About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope on top of Mauna Kea can move forward, thanks to a
Hawaiʻi Supreme Court decision. Image from bigstockphoto
HAWAIʻI SUPREME COURT RULED TODAY TO ALLOW THE THIRTY METER TELESCOPE ON MAUNA KEA. The judges voted 4-1 to close years of litigation concerning the construction of the $1.4 billion telescope near the summit top of the volcano. The top of Mauna Kea is considered a sacred site to Hawaiians and Gov. David Ige promised to protect the rights of Hawaiian cultural and religious practitioners who go there.
     The Hawaiʻi Island chapter of the Sierra Club opposed the ruling and stated the "decision to override the constitutional protections for native Hawaiian practitioners exercising their customary and traditional religious practices on land never ceded to the state ... is a failure of the rule of law."
     Suzanne Case, chief of the state Department of Land & Natural Resources, said the agency will ensure adherence to a comprehensive management plan to include "control of invasive species in attention to cultural protocols and training."
     The state Supreme Court considered the validity of the Conservation District Use Permit, issued by the sate Board of Land & Resources to University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo, which manages the mountain and a campus of telescopes operated by educational and research institutions from around the world.
     Henry Yang, Chair of TMT International Observatory Board of Governors, said: "On behalf of the TMT International Observatory, we are grateful for the Hawaii State Supreme Court's ruling that will allow TMT to be built on Maunakea. We thank all of the community members who contributed their thoughtful views during this entire process. We remain committed to being good stewards on the mountain and inclusive of the Hawaiian community. We honor the culture of the islands and its people and do our part to contribute to its future through our ongoing support of education and Hawaii Islands' young people. We are excited to move forward in Hawaii and will continue to respect and follow state and county regulations, as we determine our next steps. We are deeply grateful to our many friends and supporters for their tremendous support over the years."
Hawaiians view the top of Mauna Kea as a sacred site. Photo from bigstockphoto
     Work on TMT was halted in 2015, when the Hawaiʻi Supreme Court invalidated the permit on procedural grounds. The Supreme Court returned the case to the Hawaiʻi Circuit Court and instructed that a new contested case hearing be conducted. The contested case got underway in Oct. 2016. Following 44 days of testimony by 71 witnesses over five months, the hearing concluded in early March 2017, and hearings officer Riki May Amano in July 2017 recommended that a state Conservation District Use Permit be re-issued to allow construction of the project.
     On Thursday, Sept. 28, the BLNR announced its decision to approve the permit. Opponents challenged the new permit before the Hawaiʻi State Supreme Court. Today's ruling affirms BLNR's decision to issue the CDUP.
     The Court noted: "In this opinion, we address whether the BLNR properly applied the law in analyzing whether a permit should be issued for the TMT. Upon careful consideration of the written submissions, the applicable law, and the oral arguments, and for the reasons explained below, we now affirm the BLNR's decision authorizing issuance of a Conservation District Use Permit ("CDUP") for the Thirty Meter Telescope ("TMT")."
     TMT will be required to fulfill numerous conditions and requirements of the state CDUP prior to the start of any construction. The telescope, to be the most powerful every built, could have been constructed in other locations such as Mexico, Chile, or the Canary Islands in Spain, where governments and communities expressed support. However, Mauna Kea, in the middle of the ocean, with its dark skies and great distance from large human populations, was considered the best site on the planet.
     Opponents could ask the state Supreme Court for reconsideration or ask the U.S. Supreme Court to hear their case. Learn more at tmt.org.
Some of the 13 observatories atop Mauna Kea. Photo from bigstockphoto

