About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, June 01, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Friday, June 1, 2018

Bon Dance season begins tomorrow at Liliuokalani Gardens in Hilo, with celebrations around the island and the
finale at Pāhala Hongwanji on Saturday, Sept. 1. See more, and the schedule, below. Photo by Ron Johnson





























KĪLAUEA VOLCANO MAY BE EXPERIENCING A SIGNIFICANT CHANGE WHICH COULD BRING AN END TO ITS ASH AND ROCK EXPLOSIONS over time. Kyle Anderson, of Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, explained to press today what happened to the Halemaʻumaʻu vent inside Kīlauea Caldera, where its lava lake is gone. After the lake being the popular view from the overlook at Jaggar Museum, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park closed the area in May, in consideration of the danger of volcanic activity.

     Anderson said that, as lava drained from under the summit of Kīlauea Volcano and the floor of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater subsided and its walls fell in, the vent expanded from 12 acres on May 5 to 120 acres on May 31. It grew to more than half the size of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater.
     As the lava lake lowered into the volcano and the crater walls, unsupported by lava, sloughed off, the rubble covered the vent and plugged the escape route for the steam. The pressure created explosions of ash over the last month.
     Anderson reported that though the vent is still covered in debris, a pressure relieving, white steam plume rises through it. How many more explosions will occur, lifting ash and projectiles into the sky, is unknown, he said.
     “It’s possible that new explosions will blast through the rubble at the bottom of the vent,” said Anderson. “These may or may not be larger than the previous explosions… It is also possible that the vent may become permanently blocked, ending the explosions entirely.” He said the blockage
A mathematical calculation using information on eruptions and wind, is being refined
for use at Kilauea Volcano. It is already in use in Alaska. The map shows an ash
fall prediction today. June 1. See the USGS site.
of vents like this is often the way explosive eruptions like this end, so this could be a significant change, but that scientists do not know how significant - or long-lasting - this change will be.
     Anderson said “the great majority of the plume is now gone,” with smaller amounts of venting gasses joining the steam.
     Anderson also said that scientists are not yet able to measure the depth of the crater.
     Earthquake activity at the summit continued to be elevated today, with quakes registering as high 5.4 magnitude at 1:37 p.m. today, with an ash explosion. An experimental model of ash distribution from Kīlauea summit predicted the event would send trace amounts into Ka‘ū, inland, above Hwy 11, and Ainapo, for about 30 miles, with minor ash and substantial ash closer to the crater. See the ash prediction map on the USGS site.
     An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, a UAV, was able to capture an overflight video of Halema`uma`u yesterday, May 31. It can be seen at the USGS site.

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SO2 MEASUREMENTS were good - the green rating - today in Volcano, Ocean View, and Kona all day. Pāhala saw two short spikes when air was rated as moderate. See the University of Hawaiʻi air quality predictions on its VMAP.

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Lava shown in red headed toward Kapoho today and crossed over at least one road, as Kapoho and Vacationland
residents evacuated. USGS map
IN LOWER PUNA, KAPOHO BEACH LOTS, VACATIONLAND, and half of Leilani Estates remained under evacuation directions from county Civil Defense tonight as lava cut across Highway 130, threatened to cross Highwya 137 - Kapoho-Pohoiki Road and Government Beach Road, and continued its destruction in Leilani Estates and beyond.

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THE EMERGENCY ONE LANE LAVA ROAD that will connect Kalapana and Chain of Craters Road is expected to be ready for emergencies only, as early as tomorrow, according to state Department of Transportation officials, who are working with Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. The crushed lava road will be used only for emergencies and would take travelers up into HVNP to Highway 11, should they need it to evacuate from lower Puna neighborhoods threatened by lava and high S02 levels.

Lava cuts a path through lower Puna as more neighborhoods are told by County Civil Defense to evacuate. USGS Photo
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NĀ LEO ʻO HAWAIʻI TV IS BROADCASTING INFO AND EMERGENCY ALERTS for Hawaiʻi Island during the volcanic eruptions. Nā Leo, Channel 55, has been designated as an Emergency Broadcast Channel. It shows live broadcasts of community meetings, facilitated by Civil Defense and its partnering agencies; live audio Media Briefings at 11 a.m. weekdays, from USGS HVO, National Park Service, and Civil Defense; previous community meetings that were broadcast live; and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense messages. Get schedule and watch online at naleo.tv/vod.

