About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Wednesday, November 14, 2018

Pohoiki Boat Ramp and Isaac Hale Park, which narrowly escaped being subsumed by lava this summer. The lava at
the top and right in the photo is from Fissure 8. See story, below. Photo from video on Strangehawaii YouTube
THE PROPOSED BIOENERGY PLANT, WHERE EUCALYPTUS GROWN IN KAʻŪ would be trucked and burned north of Hilo for electricity, faced many questions at a meeting this morning in Hilo. Big Island Video news covered the session.
     Former Hawaiʻi Electric Light Co. President and former County of Hawaiʻi Public Works director Warren Lee - who works for Hū Honua - and other Hū Honua company officials answered questions about the facility that is almost completed on the cliff at Pepeʻekeo.
     How will Hū Honua and Hawaiʻi Electric Light Co. prevent hot water from going into the seabed?
     The plant will be operating within the limits established by the permits, answered Lee.
     A charter school student and Corey Hardin, of the Sierra Club, asked how many people wearing green shirts attending the meeting were being paid. The group of employees stood up.
Mālama Hāmākua produced a chart showing its concerns about
the Hū Honua energy plant that needs state Department of Health permits.
     Though the plant is not yet operating, it is being tested, and several attendees talked about an inadvertent spill into the ocean last week, which is now under investigation. A Hū Honua representative said the company will submit a report to the state. A man who, attendees said, worked at the plant, said Hū Honua knew it was discharging into the ocean and that more than the 7,000 gallons reported by the company were released.
     A woman says she surfs every morning and that she worries about chemicals in the water, and about reporting spills to the public "so we are not soaking our babies in whatever parts per million." She said the public wasn't informed about the recent spill.
     A Hū Honua representative said the state was notified the same day.
     A Hū Honua representative said chemicals used at the plant to protect pipes and keep water pure are of low toxicity, and talked about filtering and venting and "state of the art chemicals" for the water to be at its purest.
     Another charter school student asked if trees are going to be replanted. Lee said that the Hāmākua tree farms will be replanted perhaps with more trees per acre. He said that trees die and that replanting would be done with the lifecycle in mind.
     The question and answer session this morning preceded a state Department of Health hearing on three permits: a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System application and draft permit to discharge storm water associated into state waters; application for an Underground Injection Control permit; and a solid waste permit application for the recycling of ash.
     An online campaign against the facility was launched by Mālama Hāmākua, which is comprised of 350.org, HawaiʻiDemocratic Party of HawaiʻiHawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive ActionSierra Club of HawaiʻiLife of the Land, Pepeʻekeo Shoreline Fishing Committee of the Pepeʻekeo Community AssociationSurfrider FoundationNorth Hawaiʻi Action Network, and Hawaiian Cultural Center of Hamakua.
     Mālama Hāmākua states on its website that more than "two dozen hazardous chemicals" will be released into "the now hot water," which will then be injected into the aquifer via injection wells that are 400 feet deep and "less than 100 feet from the edge of geologically unstable cliffs."
     Mālama Hāmākua contends the "tainted wastewater will percolate into water supply and into coastal waters where local fishermen fish," and that "endangered hawksbill turtle feeding grounds" will be "put at risk," and that the "hot, contaminated water" will "rise up in the ocean seabed to directly impact coral reefs."
     A geologist and consultant on the project said a study on the water from the plant that would go into an injection well and reach the ocean shows that it would take about 50 days and would raise the temperature where it enters the water less than one degree.
     A Department of Health spokesperson said the site could be properly monitored with numerous inspections and reporting required, and that limits on the amount of water going into the ocean and the temperature could be set in the licensing.
     Read more at malamahamakua.org and on the Hū Honua website at huhonua.com.

