About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Thursday, February 21, 2019

The fire today was fatal and destroyed the home of a man on oxygen in Ocean View.
 Photo by Annie Bosted
A FIRE IN UPPER OCEAN VIEW killed a man and destroyed a home today. The exact cause of the fire on Kailua Blvd., near Orchid Parkway, is under investigation and may be related to a fireplace and an oxygen tank. The victim's name is being withheld until relatives are notified.
     William "Bill" Bergin, Battalion Chief for West Hawai’i Fire Department, told The Kaʻū Calendar the fire was discovered by a friend who regularly checked in on the resident, who lived alone. The friend phoned early in the morning to make sure he was well. The man replied that he was OK and about to cook breakfast. By the time the friend reached the house, it was burning.
     Bergin said the resident was believed to be using medical oxygen, which could have contributed to the fire as the gas is highly combustible. The resident's home also had a fireplace, which may have increased fire danger.
A long line of emergency vehicles were parked along Kailua Blvd. between Orchid and Paradise
Some came from towns such as Pāhala and Discovery Harbor. Photo by Annie Bosted
     Summoned to the scene were at least three fire engines, some fire trucks, and an ambulance. At least one engine came from Pāhala, and one fire truck was from the Discovery Harbor Volunteer Fire Service. Ocean View volunteer fire and ambulance services joined in the effort.
     Bergin said the fire was challenging in that the home was off the road, which limited access for the larger fire engines, as they could not get up the driveway to reach the house, and necessitated extended hoses. The fire was also very smoky and there was no available source of water, so the trucks had to shuttle water to the scene.
     The trees that were growing around the house also proved to be problematic when a few of the larger ‘ōhiʻa trees caught fire, according to Bergin. However, a light rain helped prevent spread of the fire.
Fire trucks ferried water to the scene. Photo by Annie Bosted
     By 4:30 p.m. the fire was 95 percent out.  
     At 7 p.m., Bergin reported that investigators were still on the scene, and a small portion of the fire was left smoldering, as they did not want to disturb evidence.
     Bergin confirmed that the Red Cross had been summoned to the scene, saying that it was "standard practice," but the service was not needed as the single occupant had perished.

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A MAP OF LAVA FLOW THICKNESS from the 2018 lower East Rift Zone eruption was released Feb. 19 by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcanoes Observatory. USGS HVO says this is a preliminary map and thicknesses "are subject to change. A final map will be released when all remote sensing data have been collected and processed."
     Lava erupted from 24 fissures in the Leilani Estates area in lower Puna last year. The resulting flows, especially from fussure 8, buried an area of about 35.5 square kilometers – 13.7 sq miles – and added about 875 acres of new land to the island.
     The greatest thickness on land, at fissure 22, is approximately 55 meters – 180 feet – and the greatest thickness in the lava delta of new land, where lava entered the ocean, is approximately 280 m – 919 ft. These values could change when data are finalized.
     The new map is a work in progress; black areas depict data still being collected and/or processed. The previous map, showing a thermal view of the fissure system and lava flows, was published August 15, 2018
Data depicted on this preliminary map of Kīlauea lower East Rift Zone lava flow thicknesses, released Feb. 19, 
are subject to change. A final map will be released when all remote sensing data have been 
collected and processed. USGS map
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A BILL ON DISTRIBUTION OF TRANSIENT ACCOMMODATIONS TAXES unanimously passed the state House Committee on Finance yesterday, Feb. 20. Co-sponsors include Rep. Richard Onishi, who represents east Kaʻū, and Rep. Richard Creagan, who represents west Kaʻū. The measure goes to Senate committees for review.
     House Bill 419 would make counties eligible to use TAT funds to enforce transient accommodations laws. However, "no funds shall be released to a county until it has satisfactorily complied with specified conditions," which include counties developing the ability to give report on transient accommodation use to the state. The bill would allow "an allocation" from TAT revenues."
     Three other bills regarding transient accommodations are waiting for hearings in the House and Senate: SB460, cosponsored by east Kaʻū Sen. Ruassell Ruderman, "Requires the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority to develop a list of unit addresses, including housing units and rental units marketed to the visitor industry for occupancy, and to post the list on its website." Senate Bill 480, submitted by Ruderman, along with companion bill HB642, would allow Hawaiʻi county "agricultural tourism activities including short-term vacation rentals."