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THE PĀHALA SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANT PROPOSAL drew a group of village homeowners to meet last night. The meeting followed the county and EPA last week authorizing an extension on the public comment period for the Environmental Assessment on the proposed wastewater treatment site chosen by the county at Maile Street and Hwy 11.
     Comments are due Dec. 11. The group decided to write views and suggestions and to meet again in two weeks, on Tuesday, Nov. 13, at 6:30 p.m., at Pāhala Community Center, before turning them into the county and the Environmental Protection Agency.
     Sophia Hanoa led the meeting, assisted by Terri Napeahi, a Hilo clean water advocate and Vice President of Pele Defense Fund, led by Palekapu Deadman who also attended.
     Several attendees said they don't understand the need to protect clean water resources from Pāhala's wastewater - that they don't understand how Pāhala's wastewater could reach the ocean as Pāhala is three miles inland with much ash, silt, and lava to filter wastewater before it reaches the shoreline. Deadman said there is a higher need for better sewage treatment in Hilo where, he said, the pipe releases  incompletely treated sewage into the ocean only a quarter mile offshore. Attendees also mentioned Puako, where cesspool effluent is leaking into nearshore waters as being more of an emergency for a sewage treatment plant.
Map from Draft Environmental Assessment
     Some Pāhala residents said they didn't understand the need for change in the way sewage is handled by cesspools, stating that there are more problems with leaky sewer pipes in the old plantation gang cesspool distribution system than with individual cesspools in town. The state has vowed to rid Hawaiʻi of all cesspools by 2050, and some residents said Pāhala should wait until then.
     Concerns expressed by residents included fear that a plant on the gateway Norfolk pine lined road into Pāhala could be unsightly. "Welcome to Pāhala, welcome to our sewage treatment plant," said Hanoa, who proposed it be relocated to below the highway. The majority of those attending also said they preferre relocation to land below the highway. Hanoa and others also said they were concerned about possible burials and other archaeological sites on the proposed location and called for digging below ground. Hanoa also said the proposes site is prime agricultural land and that she also feared a flood could cause the treatment plant lagoons to overflow onto Maile Street and Hwy 11. Several residents described it as a flood area. The group decided to request an Environmental Impact Statement for the site.
     The county, which maintains the old sewage system for houses hooked up to pipes on the old plantation gang cesspools, faces federal law banning gang cesspools. The Environmental Protection Agency is threatening the county with more than $30,000 a day in fines if it doesn't shut down the gang cesspools soon.
The view from the corner of Maile Street and Hwy 11, where the proposed 
Pāhala wastewater facility may be located. Image from Google Maps
     Several residents not on the old system, who have cesspools along the route of proposed new sewage pipes, said they fear they will be required to pay more than $20,000 each, plus the cost of closing off their cesspools, to hook up to the new sewage system.
     An alternative was put forth by a former teacher at Kaʻū High, who suggested that houses hooked up to the old gang cesspool system be allowed to put in compost toilets. Napeahi said that the state Department of Health might consider a pilot project of a community installing composts toilet as a test program in order to come up with rules and regulations for it. The program would have to also deal with the grey water - from showers, washing clothes and other activities.
     The retired teacher said there are many skilled carpenters and tradesmen in the town who could help build and install the compost toilets. Clyde Lewis, a former plantation union leader in the mid 1990s during the sugar plantation shutdown, said the union and plantation agreed that owners of homes on the old plantation sewage system would receive $1,000 each to help them pay for cesspools.
     Also questioned was $30 every two months charged to each household on the old system by the county to maintain the old pipes and gang cesspool until the new sewage plant is built. Eddie Andrade, who took care of the sewer system for the plantation, said that he doesn't see much being done. Those on the system have been paying for many years, said Gwen Sorenson.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THREE DAYS REMAIN FOR WALK-IN VOTING, in Kaʻū, through Friday, Nov. 2, at Pāhala Community Center, 96-1149 Kamani Street, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.- closed noon to 1 p.m.
     Two walk-in locations for registered voters from around the island are open through Saturday - West Hawaiʻi Civic Center Community Room, Bldg. G, from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy and County of Hawaiʻi Aupuni Center Conference Room, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 101 Pauahi St., Suite 1.
    Waimea Community Center will take walk-in voters through Friday, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 65-1260 Kawaihae Rd.
     On General Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, the polls will be open in precincts from Volcano through Kaʻū to Miloliʻi, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m.. The nearest polling places are: Cooper Center, 19430 Wright Road in Volcano; Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, 96-3150 Pikake Street; Nāʻālehu Elementary School, 95-5545 Mamalahoa Hwy; Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle; and Miloliʻi Halau Pavillion, off Hwy 11 in the Village of Miloliʻi. See more at elections.hawaii.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

