will affect the global economy, including tourism related impacts. In 2015, 143,434 visitors from Europe came to Hawai`i, with 50,469 of that total coming from the United Kingdom. This represents less than two percent of the 8.6 million visitors who came to Hawaii last year.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

GOV. DAVID IGE HAS APPOINTED attorney Thomas Gorak to the state Public Utilities Commission. Since 2013, Gorak has worked closely with the PUC as its chief counsel, serving as chief legal and regulatory advisor.
      Gorak has practiced law since 1977, specializing in public utility regulation at both the federal and state levels for the past 37 years. He previously worked on utility regulatory matters in Maryland and practiced law in Washington, D.C., where he provided client services that included analyzing and addressing their positions in public utility matters.
Thomas Gorak Photo from Gov. Ige's office
      Gorak opened his solo practice in 1995 and moved his firm to Hawai`i in 2003, where he continued to represent clients in utility matters, both on the mainland and before the PUC.
      “Tom has years of national and international experience in utility regulatory matters,” Ige said. “He has been closely engaged with the PUC as its chief counsel for the past three years and will be able to step in immediately to participate in discussions and decision making on all matters pending before the commission. There will be no delay in addressing the many issues that must be resolved to meet our renewable energy goals.”
      “I very much appreciate the governor’s faith in me as the state moves forward on the path to a 100 percent renewable energy future,” Gorak said. “I believe my experience and background, along with the support of the superb staff of the Public Utilities Commission, will allow me to contribute to the commission’s efforts in meeting the challenges associated with achieving this goal.”
      Gorak replaces Michael Champley, whose term expires today. Gorak begins his term on tomorrow. His appointment is subject to Senate approval.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

JOIN STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Volunteers cut invasive Himalayan ginger on Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park trails. Loppers and gloves are provided. Participants are encouraged to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and closed-toe shoes. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      See nps.gov/havo.

Pa`u riders return to Na`alehu's Fourth of July Parade this Saturday.
Photo by Peter Anderson
NA`ALEHU INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE and celebration is Saturday. The parade begins at 11 a.m. at Na`alehu School and travels up Hwy 11 to Na`alehu Hongwanji. Pa`u riders will again grace the highway, along with school groups, nonprofits, motorcyclists, classic-car owners, businesses, politicians and more. 
      `O Ka`u Kakou sponsors the parade and activities at Na`alehu Park, including keiki treats, bounce houses and senior Bingo and lunch.
      Call 929-9872 for more information.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.


Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Lava is burning vegetation in a kipuka on its rapid advance toward the ocean below the abandoned Royal
Gardens subdivision in Puna. See more below. Photo from USGS/Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
BOBBY JEAN LEITHEAD-TODD, Hawai`i County Director of Environmental Management, told Ocean View residents that she would immediately go to work on making the promised 21-acre transfer station there a permanent reality. At a meeting last night at Ocean View Community Center, she said she would work with County Council member Maile David to get funding and the state Department of Transportation to reduce costs.
A group of cavers gather around a mountain of trash
removed from an Ocean View puka. They also
recovered "No Dumping" signs tossed into
the puka. Photos by Peter & Ann Bosted
      About 60 Ocean View residents at the meeting were unanimous in their message – the temporary transfer station is temporary, and the permanent one should be completed without further delay. 
Greg Goodale, the county’s Solid Waste Division Chief, joined Leithead-Todd and David in fielding questions about why plans for a permanent transfer station were abandoned and the temporary transfer station was substituted.
      Leithead-Todd opened with reasons for the long delay in developing a permanent facility makai of the Hwy 11 and establishment of a temporary one on land earmarked for “recreational” use among homes and adjacent to a park. She stated that although the facility was important, other projects with greater priority had intervened. She added that priority is usually given to wastewater projects in lieu of solid waste.
      She said the transfer station at Wai`ohinu has top priority because fire in rubbish containers damaged wooden beams supporting the retaining wall, risking collapse. The Ocean View transfer station should have been the next priority, she said. However, permanent transfer station plans were derailed by the state, according to Leithead-Todd.
      “We did not factor in the state Department of Transportation, which will eat up $2 million,” she said, going on to explain that Department of Transportation engineers wanted the county to pay for a left-turn lane and traffic lights. 
      Goodale said it was at that point that he started thinking of ways the temporary site could be improved with more services, such as HI5 services, which have been installed. 
      Linda Shutt questioned the need for “all these turning lanes and lights” and the high cost estimate.
      “Something is not right,” she said, to which another resident commented that if the usual cost of new roads is about $1 million per mile, why $2 million for a short widening?
      Ranchos resident Ann Bosted urged the county officials to make it easy and convenient for all residents to responsibly dispose of their trash, including computers, TVs, refrigerators, stoves and tires.
Members of CCH, which stewards Ocean View cave properties,
guide a bag of trash being winched out of a puka. Since
opening of Ocean View's temporary transfer station,
such work days have not been necessary.
      “People should have more than a single day each month to legally discard a computer,” she said. 
      Bosted pointed out that members of Cave Conservation of Hawai`i, a nonprofit that owns lava tube properties in Ocean View, used to have to regularly clean out pukas two or three times a year. Since the temporary transfer station had made disposing of trash a lot easier, the natural pits are no longer being used as dumping grounds.
      Loren Heck, a member of the steering committee that drafted the Ka`u Community Development Plan, told the officials that the temporary transfer station could be shut down legally by anyone challenging it. 
      “We were not allowed to put a well there or a water tank,” he said. “Read the deed. It’s for recreation. It could be shut down any day.”
      Ocean View resident Tim Ent said, “I see big trucks turning left from the highway onto Aloha; I see cars turning left onto other HOVE streets. Everything is OK. Why is the DOT making such a fuss? Does this mean nothing new can be built? This stinks!”
      County Council candidate Raina Whiting asked about the interim options, to which Goodale replied that he could provide two-bin recycling in the short term and increased staffing, if approved by the next administration.
      Ocean View resident Mike Du Bois suggested that a bin large appliances should be provided at least once a month.
      Maria Schenkeir pointed out that dumped appliances, tires and large items, which are difficult to dispose of under current county rules, are lining the driveway on land that was purchased for the permanent facility.
      “This is just the same as your old-fashioned dump that was open 24/7,” she said.
      “Why are we spending money on the temporary transfer station when we could be building a permanent one?”
      “We need to get going on a new site, regardless,” Goodale answered.
      Shutt cautioned Goodale against expanding the facilities at the temporary site. “We don’t want the temporary one to be too comfortable,” she said. “This is a residential neighborhood. It’s next to a park – a really bad location. Keep your eyes on the goal,” she concluded, referring to the permanent site, which already has an approved building plan and a completed archaeological study.
A geologist photographs the flow front. Photo from USGS/HVO
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW FROM PU`U O`O has advanced almost one-half mile in one day, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported. Scientists attributed the fast pace to steep terrain as lava falls down the pali along the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision’s western boundary. 
      An overflight of the active flow yesterday showed the flow was 4.3 miles long. Although the majority of flow activity is pahoehoe, the fast-moving flow front is channelized `a`a. The leading tip is burning vegetation in a kipuka.
      See hvo.wr.usgs.gov.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Sherry Menor-McNamara
Photo from COC Hawai`i
SINGAPORE HAS BEEN OFFICIALLY added to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection Global Entry Program. Singaporean citizens can now apply for expedited customs clearance for visiting the United States and vice versa. Sen. Mazie Hirono led a bipartisan effort to encourage the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to add Singapore to the program in time for Hawai`i’s busy summer travel season.
      “Singapore’s inclusion in the Global Entry program will facilitate and expedite travel between our two countries,” Hirono said. “I appreciate the action by CBP to support Singapore’s participation in the Global Entry Program… . This decision also allows CBP to direct security resources to where they are needed most.”
      Hirono is a longtime advocate of expanding Global Entry and other trusted traveler programs to expand Hawai`i’s international visitor industry. In April, she led a similar effort in support of U.S. negotiations with Taiwan for inclusion in the program. Those negotiations are underway.
      “The Global Entry Program between the U.S. and Singapore is good news for Hawai`i,” said Sherry Menor-McNamara, President and CEO of the Chamber of Commerce Hawai`i. “With Singapore as our second largest export market, this bilateral initiative will serve to enhance trade, business and tourism links between both countries, taking advantage of Hawai`i’s geographic location and further strengthening our state’s strong relationship with Asia.”
Georg D. Szigeti Photo from HTA
      “We appreciate Sen. Hirono’s effort to get Singapore added to the Global Entry Program,” said George D. Szigeti, President and CEO of Hawai`i Tourism Authority. “This is welcome news for Hawai`i’s tourism industry and a decision that will improve the process and travel experience for Singapore’s citizens visiting the Hawaiian Islands on leisure and business. Singapore and Hawai`i already enjoy strong cultural connections, and their addition to this program helps strengthen those ties even more by making it more convenient for them to visit and enjoy all that Hawaii has to offer.” 
      Global Entry participants must be pre-approved by CBP and undergo a rigorous background check and in-person interview before enrollment. Participants may still be selected for further examination when entering the United States. The program allows participants to complete expedited customs and immigration procedures using self-service kiosks at over 50 airports in the U.S., Canada and select overseas locations.
      Singapore joins Canada, Mexico, Panama, the Netherlands, Germany, the United Kingdom and South Korea in CBP’s Global Entry and other trusted traveler programs.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

VOLUNTEERS CUT INVASIVE Himalayan ginger on Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park trails Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Loppers and gloves are provided. Participants are encouraged to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and close-toed shoes. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center. Stewardship at the Summit takes place weekly; days vary.
      See nps.gov/havo.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.

















Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Lava is advancing down the pali near the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision in Puna.
USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory map from NASA Earth Observing-1
satellite's Advanced Land Imager
GOV. DAVID IGE ANNOUNCED his support of a bill pertaining to water rights for farmers and ranchers. House Bill 2501 involves state licenses for Ka`u farmers and ranchers, who were afraid of losing them, as well as a state water license on Alexander & Baldwin’s former Maui sugar lands where the court has ordered the return of water to natural streams.
      “We have a water permit process that has not been working,” Ige said. “While I have major reservations about HB2501, it does provide time to transition to a process that ensures water is distributed fairly in accordance with the public trust doctrine and that decisions are made in a timely manner. The issues this bill addresses affect A&B and others such as Kaua`i Island Utility Cooperative and Hawaiian Electric Co. and smaller farmers who have revocable water permits and are not able to convert them to leases in the time allowed under statute.
      “I understand why taro farmers on Maui would want this bill vetoed, and to them I say that water diversions will not continue as they have in the past. The State Water Code explicitly prohibits wasting water, and I expect A&B to stop diverting any water it is not actively using. I also expect A&B to make its plans to support sustainable, diversified agriculture available to the public as quickly as possible and to act in good faith, so we can all pitch in on shaping Maui’s future.
Water will continue to run for farmers and ranchers awaiting
state licenses to replace one-month revocable permits.
Photo from Hawai`i Department of Agriculture
      “My expectation is that the Board of Land and Natural Resources and the Commission on Water Resource Management will act quickly, especially in setting instream flow standards so we all have the same facts. As the Board and Commission consider any application for long-term leases, I also expect them to factor in expected climate change impacts to rainfall, in-stream protection, and forest protection.
      “My administration is committed to helping the parties involved in East Maui to mediate their differences to avoid costly delays for everyone. Let us move forward together.”
      The bill will require that where an application has been made to continue an old lease, a holdover may be authorized annually until the pending application for the disposition of water rights is finally resolved or for three years, whichever is sooner. It will also require that the holdover is consistent with the public trust doctrine and any applicable law.
      Regarding amendments that placed a maximum of three years for applicants’ leases to be approved, Ways & Means Committee chair Sen. Jill Tokuda said, “We wanted to refocus the discussion on the farmers, ranchers and cattlemen statewide who were impacted by the broad ruling of the court. Our committee agreed to these amendments understanding that there are water permit holders throughout the state, including Wood Valley Water & Farm Coop, Kualoa Ranch, Kapapala Ranch, the Kaua`i Island Utilities Cooperative, Kapua Orchards Estate, LLC, Molowa`a Farmers Cooperative and the East Kauai Water Users Co-op, to name a few.”
      Ka`u’s Sen. Russell Ruderman voted for the measure but with reservations, while Sen. Josh Green voted against it.
      “Gov. Ige failed to achieve the right balance in this situation,” said Marti Townsend, Director for the Sierra Club of Hawai`i. “His decision unnecessarily favors profit-driven water diversions above the best interests of the public. Our laws are written to ensure that our water is held in trust for everyone’s benefit. The Ige Administration should follow those laws, not change them to benefit those that divert public water for private gain, while harming the people and our environment.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

A geologist collects fresh lava samples for chemical analysis.
Photo from USGS/HVO
THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW southeast of Pu`u `O`o continues to advance and spread on its way toward the Puna Coast near Kalapana, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported this morning. A satellite image from yesterday showed that the flow was 3.9 miles long, and the flow front was progressing down the pali along the western boundary of the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision. The advance rate over the past four days has increased to about 0.2 miles per day, likely due to the steeper slope on the pali.
      At Kilauea's summit, the lava lake continues to rise. HVO reported it being 80 feet below the adjacent crater floor this morning.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

