About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, June 03, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Monday, June 3, 2019

Kaʻū's Kailee "Kamalani" Kuhaulua-Stacy, who graduated from Kamehameha Schools in May, is running for Miss Hawaiʻi
Island Teen USA, which would qualify her for the statewide contest that leads to nationals. Supporters can vote for
her, contestant #7, in the Peoples Choice award, by liking her photos on Facebook. Deadline to vote by liking the
contestant photo is June 9 at 7 p.m. See story below. Photos from Miss Teen USA Hawaiʻi
FREE BREAKFASTS AND LUNCHES FOR SCHOOL CHILDREN are offered weekdays during summer break, Friday, June 7 through Friday, July 11 at Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary Schools. They are among 21 schools on Hawaiʻi Island with summer programs where 50 percent of regular enrolled students qualify for free or reduced-price lunches. Both breakfasts and lunches are free for all people under age 18, no matter their family income.
        The Seamless Summer Option program is funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A statement from the state Department of Education says that summer "is typically a period of time when our most vulnerable students do not have access to services that they normally would during school year." Dann Carlson, assistant superintendent of the Office of School Facilities and Support Services, said, "Our hope is that more students will enjoy a free meal, simply by stopping by one of our participating schools."
     Students do not have to be enrolled in a summer program at the school to receive the free food. There will be no food service on the June 11 King Kamehameha Day and July 4 holidays.

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PALMYRA ATOLL, 997 miles south-southwest of Ka Lae - South Point, is the location of the new Climate Adaptation & Resilience Laboratory, operated by The Nature Conservancy. A statement released today from TNC says the program will "focus on advancing an ambitious science agenda with the potential to benefit conservation on a global scale."
Palmyra Atoll is the new Climate Adaptation & Resilience Laboratory
operated by The Nature Conservancy. Photo from the-scientist.com
     Located in the equatorial Pacific, Palmyra is co-owned and managed as an international research laboratory and national wildlife refuge by TNC and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. It is also part of the Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument, which, at 13 million acres, is one the world's largest marine protected areas.
     Chad Wiggins, former Hawaiʻi Island marine program director for TNC, who worked on fish recovery programs in Miloliʻi and beyond, is the new program director for Palmyra Atoll. He will work in tandem with exiting program director Alex Wegmann, who intentionally transitioned to director of science for Palmyra in January.
     Ulalia Woodside, executive director of TNC's Hawaiʻi Program, said, "Wiggins has served the Hawaiʻi Island team superbly and is well positioned to lead the Palmyra team, work with Alex to implement globally-important island-based conservation science, and redevelop the Atoll's infrastructure and facilities."
Chad Wiggins worked on Miloliʻi and
other Hawaiʻi Island fish conservation
projects. Photo from TNC
     Wiggins said he is "eager to share how the lessons we can learn from resilient atoll ecosystems like Palmyra will benefit Hawaiʻi, other island people and places, and the rest of the planet. I'm starting by listening to the smartest voice of all—the voice of Palmyra."
     Wiggins started working with TNC Hawai‘i in 2008 as the lone marine staff on Hawai‘i Island. He grew the program through a focus on community-based marine management and diverse conservation partnerships. Under his leadership, TNC has supported site-based coastal conservation initiatives spanning the west coast of Hawai‘i Island, from Kohala to Miloli‘i, including helping the Ka‘ūpūlehu Marine Life Advisory Committee establish their 10-year Try Wait rest area along 3.6 miles of coastline. Recent surveys there showed that after just two years, fish populations inside the preserve are recovering, with 60 percent more wrasses, 30 percent more parrot fish, and 46 percent more kole - surgeon fish. There is also evidence of spillover, or fish populations increasing, just outside the rest area.
     Other projects have included establishing the Conservancy's loko i‘a - fish pond, Kīholo, or Kīholo Preserve; communicating sea level rise impacts on coastal ecosystems; hosting invasive fish removal events; and expanding community networks focused on caring for fishponds and estuaries, anchialine pools, and nearshore marine resources. Today, the west Hawaiʻi coastal zone is one of NOAA's Ten Habitat Blueprint Focus Areas, selected to highlight ways to address the growing challenge of coastal and marine habitat loss and degradation.