"DONALD TRUMP IS NOT KING," Tweeted Sen. Mazie Hirono, in response to a comment from Pres. Donald Trump during an interview today, in which he said he can use his Executive Order to revoke birthright citizenship, the 14th Amendment of the U. S. Constitution, which allows anyone born in the U.S. to become a U.S. citizen. 
     "For @realDonaldTrump's information: 'All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside,'" Tweeted Hirono. "The 14th Amendment confers U.S. citizenship to persons born in the United States. To incite his base, @realDonaldTrump wants to change the Constitution by fiat. Ours is a country governed by rule of law and Donald Trump is not king."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TRUNK-OR-TREAT, HAUNTED HOUSE, AND VEHICLE DECORATING CONTEST at Kaʻū District Gym tomorrow, Wednesday, Oct. 31, will draw keiki looking for sweets and scares, and cars and their drivers to see who is most creative. The event runs from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
     A prize will go for the overall best decorated vehicle. A special prize will go to the faculty or staff vehicle that is best decorated. Also on the program is the offering of healthier ideas for Fall recipes.
     Organizers are looking for community members to offer treats and/or candy to keiki attending the event. The event is organized by Department of Parks and Recreation, Kaʻū District Gym, and Pāhala High & Elementary School. Call 928-3102 or 313-4100 for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

BEE BOYS HONEY SHOP HOSTS A HAUNTED HALLOWEEN POETRY NIGHT in Nāʻālehu tomorrow, Wednesday, Oct. 31. Using Halloween as an inspiration for the theme this month, featuring spooky stories, the event takes place in the breezeway in front of their shop, located at 95-5627 Mamalahoa Hwy. Doors open at 6 p.m. Nā‘ālehu Poetry Night offers an open mic and plant-based potluck. For more, call 333-6895, email info@beeboys.org, or visit @beeboys on Facebook or @bee.boys on Instagram. See beeboys.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HALLOWEEN PEDESTRIAN SAFETY TIPS have been released by Hawaiʻi Department of Transportation. Though not all safety tips are relevant to rural Kaʻū, here's some good advice on staying safe while trick-or-treating:
     Hold a flashlight while out trick-or-treating.
     Always stand back from the curb and stay out of the street until it is time to cross.
     Look left, right, then left again before crossing the street.
     Lower electronics, such as cell phones, and keep heads up and walk – don't run – across the street.
     Only walk on sidewalks when possible, or walk on the far left side of the road, facing traffic.
     Wear highly visible or reflective costuming, or put reflective stickers on clothing.
     Especially be sure to pay attention when crossing driveways.
     Eye contact with drivers to ensure they see you, before crossing in front of them.
     Never begin crossing a street when a vehicle is coming close.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
NEW and UPCOMING
OCEAN VIEW TURKEY CHALLENGE, a fundraising event for Ocean View's Keiki Christmas at Kahuku Park, will be held on Saturday, Nov. 10, at The Terraces at Kahuku Ahupua‘a Farm and Retreat, 92-1885 Princess Kaiulani Blvd., Hawaiian Ocean View Estates. The event offers, a turkey cooking competition, raffle, turkey plates (on site or to-go) for $10, and features music by local DJ Robert Unger of D-Tech Solutions from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. and local band K.O.A. from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.
     Admission to the adults only event is one keiki gift, $10-15 value, unwrapped (no stuffed animals). Raffle tickets are $1 each, or six for $15; winners need not be present to win.
     Those interested in the turkey cooking competition - via smoking, baking, frying, etc. - must register by Thursday, Nov. 1, to receive the rules of the contest. The entries will be judged by a team and by popular vote. Contact Lee at 494-8835 or Kathie at 937-5865 or peoplerdcare@gmail.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31
Kōkua Kupuna Project, Wed., Oct. 31, 9-11am, St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Seniors 60 years & older encouraged to attend, ask questions, and inquire about services offered through Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i. Referral required from Hawai‘i County Office of Aging at 961-8626 for free legal services. Under 60, call 1-800-499-4302. More info: tahisha.despontes@legalaidhawaii.org, 329-3910 ext. 925. legalaidhawaii.org

