About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, January 04, 2018

Ka‘ū News Briefs Thursday, January 4, 2018

Bound for the home stretch, 72-year old Wayne Kawachi, center, is surrounded by Ka‘ū people supporting his
100-mile walk from Honoka‘a to Nā‘ālehu, to raise money for senior housing. He stopped after making it into Ka‘ū on Thursday, camping out at the 39.5 mile marker between Volcano and Pāhala. A victory party is scheduled for
 5 p.m. at Nā‘ālehu Community Center on Friday. See more below. Photo by Glenn Okamoto
HUI MĀLAMA OLA NĀ ‘ŌIWI'S PRENATAL EDUCATION PROGRAM will be free and offered island-wide. Hui Mālama issued a statement this week saying the organization would "like to reach the Ka‘ū community and bring a class to the area if there are interested women." Healthy Hāpai classes are ongoing in Hilo and Puna, with a new class starting in Waimea on Jan. 10, 17, 24, 31, and Feb. 14, from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Kona classes are yet to be announced.  
A free new prenatal education program could be offered in Ka‘ū if
there are interested women. Expectant mothers can call
Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi at (808) 969-9220.
     The free five-session program provides a curriculum designed to help mothers throughout pregnancy and after birth.
     A session called Mālama Ola Kino Hāpai means Taking Care of My Pregnant Body and teaches expectant mothers how to stay healthy during pregnancy.
     Mālama ‘Ohana means Taking Care of My Family and includes discussing positive parenting, managing stress, preterm labor, and an introduction to breastfeeding.
     Hoomākaukau No Ka Hānau ‘Ana is Getting Ready for Birth, teaching preparation for labor and birth.
     Hoomākaukau No Ka Pepe means Preparing for Baby, reviewing basic baby necessities, creating a postpartum plan, and discussing postpartum depression.
     Mālama Keiki means Caring for my Child, providing newborn care, safety, and infant massage information.
     All program participants receive a free pregnancy journal and calendar, as well as an opportunity to win an infant car seat or breastfeeding pillow.
     The Healthy Hāpai classes are facilitated by Leila Ryusaki, who joined Hui Mālama in July 2017 to develop the Healthy Hāpai prenatal program initiative. She started her career in the healthcare field 20 years ago as a Pharmacy Technician in Hilo. In 2007, she accepted a position at North Hawaiʻi Community Hospital, where she worked for ten years. It was her work at the Waimea Women's Center that piqued her interest in prenatal care. Leila worked in the ob-gyn clinic with four Certified Nurse Midwives to conceptualize and start a prenatal care group called Centering Pregnancy.
Leila Ryusaki 
     Ryusaki worked as Program Coordinator and Facilitator for Centering Pregnancy for five years. During her time as Program Coordinator, she furthered her training and knowledge by becoming a Certified Lactation Counselor and Childbirth Educator. "Her dedication and passion for prenatal and postnatal education has been integral in the planning of Hui Mālama’s Healthy Hāpai program," says a statement from the organization. She explains, "Pregnancy is not only about the birth of the baby. It’s also about the birth of the parents. We’re here to help with that transition."
     The Healthy Hāpai program is ideal for mothers in their first and second trimesters, and open to mothers in their third trimester as well. Both first-time and experienced mothers are encouraged to join and meet other pregnant moms. Participants are welcome to bring a partner, friend, or family member to class.
     To sign up or learn more, expectant mothers can call Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi at (808) 969-9220. For more information, visit hmono.org.

