About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, April 09, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Monday, April 9, 2018

                                                                                                                                                               NPS Photo/Joan Wasser
  
Photo from Hawaiian Horse
Owner's Association
 Kaʻū Rides in the Merrie Monarch Parade
Kaʻū's marchers, paniolo riders, and Hōkūleʻa supporters traveled in the Merrie Monarch Parade on Saturday. Above, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park shows off the conservation ethic with costumes and wings representing endangered species. At left, youth paniolo Lorilee Lorenzo (far right), who lives in Pāhala, and Blayk and Kassey Hanoa, who spend weekends on their family ranch up at Wailau, rides with Hawaiʻi Horse Owners Association. Below is the Hoʻaikane band playing for the Hōkūleʻa float for the Polynesian Voyaging Society. The band will be the headliner at the Tenth Annual Kaʻū Coffee Festival Hoʻolaulea at Pāhala Community Center on Saturday, May 5, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hokulea is expected in Miloliʻi at the end of the month. See more Kaʻū paniolo at Merrie Monarch Parade, below.
Photos captured from Big Island Video News video
A BILL TO FUND SCHOOLS THROUGH PROPERTY TAX hikes on investor homes worth more than a $1 million, and through taxing visitor accommodations, will go to a third vote in the state House of Representatives on Tuesday. The measure passed a second reading on April 5, with west Kaʻū Rep. Richard Creagan voting yes, without reservations, and east Kaʻū Rep. Richard Onishi voting yes, with reservations.
     SB2922, SD1, HD1 would send the decision to the voters for a state constitutional amendment. The amendment would be required, since only counties are allowed to levy property taxes under the Hawaiʻi Constitution.
     Hawaiʻi is the only place in the U.S. where school funding is unattached to property tax revenues. It has one of the lowest property tax rates in the country.
     The language of the bill states that funding would go to "recruitment and retention of teachers, public preschools, reduction in class sizes, special education programming, career and technical education, art, music, Hawaiian studies, Hawaiian language instruction and after-school programs."
Hawaiʻi State Teachers Association, the union for public school teachers in the islands, came up with the property tax
idea to help pay for public schools. HSTA held its annual convention over the weekend, attended by teachers
from Kaʻū public schools. Photo from HSTA
     The bill contends that "public education in Hawaiʻi is not adequately funded. According to a 2017 analysis of real property tax in Hawaiʻi performed by the Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism, Hawaiʻi's education expenditures, as a share of combined state and local government expenditures, is 27.3 per cent and ranks as the lowest in the nation. At $12,855 per child, Hawaiʻi trails mainland school districts of similar size when adjusting for cost of living. This inadequate funding of Hawaiʻi's public education system has played a role in driving many Hawaiʻi families to enroll their children in private schools, leaving Hawaiʻi with one of the highest rates of private school enrollment in the nation, according to the United States Census Bureau."
    The bill states: "The legislature finds that after adjusting for the high cost of living in Hawaiʻi, teachers are faced with the lowest pay in the United States. According to a 2016 study performed by WalletHub.com, Hawaiʻi ranks fifty-first out of the fifty states and District of Colombia in starting and median teacher salaries when adjusted for cost of living;"
   The legislature also finds that "chronic underfunding of public schools undermines the State's goal of providing a quality education to all of Hawaiʻi's children. Insufficient funding results in delayed repairs to school facilities, overheated classrooms, larger class sizes, a lack of adequate classroom supplies, elimination of arts and career and technical education courses, budget cuts for special education and English language learner programs, and an increasing number of vacant teacher positions statewide."

