About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, May 02, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Civil Defense is warning residents of the East Rift Zone of Kilauea Volcano to be prepared for a lava outbreak,
as earthquakes continue to shake the neighborhoods. See USGS updated earthquake map
DUE TO THE RISK OF A VOLCANIC ERUPTION and unstable geologic activity, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park closed 15,688 acres near Kīlauea Volcano's Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent to the ocean today, including the gravel emergency access road from the eastern gate near Kalapana, to the western gate at the end of Chain of Craters Road, and all land on the makai (ocean) side of the emergency road.
     "The recent eruption changes and increased seismicity around the East Rift Zone and Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent may threaten land and the community outside the park. The partial closure in the park is necessary to prevent unsafe travel onto lands under the jurisdiction of Hawai‘i County and to keep people safe," said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. "Most of the park, which is 333,308 acres in size, remains open," she said.
The collapse of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater floor Monday, April 30, produced a large amount 
of red ash that was deposited around Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, as well as blown farther downwind, 
with a thin dusting of ash reaching uprift as far as Mauna Ulu. This photo, taken 
between 1-2 km (0.6-1.2 miles) from the 61g vent, shows a layer of red ash on
 top of active 61g lava flow surface breakouts.  Photo from USGS
     On Monday afternoon, April 30, the crater within Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō collapsed, and a flurry of low magnitude earthquakes continues to shake the eastern side of the island, particularly communities in lower Puna. A small fissure opened to the west of the vent on Tuesday, May 1, but scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory report that an intrusion of magma is heading eastward from the vent towards Highway 130.
     Puna residents are encouraged to sign up for Hawai‘i County Civil Defense messages at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts/, and to subscribe to volcanic updates via USGS: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/vns2/.
     The current eruption at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō is off limits to hikers. However, the summit of Kīlauea continues to erupt within Halema‘uma‘u Crater within the park, and is best viewed from the Jaggar Museum overlook. The lava lake within the crater has risen dramatically since April 21, and has occasionally spilled onto the crater floor. The park is open 24 hours a day.

NEIGHBORHOODS ON THE EAST FLANK OF KĪLAUEA VOLCANO ARE ON ALERT FOR POSSIBLE LAVA OUTBREAK. Hawai‘i County Civil Defense warns residents of Leilani Estates, Nanawale Estates, and Kapoho, as shallow earthquakes continue, following Monday's collapse of the crater floor at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. As of 5 p.m. today, 123 quakes on the island were recorded in the last 24 hours, most of them on the East Rift. Though it is impossible to predict where an eruption could occur, Civil Defense issued a statement urging residents to: "Prepare and review your emergency plans in case you need to evacuate. Stay informed by listening to local radio stations for Civil Defense updates or call Civil Defense at 935-003.
A new crack 1 km (0.6 mile) long was found on the west (uprift) side of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō
 during HVO's overflight Tuesday. The cracking appeared to be nearly continuous
 structures that were heavily steaming. A small amount of lava was apparently 
erupting from the crack, based on the presence of nearby tiny pads of lava and 
spatter, but no longer active when HVO geologists saw it during the overflight.
This photo looks east, with Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō obscured by low clouds in the upper left corner.
Photo from USGS
     "Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory and your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense will continue to monitor the situation. You will be informed of any conditions that affect your safety."
     Hawai‘i County Civil Defense posts its messages at http://www.hawaiicounty.gov
/active-alerts.
     During a helicopter overflight to Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō Tuesday, geologists observed the new fissure and crack extending about 1 km (0.6 miles) uprift (west) from the west flank of the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone. A small amount of lava erupted from the crack during Monday's collapse of the crater floor. Geologists also noted red ash that was deposited around Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō and blown farther downwind; the ash resulted from small explosions that accompanied the collapse of the crater floor.
     Seismicity and deformation have been recorded since Monday afternoon, east of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō vent, associated with intrusion of magma eastward from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō magma system. Seismicity rates in the lower East Rift Zone east of Highway 130 increased yesterday and today.
     According to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the area downrift (east) of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō remains the most likely location for a lava outbreak. HVO scientists are on overnight duty to monitor the changing seismicity and deformation.
     Hundreds of earthquakes occurred since Monday, one recorded at 4.2 magnitude. Most earthquakes are migrating eastward from Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō to the lower East Rift Zone. The seismicity consists primarily of small-magnitude (less than 3.0) earthquakes at depths of less than 10 km (6.2 miles). Many of these earthquakes have been felt by residents in the area.
Telephoto view of a small lava flow (lighter in color) and spatter (blue-gray) that were 
erupted from a section of the crack on the west flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. Photo from USGS
     A tiltmeter on the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone recorded steady deflation since late Monday, with several sharp inflation offsets. These offsets probably recorded the continued episodic collapse of the crater floor.
     A tiltmeter located 12 km (7.5 miles) east of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō has recorded a slowing rate of southeastward-directed tilt of the ground along the East Rift Zone, suggesting diminished but continued deformation associated with the intrusion into the lower East Rift Zone.
     Kīlauea's summit eruption has been unaffected by the change at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. Tiltmeters at the summit have recorded a slight deflationary trend since early Tuesday, and the level of the summit lava lake lowered by a few meters (yards).
     Poor weather and an ashy plume from the Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō crater are still preventing geologists from observing the newly collapsed crater floor or the west pit area where a perched lava pond was erupting before Monday's collapse event.
     Geologists observed a few small, sluggish breakouts of the 61g lava flow, likely from lava still moving through the lava-tube system; the 61g vent was likely severed from the magma supply to Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō. Geologists did not observe any new ground cracks downrift of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō in areas where seismicity was concentrated.
Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater thermal image from the 
North Rim this morning at 5:30 a.m.
     The situation continues to evolve and USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists continue to closely monitor Kīlauea's East Rift Zone and summit.  More updates will follow as information becomes available, https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/
status.html. HVO webcam images are posted at https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/kilauea/
multimedia_webcams.html. Questions? askHVO@usgs.gov. Activity Summary also available by phone: 967-8862

