About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, January 14, 2018

Ka‘ū News Briefs Sunday, January 14, 2018

Mangos can beautiful, like the ones displayed by the National Mango Board, above, or infected
like those shown below, displaying anthracnose disease. Read University of Hawai‘i's advice on
how to protect mango and other food trees. Photo from National Mango Board
CALLS FOR NEGOTIATIONS WITH NORTH KOREA after Saturday's false alarm of a ballistic missile headed toward Hawai‘i, were all over media on Sunday, largely promoted by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. Some of the headlines are: New York Daily News - "Hawai‘i Rep. Gabbard calls for Trump to Negotiate with Kim Jong Un;" Yahoo News - "Hawai‘i Rep. Tulsi Gabbard: Trump and Kim Should Talk after False Alarm."
     Interviewed Sunday morning on CNN's State of the Union, Gabbard said that describing Saturday's scare as "traumatic" to the people of Hawai‘i and its visitors is an understatement. Such errors, accidents and misunderstandings could lead to an accidental nuclear war, Gabbard declared. "I have been calling on President Trump to directly negotiate with North Korea - to sit across the table from King Jon Un, work out the differences, so that we can build a pathway towards denuclearization to remove this threat."
      Gabbard is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, a veteran, and serves as a Major in the Army National Guard. She emphasized that negotiations should be without pre-conditions since North Korea sees keeping nuclear weapons as its only defense against a regime change. "North Korea is now in a position where Kim Jong Un is saying, 'No way, I’m not going to give up these nuclear weapons,' because he doesn't see that credible message coming from the United States that we don't - we're not interested in overthrowing your government. We're interested in removing this nuclear threat from our country and the world," said Gabbard on State of the Union with Jake Tapper.

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GOV. DAVID IGE ISSUED ON SUNDAY AN APOLOGY FOR THE FALSE INCOMING-MISSILE ALARM SENT TO CELL PHONES ON SATURDAY.  He wrote. "On Saturday, Hawai‘i's residents and visitors experienced an unfortunate situation that has never happened before and will never happen again – a false alert issued by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency that a ballistic missile was on its way to the Hawaiian Islands.
     "On behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I deeply apologize for this false alert that created stress, anxiety and fear of a crisis in our residents and guests. I can personally assure each and every resident
and visitor that steps have already been taken by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency to ensure that a situation of this type never happens again.
     "The Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency is committed to protecting the people of Hawai‘i, and over the past year it has been taking responsible measures to prepare for the highly unlikely event of a missile attack. As a state government, we must learn from this unfortunate error and continue to prepare for any safety threat to Hawai‘i's residents and visitors – whether it is a man-made threat or a natural disaster such as a hurricane or tsunami.
    "In the next few days, I will continue meeting with our emergency preparedness team and personally talking with families, individuals and leaders from around our state to ensure we reach every household. We must also do what we can to demand peace and a de-escalation of tensions with North Korea. Again, on behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I apologize for yesterday's events and any hardship and inconvenience this created for you, your family and loved ones."

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HAWAI‘I COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY is setting its agenda, and Chair Margaret Wille asks citizens to serve on Legislative Priority Huis and to come to precinct meetings, Wednesday, March 7.
     The Economic and Social/Cultural Wellbeing Committee is expected to work on the:
          Protect Workers focus: $15 minimum wage by 2020;
          Protect Students focus: Raise quality of education;
          Protect Kupuna focus: Death with Dignity rights with appropriate assurances that each person
Big Island Democratic Party Chair Margaret Wille, a former County
Council member, encourages everyone to join committees and to go
to precinct meetings on March 7 to help set the party platform.
 Photo from Big Island Video News
is making choice of own free will;
       Protect Local Farmers focus: Coffee Truth in Labeling; monitor cannabis legislation; and
       Protect The People focus: Affordable health care.
       The Environmental Wellbeing Legislative Committee is expected to work on the:
       Protect Marine Life focus: Ban oxybenzone (harms coral and other marine life);
       Climate Crisis focus: Prevent degradation of the sensitive ecosystems/mitigation;
       Pesticide/Herbicide Restriction focus: Establish buffers around sensitive areas, facilities. 
     Precinct meetings with elections are set for Wednesday, March 7, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Precinct Officers and Delegates to the county and state conventions will be selected to create the County and State Party Platforms. Area locations for the precinct meetings are: Precincts 5, 6, & 7 - Volcano Art Center; 19-4074 Old Volcano Rd, Volcano. This year will mark the first time in 30 years that the Democratic Party State Convention will be held in a place other than on O‘ahu. It will be at the Waikoloa Hilton on May 25 and 26.

