About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Monday, October 21, 2019

Rancher Michelle Galimba says, "Agriculture is a very intimate zone between nature and culture, between human and
nonhuman." She and her family operate Kuahiwi Ranch in Kaʻū. Photo from animasoul.org
"AGRICULTURE IS ONE OF THOSE DEEP STORIES THAT WE LIVE WITHIN," says Kaʻū rancher Michelle Galimba who operates Kuahiwi Ranch along with her brother Guy Galimba, their family, and employees. She gave a keynote speech at the Hawaiʻi Agriculture Conference on Oʻahu last week and explained that Kuahiwi, in business since 1993, provides beef for local restaurants and markets throughout Hawaiʻi. See the complete speech.
     Here is more of the history of the ranch and her view of agriculture, from her presentation at the conference, sponsored by the Agricultural Leadership Foundation of Hawaiʻi:
     My family started Kuahiwi Ranch in the summer of 1993 with one cow. She was a rather wild black cow. We hauled her in our little trailer up the side of the mountain where we had just finished fencing up a 25 acre pasture, a former sugar cane field, the first of many that we would fence to make up the core of our ranch. It was an overcast afternoon. The guinea grass in the pasture was dark green and very tall, at least eight feet tall. My
Michelle Galimba, of Kuahiwi Ranch in Kaʻū.
Photo from Hawaiʻi Agriculture Conference
brother Guy backed up the trailer to the pasture gate that we had painted blue. We opened up the trailer door and the black cow ran straight into that tall grass. We didn't see her again for months. Not a very promising start!
     That story, like most origin stories, is a little over-dramatic. I grew up around cattle on the dairies and ranches where my father worked. We always had our own backyard animals as well. So she wasn't our first cow by a long shot, just the first cow that belonged to our ranch as a business.
     Our ranch slowly grew until we now have a herd of about 3,000 head of cattle, and produce half a million pounds of beef per year for the local market in Hawaiʻi. The reason that I wanted to tell you that story was to point out how ambiguous that beginning was. One wild cow, one pasture salvaged from the wreckage of the great sugarcane economy. I wanted to point out how innovation doesn't have to be about using the latest gadgets; it can be as simple a thing as letting a cow out of a trailer one day. And then carrying on, bringing in new ideas, learning new skills, constructing, and making for twenty-five more years.
     What fascinates me about ranching – and agriculture in general – is that it is a multi-species collaboration. That is the first adaptation that I would like to highlight: collaboration. As Ursula K. Le Guin, one of my favorite writers says:
     To use the world well, to be able to stop wasting it and our time in it, we need to relearn our being in it. Skill in living, awareness of belonging to the world, delight in being part of the world, always tends to involve knowing our kinship as animals with animals.
     To be skillful as a pastoralist, which is say, as a rancher, you must collaborate with your domesticated animals – in my case, your cattle, horses, and dogs; you must collaborate with the grasses and trees on the ranch, and your soil flora and fauna; you must collaborate with the forest-watershed, you must even collaborate with the undomesticated, feral, or invasive animals and plants – your weeds and wild pigs, your butterflies and two-lined spittlebugs. You need to know them, know their ways, and how to respond to them.
Kuahiwi Ranch manages about 3,000 cattle in Kaʻū and produces
Kuahiwi Natural beef available at stores and restaurants, and
at its own ranch store on the edge of Nāʻālehu, at 95-5520 Māmalahoa
Hwy, across from Nāʻālehu Elementary. Photo from Kuahiwi Ranch
     Agriculture is a very intimate zone between nature and culture, between human and nonhuman. Intimate to the point of being quite often uncomfortable and even dangerous, and not just on a physical level. You are dealing with life and death, with eating and being eaten, on a daily basis.
     Agriculture is a hinge vocation and we in agriculture act as hinges and mediators – mediators between the human world and the natural world. And nature can be as small as the microbes in your cattle’s amazing four-part rumen or as large as a ranch landscape or watershed – or the planetary climate.
     See more in the Tuesday Kaʻū News Briefs, or read the entire talk here. Also, see Agriculture Leadership Foundation of Hawai`i. Buy Kuahiwi beef at 95-5520 Māmalahoa Hwy, across from Nāʻālehu Elementary.

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WETTER THAN NORMAL WEATHER IS PREDICTED for Hawaiʻi through April 2020 by the National Weather Service, with no El Niño expected in the near future. Forecasters at the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's Climate Prediction Center report that "ENSO-neutral" conditions lend themselves to wetness. Forecasters report eight of the 10 rainiest wet seasons in the last 30 years were in ENSO-neutral conditions. Low pressure combined with higher ocean temperatures will also contribute to a higher rate of rainfall, according to forecasters.
An orange "X" marks the center of a disturbance that may turn
into a tropical depression. NOAA image
     The regular dry season, over at the end of September, was the seventh wettest in the last 30 years. The drought affecting most of the state for years is expected to be over by April.
     A weather disturbance about 1,800 miles southwest of Kaʻū has a 40 percent chance of developing into a tropical depression. The disturbance is traveling west-northwestward at about 10 mph.