Pā‘ani with Amy Ka‘awaloa- ‘Ike Hana No‘eau (Experience the Skillful Work), Wed., Oct. 31, 10-2pm, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Ka‘awaloa shares her knowledge about the Makahiki season, the ancient Hawaiian New Year festival, celebrated in three phases, one of which involved playing games. Co-sponsored by Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Kaʻū Octoberfest Trunk-or-Treat happens Wednesday, Oct. 31, from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the Ka‘ū District Gym's multi-purpose room. Register all ages Oct. 15 through 31. For more, call 928-3102. The event is looking for community members to offer treats and/or candy to keiki attending the event. Organized by Department of Parks and Recreation, Kaʻū District Gym, and Pāhala High & Elementary School, there will also be a vehicle decorating contest. Call 928-3102 for more.

Bee Boys Haunted Poetry Night begins at 6 p.m. in the breezeway in front of their store at 95-5627 Mamalahoa Hwy. Poetry and plant-based potluck, open to all. For more, call 333-6895, email info@beeboys.org, or visit @beeboys on Facebook or @bee.boys on Instagram. See beeboys.org.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 1
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Thu./Fri., Nov. 1 (Committees)/2 (Council), Hilo, Mon/Tue., Nov. 19 (Committees)/20 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

Women's Support Group, Thu., Nov. 1 & 15, 3-4:30pm, PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. 1st and 3rd Thursday of every month thereafter. Women welcome to drop in anytime. Free. Lindsey Miller, 333-3460

Hula Voices w/Kumu Hula Micah Kamohoali‘i, Thu., Nov. 1, 7-9pm, Volcano Art Center Gallery, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Desiree Cruz moderates the talk story session. Free. Final program for 2018. 967-7565

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu., Nov. 1, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Meeting, Thu., Nov. 1, 6:30pm, Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 2
Stewardship at the Summit, 9-noon, Fri., Nov. 2, Sat., Nov. 17 & 24, Wed., Nov. 28, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Meet Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45am. Volunteers help remove invasive, non-native plants species that prevent native plants from growing. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring hat, raingear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools provided. Free; park entrance fees apply. No advance registration required. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3
Jumble/Plant Sale & Pancake Breakfast, Sat., Nov. 3, 8-1pm, St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. All you can eat pancakes, $3/person. 939-7000

Paths and Trails, Sat, Nov. 3, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately-difficult, 2-mile, hike with some of the most spectacular overlooks in Kahuku. Free. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Art Express, Sat., Nov. 3 & Dec. 1, 10-3pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Classes held once monthly. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.com, discoveryharbour.net/art-express

Hawai‘i Human Trafficking Presentation, Sat., Nov. 3, 10-11:30am, Ocean View Community Center. Presentation of human trafficking in Hawai‘i based on research study at University of Arizona. 939-7033

Ho‘okupu Hula No Ka‘ū Cultural Festival, Sat., Nov. 3, 10-10pm, Pāhala Community Center. Features Master Cultural Practitioners, Kukakuka (talk story), and many educational and cultural experiences with hand-on demonstrations. Hula performed by hālau from around the world and Hawai‘i. Music headliners: Ho‘aikāne, Wailau Ryder, Ke‘aiwa, Victor Chock, and Steve Sioloa. Craft vendors, food vendors, and informational booths. Festival preceded by ceremonies at Punalu‘u Beach at dawn; ancestors honored at sunset; festival closes with ceremony at Makanau. Sponsors include County Council member Maile David and community contributions. Kumu Contact for booth application Hula Debbie Ryder, leionalani47@hotmail.com, 649-9334. hookupukau.com