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A FUNDRAISER FOR KA‘Ū VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS has reached $500 in donations. It is sponsored by Raina Whiting, who is running for the House of Representatives in West Ka‘ū and Kona. 
     Whiting writes, "The men and women who volunteer their time to keep the Nā‘ālehu and Pāhala communities safe deserve our support. In the past couple of months, they have responded to two large, multi-day fires by volunteering their time.
     "I would like to use the money raised to stock up their fire house with water bottles, snacks and a few extra fire shirts for times when they have to respond quickly.
     "Please join me in supporting the brave women and men that volunteer for our community," states Whiting on the fundraising site https://www.facebook.com/donate/218531162021536/

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ANTHRACNOSE, A FUNGAL PATHOGEN MOST COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH MANGO, can also affect other fruiting plants such as banana, avocado, papaya, coffee, and more, according to University of Hawai‘i
Mango anthracnose, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, can also
affect other fruits grown in Hawai‘i. Photo by Scot Nelson
Kona Cooperative Extension Service and Research Station. Wet, humid, and warm weather conditions favor anthracnose, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, infections in the field.
     On mango, anthracnose symptoms occur on leaves, twigs, petioles, flower clusters (panicles), and fruits.     Visit flickr.com/photos/scot
nelson/8292071578/in/photo
stream for photos by Scot Nelson of anthracnose (and powdery mildew, Oidium mangiferae) on mango.
     Anthracnose and powdery mildew control methods differ, though symptoms may appear similar. Submit samples to the U.H. Agricultural Diagnostic Service Center to identify the pathogen responsible for symptoms you see on your tree or fruits. The cost is $12 per sample for a general disease diagnosis.
Image from U.H. C.T.A.H.R.
     "During this time of year, early control is critical for reducing the inoculum and spread of these diseases within trees and throughout the farm. Field sanitation – the removal and destruction of diseased fruit, branches, and old panicles in the tree and on the ground – help to decrease the amount of latent and active fungal spores that may contribute to further disease infestation," says U.H. CTAHR Extension Agent Andrea Kawabata. Learn more about these diseases, their symptoms and methods of control by visiting ctahr.hawaii.edu
/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-48.pdf for mango anthracnose and ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-46.pdf for powdery mildew.

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VOLCANO ART CENTER ANNOUNCES AUTHOR SUSAN M. SCHULTZ will teach a Documentary Poetry writing workshop on Saturday, Jan. 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at  Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. Poets and non-poets are invited to learn techniques to create documentary prose or poetry.
Photo from Volcano Art Center
    The event description says, "Documentary poetry is a form of poetry that seeks to document historical events, as well as expresses political, social or cultural issues. In Joseph Harrington’s essay, Docupoetry and Archive Desire, he defines documentary poetry as poetry that contains quotations from or reproductions of documents or statements not produced by the poet and relates historical narratives, whether macro or micro, human or natural."
     The workshop begins by discussing some readings from documentary poetry, such as Donovan Kuhio Colleps's Proposed Additions. Students are asked to bring such documents as a family photograph, a sketch/plan of a house, instructions for working a familiar machine, a neighborhood map, and the definition of the name of a street.
     The workshop involves writing about the photograph, street name, and other personal documents, and the bringing together of the private and public materials. In the final step, participants will discover how private lives intersect with public histories.
English Professor and Author Susan M. Schultz on left.
Photo from hawaii.edu
     Schultz is a professor of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and has lived in Hawai‘i since 1990. She is author of many books of poetry and poetic prose, including two volumes of Dementia Blog (Singing Horse Press), as well as Memory Cards. She has also authored a book of literary criticism and edited two others. She founded Tinfish Press, which publishes experimental poetry from the Pacific.
     The class is $35 for Volcano Art Center members and $40 for non-members. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

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A BADMINTON PROGRAM FOR ADULTS at Ka‘ū District Gym in Pāhala begins with registration starting Tuesday, Jan. 16. Badminton will be held Mondays and Thursdays, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., starting Jan. 22 and ending Feb. 27. For more, contact Hawai‘i County Parks and Recreation Technician Director Nona Makuakane or Technician Elijah Navarro at 928-3102, or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

THE KA‘Ū DISTRICT GYM RECREATION ROOM FITNESS STATION is open in Pāhala to members of the public, ages 15 and older. Public use hours are Saturday through Thursday from 3 p.m. to 7:45 p.m., until Sunday, March 31. For more, contact Hawai‘i County Parks and Recreation Technician Director Nona Makuakane or Technician Elijah Navarro at 928-3102, or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.
See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at 
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/janfebmar/januarycommunity.html.
January print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Boys Basketball: Monday, Jan. 15, Pāhoa @ Ka‘ū.
     Wednesday, Jan. 17, @ Kohala.
     Saturday, Jan. 20, Kohala @ Ka‘ū.
     Tuesday, Jan. 23, @ Wai‘ākea.
     Saturday, Jan. 27, HPA @ Ka‘ū.

Girls Basketball: Monday, Jan. 15, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 19, @ Kealakehe.

Boys Soccer: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Honoka‘a.
     Thursday, Jan. 25, @ Pāhoa.

Swimming: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 26, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, prelims).
     Saturday, Jan. 27, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, finals).

Wrestling: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Hilo.
     Saturday, Jan. 27 @ HPA.

