About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, December 04, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Monday, December 4, 2017

National Marine Monuments like Papahānaumokuākea serve as nurseries and breeding waters for
fish sought for home use and for commercial fishing. Pres Donald Trump plans to open commercial
fishing in several National Marine Monuments.  See story below.
Photo from Papahānaumokuākea National Marine Monument
HAWAI`I OCEAN VIEW ESTATES DEEPWELL REMAINS INOPERABLE. Ocean View residents are urged to conserve their catchment and any water stored through early January. The county Department of Water Supply issued an update Monday afternoon, stating that emergency repair work continues.
     "At this time, the Contractor has completed extraction of both pump and motor from well and has confirmed that the motor is inoperable. A spare motor is being transported to the site. Pump has been sent to the manufacturers for refurbishing and is expected to be back on site by early January 2018,
with installation to occur shortly thereafter. Anticipated completion of this emergency repair is in January 2018."
     Due to this breakdown, the following remain in effect:
     Drinking water spigots remain open for community access. However, users are asked to limit consumption to potable needs only in order to extend water availability in the reservoir.
    The standpipe facility for water haulers is closed until repairs can be completed.
    The Department of Water statement says that updated information will be forthcoming as it becomes available. "The Department requests your cooperation and thanks you for your patience and understanding during this emergency." For additional information, contact 961- 8790.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A CRITICAL SHORTAGE OF CHILDCARE is the conclusion of new research from University of Hawai`i and Hawai`i Children's Action Network. The study shows that Ka‘ū and Puna are the least served regions in the state with only one licensed childcare space for every 74 infant-toddlers and only one licensed childcare center space for every six children ages three to five.
See the report online.
      The findings, which describe available childcare as high quality but in short supply, are no surprise to the staff of Children's Action Network. The statewide assessment of the learning environment for infants to age-five, find that only one in four have available services. 
     The services surveyed include family-child interaction learning programs like Tutu & Me, which serves Ka‘ū. It includes family childcare homes, where a licensed family hosts children outside of their own family members. It includes childcare centers and preschools. Statewide, it finds that there is room for only one in every 37 children under age three in a licensed infant-toddler center.
      Cost is a deterrent for the opening of new childcare centers and a family's ability to pay for them. “Hawai`i is the most unaffordable state for childcare and preschool. The average cost of childcare for a three-to-four-year-old is $9,000 a year,” said Deborah Zysman, executive director for Hawai`i Children's Network, speaking to Pacific Business News. Affordable childcare for all children in a family, as defined by the federal government, is 7 percent of median family income. In Hawai`i, for only one child, the cost is 13 percent of median family income.
     “It’s concerning,” Zysman told Pacific Business News reporter Anna Hrushka. “So many Hawai`i families are in this gap group, living paycheck to paycheck, working, and childcare is very expensive. It’s a significant part of a family’s budget.”
     The study calls for workforce development to increase the number of childcare service jobs, as well as providing more childcare subsidized by government and employers.
Ka‘ū and Puna have the fewest opportunities for families needing childcare in the state, according
to a new study from University of Hawai`i and Hawai`i Children's Action Network.
Image from Hawai`i Early Leaning Needs Assessment
     Zysman said that Hawai`i “should not have to rely on philanthropy” for childcare. She named Kamehameha Schools, Harry and Jeannette Weinberg Foundation and Mary Castle Foundation for "making philanthropic investments," according to the PBN story.
     See the summary report Hawai`i Early Learning Needs Assessment.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PROTECTION OF MARINE NATIONAL MONUMENTS at Papahānaumokuākea and in waters of American Samoa made national news on Sunday and Monday. Former Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell explained in television interviews and newspaper editorials how fishing bans in preserves
Pres. Theodore Roosevelt was the first to take action
to preserve what is now known as Papahānaumokuākea.
In 1902 he outlawed seabird poaching.
allow marine species to thrive and populate fishing waters outside the monuments. Pres. Donald Trump proposes opening up fishing in protected waters. Jewell also advocated for protection of Utah's National Monuments, which Trump reduced on Monday through executive order. He is yet to announce final plans for National Marine Monuments.
     Jewell tweeted on Monday, "Pres. Trump’s expected actions today will make him the most anti-conservation, president in our history. He will be challenged by tribes and thoughtful citizens that recognize that some places are too special to develop."
     The largest marine preserve on the planet is at Papahānaumokuākea, including Hawaiian waters and the Northwest Hawaiian Islands. For more than a century, Republican and Democrat Presidents have participated in its establishment. Parts of it were first protected in 1903 by Pres. Theodore Roosevelt who forbade seabird poachers. In 1909 he established the Hawaiian Islands Bird Reservation. In 1940 Pres. Franklin D. Roosevelt protected all of its wildlife by establishing the Hawaiian Islands National Wildlife Refuge. In 1967 Pres. Lydon B. Johnson added protections. In 1988 Pres. Ronald Reagan created Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge. In 1996 Pres. Bill Clinton transferred Midway from the Navy to U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and created the Northwest Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosytem Reserve. In 2006, Pres. George W, Bush created the Marine National Monument. Pres. Barrack Obama expanded it.
      The Vision for Papahānaumokuākea, as stated on the Department of Interior website, is: "To forever protect and perpetuate ecosystem health and diversity and Native Hawaiian cultural significance of Papahānaumokuākea."
     The Mission for Papahānaumokuākea, as stated on the Department of Interior website, is:
Protecting seabirds was the first preservation effort at
Papahānaumokuākea. Photo by Kaleomanuiwa Wong
"To carry out seamless integrated management to ensure ecological integrity and achieve strong, long-term protection and perpetuation of Northwest Hawaiian Islands ecosystems, Native Hawaiian culture, and heritage resources for current and future
generations."
    The Nature Conservancy gave a presentation to the Hawai`i Legislature earlier this year on the value of protecting marine resources. According to the report, almost 50 percent of Hawai`i's coral reefs suffered bleaching between 2014 and 2015. Fisheries have suffered a 90 percent decline in overall catch during the last 100 years, in part from overfishing.
     The marine monuments are considered a nursery for the fish that local residents catch for home use and for the commercial fishery.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE LATEST TRAVEL BAN from the Trump administration will be allowed by a U.S. Supreme Court decision on Monday as legal challenges proceed. Venezuela, Chad, Libya, Syria, Yemen, Somalia, Iran and North Korea are on a list that makes it almost impossible for refugees from these countries to enter the U.S.
Hawai`i Attorney General Doug Chin
opposes Travel Ban. Photo from HPR
       Since the Trump administration has been fighting to install its travel bans for some 319 days, refugees in the U.S. have been responsible for zero attacks and deaths, while Americans have been responsible for 56,863 shootings leading to 14,335 deaths, 326 mass shootings, and zero gun bans, claims refugee advocate Qasim Rashid, posting on the twitter feeds of news outlets.
     The State of Hawai`i has taken on the Travel Bans by filing suits in federal court, proclaiming discrimination. State Attorney General Doug Chin argued on Nov. 28 that the ban causes "prolonged separation of families, the impairment of the State's university and the damage to the public as a whole inflicted by a radical departure form the status quo that had existed for decades."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A HOLIDAY COLLAGE WREATH CLASS for keiki ages 6-12 has been announced for Friday, Dec. 15, from 1:45 p.m. to 2:45 p.m., at Kahuku Park (H.O.V.E.). Register until Dec. 13. For more, call Teresa Anderson at 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