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Pohoiki boat ramp, center, is now cut off from the open ocean by tons of new
black sand. Photo from Strangehawaii
KAʻŪ RESIDENTS MAY SOON BE ABLE TO TAKE A TRIP TO POHOIKI, the shoreline area in lower Puna that was almost covered by lava during the recent volcanic eruption.
     A favorite harbor, surf spot, and gathering place, Pohoiki survived the lava flows that destroyed some 800 structures and wiped out surf spots, reefs, beach parks, farms, and forests.
     The lava came up to Pohiki and moved just past it, sand made from the lava flowing into the ocean blocking its harbor, taking out some surf breaks like Bowls and leaving it with a lagoon and black sand beach.
     Since the lava flow stopped, the county has been working to repair access through Red Road, Hwy 137, and could open a public road in the near future. Currently, the road, which was blocked by lava during the recent eruption of Kīlauea Volcano's Fissure 8 in the Lower East Rift Zone, appears to have been bulldozed to make two lanes and a bike and walking lane on each side, as shown by videos on social media.
 Tons of new black sand and lava rocks have reshaped the bay south of
Pohoiki and Isaac Hale Park, and new flow has reshaped the
coastline to the north. Photo from Strangehawaii
     Strangehawaii, a YouTube channel, documented travel along the new road on Nov. 10, with some drone footage. The people who made the trek said the travel was "easy." The film crew also documented the area around the boat ramp, where a small, roofless structure has been erected. A Hawaiian flag stands tall in the new sand. A member of the film party swam in the new lagoon. A couple members of the party boogie boarded in the bay south of the ramp. A related YouTube channel, hosted by Gabe Humphries, documented the building of the road.
     Pohoiki Boat Ramp was spared by mere hundreds of feet during the eruption that caused so much destruction this summer. Adjacent Isaac Hale Beach Park lost at least some picnicking land. The county plans more inspections and repairs before reopening.
Flow from Fissure 8 came close to flowing over all of Isaac Hale Park and
Pohoiki. Instead, only some of the parkland and picnicking areas were
covered by lava. Photo from Strangehawaii
     While road access to Pohoiki could be opened to the public, road access to Leilani Estates, a neighborhood affected greatly by the eruption, may soon be closed off to the public, "to prevent loitering and illegal trespassing onto private property." A resolution will go before the County Council on Tuesday, Nov. 19.

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No significant changes were observed on a recent overflight of the Lower 
East Rift Zone. Looking north shows the eastern portion of Leilani Estates 
subdivision, now covered by lava. The Fissure 8 cone, which was active for 
two months, is visible near the center of the photo, with its large drained 
channel extending north. White steam originates from residual heat 
in the fissure system. USGS photo
KĪLAUEA VOLCANO REMAINS QUIET, the U.S. Geologist Survey Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory  reported Tuesday, Nov. 13. The Volcano Alert Level remains at ADVISORY, and the Aviation Color Code remains at YELLOW.
     Rates of seismicity, deformation, and gas release have not changed significantly over the past several weeks. Deformation signals are consistent with magma refilling the Middle East Rift Zone.
     Low rates of seismicity at Kīlauea summit and East Rift Zone continue. Some small earthquakes continue, primarily at Kīlauea's summit area and south flank, with continued small aftershocks of the magnitude-6.9 quake on May 4. Seismicity remains low in the Lower East Rift Zone
     In the East Rift Zone, tiltmeters near Puʻu ʻŌʻō and farther east reveal no change over the last week. At the summit, tiltmeters have also shown little change this week, with the exception of a small deflation-inflation event.
This photo shows the widest portion of the Fissure 8 channel, at roughly 
425 meters (0.26 miles) across. USGS photo
     Sulfur dioxide gas emissions at the summit averaged 50 tonnes per day as reported on October 24, and 75 tonnes per day at Puʻu ʻŌʻō on October 23. There was no sulfur dioxide detected by instruments in the LERZ.

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THY WORD MINISTRIES brings together 14 churches on Friday, Dec. 14 for a Christmas feast and candlelight service. The free meal and Christmas celebration will be held at Nāʻālehu Hongwanji. Register at 5 p.m. and enjoy dinner at 6 p.m. Hula and music will entertain the guests. For more information, call Pastor Bob at 936-9114.

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NĀʻĀLEHU METHODIST CHURCH invites all to celebrate Christmas with a Candlelight Christmas Eve Service at 7 p.m. A statement from the church says, "This is a Lessons and Carols service, where the Christmas story will be told, interspersed with your favorite Christmas carols. We will have lots of special music including The Bells of Aloha Handbell Choir, stirring solos, accompanied by our band with ukuleles, trumpet, piano, guitars, and drums. We end the service with everyone's candles burning brightly as Silent Night is sung. Ring in the true meaning of Christmas and join us. Everyone is welcome!"