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REP. RICHARD CREAGAN IS CALLING FOR GOV. DAVID IGE TO CONVENE A SPECIAL SESSION OF THE HAWAIʻI LEGISLATURE to address emergency funding for the volcano disaster, and to deal with issues with the state's Transient Accommodations and General Excise taxes. Creagan also calls for incentivizing solar power now that the geothermal plant in Puna, which produced more than 20 percent of the electricity used by this island's utility, shut down with lava inundation. Creagan released an op-ed to the media this week.
     Creagan wrote that "The heavens opened," when Kauaʻi received $100 million in aid to deal with flooding in the last moments of the 2018 Legislature. "Now Madame Pele has been aroused and the Big Island is being assaulted by lava, ash and laze. Tourism revenues and property taxes are diving, county expenses are soaring, and the county budget is trashed.We need another special session and I am asking our governor to call one," wrote Creagan.
State Representative Richard Creagan, M.D, is calling for a
special legislative session to address multiple things.
First and foremost: emergency funding for disaster areas.
Photo from Richard Creagan Facebook
     He also addressed the hike in Transient Accommodations Taxes, with the additional money slated only for the mass transit rail project on Oʻahu. It was less than a year ago that our Legislature held a special session to shore up the rail project. One innovative proposed funding source was to increase the transient accommodation tax, or TAT, as that would affect in-state people less and target tourists the most. That part made sense. The part that did not make sense to me and many of my fellow neighbor-island legislators was that the increase on the TAT paid for accommodations on the neighbor islands would go to rail rather than the counties where it was paid.
     "This was especially true because Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell was complaining about having to raise property taxes on his voters if the Legislature didn’t give him the money he wanted. Because the TAT increase did not lead to a meaningful increase for the neighbor islands, the Big Island did have to raise property taxes, fuel taxes and vehicle weight taxes. For those reasons, I voted no, as did Big Island Reps. Cindy Evans, Nicole Lowen and Chris Todd."
     He wrote that a bill in this year's legislative session would have given Hawaiʻi Island more than $12 million more each year from the TAT. "It passed the House and Senate in different versions, but the Senate then killed the bill."
     Creagan stated that in a special session, "We hope that in addition to substantial emergency funding, the TAT bill will be passed and that longterm increase in the county revenue stream will be accomplished."
     He said he also calls for the counties, when needed, to have the ability to raise the GE tax with fewer restrictions. "Ideally, it would only be raised for a limited number of years and then sunset."
     In addressing solar, Creagan wrote: "It appears very likely that we may lose a quarter of the Big Island’s power source if the geothermal plant," with lava overrunning and making it inoperable. "One possible partial solution to that is mandating an extension of the feed-in tariff to encourage more solar power and passing a tax credit for storage batteries bill that would decrease the peak demand on the power grid."
     Creagan concluded that "Desperate times call for desperate measures, but these measures all make sense and we can do them expeditiously in a special session. Call your legislators. Call the governor. Let’s save our island, together!”
     Richard Creagan, M.D., is a State Representative of District 5. See his Facebook at facebook.com/DocCreagan.