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A FEE-FREE DAY IS OFFERED AT HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK in observance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - no entrance fees will be collected at any fee-charging National Parks on Monday, Jan. 15. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETS on Monday, Jan. 15, from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576 or visit discoveryharbour.net.

PAINTING WITH PEGGY, an acrylic painting class with Margaret "Peggy" Stanton is set for Monday, Jan. 15, from noon to 3 p.m., at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. It is part of an ongoing series of workshops for artists of all levels headed by Stanton. The class is $15 for VAC members and $20 for non-members per session. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS Tuesday, Jan. 16, from 10 a.m. to noon, at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576 or visit discoveryharbour.net.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT ERUPTION: STORY OF THE HALEMA‘UMA‘U LAVA LAKE is presented on Tuesday, Jan. 16, starting at 7 p.m., in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. USGS Hawai‘i Volcano Observatory geologist Janet Babb, co-producer and co-writer of the recently released USGS documentary, introduces the 24-min film. After the show, USGS H.V.O. geologist Matt Patrick provides an update on what's happening at Halema‘uma‘u today, and answers questions about the summit eruption. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WINE & WATERCOLOR takes place Tuesday, Jan. 16, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Artist Nancy DeLucrezia shows how to transfer a photo onto watercolor paper and introduces basic techniques in watercolor painting. Sampling of several wines from Hilo wine store "Grapes" is included. Class fee is $30 for Volcano Art Center members and $35 for non-members, plus a $17 supply fee. Register online, volcanoartcenter.org.

HAWAIIAN RANCHOS ROAD MAINTENANCE CORP. MEETS Wednesday, Jan. 17, starting at 4 p.m., in the Hawaiian Ranchos office. For more, call 929-9608 or visit ranchos-road.org.

A VOLCANO AWARENESS PRESENTATION takes place Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. Come and view informative displays about Mauna Loa Volcano. Talk story with scientists, public safety officials, and park rangers. For more, call 939-7033, visit ovcahi.org, or email askHVO@usgs.gov.

WEAVE A TĪ LEAF LEI Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Hear park rangers and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association staff share knowledge and love for one of the most popular lei in Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov
/HAVO.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA‘Ū meets Thursday, Jan. 18, starting at 6:30 p.m., at United Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. For more, call Pres. Berkley Yoshida at 747-0197.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETS Thursday, Jan. 18, from noon to 1 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

STORY TIME WITH AUNTIE LINDA FROM TŪTŪ & ME is hosted Thursday, Jan. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, at Nā‘ālehu Public Library. For more, call 929-8571.

THURSDAY NIGHT AT THE VOLCANO ART CENTER OFFERS AN ‘Alalā Outreach Presentation on Jan. 18, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., in Volcano Village. ‘Alalā Project staff present an update on the most recent reintroduction efforts to establish a wild population of the endemic and endangered Hawaiian crow. The presentation is free to attend - $5 donation appreciated. For more, visit volcanoartcenter.org.

Learn more about the most recent efforts to reintroduce the ‘Alalā to Hawai‘i.
Photo from volcanoartcenter.org
STEWARDSHIP OF KĪPUKAPUAULU takes place at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18, with volunteers meeting in the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot on Mauna Loa Road off Hwy 11 in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers will help remove invasive plants, like morning glory, from an area said to be home to an "astonishing diversity of native forest and understory plants." The event will take place again on Jan. 25. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, contact Marilyn Nicholson at nickem@hawaii.rr.com or visit nps.gov/HAVO.

A GLITTER SNOWFLAKE ARTS & CRAFTS ACTIVITY takes place at Kahuku Park (92-8607 Paradise Circle Mauka, Ocean View) on Friday, Jan. 19, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The class is for keiki ages 6 to 12 years. Register Tuesday, Jan. 16, through Jan. 19. For more, contact Hawai‘i County Parks and Recreation Technician Teresa Anderson at 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT takes place Friday, Jan. 19, with volunteers removing invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Interested volunteers should meet Paul and Jane Filed at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Other opportunities this month take place Jan. 26. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more see nps.gov/HAVO.

HEATHER METTLER'S GLASSWORK - hand-blown, chiseled, and etched - is showcased in a new Volcano Art Center Gallery Exhibit: Passage and Place. The display will continue to be displayed until Sunday, Feb. 11, during normal gallery hours - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Mettler's unique collection of glass explores the themes of migration, navigation, and immigration - how plants, animals, and people find their way to Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply.

BUNCO & POTLUCK takes place Saturday, Jan. 20, starting at 6 p.m., in Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Bunco is a popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring a dish to share. For more, contact Margie Hack at 541-954-8297. See more at discoveryharbour.net.

Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café.
Photo from kilaueamilitarycamp.com
OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM meets Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

MONGOLIAN BBQ is hosted Saturday, Jan. 20, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

THE ART EXRESS, a monthly class, is held Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions will be on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size is limited to 25. For more, contact Meliha Corcoran at 319-8989 or himeliha@yahoo.com, or visit discoveryharbour.net/art-express.

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