Mixed Media Encaustic w/Mary Milelzcik, Sat., Nov. 3, 10-2pm, Volcano Art Center, Ni‘aulani Campus, Volcano Village. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $25 supply fee. Participants create and take home small finished encaustic panting or two, scroll, and set of greeting cards. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Hula Kahiko - Michah Kamohoali‘i w/ Hālau Na Kipu‘upu‘u, Sat., Nov. 3, 10:30-11:30am, hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Keiki Science Class, Sat., Nov. 3, 11-noon, Ace Hardware Stores Islandwide, including Nā‘ālehu/929-9030 and Ocean View/929-7315. Free. First Saturday every month. acehardware.com

Multi-Cultural Demos and Activities: Pala‘ie, Sat., Nov. 3, 12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hawaiian cultural demonstration and hands-on activity. Free, supplies provided. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Disney Sing-Along, Sat., Nov. 3, 17 & Dec. 1, 2:30-3:30pm, Ka‘ū District Gym multi-purpose room, Pāhala. For ages 5-8. Open registration. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Thanksgiving Hand Turkeys and Placemats, Arts & Crafts Activity, Sat., Nov. 3 & 17, 2:30-3:30pm, Ka‘ū District Gym multi-purpose room, Pāhala. For ages 5-12. Register through Nov. 2. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Keiki Jump Rope for Fitness, Sat., Nov. 3, 17 & Dec. 1, 4-4:30pm, Ka‘ū District Gym multi-purpose room, Pāhala. For ages 5-14. Open registration. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 4
Palm Trail, Sun., Nov. 4, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sun., Nov. 4, noon-2pm, Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. Sponsored by South Point Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Emergency Service. View sites.google.com/site/southpointarc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Mon., Nov. 5 & 19, 1pm, Ocean View Community Center. A parent led homeschool activity/social group building community in Ka‘ū. Contact prior to attending to confirm location in case of field trip. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

Story Time with Lindsey Miller from PARENTS, Inc., Mon., Nov. 5, 2:30-3:15pm, Nā‘ālehu Public Library. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Meeting, Mon., Nov. 5, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6
VOTE: General Election, Tue., Nov. 6, 7-6pm. Senate District 2 polling places in/near Ka‘ū: Cooper Center, 19-4030 Wright Rd., Volcano Village; Ka‘ū High/Pāhala Elementary School Cafeteria, 96-3150 Pikake St., Pāhala. Senate District 3 polling places in/near Ka‘ū: Nā‘ālehu Elementary School Cafeteria, 95-5545 Mamalahoa Hwy., Nā‘ālehu; Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle, Ocean View; Miloli‘i Halau Pavilion, Miloli‘i. elections.hawaii.gov

Family Yoga Class, Tue., Nov. 6, 9:30-10:30am, PARENTS, Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Wonderful way to embody connection. 3-12 years old and caregivers. All levels welcome. Wear comfortable clothes. Bring a mat, if can, as supplies are limited. Free. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue., Nov. 6, 4-6pm, Nov. 20, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue., Nov. 6, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

After Dark in the Park, Kolea: A Story of Hawai‘i and Beyond, Tue., Nov. 6, 7pm, Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Russell Cahill introduces his latest book, with selected readings and book signing. Program co-sponsored by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free; donations help support park programs. Park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

ONGOING
VOTE: Early Walk-In Voting Open through Sat., Nov. 3. The early voting location for Kaʻū is at Pāhala Community Center, 96-1149 Kamani Street, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday - closed noon to 1 p.m.
     Local polls for the General Election open in precincts from Volcano through Kaʻū to Miloliʻi, from 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Nov. 6. The nearest polling places are: Cooper Center, 19430 Wright Road in Volcano; Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary, 96-3150 Pikake Street; Nāʻālehu Elementary School, 95-5545 Mamalahoa Hwy; Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle; and Miloliʻi Halau Pavillion, off Hwy 11 in the Village of Miloliʻi. See more at elections.hawaii.gov.