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A CLASS ON GOVERNMENT CONTRACTING 101 is offered by Hawaiʻi Small Business Development Center Wednesday, Feb. 27, 10 a.m. to noon. Co-sponsored by Hawaiʻi PTAC, Government Contracting 101 will be taught by John Greene. He will teach basics of contracting with the federal and state governments, in order for local businesses to "gain an edge," says a statement on the program. Registration for the free class begins at 9:45 a.m. at Hale Iako, Suite 119 at Natural Energy Lab of HI (OTEC), next to Kona International Airport, 73-970 Makako Bay Dr. From Kaiminani take a right onto Makako Bay Dr. and follow the road past the beach all the way to the end, Hale Iako is on the right. For more, call 808-333-5000, or register online.

Help get rid of invasive plants, like morning glory,
at Stewardship of Kīpukapuaulu. NPS photo
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HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK continues its tradition of sharing Hawaiian culture, After Dark in the Park talks, and stewardship programs during March 2019. Visitors are encouraged to check the Park's online calendar of events, and look for program flyers posted after 9:30 a.m. on the bulletin board at Kīlauea Visitor Center.
     Park programs are free, but entrance fees apply. Some programs are co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Mark your calendar for these upcoming events:
Join other volunteers in stewarding the summit
in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National ParkNPS photo
     Stewardship of Kīpukapuaulu: Help remove troublesome plants at Kīpukapuaulu, home to diverse native forest and understory plants. Bring clippers or pruners, sturdy gloves, a hat, and water. Wear closed-toe shoes and clothing that can be permanently stained from morning glory sap. Be prepared for cool and wet, or hot and sunny, weather. New volunteer? Contact Marilyn Nicholson for more info: nickem@hawaii.rr.com. Meet at the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot, Mauna Loa Road, off Highway 11 in the Park, every Thursday at 9:30 a.m., March 7, 14, 21, and 28.
     Stewardship at the Summit: Volunteer to help remove invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a World Heritage Site. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring a hat, raingear, day pack, snacks, and water. Gloves and tools are provided. Under 18? Parental or guardian accompaniment or written consent is required. Visit the Park website for additional planning details. Meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center in March at 8:45 a.m. on Friday 22 or 29, or Saturday 2, 9, and 16.
Learn what motivated Dr. Jaggar to study volcanoes
during a free walking tour theatrical experience. NPS photo
     A Walk into the Past with Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar: Walk back to 1912, and meet the founder of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Dr. Thomas A. Jaggar, at the edge of Kīlauea Volcano. Dressed in period costume, Ka‘ū actor-director Dick Hershberger brings the renowned geologist to life. Dr. Jaggar will lead a tour of his tiny lab located below the Volcano House to see original seismograph equipment and other early instruments.
     Learn what motivated Dr. Jaggar to dedicate his life to the study of Hawaiian volcanoes, and how his work helps save lives today. Program includes climbing stairs and entering a confined space. Supported by the Kīlauea Drama Entertainment Network (KDEN). Space is limited; pick up a free ticket at the Kīlauea Visitor Center's front desk the day of the program. Each performance is about an hour on Tuesdays: March 5, 12, 19, and 26, at 10 a.m., noon, and 2 p.m.
Explore Kahuku with a guide on Sundays in March.
NPS photo
     Explore Kahuku: Join rangers on Sundays in March, or take a self-guided tour any day, for a two-hour guided trek at 9:30 a.m. (The trail will vary depending on visitor interest). Enter the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5. Kahuku is located in Ka‘ū, and is about a 50-minute drive south of the park’s main entrance. Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection and a snack are recommended for all hikes. The Kahuku Unit is open Wednesday through Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and is free.
     Pahu Manamana o ‘Umi - Ancestral Brilliance, After Dark in the Park: Join Pualani Kanahele of the Edith Kanaka‘ole Foundation as she leads a virtual visit to Pahu Manamana o ‘Umi, a stellar instrument positioned 7,752 feet up on the southwest slope of Mauna Loa, and protected within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The ancient structure is a remarkable example of the brilliance of Hawaiian archaeo-astronomy, and how the ancestors made sense of these archaic instruments to align themselves with the moving planets, the rising and setting of stars and even the making of islands. Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium on Tuesday, March 12, 7 p.m.
Take a virtual visit to an ancient Hawaiian stellar instrument, at Pahu Manamana o ‘Umi -
Ancestral Brilliance, After Dark in the Park
NPS photo
     Lomilomi Demonstration, ‘Ike Hana No‘eau - Experience the Skillful Work: Join Michelle Wall-O’Connor as she demonstrates the spiritual components of lomilomi, a style of massage that incorporates the Hawaiian concept of aloha to promote personal harmony. Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Wednesday, March 13, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
Join Michelle Wall-O’Connor for a Lomilomi
demonstration at ‘Ike Hana No‘eau - Experience
the Skillful Work
NPS photo
     Exploring the Unknown Depths, After Dark in the Park: Have you ever wondered what lives 2,000 meters below the ocean surface? Justin Umholtz, National Marine Sanctuary Foundation education associate for Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, shares his experiences aboard the Exploration Vessel Nautilus, mapping and diving unexplored seamounts via a remotely operated underwater vehicle, or ROV. Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium on Tuesday, March 26, 7 p.m.
     ‘Ohe Kāpala Workshop, ‘Ike Hana No‘eau - Experience the Skillful Work: Learn to create beautiful designs from traditional patterns using ‘ohe kāpala, bamboo stamps. Originally used to decorate clothing with symbolic meaning, ‘ohe kāpala designs are now used to tell stories on a variety of modern materials. Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai  on Wednesday, March 27, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.