CONSERVATION COUNCIL FOR HAWAI`I asks for help in reaching a goal of raising $18,000 to produce and distribute this year’s wildlife education poster to 450 public, charter, Hawaiian language immersion and private schools in Hawai`i.
Conservation Council for Hawai`i's poster
features art by Caren Lobel-Fried.
      Posters will also be distributed to community leaders and organizations, wildlife agencies, elected officials, attendees of the IUCN World Conservation Congress in September and anyone who requests them.
      This year’s poster features native Hawaiian birds with a focus on forest birds and the extinct `o`o bird as an example of species extinction in the islands.
      “When we talk with children at community events, we notice our keiki know more about the extinction of dinosaurs than they do about the loss of unique Hawaiian birds,” coordinator Marjorie Ziegler said. “This prompted us to collaborate with award-winning author, artist, and conservationist Caren Loebel-Fried on a book and poster project about Hawaiian birds and the `o`o.
      “Caren’s amazing block print for this year’s poster portrays a local boy communicating with an `o`o bird in a modern-day dream scene.”
      Poster text is written by Dr. Sheila Conant, a leading authority on Hawaiian birds and a dedicated conservationist. The text on the back of the poster includes information on the status of Hawai`i’s birds, their cultural significance, what can be done to help protect them, and the `o`o bird’s special story.
      Suggested donations are $50-$200 for individuals; $200-1,000 for small organizations and businesses; $1,000-$5,000 for medium organizations, businesses and agencies; and $5,000 or more for large organizations. Any amounts are accepted.
      Mail checks made out to the Conservation Council for Hawai`i to PO Box 2923 Honolulu HI 96802, or 808-593-0255 to make a credit card donation.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Mayor Billy Kenoi comes to Ka`u tomorrow
to open two new playgrounds.
OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION encourages residents to meet with county officials who will discuss the planned Ocean View Transfer Station today at 6 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center.
      Call 939-7033 for more information.

GRAND OPENING OF TWO NEW Ka`u playgrounds is set for tomorrow. Mayor Billy Kenoi and Hawai`i County Council member Maile David invite residents to Na`alehu Park at 10:30 a.m. and Pahala Community Center at 12:30 p.m. Refreshments will be served.

HAWAI`I POLICE DEPARTMENT will make an “active shooter” presentation in Na`alehu Community Center on Wednesday, July 6 from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. It is designed to help individuals increase their survivability should they encounter an active shooter or other type of active violent incident.
      Police will provide information on previous incidents of mass violence, recent events, best practices for those caught in such situations, law enforcement’s response and how to work together as a community toward prevention. They will also provide additional resources for participants so they can continue their education on this topic, followed by a question-and-answer segment.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/Kau_Calendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.




Monday, June 27, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Monday, June 27, 2016