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KAʻŪ PANIOLO REPRESENTED LANAʻI in the Merrie Monarch parade on Saturday, wearing the colors and flowers of the island. Led by Kehau Ke, as Princess of Lanaʻi, the contingent wore the color of the Kaunaʻoa orange vine of Lanaʻi. The riders allowed representation of the pineapples, long grown on Lanaʻi, with a sign on their pooper scooper cart saying Dole 1922-2012. Leis for horses and humans were made from many plants, including kaunaʻoa, moa, aʻalilʻi, croton, ti leaf, lawaʻi, heleconia, and uki grass.
    Above left is  Lanaʻi Princess Kehau Ke and her attendant Denecia Deresin. Lady attendants, above right) included Denecia Deresin, Merle Becker from Aikane Plantation, and Elaine Togami. Paniolo male attendants  (left) included  Kai and Mana Ke, as well as Colton Wong (not shown). Kehaulani Ke, Laa Ke, and Pomai Ke took charge of the pooper scooper cart. Photos from the Ke ʻOhana.

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VOLCANO SCHOOL OF THE ARTS & SCIENCES STUDENTS are partnering with U.S. Forest Service volunteers to study ambrosia beetles, a potential vector of Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death.
Ambrosia beetles, a possible vector
for ROD. Photo from hawaii.edu
     Hawai‘i Tribune Herald reporter Kirstin Johnson reported last weekend that from as early as first grade, students capture the beetles at home in handmade traps - made from empty soda bottles filled with hand sanitizer - and bring them in to study under microscopes.
     U.S. Forest Service volunteer Kenneth Puliafico told Hawaiʻi Tribune Herald that students hail from a wide geographic area spanning from "Discovery Harbour to lower Puna to everywhere in between." Samples collected at their homes give scientists "an opportunity to get a more systematic coverage of the area," which would otherwise take, "hiring 60 people to put out traps ourselves. This way, we can teach the kids about some insects and give them a hands-on look at what we are trying to do, and also help them collect some data for us about where the insects occur and how many." He also said it's an opportunity to teach the students about a conservation issue present in their own backyard.
     The beetles don't carry the disease, states the article, but researchers think they might spread the fungus via windborne sawdust from beetles drilling the dead and dying trees. Puliafico told the reporter that about six ambrosia beetle species have been linked to dead and dying ‘ōhi‘a trees.
     Fifth-grader Kalea Smith, 10, told the reporter she observed "more beetles (collected in her trap) when it was sunnier," She hung her trap in an ‘ōhi‘a tree in her yard; her favorite part was "having the responsibility of having to scoop out the trap every day."
     Read the Tribune Herald article.
     Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death is an islandwide issue with concerns the disease could spread to other islands through airborne means. With infestation in Kohala on the northwest side of Hawaiʻi Island, Maui is only 40 miles away from the closest infected area, according to scientists at College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, which urges the community to help prevent spreading Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death by practicing these rules: Avoid injuring ʻōhiʻa. Don't move ʻōhiʻa wood or ʻōhiʻa parts. Don't transport ʻōhiʻa inter-island. Clean gear and tools, including shoes and clothes, before and after entering forests. Wash the tires and undercarriages of vehicles to remove all soil and mud.
     Find out more about this disease at cms.ctahr.hawaii.edu/rod or rapidohiadeath.org.

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REGISTER KEIKI, GRADES K-8, THROUGH APRIL 10, FOR SILLY SNAKE, an Arts & Crafts activity at Pāhala Community Center. The program takes place Wednesday, April 11, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, contact Nona Makuakane at 928-3102. See hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation for more county park programs.

Kaʻū District Gym hosts a wide selection of community events,
including sports and the upcoming Miss Kaʻū Coffee
Scholarship Pageant. Photo by Julia Neal
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KA‘Ū DISTRICT GYM OFFERS A BASKETBALL CLINIC on Saturday, April 14. From 9 a.m. to 11 a.m., registered keiki in ages groups 11-12 years old, 13-14 years old and those in high school are welcome.
     Three on three basketball will be taught to keiki in age groups 5-6 years old, 7-8 years old, and 9-10 years old, from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     Those interested in participating are asked to register through Friday, April 13. For more, contact Nona Makuakane at 928-3102. See hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation for more county park programs.