Palmyra is 997 miles from South Point and will host a new laboratory to study resilience and climate adaptation under
management of The Nature Conservancy. USGS map
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HAWAIʻI RANKS 26TH NATIONWIDE in annual medium household income. However, other rankings by WalletHub, to determine the Best & Worst State Economies, placed  Hawaiʻi as the fourth worst economy in the country. Among the 50 states and Washington, D.C. Hawaiʻi ranked 51st in exports per capita; 50th in jobs in-tech industries; 44th in Gross Domestic Product growth; 44th in change in nonfarm payrolls and, 41st in startup activity.
     The top economy is Washington, followed by Utah, Massachusetts, California, Colorado, District of Columbia, Idaho, Oregon, New Hampshire, and North Carolina. The worst, according to WalletHub, is Alaska, followed by Louisiana, Mississippi, Hawaiʻi and West Virginia, Arkansas, Kentucky, Wyoming, Rhode Island, and Maine.

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OVERFLIGHTS OF KAʻŪ AND SURROUNDING AREAS were announced for June today by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park:
     June 4, between 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., to transport fence material and field equipment and supplies to the Ka‘ū desert boundary between sea level and 1,500-ft. elevation.  
     June 11, between 6 a.m. and 8:30 a.m., for ungulate surveys and control work in Kahuku Unit, between 4,000- and 6,500-ft. elevation.  
     June 25, between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m., for invasive faya tree surveys on Mauna Loa between Nāmakanipaio and Kīpukapuaulu.
     June 26, between 8 a.m. and noon, for invasive Guinea grass surveys and control along Keauhou Trail, from the coast to 2,000-ft. elevation.
Mouflon sheep are ungulates targeted for removal from areas of the
Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. NPS photo
     USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory may conduct flight operations over Kīlauea and Mauna Loa to assess volcanic activity and maintain instrumentation. HVO plans for a bright yellow helicopter fly over much of Kīlauea's summit and East Rift Zone at an altitude of 396 meters (1,300 feet) above ground level between Thursday, June 13 and Sunday, June 30. The aircraft will fly in a lawn-mowing pattern, back and forth in a northeast-southwest direction. A few smaller areas on Kīlauea, namely parts of the East Rift Zone – Leilani Estates, Ala ʻIli Roadd, and Puʻu ʻŌʻō – the upper Southwest Rift Zone, and the summit caldera, will be flown at a lower altitude of 152 m (500 ft) agl. The purpose is to use LIDAR to map the features and flows from last year's eruption. Learn more from last week's Volcano Watch on Saturday, June 1 Kaʻū News Briefs.
     "The park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather," says a statement from the Park.
     "Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities."

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KAILEE "KAMALANI" KUHAULUA-STACY IS A CANDIDATE FOR MISS HAWAIʻI ISLAND TEEN USA. The pageant is June 15 at The Grand Naniloa Hotel in Hilo. Winning would qualify her for the statewide contest that leads to nationals.
Kailee Kuhaulua-Stacy playing music
at a Kaʻū Coffee Fest event.
Photo by Julia Neal
     The Pāhala resident graduated last month from Kamehameha School-Hawaiʻi and plans to attend college in Salt Lake City, Utah. She recently served as a photographer and social media contributor for the Kaʻū Coffee Festival and played music for one of its events. She is contracted to work with the Kaʻū Coffee Growers Cooperative this summer to help individual farmers with direct sales of their Kaʻū Coffee on their own web sites. During high school, she served as a sports photographer for Kamehameha School and volunteered to photograph sporting events in her home town at Kaʻū High School.
     Supporters can vote for the candidate called Kamalani, contestant #7, for the People's Choice award, by liking her photos on the pageant Facebook. Deadline to vote by liking the contestant photo is this Sunday, June 9 at 7 p.m.
     Pageant tickets for Saturday, June 15 at The Grand Naniloa Hotel in Hilo are $25 and sold by contestants. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. The pageant begins at 6:30 p.m. The evening will  include both competition for Miss Hawaiʻi Island Teen USA, for contenders 14 to 18 years of age, and Miss Hawaiʻi Island, for contestants 18 to 28.
     Contestants for Miss Teen are judged in the categories of Interview, Active Wear, and Evening Gown. Miss Hawaiʻi Island, USA includes a Swimsuit category.
     See misshawaiiisland.com.