Learn from Justin Umholtz about his experience on the
Exploration Vessel Nautilus, at Exploring the Unknown
Depths, After Dark in the Park
NPS photo
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BEWARE OF SWEEPSTAKES SCAM, says the office of Mayor Harry Kim. The Mayor wants to alert the public to "a scam involving solicitations of money to win a bogus sweepstakes, with the scammers purporting to be County officials or having the endorsement of the County.
     "The County of Hawai‘i does not solicit money, and the public should beware of scammers posing as County officials offering sweepstakes winnings. If you receive a sweepstakes solicitation letter or telephone call purporting to be from the Mayor's Office or another County Department, please disregard the solicitation and notify the Hawai‘i Police Department immediately."
Learn to create designs with bamboo stamps at
‘Ohe Kāpala Workshop, ‘Ike Hana No‘eau -
Experience the Skillful Work
NPS photo
     To report suspected scams, call the Hawai’i Police Department's non-emergency number at 935-3311.

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DEADLINE FOR KAHA KIʻI CONGRESSIONAL ART COMPETITION, sponsored by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, is tomorrow, Feb. 22, by 6 p.m. Open to all high school students in Hawaiʻi's 2nd Congressional District, the winning artwork is displayed for one year in the U.S. Capitol, along with winning artwork from all participating districts around the country. The winning artwork is also featured on the Congressional Art Competition page. Second-place artwork is displayed for one year in Gabbard's Washington DC office, third-place in her Hawaiʻi District Office. Art will be exhibited Monday, April 22 through Saturday, May 11 at Hawaiʻi State Capitol. The Awards Ceremony will be held Saturday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to noon.
     Details about submissions at gabbard.house.gov/serving-you/student-resources/art-competition. Contact Anya at Anya.Anthony@mail.house.gov or call (808) 541-1986 with questions. See also: A Guide to Copyright and Plagiarism2019 Rules for Students and Teachers2019 Student Release Form – must be completed/signed and submitted with entry2019 Art Competition Submission Form.

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KEIKI JINGLE BUMS Song and Play Group for babies and toddlers happens Fridays, 9 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Discover the joy of early learning through song and musical instruments. For keiki 0-4 years.

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KAʻŪ TROJANS SOFTBALL kicked off the Spring season yesterday with a win in the first game. Trojans hosted Pāhoa. The game was called in the sixth inning. Kaʻū won with 14, Pāhoa 4. Winning Pitcher was CeAndrea Kamei-Silva. The team is coached by Donovan Emmsley.

