About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, June 15, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Friday, June 15, 2018

Chan Bird, Isaiah Ortiz, Michael Wichtermar, and John Lambie are in the Hawaiʻi Ekbalo School of Prayer; Samuel Ajayi is from Ocean View; Simaile Paea, Pastor Kevin Brown, McKenzie Curtis, and Gabriel Quevas are from Nāʻālehu and surrounding areas. Photo from Nāʻālehu Assembly of God
NĀʻĀLEHU ASSEMBLY OF GOD IS RAISING MONEY AND VOLUNTEERING TO HELP VICTIMS OF THE LAVA in lower Puna. 
Nāʻālehu community pitches in at a car wash 
to raise money for lava victim housing.
Photo from Pastor Kevin Brown 
     The church pastor, Kevin Brown, said that on June 6, a Nāʻālehu community car wash raised over $1,000 toward purchase of a $3,000 micro-home for transitional housing for evacuees from eruption areas. “The wealth of support of the volcano relief efforts from the Nāʻālehu community was overwhelming,” said Brown. “We are thankful to Nāʻālehu Assembly of God and Ekbalo School of Prayer for their work that not only cleaned a few cars but inspired a community to help our extended ʻohana. Our plan is to continue to be a part of this relief effort and shelter project.”
     On June 11, a group of concerned members of Nāʻālehu Assembly of God and Ekballo School of Prayer connected with Convoy of Hope to take supplies the both the Pāhoa and Nanawale communities.
     Brown said that Convoy of Hope can turn one dollar into seven dollars worth of supplies. “It is difficult to understand the direct impact that the eruption has had on the Puna community without going there. This, my first visit to Puna since the eruption began, has given me an even greater appreciation of the people on the front line. The impact they are having in their community is nothing more that a miracle…
Linda, of Bodacious Women of Puna, with Pastor 
Kevin Brown. Photo from Nāʻālehu Assembly of God
     “We had a very memorable experience as we partnered with other churches in a Convoy of Hope relief distribution. We met some great people in Nanawale that are serving on the front lines of the Hawaiʻi eruption relief. They really helped us understand the great need. Please pray for them. The level of loss is greater than anyone could have ever imagined. We helped unload about 42,000 lbs. of food from the Convoy of Hope container... Please pray for the people affected and support financially where you can.”
     Brown said Linda of Bodacious Women of Puna has been on the front line since before the crisis began. “They provide resources of all kinds and really have the heartbeat of the needs,” said Brown. “As she said, ‘We serve everyone.’ We were there to serve them.”
Nāʻālehu Community members, together to raise funds for their displaced
Puna neighbors. Photo from Nāʻālehu Assembly of God
     Brown said, “All of us can be involved – Kaʻū can be involved. We’re all working together in this. Nāʻālehu and Pāhala and Ocean View have been really blessed – but the people (in Puna) have lost so much; it‘s really difficult to see. It’s going to be something that’s going to be with us. We want to reach out to the people who are hurting. Let them know they are not in this alone.”
     To get involved, for more info, or to donate, contact Pastor Kevin T. Brown, 808-929-7278, www.naalehuag.org, office@naalehuag.com, Pastor@naalehuag.com, or Nāʻālehu Assembly of God, P. O. Box 129, Nāʻālehu, HI, 96772.