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Installing the latest education signage along Hwy 11 on the Kaʻū Scenic Byway.
 The dedication will be held Thursday, May 10, at 2 p.m. Photo by Babette Morrow
KAʻŪ SCENIC BYWAY COMMITTEE installed its latest educational signage complex along Hwy 11, announcing today that it invites the community to its dedication on Thursday, May 10. Cosponsored by the state Department of Parks, the event will be held at Manuka State Wayside Park, north of Ocean View.
     Funding for the panels was provided by County Council member Maile David and state parks. The design was directed by Rich Morrow of the Byway Committee, with cooperation and support from Dena Sedar of the parks department. The signs were erected by the state parks staff.
     The three panels are the third set of informational signs created by the Byway. Others are at the scenic overlook south of Ocean View, at mile marker 75, and in the Nāʻālehu town park. The next project is to install signs on the highway that identify various lava flows by dates.
Some who helped install the latest education signage, along Hwy 11 on the 
Kaʻū Scenic Byway, pose with their handiwork. Photo from Babette Morrow
     The Byway, also called the Slopes of Mauna Loa, is an official state Byway. Light refreshments will be served at the simple ceremony. State Rep. Richard Creagan, Maile David, and former County Council member Brenda Ford are expected to attend, said Morrow.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū COFFEE COLLEGE WILL PRESENT INDUSTRY EXPERTS this Sunday, May 6, to teach at Ka‘ū Coffee College. The educational day wraps up the tenth annual Ka‘ū Coffee Festival from 9 a.m. until pau, at Pāhala Community Center. Ka‘ū Coffee College will also give away a new Shore 920 C moisture meter to a lucky attendee.
     The annual Ka‘ū Coffee College is designed for learning, sharing, and networking. A reverse trade mission, it brings industry experts to Ka‘ū to interface with local growers and make valuable connections. "This year's college again stages notable coffee professionals to help farmers with their challenges," notes one of the long-time festival organizers Chris Manfredi. "These talks will certainly reinforce the exceptionally high quality for which Ka‘ū coffee has become famous, but also ensure there is a steady supply of it. As we reach more markets, we need a solid supply of quality coffees to meet the increasing demand while ensuring growers remain profitable."
     Getting the Most Out of Your Coffee Moisture Meter, a presentation by Fred Seeber of Shore Systems, a leading manufacturer of coffee moisture meters used throughout the world's major coffee producing regions. Manfredi said Seeber's talk "will go into great depth about how testers work and why they are important." Attendees are invited to bring their testers for Seeber to check them for calibration.
A Shore Moisture Meter will be given away at Kaʻū Coffee College this Sunday at Pāhala Community Center.
Photo from Shore Measuring Systems
     Pruning Techniques to Maximize Yields, offered by University of Hawai‘i's Andrea Kawabata and Tom Greenwell, president and long-time coffee farmer of Greenwell Farms. Based in Kona, Kawabata is an assistant extension agent for coffee and orchard crops with UH's CTAHR cooperative extension service. They will explain how proper pruning can promote tree health, which improves yield efficiency, profit margins, coffee quality, and sustainability for growers.
  Quality Control in Roasting will be explored in a workshop by Brian Webb of Pacific Coffee Research. Located in South Kona, PCB is a specialty coffee association training campus, coffee lab, roastery, and community education center. With experience as both a barista and Kona roaster, Webb will discuss the importance of profile roasting. He will do an on-site, sample roasting, and then demonstrate data logging software to keep detailed records for future analysis.
     Admission to Ka‘ū Coffee College is free, though donations are appreciated. Farmers, brokers, coffee shop owners, and coffee enthusiasts are invited to attend.
     The Ka‘ū Coffee Festival is underway and all activities are open to the general public; some require a fee. Find details below, at KauCoffeeFest.com, or call 808-929-9550.
     For more information and festival updates, visit kaucoffeefest.com, follow Ka'u Coffee Festival on Facebook and @kaucoffeefest on Twitter, or call 808-929-9550.