MAKING A HANGING SANTA CRAFT will be the activity on Wednesday, Dec. 13, from  3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., at Pāhala Community Center. Register keiki, grades K-8, until Dec. 12. For more or to register, call Nona Makuakane/Elijah Navarro at 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY COUNCIL MEETS Tuesday, Dec. 5, and Wednesday, Dec. 20. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.


KA‘Ū COFFEE GROWERS COOPERATIVE MEETS TUESDAY, Dec. 5, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center. The cooperative's Christmas party is Saturday, Dec. 30 at Pāhala Plantation House.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS Tuesday, Dec.  5, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576 or visit discoveryharbour.net.

CASCADE VOLCANOES BENEATH A SOLAR ECLIPSE is the After Dark in the Park talk that has been announced for Tuesday, Dec. 5, starting at 7 p.m. in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about the volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington and Oregon - how often they erupt and why they can be more dangerous that volcanoes in Hawai’i. Park rangers share their stories of their adventures while visiting these majestic mountains during the total solar eclipse. Free, park entrance fees apply. For more see nps.gov/HAVO.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REGISTER KEIKI, GRADES K-8, UNTIL TUESDAY, DEC. 5, for a Mason Jar Lover Wreath Craft class planned for Wednesday, Dec. 6, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center. For more call Nona Makuakane or Elijah Navarro at 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

OPEN MIC NIGHT is Wednesday, Dec. 6, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests 21 years and older. Park entrance fees apply. Visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com for more details.