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KAʻŪ’S COUNTY COUNCIL MEMBER MAILE DAVID is asking residents to make sure to be prepared for hurricane season, which began June 1 and runs through Nov. 30. She passed on advice from Hawaiʻi Emergency Management Agency, which says:
     “It’s a familiar sight: The public receives a warning of a possible emergency and long lines suddenly appear at gas stations, grocery stores, and ATMs across Hawaiʻi. But there is a better way.”
     With the arrival of hurricane season, HI-EMA is reminding residents to prepare an “emergency kit” of a minimum of 14 days of food, water, and other supplies.
      Jennifer Walter, Chief of HI-EMA’s Preparedness Branch, says “Our 14-day recommendation is based on the experiences of other states and jurisdictions that have gone through similar disasters. What happened in Puerto Rico last year can happen here, but we have a chance to get ahead of the game. Everyone who plans ahead and prepares an emergency kit helps not only themselves, but the entire community deal with a disaster.”
     HI-EMA suggests keeping your family’s supplies fresh for the entire season by rotating, consuming, and replenishing them over time. HI-EMA also recommends residents and visitors take the following actions to prepare for any possible hurricane or tropical cyclone:
   - Talk with family members and develop a clear understanding of what you will do if a hurricane or tropical storm threatens. Prepare an action plan that includes details such as whether your family plans to shelter in place or evacuate.
   - Know if your home is in an inundation zone, flood zone, or susceptible to high winds and other hazards. Know if your home is retrofitted with hurricane resistant clips or straps.
   - Stay tuned to local media and their websites/applications regarding weather updates.
   - Sign up for local notification systems (i.e., HNL.Info, or prh.noaa.gov/hnl/watchwarn/island_watchwarn.php?island=Big_Island).
   - Sign up for community emergency response team by calling 723-8960.
   - Get to know your neighbors and community so you can help each other. 
   - Walk your property and check for potential flood threats. Clear your gutters and other drainage systems. Remove and secure loose items. Keep your car gas tanks filled. 
   - Prepare your pets by checking or purchasing a carrier and other preparedness items. A pet carrier is necessary for your pet’s safety if you plan to evacuate to a pet-friendly shelter. Don’t forget 14 days of food and water for your furry family members.
   - Set aside an emergency supply of any needed medication and keep a copy of your prescriptions in case you run out of medication after a disaster.
   - Secure your important documents in protective containers. 
   - Visitors should download GoHawaii App and read the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority’s Travel Safety Brochure at travelsmarthawaii.com.
   - Build an emergency kit – now.

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CLOUDS GENERATED BY THE OCEAN ENTRY OF LAVA MIXING WITH SEAWATER IN KAPOHO IMPACT WEATHER. Rains in Kapoho and cloudiness over a third of the island today are related, said Tom Birchard, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. He explained to press this morning that “relatively light” tradewinds from the east are pushing the lava ocean entry clouds and the emissions from Fissure 8 to the west, and potentially to the southwest. He said the wind patterns contribute to the “overall voginess” on the leeward side of the island.
Fissure 8 and the lava from it, entering the ocean, are having an
effect on the weather in the southern part of the island.
Photo from USGS
     Birchard said it “looked like a good amount of the cloud cover we were seeing was due to the clouds that are being generated by the lava’s ocean entry.” He said there were reports of “some pretty good rainfall” in the Pāhoa area, impacting life in shelters for those who have lost or cannot reach their homes. Pallets are used to lift up the evacuees belongings away from water, he said.
   An update from USGS estimates that the lava flow from Fissure 8 has produced over 320 acres of new land, after filling in Kapoho Bay, covering over Vacationland and Kapoho farms and houses, and extending out to sea along the coast. No new communities are immediately threatened.
     Sulfur dioxide emissions from the volcano's summit have dropped to levels that are about half those measured prior to the onset of the current episode of eruptive activity. Jessica Ball of USGS said the measured difference is in comparison to late April or early May, when there was a lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu. A small amount of gas and minor amounts of ash blow and drift downwind, with small bursts of ash and gas accompanying intermittent explosive activity.
     Six-hundred forty earthquakes occurred on the island in the last 24 hours as of 6:45 p.m., with most of them near the summit. At noon, an explosive eruption sent up an ash and gas plume to nearly 10,000 feet above sea level. Seismicity dropped abruptly after the explosive event but is expected to build up slowly over the next hours. Inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halemaʻumaʻu continues in response to ongoing subsidence at the summit.
          See live air quality info from multiple agencies. See SO2 measurements. See Air Quality Index readings.