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WINNER OF THE ENTRÉE CATEGORY IN THE KA‘Ū COFFEE RECIPE CONTEST last Sunday is Peggy Kilkenny of Ocean View, who created her Huli BBQ Chicken in Paradise.
     Ingredients:
   - 1 whole fryer chicken, rinsed and patted dry
   - 1 container sweet and smoky bbq rub, mix in 1 Tbsp. finely ground Ka‘ū coffee
   - 1 bottle of your favorite BBQ sauce
Ka‘ū Coffee Recipe Contest entrée winner is Peggy Kilkenny, 
with her Huli BBQ Chicken in Paradise. The annual event 
was held at Kaʻū Coffee Mill last Sunday. Photo by Julia Neal
   - ¼ Cup strong brewed Ka‘ū coffee
   - A squirt of Liquid Smoke
   - 2 tsp. finely ground Ka‘ū coffee
   - 1 pkg. Hawaiian sweet bread onion buns
   - Prepared coleslaw
     Instructions: Apply coffee rub liberally inside and out of chicken. Huli (turn) over wood smoke grill until fully cooked. When cool enough to handle, shred one chicken into large bowl. In another bowl, combine brewed coffee, Liquid Smoke, finely ground coffee, and BBQ sauce. Evenly coat shredded chicken in mixture. Mound on buns. Top with coleslaw.
     See this spot tomorrow for the winning dessert recipe.
     Ka‘ū Coffee Recipe Contest is an annual event of the Ka‘ū Coffee Festival. See more events below and at kaucoffeefestival.com.

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THURSDAY'S KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS
Ka‘ū Valley Farms Tour, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m., Ka‘alaiki Rd, Nā‘ālehu. Explore hydroponic nursery, and tea and coffee plantings. Expansive hilltop views, mountain to coast. Includes water systems and tunnels from sugar days, and native Hawaiian forest tour. $35 per person; includes lunch. Reservations required. John Cross, 987-4229; Brenda Iokepa-Moses, 731-5409.
     Innovations in Coffee Pulping from Colombia will be held from 5 p.m. on Thursday, May 3, at Pāhala Plantation House. Free.