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Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
Kaʻū High Winter Sports Schedule
Boys Basketball:
Feb. 21-23, Thu.-Sat., HHSAA

NEW and UPCOMING
FIT & FIRM CO-ED MEDIUM INTENSITY STRENGTH EXERCISE CLASSES for those 30 and over with PK Mercado happen Fridays in March, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m., no late entry. Strength, balance, core, and agility exercise conditioning classes, low to medium exercise intensity, including but not limited to squats, planks, shoulder presses, and lunges. Geared towards full body functional fitness to compliment one's active lifestyle. Most fitness equipment provided. Bring exercise ball, exercise mat, water, towel, and wear comfortable fitness clothing. No slippers or crocks, shoes or bare feet only.
     Payment of $45 for all five classes required at first class session, check or exact cash. Make checks out to Soul Fitness Hawaii, LLC. No make-ups for missed classes, no roll overs, no prorating, no drop-ins; payment holds a spot for March only. To continue taking ongoing classes, confirm spot with instructor. All classes are booked and scheduled in advanced. Spots limited to 15 people.
     Before signing up, or for those with prior medical concerns or attending physical therapy – all P.T. must be completed before taking this class – call instructor to learn if this is the appropriate fitness level. Call instructor directly to register: 315-9130, soulfitnesshawaiipksm.com, Instagram @ pk.soares_fitness, Facebook @ PK Mercado

SENIOR STRONG CHAIR EXERCISE CLASSES with PK Mercado in Volcano start the first Friday in March, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Class equipment provided. Bring water and a towel, and wear fitness wear and shoes – no Crocks, slippers, or sandals. Those that walk with a walker or cane should bring them.
     Payment of $45 for all five classes required at first class session, check or exact cash. Make checks out to Soul Fitness Hawaii, LLC. No make-ups for missed classes, no roll overs, no prorating, no drop-ins; payment holds a spot for March only. To continue taking ongoing classes, confirm spot with instructor. All classes are booked and scheduled in advanced. Spots limited to 15 people.
     For those under a doctor's care, call instructor to learn if this is the appropriate fitness level. Call instructor directly to register: 315-9130, soulfitnesshawaiipksm.com, Instagram @ pk.soares_fitness, Facebook @ PK Mercado

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Honuʻea: The Endangered Hawksbill Turtle of Hawaiʻi Island will be presented by Lauren Kurpita, director of Hawaiʻi Island Hawksbill Recovery Project. This year's first Coffee Talk at Kahuku happens Friday, Feb. 22, 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., at Kahuku Unit's Visitor Center. She will talk about the difference between hawksbill and green sea turtle species, threats hawksbills encounter, and conservation efforts.
     Get to know the Park and neighbors at monthly Coffee Talk events, an informal conversation on a variety of topics. Kaʻū coffee, tea, and pastries are available for purchase. Entrance south of 70.5 mile marker on mauka side of Hwy 11.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 23
Count Humpback Whales - Sanctuary Ocean Count, Sat., Feb. 23, 8-noon, Ka‘ū locations: Kaʻena Point in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Miloli‘i Lookout, Ka Lae Park, and Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park. Participants tally humpback whale sightings and document whale surface behavior during survey, providing valuable data to NOAA. Register at oceancount.org. Registration closes one week prior to event. Last 2019 count is on March 30.

Jazz in the Forest: A Tribute to Miles Davis happens Saturday, Feb. 23 at 5:30 p.m. Jazz in the Forest returns in 2019 at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village, featuring Jean Pierre Thoma and the Jazztones performing Miles Davis compositions spanning 50 years of his original and groundbreaking creative directions.

     Tickets are $25, $20 for VAC members. Beer, wine, and pupus will be available for purchase. Tickets are available for sale at volcanoartcenter.org, at VAC's Administration Office in Volcano Village, and at VAC Gallery in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26
HOVE Road Maintenance Board Mtg., Tue., Feb. 26, 10am, HOVE Road Maintenance office. hoveroad.com, 929-9910, gm@hoveroad.com

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tue., Feb. 26, 11:30-1pm, last Tuesday monthly, St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View.