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Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
Kaʻū High Winter Sports Schedule 
through end of 2018
Girls Basketball:
Nov. 23 and 24, Fri. and Sat., Kaʻū Tourney
Dec. 3, Mon., @Konawaena, 6pm
Dec. 5, Wed., @Waiakea, 6pm
Dec. 15, Sat., host Laupāhoehoe, 2pm
Dec. 17, Mon., host HPA, 6pm
Dec. 19, Wed., host Kohala, 6pm
Dec. 22, Sat., @Parker, 4:30pm

Boys Basketball:
Nov. 28-Dec. 1, Wed.-Sat., Waiakea and Keaʻau Preseason Tourney, Varsity
Dec. 15, Sat., host Pāhoa
Dec. 18, Tue., @Keaʻau
Dec. 27., Thu., @Kealakehe

Wrestling:
Nov. 17, Sat., @Kealakeha, JV
Nov. 24, Sat., @Konawaena
Dec. 1, Sat., @Hilo
Dec. 8, Sat., @Waiakea
Dec. 15, Sat., @Oʻahu
Dec. 22, Sat., @Oʻahu

Soccer:
Nov. 17, Sat., JV @Waiakea
Nov. 28, Thu., Girls host Kealakehe, Boys host MLA
Dec. 1, Sat., @Honokaʻa
Dec. 3, Mon., host Kamehameha
Dec. 5, Wed., host Pāhoa
Dec. 8, Sat., Boys host Kohala
Dec., 11, Tue., @Kamehameha
Dec., 13, Thu., Girls host Makualani
Dec. 19, Wed., host HPA
Dec. 22, Sat., host Waiakea
Dec. 29, Sat., @Kona

Swimming:
Dec. 8, Sat., @HPA, 10am
Dec. 29, Sat., @Kamehameha, 10am

NEW and UPCOMING
LEARN A SIMPLE HULA AT THE KUHUKU UNIT OF HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK on Saturday, Nov. 17, starting at 12:30 p.m. The multi-cultural demonstration activity is hands-on and free with all supplies provided. For more, see nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes.

NONTURBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA: A KĪLAUEA VOLCANO STUDY WITHIN A STUDY, is an After Dark in the Park presentation scheduled for Tuesday, Nov. 20, starting at 7 p.m., in the Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     Nontuberculous mycobacteria are bacteria found in soil and water-based biofilms. When inhaled into the lungs, Nontuberculous mycobacteria can cause chronic disease in susceptible individuals. Hawaiʻi shows the highest number of Nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease cases in the United States.
     Dr. Jennifer Honda introduces her on-going research to study the environmental, host, and microbial factors driving Nontuberculous mycobacteria lung disease emergence in Hawaiʻi. Along with collaborators from Hawaiʻi Volcano Observatory and USGS, this study takes a closer look at the potential association of Nontuberculous mycobacteria with the Kīlauea environment.
     Program co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free; donations help support park programs. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 985-6011, or visit nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes.

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Hawai‘i Disability Legal Services, Thu., Nov. 15, 9-noon, Ocean View Community Center. ovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

Story Time with Auntie Linda from Tūtū & Me, Thu., Nov. 15, 10:30-noon, Nā‘ālehu Public Library. 929-8571

Family Reading, Thu., Nov. 15, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16
PATCH Class #407, Extending Books I, Fri., Nov. 16, 8-11am, PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Sponsored by Tūtū & Me. Open to all. Childcare not provided. 238-3472, rhall@patch-hi.org

PATCH Class #207, Social Guidance: Helping Infants and Toddlers Develop Positive Peer Interactions, Fri., Nov. 16, noon-3pm, PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Sponsored by Tūtū & Me. Open to all. Childcare not provided. 238-3472, rhall@patch-hi.org

Volunteer Forest Restoration Project: Collecting and Processing Seeds, Fri., Nov. 16, 8:30-1pm, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, contact for meet-up location. Hosted by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers must be at least 12 years of age and able to hike at least one mile over rough, uneven terrain. Release forms required. Co-signatures of adult required for volunteers under 18. Contact Patty Kupchak at forest@fhvnp.org or 352-1402 by Mon., Nov. 12. fhvnp.org

Exhibit: Christmas in the Country featuring the Annual Wreath Exhibition, daily, Nov. 16-Dec. 31, 9-5pm, Volcano Art Center Gallery, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

Relay Races, Arts & Crafts Activity, Fri., Nov. 16, 2-3pm, Kahuku Park, HOVE For ages 6-12. Register Nov. 7-14. Athletic shoes required. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17
Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Ho‘onoua Anchialine Pond Volunteer Work Day & Marine Debris Survey at Kamilo, Sat., Nov. 17, contact in advance for meet up time at Wai‘ōhinu Park. Seats full. BYO-4WD welcome. Free; donations appreciated. RSVP to kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com or call 769-7629 for more.