FRIDAY'S KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS
Ka‘ū Coffee & Cattle Day, Friday, May 4, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Aikane Plantation Coffee Company. Tour the farm and learn how coffee is integrated into cattle ranching and other agriculture. $25 per person; includes BBQ buffet and hayride. Reservations required, 927-2252. aikaneplantation.com

SATURDAY'S KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS
This Saturday's tenth annual Hoʻolauleʻa with feature Debbie
Ryder's Halau Hula Leionalani. Photo by Julia Neal
Tenth Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a, Saturday, May 5, 9 a.m - 5 p.m. p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Celebrate Ka‘ū Coffee with free music, hula entertainment, and coffee tastings all day long. Local vendor booths. Food and beverage sales. Free to attend. Ka‘ū Coffee Experience: 9:30-noon, 1-3:30 p.m., discover the methods behind brewing the perfect cup while enjoying free coffee tastings. Farm & Mill Tours 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., $20/person.

SUNDAY'S KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS
Ka‘ū Coffee College, Sun, May 6, 9-noon, Pāhala Community Center. Informative talks given by visiting coffee experts. Free; donations appreciated.
     The Fuji Royal, Ltd. Mini Roaster from Japan - designed for coffee shops, small farmers with their own brand, and for home - will be presented by Yoshiyuki Asano at a workshop at Pāhala Plantation House on Sunday, May 6, after the Coffee College. Also attending will be Tatsuo Fukushima, President of Fuji Royal, and Tokyo manager Yuuki Sugii.
     The roasting quality with the Fuji Royal, Ltd. Mini is the same as with large professional coffee roaster machines, said Max Maemori, who represents Fuji Royal in Hawai‘i. The Fuji Royal mini roaster can process as little as a half pound, 250 grams of green beans and 200 grams of roasted beans. "The top quality micro roaster brings the same efficiency of high performance models to your coffee life," said Maemori. The machine weighs about 70 lbs and can fit on a 14 by 28 inch space with a height of two feet.

Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THURSDAY, MAY 3
Free Dog Spay and Neuter Clinic from KARES, Thursday, May 3, in Ocean View. Registration required: call 328-8455.

VA Medical Services, Thu, May 3 & 17, 8:30-noon, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org
Veteran's Center, Thu, May 3, 8:30-12:30pm, May 17, 8:30-11:30am, Ocean View Community Center. No appointment needed to visit w/VA counselor & benefit specialist. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Ka‘ū Valley Farms Tour, Thu, May 3, 9-2pm, Ka‘ū Valley Farms Nursery, Ka‘alaiki Rd, Nā’ālehu. Explore hydroponic nursery, and tea and coffee plantings. Expansive hilltop views, mountain to coast. Includes water systems and tunnels from sugar days, and native Hawaiian forest tour. $35 per person; includes lunch. Reservations required. John Cross, 987-4229; Brenda Iokepa-Moses, 731-5409. kaucoffeefestival.com

Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool Vision Screening, Thu, May 3, 9-noon, Project Vision Hawai‘i van at Pāhala Community Center. Free; for all ages. Keiki offered free sunglasses; adults, reading glasses. projectvisionhawaii.org, 808-282-2265

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Special Pulping Presentation, Thu, May 3, 5pm, Pāhala Plantation House. Diego Botello of Penagos UDC Technology shows off new pulping equipment that separates ripe from green. See booth at Ka‘ū Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a, Sat, May 5, 9-5pm, Pāhala Community Center.

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu, May 3, 6-7pm, Ocean  View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

FRIDAY, MAY 4
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Ka‘ū Coffee & Cattle Day, Fri, May 4, 10-3pm, Aikane Plantation Coffee Company. Tour the farm and learn how coffee is integrated into cattle ranching and other agriculture. $25 per person; includes BBQ buffet and hayrides. Reservations required, 927-2252. kaucoffeefestival.comaikaneplantation.com

Hula Hoop Challenge, Fri, May 4, 2-3pm, Kahuku Park, H.O.V.E. Ages 6 to 12. Register until May 4. Teresa Anderson, 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Cinco De Mayo Dinner, Fri, May 4, 5:30pm, St. Jude's Episcopal Church. $8/single, $15/couple, $20/family. 939-7000

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Ka‘ū Star Gazing, Fri, May 4, 5:30-10pm - SOLD OUT. Those with tickets, Meet at Olson Trust Building in Pāhala.