Talk Story about Proposed Nāʻālehu Wastewater Treatment Plant Tuesday, Feb. 26, 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Nāʻālehu Community Center, 75-5635 Mamalahoa Hwy. Nāʻālehu residents are invited to hear progress and changes that have been made to the project, and an outline the next steps of the environmental review process, and to share thoughts and ideas. RSVP to Brena Cabacungan Senelly at eplan1@aol.com, Mary Fujio at 808-961-8030, or Iris Cober at 808-442-3300.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27
Kōkua Kupuna Project, Wed., Feb. 27, 9-11am, St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Last Wednesday monthly. Seniors 60 years & older encouraged to attend, ask questions, and inquire about services offered through Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i - referral required, 961-8626 for free legal services. Under 60, call 1-800-499-4302. More info: tahisha.despontes@legalaidhawaii.org, 329-3910 ext. 925. legalaidhawaii.org

Arts & Crafts Activity: Valentine's Day Card, Wed., Feb. 27, 2:45-3:30pm, Kahuku Park, H.O.V.E. Register keiki ages 6-12 Feb. 19-25. Free. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Arts & Crafts Activity: Group Art Project, Wed., Feb. 27, 3:30-5pm, multi-purpose, Ka‘ū District Gym. Register keiki ages 5-12 Feb. 19-26. Free. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28
Craft Class, Thu., Feb. 28, 9:30-10:30am, PARENTS, Inc., Nā‘ālehu. For keiki 2-12 years old and caregivers. Free. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thu., Feb. 28, 12-1:30pm, Punalu‘u Bake Shop. 4th Thursday monthly. Provides local forum for community members to come together as equal partners to discuss and positively affect multiple systems' issues for the benefit of students, families, and communities. Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thu., Feb. 28, 4-6pm, Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

ONGOING
Miss Kaʻū Coffee Pageant will accept applicants through Feb. 28. The pageant will be held again at the Ka‘ū District Gym on Saturday, April 27, 6 p.m. Miss Kaʻū Coffee and her court will represent the Kaʻū Coffee industry throughout the year at events in the community and beyond, her appearances sponsored by the Edmund C. Olson Trust, II. Pageant Director is Trinidad Marques. Scholarship Committee Directors are Julia Neal and Gloria Camba.
     The community can support the pageant through purchasing tickets, volunteering, and providing scholarships.
     Girls three to 24 years of age are encouraged to enter the pageant. Talents often include hula and singing. Competitive categories include Talent, Gown, Photogenic, Career-Interview, Characters Outfit, and Swimsuit for Miss Kaʻū Coffee. Pageant hopefuls contend for titles of Miss Ka‘ū Coffee, Jr. Miss Kaʻū Coffee, Miss Kaʻū Peaberry, and Miss Kaʻū Coffee Flower.
      Email tmarques@yahoo.com.

Volunteer on Midway Atoll for Six Months. The volunteer will serve as a communication assistant out on Midway Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, on or about March 12 through August. Applications are due by Feb. 28. Potential to be extended to a full year. Get more info and instructions on how to apply.

Nāʻālehu Celebrates Craft Month with open crafting for all ages, while supplies last. Crafting starts off at 3 p.m. each Thursday in February. Free. Contact Sara Kamibayashi at (808) 939-2442 for more.

Kauahaʻao Congregational Church Fundraising Bazaar, Saturday, March 16, 9-2 pm, just above the Wong Yuen Store in Waiʻōhinu. Bazaar vendor spaces, located on the church lawn, are $10 for a 10' X 10' space. Vendors are responsible for bringing their own tent, table and chairs, and if power is needed, generator. Vendors can sell anything except hot foods or plate lunches. Submit vendor application with $10 fee by Sunday, March 10. Call Debbie at 928-8039 for application. Church members will sell kalua pig and cabbage bowls, and roast chicken with gravy bowls, as well as baked goods, produce, and crafts. Walter or Debbie, 928-8039. 