Kailee Kuhaulua-Stacy, at right, volunteering as a photographer at Kaʻū High School sports. She also served as a
photographer for sports at Kamehameha School, where she graduated in May. She competes for Miss Hawaiʻi
Island Teen USA on Saturday, June 15. Photo by Julia Neal
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com

JUST ANNOUNCED
CULTURAL FESTIVAL at Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park happens July 13, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. This year's festival theme is E Ho‘omau: To Continue. Last year's festival was canceled due to the 2018 Kīlauea eruption. The event offers visitors to "Come learn about Hawaiian culture and enjoy the music of these islands. Experience traditional ‘oli (chant) and hula (dance) while learning a traditional craft. It will be a fun-filled, family-friendly day that shares the connection of Hawaiian people to this storied place on Mauna Loa volcano."
     Performers and crafts will be announced next month. The Volcano House will sell food and refreshments, or bring a picnic lunch. Visitors can learn more about conservation through fun, interactive exhibits sponsored by leading conservation organizations on the festival grounds, located on the southwestern slopes of Mauna Loa
      Sunscreen and a hat are recommended. Bring water, rain jacket, and ground mat or chair. A drug- and alcohol-free event. Co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, and the Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association.
     Entrance into Kahuku and all events are free. Kahuku is on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5, a 50-minute drive south of the park's main entrance.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
TUESDAY, JUNE 4
Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Mtg., Tuesday, June 4, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5
Early Head Start, Wednesday, June 5 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 10 a.m. to noon, Ocean View Community Center. Social get together for keiki and parents; open to public. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Master Gardeners: Plant Propagation, Wednesday, June 5, 2 p.m., Nā‘ālehu Public Library. Sharing techniques to propagate plants. Free seeds and starts give away. 939-2442

All About Buddhism in the Jodo Shinshu Tradition, Wednesday, June 5 and every following Wednesday, 5 p.m., Nā‘ālehu Hongwanji Buddhist Temple. Book study/talk story. Materials and light refreshments provided. Temple president Robert Kobzi, robertkobzi@aol.com

Hula Voices with Kumu Hula Sammi Fo, Wednesday, June 5 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Desiree Moana Cruz moderates the talk story session. Free. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

THURSDAY, JUNE 6
Keiki Jiggle Bums, Thursday, June 6 and 20 – 1st and 3rd Thursday, monthly – 9 a.m. to 10:30 a.m., Ocean View Community Center. Discover the joy of early learning through song and musical instruments. For keiki 0-4 years. Nicola, 238-8544

Women's Expression Group, Thursday, June 6 – 1st Thursday monthly – 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Women welcome to drop in. Free. Lindsey Miller, 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Mtg., Thursday, June 6, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Mtg., Thursday, June 6, 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m., Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

FRIDAY, JUNE 7
Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Coastal Net Patrol, Friday, June 7. Free; donations appreciated. Limited seating available. RSVP in advance. kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, 769-7629

Uplink All-Stars: Grades 6-8, Friday, June 7, to Friday, June 28, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Ka‘ū High & Pāhala Elementary. Registration required, 313-4100

Stewardship at the Summit, Fridays, June 7, 15, 22, and 28, 8:45 a.m. to noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteers remove invasive, non-native plants. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks, and water. Gloves/tools provided. Parental/guardian accompaniment or written consent required for those under 18. Free; park entrance fees apply. Paul and Jane Field, field@hawaii.edu, nps.gov/havo

SATURDAY, JUNE 8
Pancake Breakfast and Raffle, Saturday, June 8, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m., Ocean View Community Center. To volunteer, call 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Stained Glass Basics II: Baubles, Bevels and other Embellishments w/Claudia McCall, Saturday and Sunday, June 8, 9, 15 and 16, 9 a.m. to noon, Volcano Art Center. $90/VAC member, $100/non-member, plus $30 supply fee. Open to those with prior copper foil stained glass experience. Advanced registration required. Limited to 6 adults. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mamo o Kāwā ʻOhana Work Day, Saturday, June 8, meet 9:30 a.m., Northern Gate, Kāwā. RSVP to James Akau, jakau@nmok.org, 561-9111. Bring a water bottle, lunch, closed toed shoes, long sleeved t-shirt, and pants. Tools, gloves, water, and light refreshments provided. nmok.orgfacebook.com/NMOK.Hawaii