Registration for Track & Field Practice open through Wed., Nov. 21, Kahuku Park, on Paradise Circle in H.O.V.E. Program for ages 6-14 to be held Dec. 3-Feb. 8. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Exhibit, Volcano Collaborations 2018: Artists Invitational, through Nov. 4, 9-5pm, Volcano Art Center Gallery, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Features pieces made by 18 artists at VAC's first Artists' Collaboration event. 967-7565

Tūtū and Me tuition-free traveling preschool, for keiki birth to five years old and their caregivers, is temporarily moving their Pāhala site program for Nov. 1 to the River of Life Assembly of God church. The group still meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. They will be back at Pāhala Community Center on Nov. 6. The Nāʻālehu location remains at Kauahaʻao Church in Waiʻōhinu, Mondays and Wednesdays, from 8:45 to 10:45 a.m.
     Tūtū and Me also offers home visits to aid caregivers with parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate, listening ear. Visits last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, total of 12 visits. Snacks are provided.
     To enroll in either free program, fill out enrollment forms found at pidf.org/programs/tutu_and_me/enrollment_forms, or call Linda Bong at 929-8571, or Betty Clark at 464-9634 or eclark@pidfountation.org.

Public Access Room comes to Ocean View on Wednesday, Oct. 31. The non-partisan division of Hawaiʻi state legislature's legislative Reference Bureau will offer workshops. Free and open to the public, they focus on training for creating, following, and testifying on legislation.
     Two workshops will be offered. The first is geared towards newcomers, provides an introduction to the state legislative process to prepare new participants for the session. The second workshop is for those with an understanding of lawmaking. It will offer advanced advocacy tips on effective lobbying and often overlooked online resources. How-To guides, informational handouts, and other resources will be available.
     PAR's staff will be at Ocean View Ocean View Community Center on Wednesday, Oct. 31, at 92-8924 Leilani Circle. The Beginners Presentation will be from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m.; the Advanced Presentation will be from 2:15 p.m. to 3 p.m. Additional presentations will be in Kona, Waimea, Pāhoa, and Hilo, from Oct. 29 through Nov. 1.
     For more, call toll free to 808-974-4000, ext. 7-0478, email Keanu Young at k.young@capitol.hawaii.gov, or go to lrbhawaii.org.

Hoʻokupu Hula No Kaʻū Cultural Festival happens Saturday, Nov. 3, at Pāhala Community Center, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Featuring Master Cultural Practitioners, Kukakuka (talk story), and many educational and cultural experiences with hands-on demonstrations. The festival is preceded by ceremonies at Punaluʻu Beach at dawn; at sunset, a ceremony will be held to honor ancestors; the festival will close with a ceremony at Makanau.
     Craft vendors, food vendors, and informational booths can still be applied for. Contact Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder at leionalani47@hotmail.com or (808) 649-9334 for an application. Last year brought over 1,000 spectators.
     The festival features hula performed by hālau from MexicoJapanWest Virginia, Oʻahu, South America, and Hawaiʻi Island. Traditional ethnic dance performances will come from Mexico, as well as the University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo Filipino Dancers. Taiko Drummers will perform. This year's headliner musical acts include Hoʻaikāne, Wailau Ryder, Keʻaiwa, Victor Chock, and Steven Sioloa.
     Sponsors include County Council member Maile David and community contributions through fundraising. See hookupukau.com.

Volunteers Needed by St. Jude's Episcopal Church for community outreach, especially soup cooks and shower organizers, towel laundry, alter guild, and for the computer lab. Volunteers do not have to be members of the church. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's. Contact Dave Breskin, 319-8333.

CU Hawaiʻi Federal Credit Union's Nāʻālehu Branch is taking applications for a Member Service Representative. The job description reads: Serve as a liaison between the member and the Credit Union. Provide a variety of financial services to members including savings, share drafts, and loan transactions, as well as sales of merchandise items: money orders, traveler's checks, postage stamps, etc., in accordance with Credit Union procedures and policies. CU Hawaiʻi offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Mail, hand-deliver, or fax application to: CU Hawaii Federal Credit Union, Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street, Hilo, HI 96720, Fax (808) 935-7793. Applications can be downloaded online at cuhawaii.com/about-cu/career-opportunities.html

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