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A NEW ANIMATED GIF WITH MORE CHANGES in Kīlauea caldera shows a sequence of radar amplitude images from the Agenzia Spaziale Italiana CosmoSkyMed satellite system. The images illustrate changes to the caldera between May 5 and June 14 at 6 a.m.
     The satellite transmits a radar signal at the surface and measures the strength of the return, with bright areas indicating a strong return and dark areas a weak return. Strong returns indicate rough surfaces or slopes that point back at the radar, while weak returns come from smooth surfaces or slopes angled away from the radar. Over time, expansion of the summit eruptive vent within Halema‘uma‘u crater and the widening of Halema‘uma‘u itself are clear.
     The last four images in the sequence, from May 29-June 14, show the development of several cracks outside Halema‘uma‘u (also seen in recent UAS footage of the crater) and inward slumping of a large portion of the western, southwestern, and northern crater rim. Much of this motion appears to be coincident with the small explosions from the summit that have taken place on a near daily basis over the past two weeks. USGS scientists say that slumping is expected to continue as long as the explosions and overall subsidence persist.

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A DISASTER RECOVERY CENTER, jointly operated by Hawaiʻi County, the State of Hawaiʻi, and FEMA, is open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at Keaʻau High School Gym. Buses run from 7:30 a.m. and 9 p.m. to and from Keaʻau Armory every 20 minutes and Pāhoa Community Center Shelter every hour. See the full bus schedule on the Civil Defense Website at HawaiiCounty.gov/Active-Alerts. For a list of the information applicants need to bring to the DRC, or to register online, go to DisasterAssistance.gov

Hawaiʻi County Mayor Harry
Kim is resting at home after a
pneumonia relapse. Photo by
William Neal
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MAYOR HARRY KIM WAS RUSHED TO EMERGENCY at Hilo Medical Center early this morning, June 15, where he was diagnosed with a relapse of pneumonia, says a release from his office.
     The Mayor said he suffered severe chills, and his wife called 911 for an ambulance. He was released from the ER and is resting at home, says the announcement. Kim was diagnosed with walking pneumonia in early May. “They made me promise to stay home today,” Kim said.
     The Mayor’s spokesperson said he has been at the helm of the ongoing response to the Puna eruption. Late Thursday night, he took a look at preparations of the Federal Emergency Management Agency Disaster Recovery Center at Keaʻau High School gym. The facility opened its doors to offer individual assistance to the public this morning. See above for details.