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TARGETING STATES ALLOWING MARIJUANA USE is the latest move by the administration of Pres. Donald Trump. Hawai‘i Rep. Tulsi Gabbard responded on Thursday.
     After Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced rescinding the Obama-era, non-interference policy, and that the fed will go after states that have legalized medical or recreational marijuana use, Gabbard denounced the decision. She called on Congress to pass H.R.1227, the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act, which removes marijuana from the federal controlled substances list.
     "Attorney General Sessions' reversal of the current non-interference policy that essentially allowed states to implement their own marijuana laws without federal interference, tramples on states' rights and is a dangerous escalation of the failed so-called War on Drugs. This overreach by the federal government undermines state governments like Hawai‘i's that have legalized medical marijuana and threatens the livelihoods and rights of the people of Hawai‘i and those of the 29 states and Washington, D.C., who have legalized some form of marijuana.
     "This decision reinforces our outdated and destructive policies on marijuana that turn everyday Americans into criminals, tear families apart, and waste billions of taxpayer dollars to arrest, prosecute, and incarcerate people for nonviolent marijuana charges. Taxpayer dollars would be better spent tackling the many problems that plague the American people including combating the opioid epidemic, ensuring affordable housing, repairing aging infrastructure, and investing in education, healthcare, veterans' care, and more."
     Under H.R. 1227, marijuana would be treated the same as alcohol and tobacco. “Our bipartisan legislation will end this unnecessary and costly debate once and for all by federally decriminalizing marijuana and kick-starting long overdue, common sense criminal justice reform," declared Gabbard.
     She is the lead Democrat co-sponsor of the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act.
‘O Ka‘ū Kākou President Wayne Kawachi continues his 100-mile
walk, with the final stretch of his journey taking place tomorrow.
Follow his walk at okaukakou.org/track-wayne-100-mile-walk.
     "By continuing to pour billions of dollars down the drain with our archaic marijuana policies, we stifle our economy, society, and criminal justice system and leave the people of Hawai‘i and millions more devastated – all for a substance that is far less dangerous and harmful than alcohol. Our laws should accurately reflect scientific consensus – not misplaced stigma and outdated myths about marijuana."

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DAY THREE OF THE ‘O KA‘Ū KĀKOU 100-MILE WALK FOR SENIOR HOUSING IN NĀ‘ĀLEHU saw ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou President Wayne Kawachi walking up Kīlauea volcano along Hwy 11 to Volcano Village, and down the mountain into Ka‘ū. He stopped on Thursday evening to camp out at the 39.5 mile marker between Volcano and Pāhala.
     On Friday morning, Kawachi sets out on the final leg of trekking 100 miles in his rubber slippers to raise $250,000 toward purchase of 1.9 acres in Nā‘ālehu for future senior housing. The landowner, Asha Mallick, is giving a discount on the price for the project.
     Make a donation to support his quest at okaukakou.org. Follow his walk online at okaukakou.org/track-wayne-100-mile-walk. Meet him at a welcome home celebration party on Friday at 5 p.m. at Nā‘ālehu Community Center.
     For more call Kawachi at 937-4773.

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Visitors explore the Mauna Loa Lookout improvements.
Photo by Janice Wei, National Park Service
WHEELCHAIR - FRIENDLY IMPROVEMENTS TO THE MAUNA LOA LOOKOUT ARE COMPLETE, and the entire 11.2-mile Mauna Loa Road is now open to vehicles, says a press release issued on Wednesday, Jan. 3, by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     The parking area and path to the Mauna Loa Lookout shelter were reconstructed and repaved, and a new accessible vault toilet was installed. Visitors will also find an inviting new wheelchair-friendly picnic table and accessible parking stall.
     The Mauna Loa Lookout is perched at 6,662 feet, and provides panoramic views of Kīlauea volcano, old lava flows, and the ocean on clear days. The subalpine woodland includes koa, māmane, and ‘ōhi‘a trees, and endemic bird species, including ‘i‘iwi. The octagonal shelter at the Lookout was built by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1937.
New accessible pathway to the Mauna Loa Lookout Shelter.
Photo by Janice Wei, National Park Service
     Back-country hikers utilize Mauna Loa Road and Lookout to access Pu‘u‘ula‘ula (Red Hill) and its cabin, Mauna Loa summit and cabin, and other sections of the challenging Mauna Loa Trail - back-country permits are required for all overnight stays.
     Workers will begin to fix potholes along Mauna Loa Road next week, but no closures are necessary.

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TROPICAL FLOWER ARRANGING WITH HAWAIIAN CULTURAL PRACTITIONER Kaipo Ah Chong takes place Friday, Jan. 5, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. Ah Chong offers a popular tropical flower arranging workshop and provides flowers for all those in attendance; however, individuals must bring their own clippers. Pre-registration is required. The class fee is $45 plus a $20 supply fee per person. For more, visit volcanoartcenter.org.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at 
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/janfebmar/januarycommunity.html.
February print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Girls Basketball: Friday, Jan. 5, Konawaena @ Ka‘ū.
     Wednesday, Jan. 10, Honoka‘a @ Ka‘ū.
     Friday, Jan. 12, @ Laupahoehoe.
     Monday, Jan. 15, @ HPA.