Preservation of Kauleoli fishing village and apuhua`a in South Kona also includes Ala Kahakai National
Historic Trail, which extends from Kohala south through Ka`u and then north into Puna.
Photo from Trust for Public Land
ALA KAHAKAI NATIONAL HISTORIC TRAIL is adding more to its jurisdiction in South Kona. Bret Yager, of West Hawai`i Today, reported that the Trust for Public Land helped the organization attain 59 coastal acres south of Pu`uhonua o Honaunau National Historical Park from willing sellers, and escrow is expected to close next month. It’s Ala Kahakai’s first land purchase.
Ka`u's section of Ala Kahakai is longer than those of other districts.
Photo by Julia Neal
      The landscape envelopes the entire shoreline of Kauleoli ahupua`a, a well-preserved section of the trail and numerous ancient sites at Kauleoli fishing village, such as Hawaiian house foundations, a canoe shed, traditional agriculture areas and salt making ponds.
      The purchase will connect the property to the southern border of Pu`uhonua O Honaunau at the ancient fishing village of Ki`ilea, which was added to the park in 2006, also with assistance from TPL. It will further protect the park and “support continuation of traditions and stories of this treasured South Kona cultural landscape,” according to a statement from TPL.
      “The lineal descendants of the area have been caring for the trail,” Laura Kaakua, native lands project manager for the Trust For Public Land, told Yager. “Now, under ownership of Ala Kahakai, the trail but also the makai lands will have educational, cultural and stewardship opportunities not just for the descendants but anyone who is interested in volunteering.”
      See westhawaiitoday.com.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono
SEN. MAZIE HIRONO, WHO REPRESENTS Ka`u in the U.S. Senate, today applauded the Supreme Court’s 5-3 decision in Whole Woman’s Health v. Hellerstedt, which struck down a Texas law restricting access to reproductive health care. Had the Court ruled in favor of the Texas law, states across the nation could have enacted similarly restrictive laws.
      Hirono joined her Senate colleagues on an amicus brief to the Supreme Court urging the justices to rule in favor of the plaintiff, Whole Woman’s Health, and to preserve access to reproductive health care services.
      “Earlier this year, when the Supreme Court was hearing Whole Woman’s Health, I joined advocates on the Court steps who were holding signs that read ‘Don’t mess with access,’ and ‘Respect my fundamental human dignity,’” Hirono said. “The Court heard their plea and saw the Texas law for what it really was: an unconstitutional restriction on a woman’s right to access reproductive health care. Significantly, the Court looked at the real effect of the Texas law – which was to restrict access to critical health care services – instead of limiting its review to the state’s ostensible justification.
      “Texas, however, is only one state out of many which has enacted predatory laws aimed at shutting down clinics that provide reproductive health care services and highlights how far some states will go to restrict a woman’s right to choose. We must remain vigilant against such measures going forward.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Amy Shoremount-Obra
MUSICIANS COMING TO PAHALA in August will present a concert to support KAHU Radio and honor Ka`u Coffee growers.
      The concert, a tribute to the 20th anniversary of the post-plantation Ka`u Coffee industry, will, in part, raise funds for Hawai`i Public Radio and its efforts to bring a stronger and more reliable signal to all of Ka`u and the entire state. HPR operates KAHU radio and work is in progress on a tower toward expanding the broadcast to the entire community. The coverage is also considered critical for Civil Defense, as much of Ka`u is without any emergency radio reception.
      Opera singer Amy Shoremount-Obra returns to Pahala Plantation House on Saturday, Aug. 13 at 6 p.m. The concert features the soprano, internationally acclaimed violinist Eric Silberger, cellist Daniel Lelchuk and pianist Kwan Yi. It is one in a series in the inaugural year of the Hawai`i International Music Festival, with other performances at Maui Arts & Cultural Center and on O`ahu.
      Shoremount-Obra’s family includes the founders of Rusty’s Hawaiian 100% Island Coffee, including the late Rusty Obra as well as Lorie and Joan Obra, Ralph Gaston and Shoremont-Obra’s husband Rusty Obra. She brought operatic music to Pahala in 2009 as a community outreach program with a grant she received from the Sing for Hope organization in conjunction with her alma mater The Juilliard School. She was accompanied by a pianist and tenor. The trio performed operatic music for Ka`u Coffee growers and other community members at Pahala Plantation House.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
      For more, see himusicfestival.com.

Maiki Cofer and John Poetzel received brown belt certification
last Friday. Photo from Cliff Field
PAHALA DOJO MEMBERS Maiki Cofer and John Poetzel successfully completed their promotion test to the rank of brown belt in the International Karate League on June 24. The promotion brings them one step closer to attaining their black belts. 
      Cofer organized and has been teaching a keiki karate conditioning class for ages five to 10 held every Tuesday and Friday at 5 p.m. before the regular beginners class. The class helps youngsters prepare for the beginners class.
      Pahala Dojo, established in 2009, holds classes every Tuesday and Friday at Pahala Community Center. A beginners class from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. is taught by Sensei Susan Field. An advance class follows from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., taught by Sensei Cliff Field. Classes are open to anyone interested in learning a traditional martial art, and the public is welcome to watch classes.
      Pahala Dojo is a member of the International Karate League. Recently, IKL obtained a 501c3 status and now has 31 dojos across the country.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Mosquitoes in Hawai`i Project works to identify what species
live where.
KA`U RESIDENTS CAN HELP the Mosquitoes in Hawai`i Project identify where mosquito species live. The citizen science project, established in May 2015, is powered by iNaturalist, the primary social network for natural history. The iNaturalist app allows individuals to take photos of any living thing and upload them to the cloud to be identified by thousands of volunteers worldwide.
      To get involved, download the iNaturalist app. Go to iNaturalist and set up an account. Capture a mosquito, or rear from larvae wrigglers, in a closed container. Place adult insects in the freezer for 20 minutes to make sure they have expired. Place them on a sheet of paper, and take several pictures, especially on the back. Open the app and import the best photos. Double-check that dates, times and locations are correct. Upload the record.
      Project organizers urge participants to be cautious when around mosquitoes and wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants, socks, shoes or boots and repellent.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
      See http://www.inaturalist.org/projects/mosquitoes-in-hawaii.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION encourages residents to meet with county officials who will discuss the planned Ocean View Transfer Station tomorrow at 6 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center.
      Call 939-7033 for more information.

LEARN ABOUT THE EVOLUTION of landscape restoration at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park at After Dark in the Park tomorrow at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.