About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, October 03, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015

Hula sisters from Japan joined Halau Hula O Leionalani on stage last night during Ho`okupu Hula No Ka`u Cultural Festival at Pahala Plantation House. The festival continues today from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Photo by Julia Neal
DR. BRUCE ANDERSON, A WELL-KNOWN Hawai`i leader in environmental protection, has been selected as administrator of Department of Land & Natural Resources Division of Aquatic Resources.
Dr. Bruce Anderson
      Anderson has more than 20 years of experience in managing health, environmental protection and marine resource programs, policy and issues in Hawai`i. DLNR Chair Suzanne Case said, “What particularly impresses me is Bruce’s ability to consistently find solutions to complex problems where conflicting and divergent interests are at stake. He is a hands-on leader who works collaboratively with others internally and externally. He is well known to many DLNR staff, legislators, stakeholders and others.”
      Anderson began his career as state Environmental Epidemiologist at the Hawai`i Department of Health, focusing his research and interests on ciguatera fish poisoning and other aquatic marine toxins. As Deputy Director for Environmental Health for 12 years, he worked closely with the DAR staff in addressing problems associated with sewage spills and other pollution threats. When appointed by Gov. Ben Cayetano as Director of the Department of Health, he served on the state Water Commission.
      As President of Oceanic Institute, he led a team of over 70 scientists, researchers and support staff in developing and transferring new aquaculture technologies to the private sector to produce shrimp, fish and other seafood in an environmentally sustainable manner. Most recently, he served as President and CEO of Hawai`i Health Systems Corporation.
      “Bruce obviously loves the ocean,” Case said. “In addition to growing up here fishing, diving and surfing, he organized and led the `O`o Tagging Project, a project modeled after DAR’s Ulua Tagging Project, in his free time. Recently, he worked with John Morgan and staff at Kualoa Ranch to develop a method to successfully grow oysters in a Hawaiian fishpond. It is a thriving new business now.”
      Anderson was born and raised in Hawai`i. He attended Punahou School, Colorado College and received his Master’s in Public Health from Yale University and a Ph.D. in biomedical sciences from the University of Hawai`i. He has a passion for saltwater flyfishing. He also enjoys hiking, riding horses and gardening with his wife, Debbie.
      “I am looking forward to this opportunity and working with the Division of Aquatic Resources team, Chair Case and First Deputy Kaluhiwa, the DLNR staff and all the stakeholders to better manage our marine resources and freshwater fisheries,” Anderson said. “I have a lot to learn and expect to spend the next month or two doing a lot of listening.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Mina Morita
MINA MORITA, FORMER CHAIR of Hawai`i’s Public Utilities Commission, discusses business models for utilities at minamoritaenergydynamics.com. Her comments follow sessions statewide where the state Public Utilities Commission listened to residents’ ideas about the proposed merger of Hawaiian Electric Co. and NextEra Energy. At a session in Hilo, many residents told the PUC that a cooperative would be a preferable business model on Hawai`i Island. Life of the Land also last week petitioned the PUC to investigate different business models and utility structures. 
      “As the electric sector is evolving, an electric utility’s business model must be flexible and adaptable to address advancing technology and changing customer preferences,” Morita wrote. “It is the electric utility’s responsibility to develop its business model to meet the performance standards and expectations of the regulator. While the regulator can demand operational and financial performance and scrutinize the business model to achieve regulatory objectives, it is the responsibility of the electric utility to have an updated business plan to execute its productivity and ensure its profitability. …
      “If people want to argue the merits/demerits of a publicly owned or municipal utility, do it before the state Legislature or County Councils. If the merits outweigh the negatives, then those elected officials should lay out the game plan for eminent domain and address the charter and statutory changes necessary before bringing the ownership transfer issue to the PUC. Proponents of an electric cooperative should establish their nonprofit corporation and be able to put their money on the table to begin negotiations with the Hawaiian Electric Companies for its purchase. You don’t need a PUC investigation to initiate any one of these change of ownership actions. …
      “A PUC investigation should begin only when there is something concrete to be evaluated where, if the Consumer Advocate prevails, the standard of review will be an evaluation of the substantial net benefits for the consumer.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Ka`imia Na`auao Kahiko, of Ka`u School of the Arts, and Kumu Hula
Marsha Bolosan share the ancient style of hula.
Photo by Julia Neal
U.S. SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ CO-INTRODUCED legislation that would streamline and improve the visa application system for foreign tourists seeking to visit the United States. Current visa procedures make it difficult for tourists from many countries to visit the U.S. The bipartisan bill would reform and strengthen the Visa Waiver Program, shorten the waiting time for certain tourist visas, allow for certain tourists to stay in the U.S. for a longer period of time and more.

