About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, January 06, 2018

Ka‘ū News Briefs Saturday, January 6, 2018

Expanding telehealth services has reached veterans served at Ocean View Community Center and is receiving
more support from the bill that just passed Congress, co-introduced by Sen. Mazie Hirono and her
Republican counterpart Joni Ernst. Image from telehealthperspectives.com
AN ACT TO SUPPORT VETERANS E-HEALTH AND TELEMEDICINE has unanimously passed the U.S. Senate. The bipartisan bill was introduced by Senators Mazie K. Hirono and Republican Joni Ernst. This legislation seeks to improve veterans’ access to health care services by expanding telehealth services - including mental health treatment - provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs. A telemedicine kiosk was recently installed at Ocean View Community Center.
     "The VETS Act will help Hawai‘i veterans access high quality V.A. care and health services when they need it, where they need it," said Hirono. "I urge the swift enactment of the bill and will continue to fight to ensure Hawai‘i veterans can access the care they need from a strong, well-resourced V.A. system."
     "All of our veterans must have access to quality and timely care, including life-saving mental health treatment, regardless of where they live," said Ernst.
     The VETS Act seeks to improve health care access for disabled or rural veterans by expanding telehealth services provided by the Department of Veterans Affairs, by allowing V.A. health officials to practice telemedicine across state lines if they are qualified and practice within the scope of their authorized federal duties. Hirono and Ernst first introduced the VETS Act in 2015, and reintroduced it in the 115th Congress in April of 2017.
At the end of the Ka‘ū Coffee season
comes the last harvest, strip-picking and
the eruption of new coffee flowers.
Photo from Andrea Kawabata
     Hirono is a consistent and outspoken advocate for expanding health care access for Hawai‘i's veterans.

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FINAL HARVESTING FOR KA‘Ū COFFEE is bringing reminders from University of Hawai‘i Agricultural Extension Service. Andrea Kawabata, Associate Extension Agent, recommends that farmers "strip-pick remaining berries from your coffee trees as soon as possible following your final harvest. If you've missed our newest video, you can find the link here and at hawaiicoffeeed.com's home page and 'field sanitation' and 'CBB publications' pages under the CBB Management tab."
     During this time of year, it is also important to note the first and any major flowerings, writes Kawatabata. "This will help you time the start of your monitoring program, spray schedule, harvests, and determine if a pre-season strip-pick is needed to remove berries from an early, unsubstantial flowering. If using traps to monitor for CBB activity, employing them after the harvest season can be helpful in determining CBB flight activity prior to and during young berry development. Without coffee on the trees, CBB may be easier to lure into traps and kill with the soapy water. The only good CBB is a dead CBB. Learn more at the links Record keeping and Trapping.

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Image from Volcano Art Center
VOLCANO ART CENTER HAS ANNOUNCED A ZENTANGLE CLASS that blends inspiration from nature with traditional Zentangle patterns and explores possibilities within the Zendala (round) format with twirling leaves on a pre-strung tile. According to a summary from Volcano Art Center, tangles within the leaves may include tangleations and traditional Zentangle patterns such as Diva Dance, Crescent Moon, Betweed, Nipa, Enyshou, Bunzo, Flux, Dewd, and others.
     The class takes place on Saturday, Jan. 13, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Dina Wood Kageler, a Certified Zentangle Teacher, offers the class to beginning and returning anglers. The class fee is $30 for Volcano Art Center members and $35 non-members, plus a $10 supply fee. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.
     Returning anglers are encouraged to bring a pencil, 01 pen and other tools of their choosing. Loaner pens, pencils, and watercolor shadings will be available. The class is a potluck style with attendees asked to bring a light refreshment to share.