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KA‘Ū TROJANS BOYS VOLLEYBALL at Christian Liberty today was a valiant but disappointing effort, with three of four games going to the host team. Kaʻū's final scores were 25, 19, 19, and 21.
     Kaʻū Trojans Girls Softball at Pāhoa today was a valiant effort with an inspiring outcome, with a game that ended 23 to 11.
     The Spring sports season is drawing to a close; see the remaining schedule, below.

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Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE
Girls Softball: Wednesday, Apr 11 @ KSH
   Saturday, Apr 14, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
Boys Volleyball: Wednesday, Apr 11, Kea‘au @ Ka‘ū
   Friday, Apr 13, Honoka‘a @ Ka‘ū
   Monday, Apr 16, @ Hilo
   Friday, Apr 20, Parker @ Ka‘ū

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TUESDAY, APRIL 10
HAWAI‘I COUNTY COUNCIL Meetings, Tue/Wed, Apr 10 (Committees)/11 (Council), & Tue/Wed, Apr 24 (Committees)/25 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

REGISTER KEIKI, GRADES K-8, THROUGH APRIL 10, FOR SILLY SNAKE, an Arts & Crafts activity at Pāhala Community Center. The program takes place Wed, April 11, from 3:30 to 5 p.m. For more, contact Nona Makuakane at 928-3102. See hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation for more county park programs.

C.E.R.T. Discovery Harbour/Nā‘ālehu, Tue, Apr 10, 4 - 6 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Public invited to see what Community Emergency Response Team is about, and participate in training scenarios. Dina Shisler, dinashisler24@yahoo.com, 410-935-8087

PROPOSED NĀ‘ĀLEHU WASTEWATER TREATMENT PLANT TALK STORY, Tue, Wed, Thu, Apr 10, 11 & 12, 6 - 7:30 p.m., Nā‘ālehu Community Center. County asks those planning to attend contact Berna Cabacungan of Earthplan, eplan1@aol.com, Mary Fujio at Department of Environmental Management, 961-8083, or Iris Cober at Brown and Caldwell, Maui office, (808) 442-3300.

DIRTY CELLO IN CONCERT, Tue, Apr 10, 7 - 9 p.m., Volcano Art Center. Unique spin on blues and bluegrass. $20/VAC member, $25/non-member. Tickets: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

PU‘UWA‘AWA‘A AHUPUA‘A: Successes & Challenges of Restoring Endangered Dry Forests of Kona, Tue, Apr 10, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Elliott Parsons, Division of Forestry and Wildlife, discusses ongoing conservation efforts and lessons learned. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11
LAU HALA DEMONSTRATION, Wed, Apr 11, 10 - noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn to weave leaves from the hala tree into many useful and beautiful items. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

THURSDAY, APRIL 12
DISABILITY LEGAL SERVICES, Thu, Apr 12, 9:30 - 1 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Provided by Paula Boyer of Big Island Disability. ovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

FRIDAY, APRIL 13
KA‘Ū DISTRICT GYM BASKETBALL CLINIC Sat, April 14; register through Friday, April 13. 9 to 11 a.m., registered keiki in ages groups 11-12 years old, 13-14 years old and those in high school are welcome. Three on three basketball will be taught to keiki in age groups 5-6 years old, 7-8 years old, and 9-10 years old, from 11:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more, contact Nona Makuakane at 928-3102. See hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation for more county park programs.

PĀHALA PUBLIC AND SCHOOL LIBRARY 55th Anniversary Celebration, Fri, Apr 13, 2 - 4 p.m. The event offers music, food, games and prizes. librarieshawaii.org/events

SATURDAY, APRIL 14
PANCAKE BREAKFAST AND RAFFLE, Sat, Apr 14, 8 - 11 a.m., Ocean View Community Center. To volunteer, call 939-7033, ovcahi.org

MINI-BAZAAR FUNDRAISER, Sat, Apr 14, 9 - 2 p.m., Kauaha‘ao Congregational Church, Ka’ū. Vendor "flea market" - $10 for 10' X 10'. Vendors can sell anything except hot foods/plate lunches. For info or to reserve vendor space, call Walter or Debbie at 928-8039, in the evening.