 
      “Every new visitor to Hawai`i gives us an opportunity to share our culture, strengthen our economy and support our small businesses,” said Schatz, who co-chairs the Senate Tourism Caucus. “In Congress, tourism is an area that has strong bipartisan support so we should work together to do everything we can to attract new visitors and grow the industry. By modernizing and streamlining our visa system, we can expand Hawai`i’s international tourism market, improve the visitor experience and bring a jolt to our local economy.”


      As Chair of the Tourism Subcommittee during the last Congress, Schatz held hearings on the state of the U.S. tourism and travel industry to explore ways to improve the visa system and help the government achieve its goal of attracting 100 million visitors annually by 2021. At one of those hearings last year, Roger Dow, President and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, which represents all sectors of America’s travel community, testified that the JOLT Act would help ensure that the United States is able to meet the rising visa demand.
      This legislation reforms and strengthens the Visa Waiver Program, streamlines visa processing by requiring new standards of efficiency, encourages Canadian tourism to the U.S., creates a videoconferencing pilot program for visa processing, requires coordination of Trusted Traveler applications and improves passport security by requiring every U.S. visitor entering through the reformed VWP to have electronic passports.
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
       While the global travel market is expected to double over the next decade, the United States’ market share of this industry has declined by five percent since the 2000. The JOLT Act is aimed at reversing that trend and recapturing the United States’ historic share of worldwide overseas travel, which could add nearly $100 billion to the economy over the next decade and create nearly 700,000 more American jobs.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

OCTOBER IS FILIPINO AMERICAN History Month.
       “For centuries, Filipino Americans have made exceptional contributions to U.S. businesses, culture and arts, government, technology, sports, health care, military and more,” U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said. “In Hawai`i, Filipino Americans have been integral to our history, from driving our plantation-based economy in the early 20th century to becoming leaders across every industry in our state. As we celebrate Filipino American History Month and the many positive contributions the Filipino community has made, we must also continue to fight for issues like family reunification and honoring our Filipino veterans.”
       In June, Gabbard introduced bipartisan legislation to award the Congressional Gold Medal to WWII Filipino Veterans. The legislation acknowledges over 200,000 Filipino and Filipino American soldiers who responded to President Roosevelt’s call-to-duty and fought under the American flag against the Imperial Forces of Japan during World War II.
       In 2009, the United States Congress passed legislation recognizing October as Filipino American History Month.
       Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Hula `auana, or modern style, dancers graced the stage, also.
Photo by Julia Neal
HO`OKUPU HULA NO KA`U Cultural Festival continues today with an opening pule at 4 p.m. 
      Entertainment schedule: `Ohana Band from Japan, 4:30 p.m.; Kahoku Kauahiahionalani with Kumu Hula Sammy Fo, 5:30 p.m.; Kukui Ceremony (Remembering our Ancestors), 6:15 p.m.; Ho`omaika`i Hula Halau with Kumu Hula Shona LamHo, 6:30 p.m.; Times 5, 7:30 p.m.; Halau Hula O Ke Anuenue with Kumu Hula Glen Vasconcellas, 8:30 p.m.; and Los Borinquen’os, 9:30 p.m.
      Among the performers backing up the talent are Wailau Ryder and Demetrius Oliveira, as well as Skylark.
      See www.hookupukau.com.

KAHUKU UNIT OF HAWAI`I Volcanoes National Park visitors discover the Hawaiian goddesses Hi`iaka & Pele and the natural phenomena they represent on a moderate one-mile walk tomorrow from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m.
      For more information, call 985-6011.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.



See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_October2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.