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VENDOR BOOTHS ARE AVAILABLE FOR THE FUNDRAISING BAZAAR AT KAUAHAʻAO CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH in Waiʻōhinu. The annual event will be held Saturday, Nov. 16, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., on the church campus at the corner of Mamalahoa Hwy, Kamaoa Road, and Pinao Street, just above the Wong Yuen Store.  
     Individuals, schools, clubs, and sports/athletic groups are invited to be a vendor at the flea market. Interested vendors are asked to submit a Vendor Application by Sunday, Nov. 10. The booth fee for a 10' X 10' space is a $10 suggested donation. To obtain a Vendor Application, email the church at dwongyuen.kauahaaochurch@gmail.com, or call Debbie Wong Yuen at 928-8039. Vendors can sell anything except hot foods and plate lunches, and need to provide their own tent, tables, chairs, and – if power is needed – a generator.
     The Church will be selling Kalua Pig Bowls, Smoked Meat bowls, baked goods, produce, crafts, and more.
     Entertainment provided by community groups Hannaha's Makana ‘Ohana Hālau, Thy Word Ministry Praise Team, and Gene Akamu.
     For more information call Debbie at 928-8039.

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Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
2019 Kaʻū High School Fall Athletics Schedule
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates

Football, Division II:
Sat., Oct. 26, 1 p.m., Kohala hosts Kaʻū
Fri. and Sat., Nov. 1 and 2, Div II BIIF Championship
Fri. and Sat., Nov. 15 and 16, HHSAA Div II Semifinals
Fri., Nov. 29, HHSAA Div II Championship

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See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
TUESDAY, OCT. 22
Birding at Kīpukapuaulu, Tuesday, Oct. 22, 8-10a.m., Kīpukapuaulu - Bird Park - Parking Lot, HVNP. Led by retired USGS Biologist Nic Sherma. 2 hour birding tour. $40/person. Register online. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Oct. 22, 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 23
Nāʻālehu School Parent Conferences, Wednesday and Thursday, Oct. 23 and 24, Nāʻālehu Elementary School; Friday, Oct. 25, Ocean View Community Center. Times to be determined via letter home.

Guided Hike On A 60 Year Old Lava Lake, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 10a.m.-2p.m.Kīlauea Iki Overlook Parking Lot, HVNP. Moderate to challenging 2.4 mile hike (one way). $80/person. Register online. Park entrance fees may apply. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

Lei Kukui Demonstration, Wednesday, Oct. 23, 10a.m.-noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Make hīpu‘u - a style of lei making in which the steams and leaves of the Kukui tree are tied together - with rangers and staff. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo/

THURSDAY, OCT. 24
Birding at Kīpukapuaulu, Thursday, Oct. 24, 8-10a.m., Kīpukapuaulu - Bird Park - Parking Lot, HVNP. Led by retired USGS Biologist Nic Sherma. 2 hour birding tour. $40/person. Register online. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, Oct. 24 - fourth Thursday monthly - 3-4p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for all community members to come together as equal partners to discuss and positively affect multiple systems' issues for the benefit of all students, families, and communities. Chad Domingo, text 381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

FRIDAY, OCT. 25
Kahuku Coffee Talk: Creatures That Have Evolved in the Dark, Friday, Oct. 25, 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Join local experts to learn about lava tubes and some interesting animals that call them home. Free. nps.gov/havo

Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Mele & Hula ‘Auana Performances, Friday, Oct. 25 - fourth Friday monthly - 4-5:30p.m., Volcano Art Center. Free and open to public. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Chicken Skin Stories, Friday, Oct. 25, 7-9p.m., Kīlauea Military Camp's Theater, in HVNP. DJ KTA. $20/person in advance, $25/person at the door. Open to eligible patrons; certain Terms of Service. Free; park entrance fees apply. Purchase online at bigisland.ticketleap.com (+$2 fee online). mariner@kimurabrands.com

Halloween Party, Friday, Oct. 25, 7p.m.-midnight, Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge, in HVNP. DJ KTA. $5 cover with costume, $7 cover without. 21+. Open to eligible patrons; certain Terms of Service. Free; park entrance fees apply. Call 967-8365 after 4p.m.kilaueamilitarycamp.com

SATURDAY, OCT. 26
Free Spay and Neuter Clinic for Dogs offered by KARES in Ocean View on Saturday, Oct. 29. For info and to register, 328-8455.