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AUGUST PRIMARY ELECTION DAY IS COMING UP ON SATURDAY, AUG 11. It will decide candidates for the general election on Tuesday, November 6. The deadline to register to vote is July 12 for the primary election, October 8 for the general election. The deadline for candidates to register was June 5.
     State Sen. Josh Green, running for Lt. Gov., has three people vying for the West Kaʻū and Kona District Three Senate seat he will vacate. County Council member Dru Kanuha and former County Council member Brenda Ford are both running for the Democratic slot for the West Kaʻū and Kona District Three Senate seat. The winner of the primary will be up against Libertarian Michael Last in the general election.
Deadline to register to vote is July 12 for the primary election.
Photo by Julia Neal
     Green is running against four candidates for Lt. Gov. in the Democratic primary: Bernard Carvalho Jr., Will Espero, Kim Coco Iwamoto, and Jill Tokuda. The Republican slate is comprised of Marissa Dipasupil Kerns, Steve Lipscomb, and Jeremy Low. Non-Partisan candidates Ernest Magaoay and Paul Robotti, and Renee Ing of the Green party, will run against the Democratic and Republican primary winners.
     Incumbent state Rep. Richard Onishi of District Three, which runs from Hilo through Volcano and Pāhala to Honuʻapo, is challenged by Raina Whiting in the Democrattic primary. Libertarian Fred Fogel will run against the winning Democratic candidate.
     Incumbent state Rep. Richard Creagan of Kaʻū District Five faces two Democratic candidates in the primary: Jeanne Kapela and Gene Leslie. The winner will automatically take the seat; no other party entered a candidate.
June Domondon, of Pāhala, has worked the polling places on election
 day for years. Photo by Julia Neal
     District Six for South Kona into Kaʻū incumbent County Council member Maile David is challenged by Richard Abbett and Yumi Kawano. The council race is nonpartisan.
     Incumbent U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono will face no challengers who are Democrats. Others running are Republicans Thomas White, Eddie Pirkowski, Michael Hodgkiss, Robert Helsham Sr., Rocky Mamaka De La Fuente, Ron Curtis, George Berish, and Consuelo Anderson. The primary winner among the Republicans, and Non-Partisan candidates Arturo Pacheco Reyes, Matthew Maertens, and Charles Haverty, will face Hirono in the general election.
     Incumbent U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard will face two Democratic challengers: Sherry Alu Campagna and Anthony Austin. Republican Brian Evans will run against the winner in the general election.
     Incumbent Gov. David Ige will face five challengers in the Democrats’ race: U.S. Rep. Colleen Hanabusa, Ernest Carvalho, Wendell Kaʻehuʻaeʻa, Richard Kim, and Van Tanabe. John Carroll, Ray Lheureux, and Andria Tupola are the Republican candidates. Non-Partisan candidates Selina Blackwell, Link El, and Terrence Teruya, and Green Party candidate Jim Brewer, will challenge the Democratic and Republican winners in the general election.
     To register to vote online, visit olvr.hawaii.gov. You must provide a Hawaiʻi Driver’s License or State ID, and your Social Security Number. If you cannot provide these, you may submit a paper Voter Registration & Permanent Absentee Application by mail, or in-person.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com 
and facebook.com/kaucalendar.
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SATURDAY, JUNE 16
4-H Livestock Show & Sale is Friday, June 15, and Saturday, June 16, at Anderson Arena, also known as Rocking Chair Ranch, at 47-5124 Hawaiʻi Belt Road in Waimea. Open to the public, the annual event supports young farmers and ranchers. This year marks a century of 4-H in Hawai‘i; the state’s first 4-H livestock club opened in 1918.
     Saturday’s large animal activities kick off with an 8 a.m. welcome, followed by 4-H participants showing lambs, hogs, steers, and heifers. Competition continues for top showmanship honors in the Round Robin Showmanship Class. Buyer’s registration and lunch is at 12:30 p.m., with the sale of 4-H animals at 2 p.m., including beef steer and heifer, hog, lamb, goat, and possibly poultry and rabbits.
     For more information, contact Michelle Galimba at mgalimba@kuahiwiranch.com or 808-430-4927.

Nature and Culture: An Unseverable Relationship, Sat, Jun 16, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderate guided hike along the Palm Trail, approx. 2 miles. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture, observe catastrophic change and restoration of the land as it transitions from the 1868 lava flow to deeper soils with more diversity and older flora. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

Hands-On Fermented Foods Workshop: Sauerkraut and Kombucha w/ Jasmine Silverstein, HeartBeet Foods, Sat, Jun 16, 10-1pm, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. $50/VAC Members, $55/non-Member. Pre-registration required. Supplies and organic ingredients provided. No cooking skills necessary. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Inspired Figure Drawing Workshop, Sat, Jun 16, 10-3pmVolcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. $60/VAC Member, $65/non-Member, plus $10 model fee. Students asked to bring materials, see volcanoartcenter.org. 967-8222

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Meeting, Sat, Jun 16, 10-1pmOcean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting/training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

The Art Express, Sat, Jun 16, 10-3pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Classes held once monthly. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.comdiscoveryharbour.net/art-express

Hula Kahiko - Hope Keawe w/Hula Hālau Mana‘olana Sat, Jun 16, 10:30-11:30am, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Hula performance. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula - Kumu Kaho‘okele Crabbe w/Halauokalani, Sat, Jun 16, 11-1pm, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Cultural demonstration. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