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Take a Silk Painting with Wax Resist Workshop at Volcano Art Center
under the guidance of Big Island artist and instructor Patti Pease Johnson.
Photo from Volcano Art Center
A SILK PAINTING WITH WAX RESIST WORKSHOP led by Patti Pease Johnson has been announced by Volcano Art Center for Saturday, Jan. 13, from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in Volcano Village. Johnson's artwork can be found at galleries and shops across the state and in collections around the world.
     The class combines batik methods with the art of Serti silk painting to create a representational piece of art, like a wall hanging.
     A statement from Volcano Art Center says, "Wax resist dyeing of fabric is an ancient art form. Indonesian batik made in the island of Java has a long history of diverse patterns influenced by a variety of cultures, and is very developed in terms of pattern, technique, and quality of workmanship. In 2009, UNESCO designated Indonesian batik as a Masterpiece of Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity.
     "…The art of Serti silk painting, coined in France meaning 'fence' or 'closing', was introduced there in the 20th century. It is a colorful, and popular art form practiced world-wide. The Crusades brought silk from areas surrounding the Indonesian Islands to Europe and eventually the industrial revolution made silk production available internationally."
Big Island artist and instructor Patti Pease Johnson
demonstrates her technique. Photo from Volcano Art Center
     In Johnson's workshop, color theory and composition will be discussed. First, students will use a 5" × 8" China silk sampler to get the feel of the wax tool and using the dyes, and to work out color or composition details for the larger 12" × 16" piece each student will get to design.
     All colors will be mixed with four process colors. Students are asked to bring a design concept in mind from an original photo, plant material, or objects for an idea. Students are also welcome to prepare a 12" × 16" sketch before class.
     The statement from Volcano Art Center says, "Big Island artist and instructor Patti Pease Johnson can help you gain the confidence and techniques of working in this medium. Patti supplies the instruction and materials along with guidance and inspiration for this process along with some handy tips for your creative journey."
     The workshop fee is $45 per Volcano Art Center member and $50 per non-member, plus a $10 supply fee per person - which includes a 3-page handout. Beginner and intermediate artists are welcome. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

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KA‘Ū TROJANS BEAT LAUPĀHOEHOE 60 to 10 in boys basketball on Saturday, Jan. 6, at home. High scorers for Ka‘ū were Masen Dacalio with 13 points, and Janslae Badua with ten points. 

KA‘Ū HIGH HOSTED KONAWA‘ENA FOR SOCCER on Saturday, Jan. 6. The final was Kona boys 6, Ka‘ū 0; Kona girls 8, Ka‘ū 0.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at 
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/janfebmar/januarycommunity.html.
January print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Boys Basketball: Monday, Jan. 8, @ Honoka‘a.
     Wednesday, Jan. 10, @ St. Joseph.
     Monday, Jan. 15, Pāhoa @ Ka‘ū.
     Wednesday, Jan. 17, @ Kohala.

Boys Soccer: Tuesday, Jan. 9, Pāhoa @ Ka‘ū.

Girls Basketball: Wednesday, Jan. 10, Honoka‘a @ Ka‘ū.
     Friday, Jan. 12, @ Laupahoehoe.
     Monday, Jan. 15, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 19, @ Kealakehe.

Swimming: Saturday, Jan. 13, @ HPA.

Wrestling: Saturday, Jan. 13, @ Konawaena.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LEARN ABOUT NATIVE PLANTS THAT PLAY A VITAL ROLE IN HAWAIIAN CULTURE on a free guided hike along the Palm Trail in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The hike, Nature & Culture: An Unseverable Relationship, takes place on Sunday, Jan. 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Observe the catastrophic change and restoration of the land as it transitions from the 1868 lava flow to deeper soils with more diversity and older flora. The hike is approximately 2 miles long and moderately difficult. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

AMERICAN RADIO EMERGENCY SERVICE MEMBERS, as well as anyone interested in learning how to operate a ham radio, and families, are welcome to join a Ham Radio Operators Potluck Picnic on Sunday, Jan. 7, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at Manukā Park. For more, call Dennis Smith at 989-3028.