Boys Basketball: Saturday, Jan. 6, Laupahoehoe @ Ka‘ū.
     Monday, Jan. 8, @ Honoka‘a.
     Wednesday, Jan. 10, @ St. Joseph.
     Monday, Jan. 15, Pāhoa @ Ka‘ū.

Swimming: Saturday, Jan. 6, @ Kamehameha.
     Saturday, Jan. 13, @ HPA.

Boys Soccer: Saturday, Jan. 6, Konawaena @ Ka‘ū.
     Tuesday, Jan. 9, Pāhoa @ Ka‘ū.

Wrestling: Saturday, Jan. 6, @ Kea‘au.
     Saturday, Jan. 13, @ Konawaena.

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FEARLESS ABSTRACT PAINTING, an acrylic paint art class, is set for Saturday, Jan. 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Professional artist Samantha daSilva shares her unique method of painting using rollers, tables, lots of paint and water, canvas manipulation and plaster, sand, and wood shavings to create textured abstracts. No experience necessary. Class fee is $85 for VAC members and $90 for non-members, plus $15 supply fee per person. Register online, at volcanoartcenter.org, or call 967-8222.

Lava dribbles into the ocean at the front of Kīlauea Volcano's Kamokuna 
lava delta, October 2017. Photo from U.S.G.S.
STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT offers four days in January for volunteers to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The upcoming meeting is Saturday, Jan. 6. Interested volunteers should meet Paul and Jane Filed at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Other opportunities this month take place Jan. 13, 19, and 26. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more see nps.gov/HAVO.

DISCOVER THE HAWAIIAN GODDESSES HI‘IAKA & PELE and the natural phenomena they represent on a free, moderate, one-mile walk on Saturday, Jan. 6, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. For more, see nps.gov/HAVO.

TAKE A FREE GUIDED HIKE ALONG THE PALM TRAIL and learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture in Nature & Culture: An Unseverable Relationship, on Sunday, Jan. 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The hike is approximately 2 miles and moderately difficult. Observe the catastrophic change and restoration of the land as it transitions from the 1868 lava flow to deeper soils with more diversity and older flora. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

HAM RADIO OPERATORS POTLUCK PICNIC is Sunday, Jan. 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Manukā Park. The event organizers invite American Radio Emergency Service members, anyone interested in learning how to operate a ham radio, and families. For more, call Dennis Smith at 989-3028.

Margaret "Peggy" Stanton.
Photo from peggystanton007.wixsite.com
PAINTING WITH PEGGY, an acrylic painting class with Margaret "Peggy" Stanton is set for Monday, Jan. 8, from noon to 3 p.m., at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. It is part of an ongoing series of workshops for artists of all levels, headed by Stanton. The class is $15 for VAC members and $20 for non-members per session. The class will take place again on Jan. 15. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR/ NĀ‘ĀLEHU C.E.R.T. meets Tuesday, Jan. 9, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. The public is invited to come see what Community Emergency Response Team is about, as well as participate in training scenarios. For more, contact Dina Shisler at dinashisler24@yahoo.com or 410-935-8087.

KĪLAUEA VOLCANO'S EAST RIFT ZONE: 35 YEARS AND STILL ERUPTING is the After Dark in the Park talk scheduled for Tuesday, Jan. 9, starting at 7 p.m., in Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. U.S.G.S. Hawai‘i Volcano Observatory geologist Carolyn Parcheta briefly describes the early history of the East Rift Zone eruption that began 35 years ago, and provides an in-depth look at lava flow activity during the past year. The event is free; however, park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

‘OHE KĀPALA DEMO: HAWAIIAN BAMBOO STAMPING takes place Wednesday, Jan. 10, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn to create beautiful designs using bamboo stamps (‘ohe kāpala), which were originally used to decorate clothing with deep symbolic meaning. The event is free to attend; however, park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

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