OCEAN VIEW NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETS Thursday, Dec. 7, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-703.

VOLCANO SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES FALL EDITION OF THEATER NIGHT takes place Thursday, Dec. 7, starting at 6 p.m. at Kīlauea Military Camp Theater in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Park entrance fees apply.

FIVE STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT events in which volunteers help remove invasive non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park take place this December. The first event is Thursday, Dec. 7, with remaining events taking place Dec. 15, 23, and 30. Volunteers should meet leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park at 8:45 a.m. Free; park entrance fees apply. Fore more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.
Ocean View Community Center Pancake Breakfast
will be Dec. 9 from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.

ALOHA FRIDAY: LEI MAKING WITH RANDY LEE is Dec. 8, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the Volcano Art Center Gallery Porch in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Make lei from a variety of natural materials from the forest. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-7565 or visit volcanoartcenter.org.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST AT OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER is Saturday, Dec. 9, from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. For more, call 939-7033.

SOFT PASTEL STILL LIFE WITH PATTI PEASE JOHNSON is the class at Volcano Art Center on Saturday, Dec. 9, from 9 a.m. to noon. Instruction and materials provided. Beginners to intermediate artists welcome. $50 per non-member, $45 per VAC member, plus $10 supply fee per person. For more, call 967-7565 or visit volcanoartcenter.org.

EXPLORE THE RICH GEOLOGIC HISTORY OF KAHUKU on a easy-to-moderate guided hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, displaying different volcano features and formations in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Saturday, Dec. 9, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The hike, titled Birth of Kahuku, also offers hikers the opportunity to learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. It will also take place on Dec. 30.

ST. JUDE'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH IN OCEAN VIEW ANNOUNCES A KEIKI CHRISTMAS PARTY for Saturday, Dec. 9, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in their lower parking lot. Each child receives two books at Rudolph’s Reading Room, a stocking from Santa, and a cookie and punch from Mrs. Claus’s Kitchen. All are welcome. For more, visit stjudeshawaii.org or call 939-7000.

DISCOVERY HARBOR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT will host its Holiday Event t Saturday, Dec. 9, from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576, or visit discoveryharbour.net.

THE PRE CHRISTMAS JAZZ IN THE FOREST FEATURES holiday songs in many musical styles, including Latin, Swing, Bossa, Gospel and Salsa. It stars Jeannine Guillory and The Jazztones with Jean Pierre Thoma, Loren Wilken and Matt Spencer  at 4:30 p.m. and 7 p.m. at the Volcano Art Center campus in Volcano village. Pupus from Ohelo cafe, Beer and Wine available for purchase. See www.volcanoartcenter.org.

SUNDAY WALK IN THE PARK is Dec. 10, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai’i fhvnp.org. For more, email admin@fhvnp.org or call 985-7373.
Volcanoes National Park. All attendees must be current Friends Member, become a new member by registering online at

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Soccer: Tues, Dec. 5, Ka`u @Konawa`ena
Saturday, Dec. 9, Makua Lani @ Ka`u

Boys Basketball: Fri and Saturday, Dec. 8 and 9, Maui Tournament

Swimming: Sat, Dec. 9 at Konawaena

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram andTwitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

LEARN ABOUT THE VITAL ROLE OF ‘ŌHI‘A LEHUA in native Hawaiian forests, the many forms of the ‘ōhi‘a tree and its flower on this free, easy, one-mile walk. The guided hike takes place Sunday, Dec. 10, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., at Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. For more, visit nps.gov/havo.

ANNUAL PĀHALA CHRISTMAS PARADE starts at 1 p.m. at Pāhala Armory and ends at Holy Rosary Church on Sunday, Dec. 10. Contact Andrade family at 928-0808 to participate or for more details, no entry fees.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REGISTER KEIKI, GRADES K-5, BY Wednesday, Dec. 13, for the Annual Christmas Coloring Contest that takes place Thursday, Dec. 14, starting at 5 p.m., at Ka‘ū District Gym. For more or to register, call Nona Makuakane/Elijah Navarro at 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION OFFERS EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.