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf Workshop with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, Oct. 26, 9a.m.-12:30p.m., Volcano Art Center. Students complete one 8"x 53" scarf. $45/VAC member, $50/non-member, plus $10 supply fee per person. All materials supplied. Beginner and intermediate artists welcome. Register - 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Nature & Culture, Saturday, Oct. 26, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate hike, approx. 2 miles. nps.gov/havo/

Kimchi & Kombucha/Jun, Hands-On Fermented Foods Workshop with Jasmine Silverstein of HeartBeet Foods, Saturday, Oct. 26, 10a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $15/person supply fee (includes organic ingredients). Pre-registration required. No cooking skills necessary. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Chicken Skin Stories, Saturday, Oct. 26, 7-9p.m., Kīlauea Military Camp's Theater, in HVNP. DJ KTA. $20/person in advance, $25/person at the door. Open to eligible patrons; certain Terms of Service. Free; park entrance fees apply. Purchase online at bigisland.ticketleap.com (+$2 fee online). mariner@kimurabrands.com

SUNDAY, OCT. 27
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sunday, Oct. 27, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/havo/

MONDAY, OCT. 28
Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ‘Āina, the fabric of Hawai‘i with Puakea Forester, Monday, Oct. 28, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

ONGOING
Help Shape Hawaiʻi Island at upcoming SpeakOuts and workshops on the General Plan. The community is encouraged to "come share your manaʻo," opinion.
     The last scheduled SpeakOut meeting will be held in Waikaloa, Thursday, Oct. 246 p.m. to 8 p.m., Waikoloa Elementary & Middle School.
     A Topic Workshop will be held in Hilo at County of Hawaiʻi Office of Aging on Saturday, Oct. 26, on Infrastructure from 9 a.m. to noon and Natural Resources from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
     Submit feedback online by Thursday, Oct. 31. See more Info on the Draft General Plan at hiplanningdept.com/general-plan/.


Trunk or Treat at Kaʻū District Gym will be held Thursday, Oct. 315:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Organized by Kaʻū High and Pāhala Elementary school, the free event offers a haunted house, healthy recipes, a family-friendly atmosphere, and Trunk or Treat, where keiki and youth go from parked car to car, asking for treats.
     For those interested in participating in Trunk or Treat, distributing goodies, prizes will be awarded for the best decorated car: Most Beautiful, Most Original, Spookiest, and a special awards for teachers or staff who decorate; decoration not required. Contact Nona at 928-3102 or Angie Miyashiro at 313-4100.

Nationwide 2019 Congressional App Challenge submissions from middle and high schoolers are open through Friday, Nov. 1. Submit to Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, CongressionalAppChallenge.us, apps "designed to promote innovation and engagement in computer science." All skill levels, all devices and platforms, and all programming languages, accepted.

Hoʻokupu Hula No Kaʻū Cultural Festival Booths can be reserved. The free event on Saturday, Nov. 2, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m., at Pāhala Community Center, will feature cultural practitioners and demonstrators; workshops; crafts; food; music and entertainment from artists such as Bali Hai from Mexico, Vero Cruz Folklore Dancers, taiko drummers, UH-Hilo Filipino/Samoan dancers; and hula from Mexico, Japan, Virginia, ʻOahu, and Hawaiʻi Island. Interested vendors can apply for food, craft, or information booths. Email leionalani47@hotmail.com or call 808-649-9334. See hookupukau.com.

Tiny Treasure Invitational Exhibit at Volcano Art Center gallery in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park runs through Sunday, Nov. 3. Open to the public, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Free; Park entrance fees apply. The exhibition also celebrates VAC's 45th anniversary, Oct. 21.
     Artists include Daniel Rokovitz, Stone O'Daugherty, Kristin Mitsu Shiga, Pat Pearlman, and Amy Flanders, Karen and Mark Stebbins. Also on display, small works from the annual Volcano Art Collaboration from June, featuring Rose Adare, Nash Adams-Pruitt, Lisa Louise Adams, Ed Clapp, Amy Flanders, Bill Hamilton, Liz Miller, Joe Laceby, and Erik Wold. volcanoartcenter.org

Vendor Booth Space is Available for the Kamahalo Craft Fair. The 12th annual event will be held Thanksgiving weekend, Friday, Nov. 299 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 30, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Cooper Center. Booths are open for crafters with quality homemade and homegrown products. Food vendors must prepare all food items in a certified kitchen and must have a Department of Health permit displayed prominently at their booth. Application online at thecoopercenter.org. Direct questions to 936-9705 or kilaueatutu@gmail.com.

King Cab 2016 Nissan Frontier for Sale by Holy Rosary Church of Pāhala and the Sacred Heart Church of Nāʻālehu. The parishes are selling the truck to raise funds to benefit both churches. The truck is a great 6 cylinder, 2WD automobile. The churches are asking for $21K or best offer. Only cash or cashier's check will be accepted. Anyone interested should contact the parish secretary Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at 928-8208.

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call Tata Compehos and Melody Espejo at 808-938-1088.

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