Art Affair, Sat., Nov. 17, 9-noon, Ocean View Community Center. Local artists sell and display their creations. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Fundraising Bazaar, Sat., Nov. 17, 9-2pm, Kauaha‘ao Congregational Church, Wai‘ōhinu. Free entertainment and "flea market" attendance. Church will sell Kalua Pig plate lunch, containers of Kalua Pig, and Smoked Meat bowls, as well as baked goods, produce, and crafts. Potential vendors submit Vendor Application by Fri., Nov. 2. $10 booth fee suggested donation. Individuals, schools, clubs, and sports/athletic groups invited to vend. Debbie Wong Yuen, dwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com, 928-8039

Birth of Kahuku, Sat., Nov. 17, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Explore rich geologic history of Kahuku on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, with different volcano features and formations. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. Free. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Inspired Figure Drawing Workshop w/Rose Adare, Sat., Nov. 17, 10-3pm, Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus, Volcano Village. Out of the box way of drawing a model and connecting. Variety of drawing techniques covered, including The Tornado, Pop & Lock Draw. $60/VAC member, $65/non-member, $10 model fee. See volcanoartcenter.org for supply list and to register. 967-8222

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Meeting, Sat., Nov. 17, 10-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting/training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Kahiko - Ha‘amauliola Aiona w/Ke Kula ‘O Nāwahīokalani‘ōpu‘u Public Charter School, Sat., Nov. 17, 10:30-11:30am, hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula w/Loke Kamanu and ‘Ohana, Sat., Nov. 17, 11-1pm, Volcano Art Center Gallery porch. Hands on cultural demonstration. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Multi-Cultural Demos and Activities: Learn a simple hula, Sat., Nov. 17, 12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hawaiian cultural demonstration and hands-on activity. Free, supplies provided. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Bunco & Potluck, Sat., Nov. 17, 6pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Popular game played with nine dice. Bring dish to share. Margie Hack, 541-954-8297

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 18
People & Land of Kahuku, Sun., Nov. 18, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Guided, 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain focuses on the area's human history. Free. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20
HOVE Road Maintenance Corp. Meeting, Tue., Nov. 20, 10am, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. hoveroad.com, 929-9910, gm@hoveroad.com

After Dark in the Park, Nontuberculou Mycobacteria: A Kīlauea Volcano Study within a Study, Tue., Nov. 20, 7pm, Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Dr. Jennifer Honda introduces her on-going research to study the environmental, host, and microbial factors driving Nontuberculou Mycobacteria – bacteria found in soil and water-based biofilms that when inhaled, can cause chronic disease in susceptible individuals – lung disease emergence in Hawai‘i, which has the highest numbers in the U.S. Program co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free; donations help support park programs. Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 21
Turkey Trot, Wed., Nov. 21, noon-1:30pm, Ka‘ū District Gym multi-purpose room, Pāhala. For grades Pre-K to 6. Register Nov. 5 to 21. Joint program with Pāhala Elementary School. Homeschooled keiki welcome to register and attend. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Ocean View Community Association Board Meeting, Wed., Nov. 21, 12:30pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Thanksgiving Nature Wreath, Arts & Crafts Activity, Wed., Nov. 21, 3-4pm, Kahuku Park, HOVE For ages 6-12. Register Nov. 13 to 22. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Fall Wreath of Thanks, Arts & Crafts Activity, Wed., Nov. 21, 3:30-5pm, Ka‘ū District Gym multi-purpose room, Pāhala. For grades K-8. Register Nov. 13 to 20. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

ONGOING
Registration for Track & Field Practice open through Wed., Nov. 21, Kahuku Park, on Paradise Circle in H.O.V.E. Program for ages 6-14 to be held Dec. 3-Feb. 8. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Volunteers Needed by St. Jude's Episcopal Church for community outreach, especially soup cooks and shower organizers, towel laundry, alter guild, and for the computer lab. Volunteers do not have to be members of the church. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's. Contact Dave Breskin, 319-8333.

Tūtū and Me tuition-free traveling preschool, for keiki birth to five years old and their caregivers, has twice a week meeting in Pāhala, Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., at Pāhala Community Center, and in Nāʻālehu at Kauahaʻao Church in Waiʻōhinu, Mondays and Wednesdays, from 8:45 to 10:45 a.m.
     Tūtū and Me also offers home visits to aid caregivers with parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate, listening ear. Visits last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, total of 12 visits. Snacks are provided.
     To enroll in either free program, fill out enrollment forms found at pidf.org/programs/tutu_and_me/enrollment_forms, or call Linda Bong at 929-8571, or Betty Clark at 464-9634 or eclark@pidfountation.org.

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