KDENte! Italian Food Fundraiser, Fri, May 4, 6pm, Almafatano's Italian Restaurant, Hilo. Buffet; includes pasta dish, lasagna, salad. Karl Halemano provides music. $20 at door. Reservations: 982-7344

SATURDAY, MAY 5
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: 10th Annual Ho‘olaule‘a, Sat, May 5, 9-5pm, Pāhala Community Center. Celebrate Ka‘ū Coffee and with free music, hula entertainment and coffee tastings. Local vendor booths. Food and beverage sales. Free to attend. Ka‘ū Coffee Experience: 9:30-noon, 1-3:30pm, discover the methods behind brewing the perfect cup while enjoying free coffee tastings. Farm & Mill Tours, shuttle to Ka‘ū Coffee Mill,$20/person, at 9:30am, 11am, 12:30pm, 2pm, & 3:30pm. kaucoffeefestival.com

Realms and Divisions of Kahuku, Sat, May 5, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, two-mile, guided hike on Kahuku Unit's newest trail, Pu‘u Kahuku, explores the traditional Hawaiian classification system.

Cinco de Mayo Dinner, Sat, May 5, 3-5pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. discoveryharbour.net

Cinco de Mayo Buffet, Sat, May 5, 5-8pm, Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp, inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Build Your Own Fajita Bar; menu includes Cheese Quesadillas, Black Beans, Spanish Rice, Soup, Salad/Potato Bar, Beverage, and Ice Cream Sundae Bar. $15.50/Adult, $8.25/Child (6-11 yrs). Regular menu available. KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

SUNDAY, MAY 6
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Ka‘ū Coffee College, Sun, May 6, 9-noon, Pāhala Community Center. Informative talks given by visiting coffee experts. Free; donations appreciated. kaucoffeefestival.com

Palm Trail, Sun, May 6, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. nps.gov/HAVO

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sun, May 6, noon-2pm, Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. Sponsored by South Point Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Emergency Service. View sites.google.com/site/southpointartc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

MONDAY, MAY 7
Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Monday, May 7 & 21, 1 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. A parent led homeschool activity/social group building community in Ka‘ū. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Meeting, Mon, May 7, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Community Meeting with State Senatorial Candidate Brenda Ford, Mon, May 7, 6-9pm, Ocean View Community Center. Free; donations from $1 to $1,000 accepted.

TUESDAY, MAY 8
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue/Wed, May 8 (Committees)/9 (Council), Kona; Mon/Wed, May 21 (Committees)/23 (Council), Hilo. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

C.E.R.T. Discovery Harbour/Nā‘ālehu, Tue, May 8, 4-6pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Public invited to see what Community Emergency Response Team is about, and participate in training scenarios. Dina Shisler, dinashisler24@yahoo.com, 410-935-8087

Return to Abundance: A Vision for Healthy Oceans, Tue, May 8, 7pm, Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Kēhau Springer describes how Conservation International Hawai‘i works collaboratively to revitalize pono (responsible) Hawaiian fishing values and practices. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Wed, May 9 (Council), Kona; Mon/Wed, May 21 (Committees)/23 (Council), Hilo. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

NEW & UPCOMING
KA‘Ū SCENIC BYWAY DEDICATION CEREMONY happens Thursday, May 10, at 2:00 p.m. The Ka‘ū Scenic Byway Committee and the State Department of Parks and Recreation invite the public to a ceremony dedicating the new informational panels in the Manuka State Wayside. The Byway, also called the Slopes of Mauna Loa, is an official state byway.
     Funding for the panels was provided by Maile David and state parks. The design was directed by Rich Morrow of the Byway, with cooperation and support from Dena Sedar of the parks dept. The signs were erected by the state parks staff.
     The three panels are the third set of informational signs created by the Byway. Others are at the scenic overlook south of Ocean View, at mile marker 75, and in the Nā‘ālehu town park. The next project is to install signs that identify various lava flows by dates on the highway.
     Light refreshments will be served at the simple ceremony. State Rep. Richard Creagan, County Councilperson Maile David, and Brenda Ford plan to attend.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration is open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Summer Fun - Registration, May 7-10, Nā‘ālehu Community Center. For grades K-6. $40 per child. $50 portion of registration fee funded by Councilwoman Maile David. Program runs Mon-Fri, Jun 12-Jul 20, 8-2pm. Richard Karasuda, 939-2510. hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

ONGOING
Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Art Center Gallery Presents Hoʻokuʻi I Nā Kiko, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222

One Community and One Parent Representative are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.