GARDEN SUCCESS IN HAWAI‘I, Sat, Apr 14, 9 - noon, County Extension Office, across from Aloha Theater, Kainaliu. Event features plant sale, demo garden, how to grow from containers, plant questions answered, info on rat lungworm and fire ants, keiki activities, and more. Every family that attends will receive a free tomato plant. Master Gardener Helpline, 322-4895

PAINT YOU OWN SILK SCARF with Patti Pease Johnson, Sat, Apr 14, 9 - 12:30 p.m., Volcano Art Center. $45/VAC member, $50/non-member, plus $10 supply fee per person. Beginner and intermediate artists welcome. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

BIRTH OF KAHUKU, Sat, Apr 14, 9:30 -11:30 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Explore the rich geologic history on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow. nps.gov/HAVO

KĀWĀ VOLUNTEER DAY, Sat, Apr 14, 9:30 a.m., Kāwā. Sign up with James Akau, Nā Mamo o Kāwā, at namamookawa@gmail.com or 430-3058.

SPINLAUNCH PROPOSAL PUBLIC MEETING, Sat, Apr 14, 10 a.m., Nā‘ālehu Community Center. SpinLaunch representatives Ryan Hampton and Raphael Feldman come to talk with Ka‘ū Community, along with Sen. Glenn Wakai of O‘ahu.

ZENTANGLE: DINGBATZ, Sat, Apr 14, 10 - 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member, plus $10 supply fee per person. Basic knowledge of Zentangle recommended by not required. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

HULA KAHILO WITH KINI KA‘AWA & Kua O Ka La Public Charter School, Sat, Apr 14, 10:30 - 11:30 a.m., kahua hula (hula platform) at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. volcanoartcenter.org

NĀ MEA HULA w/ Kumu Hula Kaho‘okele Crabbe & Hālauolaokalani, Sat, Apr 14, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Cultural demonstration. Free. volcanoartcenter.org

JAZZ IN THE FOREST Concert, Sat, Apr 14, 4:30 p.m. & 7 p.m., Volcano Art Center. Retrospective tribute to Miles Davis - revisiting his compositions and styles of the six distinct periods of his creative output. Tickets available online, volcanoartcenter.org, $18/VAC member or $20/non-member. 967-8222

MONGOLIAN BBQ, Sat, Apr 14, 5 - 8 p.m. Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. $0.85/ounce - choice of 13 veggies, 4 meats, sauces, chow mein, and beverage. Park entrance fees apply. KMC is open to all authorized KMC patrons and sponsored guests. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 15
PEOPLE AND LAND OF KAHUKU, Sun, Apr 15, 9:30 - 12:30 p.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free, guided, 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain focuses on the area’s human history. nps.gov/HAVO

KA‘Ū HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS compete on It's Academic - Hawai‘i, Sun, Apr 15, 7 p.m., re-air Sat, Apr 21, 6:30 p.m., Channel 5 (KFVE). Watch live stream on KFVE.comMore info.

MONDAY, APRIL 16
DISCOVERY HARBOUR NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETING, Mon, Apr 16, 5 - 6:30 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

ONGOING
ONE COMMUNITY AND ONE PARENT REPRESENTATIVE are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. Nominations will be accepted from April 2 through April 16 at 3 p.m. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee.
     The campaign for the positions starts April 16. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.

TŪTŪ AND ME OFFERS HOME VISITS to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 646-9634.

VOLCANO ART CENTER GALLERY PRESENTS HO’OKU’I I NĀ KIKO, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222

KAʻŪ COFFEE RECIPE CONTEST registration open through Friday, April 20, limit one entry per category, per contestant. Recipes will be judged Sunday, April 29, 11 a.m., at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Youth and adult submissions judged separately. Categories are pūpū, entrée, and dessert; all recipes must be made with (any) Ka‘ū Coffee. Entry info at kaucoffeemill.com or kaucoffeefestival.com, or call 808-928-0550. Entry forms can also be found at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill or Mizuno Market; forms below. Email for info/questions sales@kaucoffeemill.com

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