Zentangle Ulana, Appreciations of Weaving w/Dina Wood Kageler, Saturday, June 8, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center. All welcome, no prior experience necessary. Supplies provided. Students invited to bring snack to share. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Jazz in the Forest: Binti Bailey & Larry Seyer with the Jazztones, Saturday, June 8, 5:30 p.m., Volcano Art Center. Refreshments available for purchase. Tickets available online, $20/VAC Member, $25/non-Member. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Medicine for the Mind: Teachings in the Tibetan Buddhist Tradition, Sunday, June 9 – 2nd Sunday, monthly – 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Volcano Art Center. Free; calabash donations welcome. Dress warmly. Patty Johnson, 345-1527

SUNDAY, JUNE 9
Medicine for the Mind: Teachings in the Tibetan Buddhist Tradition, Sunday, June 9 – 2nd Sunday, monthly – 3-5p.m., Volcano Art Center. Free; calabash donations welcome. Dress warmly. Patty Johnson, 345-1527

MONDAY, JUNE 10
Summer Algebra Camp: Grades 6-8, Monday, June 10, to Friday, June 21, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Ka‘ū High & Pāhala Elementary. Supplies provided, free. Registration required, 313-4913, dexsilyn.navarro@k12.hi.us

Early College: High School Students, Monday-Thursday, June 12-July 11, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m., Ka‘ū High & Pāhala Elementary. Registration required, 313-4100

Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Monday, June 10, 1p.m., contact for location. Parent-led homeschool activity and social group, building community in Ka‘ū. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

ONGOING
Seamless Summer Program, open to all people under age 18, no registration required, offers free breakfast at Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School cafeterias. Meals are available weekdays, June 7 through July 11; no meals Tuesday, June 11 and Thursday, July 4. Kaʻū High serves breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call (808) 939-2413 for Nāʻālehu Elementary mealtimes.

Summer Programs for Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary registrations are open.
     Uplink All-Stars runs Friday, June 7 through Friday, June 28 for students in grades 6, 7, and 8, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
     Algebra camp is also open to students in grades 6, 7, and 8 from Monday, June 10 through Friday, June 21, 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.
     Early College, for high school students, runs from Wednesday, June 12 through Thursday, July 11, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
     All three programs require registration by calling 313-4100. No classes Tuesday, June 11 and Thursday, July 4.

Exhibit – Hulihia, A Complete Change: The Hawai‘i Nei Invitational Exhibition, runs through Sunday, June 16, daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Volcano Art Center Gallery. Multi-media exhibition of seven artists. Free; National Park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

Nā‘ālehu Independence Day Parade Sign-Up Open until Thursday, June 20. Parade happens Saturday, June 29 at 11 a.m. The parade route begins at the Nāʻālehu Elementary School and ends at the Nāʻālehu Hongwanji Mission. To participate, call Debra McIntosh, 929-9872.

Full-Time Teaching Assistant Sought by Tūtū & Me to implement curriculum for caregivers and keiki in Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool in Kaʻū. Competitive salary and benefits package, including medical, dental, drug, and vision; flexible spending plan; 403b retirement plan; vacation, sick days, and 14 paid days off; and more.
     Minimum requirement is a high school diploma. Early Childhood Education, related coursework, and/or experience working children preferred. For more, visit pidf.org/about/careers. Apply by emailing resume and cover letter to hr@pidfoundation.org or fax to 808-440-6619.

Hi-Employment Seeks Student Employees to work in a macadamia nut orchard on weekends and holidays. Duties include hand-harvesting macadamia nuts, filling and transporting nut bag and buckets, loading 25-plus pound bags into truck beds, and possible clearing of brush and branches. Applicants must be at least 15 years old, have a work permit, two forms of ID, and transportation to "Panaʻewa Stretch." Call for more details, 238-3741, hi-employment.com.

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