Bunco and Potluck, Sat, Jun 16, 6pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring dish to share. Margie Hack, 541-954-8297

SUNDAY, JUNE 17
People and Land of Kahuku, Sun, Jun 17, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free, guided, 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain focuses on the area's human history. nps.gov/HAVO

MONDAY, JUNE 18
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Discovery Harbour Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Mon, Jun 18, 5-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net


TUESDAY, JUNE 19
Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Tuesday, June 19, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Cooper Center19-4030 Wright Road, Volcano; Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue, Jun 19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ocean View Community Association Board Meeting, Wed, Jun
e 20, noon-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Hawai‘i Disability Legal Services, Thu, Jun 21, 9-1pmOcean View Community Centerovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Jun 21, 6:30pmUnited Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, JUNE 22
Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Kaʻū Chapter community meeting Fri, June 22, 5pm, Pāhala Plantation House. “Come chat about agriculture in Kaʻū, local food production, ag related legislation, and make connections with folks in the community. All Kaʻū Farmers and Ranchers are encouraged to attend.” Light pupus available; welcome to bring something to share. Any questions call Raina Whiting, Kaʻū Chapter President, at 464-0799 or rainawhiting@gmail.com.

ONGOING
Disaster Recovery Center open daily from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Keaʻau High School Gym. Buses will be running between the two shelters and the DRC between 7:30 a.m. and 9 p.m. The Keaʻau Armory shuttle runs every 20 minutes and the Pāhoa Community Center Shelter every hour. See the full bus schedule on the Civil Defense Website at HawaiiCounty.gov/Active-Alerts. For a list of the information applicants need to bring to the DRC, or to register online, go to DisasterAssistance.gov.

Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park invites kamaʻaina and tourist alike to visit the Kahuku Unit. There are no entry fees, and all programs are free of charge. In addition to regularly scheduled Guided Hikes and the monthly Coffee Talk, Kahuku Unit has added daily Ranger Talks, and cultural demonstrations and activities on weekends.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ike Hana Noe ʻAu, Cultural Demonstrations and Activities, at 12:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June, made possible by Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association. Make a Ti Leaf Lei, Sat, June 16. Make an Eyelash Lei, Sun, June 17. Make an ͑Ohe Hana Ihu (Nose Flute), Sat, June 23. Make a Mini Feather Kahili, Sun, June 24.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ranger Talks on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
     Guided Hikes begin at 9:30 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June. Meet the ranger at the welcome tent. Sat, June 16: Nature and Culture. Sun, June 17: People and Land. Sat, June 23: Birth of Kahuku. Sun, June 24: ͑Ōhi͑a Lehua.
     Artist in Residence Talk, in the Visitor Center on Fri, June 22, at 10 a.m.
     In the Visitor Contact Station, Coffee Talk, a monthly, casual get together, is held the last Friday of the month. On June 29 at 9:30 a.m., Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund will present Removing Trash, Restoring Habitat.
     Join in the Cultural Festival, Pu ͑uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park, in Hōnaunau, Sat and Sun, June 23 and 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     See the Kahuku Unit Rangers,The Kahuku Cowgirls, in the Na ͑alehu 4th of July Parade Sat, June 30, beginning at 10 a.m.

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will take sign-ups in Kaʻū, through June 29.
     In Nā’ālehu, it will take place at the Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263.
     In Ocean View, it will take place at Ocean View Community Center, Mon and Tue (except Mon, June 11), 8-4:30pm.
     In Pāhala, it will take place at the Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue and Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See more for eligibility requirements and application.

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, through July 14, statewide and online. Register and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, and adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.
     Two Park Rangers are stationed at the Grand Naniloa Hotel in downtown Hilo, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., every Sunday and Monday, in the Willie K Crown Room - as long as nothing else is scheduled in the space. The rangers will be doing daily talks at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. about the eruption. They will show the park film that is normally available to visitors to see at the Kilauea Visitor’s Center at the Summit, Born of Fire, Born in the Sea, every half-hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, August 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases August 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.


5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

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