Margaret "Peggy" Stanton teaches an acrylic painting class Monday in
Volcano. Photo from peggystanton007.wixsite.com
AN ACRYLIC PAINTING CLASS, entitled Painting with Peggy, takes place on Monday, Jan. 8, from noon to 3 p.m., at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. It is part of an ongoing series of workshops headed by Margaret "Peggy" Stanton for artists of all levels. The class is $15 for VAC members and $20 for non-members per session. Painting with Peggy will take place again on Jan. 15. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO COME AND SEE what Discovery Harbour/Nā‘ālehu Community Emergency Response Team is about, as well as participate in training scenarios at their meeting Tuesday, Jan. 9, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, contact Dina Shisler at dinashisler24@yahoo.com or 410-935-8087.

A Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park ranger chats with visitors about 
‘ohe kāpala. Photo by Christa Sadler, National Park Service
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 3, 2018, MARKED THE 35TH ANNIVERSARY of Kīlauea Volcano's ongoing East Rift Zone eruption. Join Carolyn Parcheta, U.S.G.S. Hawai‘i Volcano Observatory Geologist, as she briefly describes the early history of the East Rift Zone eruption and provides an in-depth look at lava flow activity during the past year at an After Dark in the Park talk on Tuesday, Jan. 9, starting at 7 p.m., in Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The event, entitled Volcano's East Rift Zone: 35 Years and Still Erupting, is free to attend; however, park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

LEARN TO CREATE BAMBOO STAMPS (‘OHE KĀPALA) in a demonstration Wednesday, Jan. 10, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai within Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. ‘Ohe kāpala were originally used to decorate clothing with deep symbolic meaning - it is now used to tell stories on a variety of modern materials. The event is free to attend; however, park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Ōiwi would like to offer Health Hāpai classes to 
the Kā‘ū community by bringing a class to the area if there are interested
women. Expectant mothers can call Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi at 
(808) 969-9220.
HUI MĀLAMA OLA NĀ ‘ŌIWI hosts a free, new prenatal education program which is to be offered island-wide. The Healthy Hāpai classes currently scheduled are held in Hilo and Puna, with a new class being held in Waimea on Jan. 10, 17, 24, 31, and Feb. 14, from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Kona classes are yet to be announced. The organization would "like to reach the Ka‘ū community and bring a class to the area if there are interested women."
     The free five-session program is offered island-wide, with an engaging and educational curriculum designed to help mothers throughout pregnancy and after birth. The course is facilitated by Leila Ryusaki, who started her career in the healthcare field 20 years ago. She says, "Pregnancy is not only about the birth of the baby. It's also about the birth of the parents. We're here to help with that transition."
     The Healthy Hāpai program is ideal for mothers in their first and second trimesters, and open to mothers in their third trimester as well. Both first-time and experienced mothers are encouraged to join and meet other pregnant moms. Participants are welcome to bring a partner, friend, or family member to class.
     To sign up or learn more, expectant mothers can call Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi at (808) 969-9220. For more information, visit hmono.org.

BEGINNING HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE CLASSES - two 8-week courses - start Thursday, Jan. 11, at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. Both courses focus on simple vocabulary, conversation, grammar, and sentence structure. No experience necessary. Part One is scheduled for 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Thursdays and requires no prior experience in Hawaiian Language. Part Four follows from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Thursdays - some experience with Hawaiian Language is preferred. The course fee for either class is $80 for Volcano Art Center members and $90 for non-members. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

A FREE PUBLIC HEALTH SHOWER WITH HOT WATER, soap, shampoo, and clean towels is offered at St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View every Saturday, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., along with a free hot meal.

STEWARDSHIP OF KĪPUKAPUAULU takes place at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 11, with volunteers meeting in the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot on Mauna Loa Road off Hwy 11 in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers will help remove invasive plants, like morning glory, from an area said to be home to an "astonishing diversity of native forest and understory plants." The event will take place again on Jan. 18 and 25. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, contact Marilyn Nicholson at nickem@hawaii.rr.com or visit nps.gov/HAVO.

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