Applications for a Job to Help Kids with Healthy Eating and Living in Kaʻū are open through March 15. The position, through FoodCorps, is a full-time 11.5-month commitment from August 1, 2019 through July 15, 2020, at Pāhala Elementary School.
     In exchange for service, members receive: $22,000 living stipend paid bi-weekly over the 11.5-month term; $6,095 AmeriCorps Segal education award upon successful completion of service; Student loan deferral or forbearance, if eligible; partial childcare reimbursement, if eligible; Health insurance; Ongoing training; mentorship; and professional development.
     Apply at foodcorps.org/apply. See the service member position description for more details. Visit foodcorps.orgFacebook page, or contact seri.niimi-burch@foodcorps.org for more information.

Niuhi-Shark Fine Art Exhibit is open daily through March 24 at Volcano Art Center Gallery. The public is invited to hear different perspectives on the life of Kamehameha the Great and experience a visual experience of important events in Kamehameha's life from the perspective of two styles of art. The exhibit and supporting events promise paint, prose, protocol, and conversations providing cultural, historical, and educational experiences, with original paintings by Carl F. K. Pao, paired with selections from the book Kamehameha–The Rise of a King by David Kāwika Eyre, with illustrations by Brook Parker. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more information.

Preschool Opens Doors Applications are open for the 2019-2020 school year. The Department of Human Services encourages families to apply before March 29. This program is for families seeking aid in paying for preschool. Applications, available at patchhawaii.org, received during this period will be considered for preschool participation during July 1, 2019 and June 30, 2020. For more information, visit bit.ly/2TolEOm or call 800-746-5620.

Five Scholarships are available from American Association of University Women-Kona.
     Three $2000 scholarships will go to female college-bound Kaʻū High School and West Hawaiʻi high school students. Application packets were sent to high school counselors and are available on the AAUW Kona website at kona-hi.aauw.net. Criteria for choosing recipients are: academic achievement; community involvement; activities and experience; and financial need. Applications must be postmarked by Monday, April 1.
     Two $1,000 scholarships will go to any female high school graduate or women returning to school from home or workplace who are attending a two-year vocational program leading to a marketable skill at Palamanui Campus, 73-4225 Ane Keohokalole Hwy, Kona. Application packets are available on the AAUW Kona website at kona-hi.aauw.net and must be postmarked by Wednesday, April 10.
      AAUW promotes equity for women and girls through advocacy, education, philanthropy, and research. Contact sharonnind@aol.com.

Beginning Farmer Institute Cohort Applications are open through April 15. BFI is a free training program which "prepares new producers of any age or operation type for a successful future in agriculture," says the release from Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. A quote from a former student says, "In our time together, we became more than just farmers and friends – we became a family. NFU's Beginning Farmer Institute is a truly valuable experience that you will not forget."


Kaʻū Coffee Fest invites non-profits, clubs, cooperatives, and businesses to sign up for booths to serve the public at the 11th annual Kaʻū Coffee Fest Hoʻolauleʻa on Saturday, May 4 at Pāhala Community Center. The all-day event comes with music, hula, coffee tasting, and meeting the famous Kaʻū Coffee farmers. See KauCoffeeFestival.com.
     Booth fees are $100 for food vendors; $60 for non-food items and crafts, including coffee and coffee samples; and $35 for pre-approved information displays. Campaign and other political displays are not invited. Fifty percent discounts are provided to bona fide non-profit organizations and cooperatives selling food, crafts, and coffee. Each vendor is responsible for a Department of Health permit, if serving food. Call Gail Nagata 933-0918. Vendors must also obtain county vendor permits costing $30 each, to be displayed at each booth.
     Apply by Friday, April 26. Application at KauCoffeeFestival.com. Email to biokepamoses@gmail.com; mail to Brenda Iokepa-Moses, P.O. Box 208PāhalaHI 96777; or call 808-731-5409.

Applications for a Paid Internship in Kaʻū for Kupu Hawai‘i and The Nature Conservancy are being accepted. The year-long, full-time position is in TNC's Hawai‘i Island Terrestrial Program, which stewards native forest preserves in Ka‘ū and South Kona. Benefits offered include: a $1,600 monthly living allowance, before taxes; a $5,920 education award towards higher education; health care and childcare benefit, if eligible; and receiving an entry-level conservation career experience.
     Application at kupuhawaii.org/conservation. For more, call The Nature Conservancy at 443-5401 or call Kupu Hawai‘i at 808-735-1221.

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