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Taiko drumming at last year's Pāhala Hongwanji Bon Dance led to regular classes here, with students preparing
to perform this year. Photo by Ron Johnson
BON DANCE SEASON BEGINS TOMORROW, with Pāhala Hongwanji scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 1. Pāhala will serve up the final celebration that rotates through Buddhist churches around the island. They begin Saturday, June 2, with Obon in the Gardens at Liliuokalani Gardens in Hilo.
     The Obon season remembers ancestors with temple services and the displaying of foods at alter to honor the harvest of agriculture. The outdoor dance features traditional and modern Japanese music - with a caller keeping the tempo, standing in a yagura outdoor tower - which also serves as the bandstand. Dancers circle the yagura, often wearing traditional Japanese costumes. Taiko drumming, Japanese crafts, activities, and food are part of the celebration.
     Pāhala's annual Bon Dance celebration was reinstated three years ago, having stopped after the 1999 event, just three years after the sugar plantation - where many Japanese immigrants worked - shut down in the town. Community members of all faiths and background enjoyed the Bon Dance throughout its history, and are welcome to join in Sept. 1. Pāhala Hongwanji, and ʻO Kaʻū Kākou and other community volunteers, help to put on the event.
     Many Bon Dance enthusiasts follow the celebrations around the island to hone their dance skills before the finale at Pāhala. Here is the schedule for this summer.
Services will be held at Pāhala Hongwanji to honor
ancestors. Photo by Julia Neal
Obon in the Gardens: June 2, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Liliuokalani Gardens, with keiki crafts, taiko and matsuri dancing, and bon dance lessons. Info: 808ne.ws/2rSTCQ3.
Keauhou Shopping Center: June 9, 6 to 10 p.m. Info: 322-3000.
Honomu Henjoji Mission: June 16, 7 to 10:30 p.m., 28-1668 Old Mama­lahoa Highway. Info: 963-6308.
Papaikou Hongwanji Mission: June 23, 7 p.m., 27-378 Old Mamalahoa Highway, with service at 6 p.m. Info: 964-1640.
Honomu Hongwanji Mission: June 30, 7 p.m., 28-1658 Government Main Road, with service at 6 p.m. Info: 963-6032.
Puna Hongwanji Mission: July 6-7, 7:30 p.m., 16-492 Old Volcano Road, Keaʻau, with service at 6 p.m. both nights. Info: 966-9981.
Kohala Hongwanji Mission: July 7, 7 p.m., 53-4300 Akoni Pule Highway, Kapaʻau, with service at 6 p.m. Info: 775-7232.
Honpa Hongwanji Hilo Betsuin: July 13-14, 7 p.m., 398 Kīlauea Ave., with serv­ice at 6 p.m. both nights. Info: 961-6677.
Daifukuji Soto Mission in Kona: July 14, 7 to 10 p.m., 79-7241 Mama­lahoa Highway. Info: 322-3524.
Kohala Jodo Mission: July 14, 7 p.m., 54-541 Kapaʻau Road. Info: 775-0965.
Keiki, like Takami Munnerlyn, stamp headbands to wear
at the bon dance. 
Photo by Ron Johnson
Paʻauilo Hongwanji Mission: July 14, 7:30 p.m., 43-1477 Hauola Road, with service at 6:30 p.m. Info: 776-1369.
Honokaʻa Hongwanji Mission: July 21, 7 p.m., 45-516 Lehua St., with service at 5:30 p.m. Info: 775-7232.
Keʻei Buddhist Temple: July 21, 7 p.m., 83-5569 Middle Keʻei Road, Captain Cook. Info: 323-2993.
Hilo Meishoin: July 21, 7 p.m., 97 Olona St. Info: 935-6996.
Hilo Daijingu: July 27, 6 to 10 p.m., 10 Anela St., with service at 5 p.m. Info: 959-8611.
Papaʻaloa Hongwanji Mission: July 28, 6 p.m., 35-2026 Old Mama­lahoa Highway, with service at 5 p.m. Info: 962-6340.
Kona Hongwanji Mission: July 28, 7 p.m., 81-6630 Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua. Info: 323-2993.
Hilo Hoʻoganji Mission: July 28, 7:30 p.m., 457 Manono St. Info: 935-8331.
Hawi Jodo Mission: Aug. 4, 6 p.m., 55-1104 Akoni Pule Highway. Info: 775-0965.
Kurtistown Jodo Mission: Aug. 4, 7 p.m., 17-420 Kuaʻaina Road. Info: 935-6996.
Paʻauilo Kongoji Mission: Aug. 4, 7 p.m., 43-1461 Hauola Road. Info: 963-6308.
Taishoji Soto Mission: Aug. 4, 7 to 10 p.m., 275 Kinoʻole St., Hilo. Info: 935-8407.
Part-time Pāhala resident Minako Yamazaki, in kimono, greets
long time Nāʻālehu residents Alice and Iwao Yonemitsu, as
Japanese 
traditions are shared. Photo by Ron Johnson
Hilo Higashi Hongwanji Mission: Aug. 11, 6:30 p.m., 216 Mohouli St., with service at 6 p.m. Info: 935-8968.
Hamakua Jodo Mission: Aug. 11, 7 p.m., 44-2947 Kalopa Road, Honokaʻa. Info: 775-0965.
Kona Koyasan Daishiji Mission: Aug. 11, 7 p.m., 76-5945 Mamalahoa Highway, Holualoa. Info: 324-1741.
Hakalau Jodo Mission: Aug. 18, 7 p.m., 29-2271 Old Mamalahoa Highway. Info: 935-6996.
Kamuela Hongwanji Mission: Aug. 18, 7 p.m., 65-1110 Mamalahoa Highway, with service at 6 p.m. Info: 885-4481.
Honohina Hongwanji Mission: Aug. 25, 7 p.m., 32-896 Mamalahoa Highway, ­Ninole, with service at 6 p.m. Info: ­345-6869.
Pāhoa Nikkei Jin Kyokai: Aug. 25, 8 p.m., Pāhoa YBA Hall on Pāhoa Road. Info: 966-9981.
Pāhala Hongwanji Mission: Sept. 1, 5 p.m., 96-1123 Paʻauau Place, with service at 4 p.m. Info: 928-8254.
     Organizers ask that participants call ahead to confirm events are taking place as the ongoing Kilauea Volcano eruption might affect scheduling.

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See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
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SATURDAY, JUNE 2
A fundraiser for Miloli`i: 23rd Annual Kona Classic Jackpot - Classic Fishing Tournament Series, Sat-Sun, Jun 2-3, Honokōhau Club House. All profits go towards marine conservation and youth educational programs in and around Miloli‘i. $300 entry fee, 4 per boat, $25 additional. Cash prizes $100-$3,000. Qualifying weights: Marlin, 100lbs; Ahi, 50lbs; Mahi, 15lbs; Ono, 15lbs. Grand Prize qualifies for Las Vegas Trip. Contact Wilfred Kaupiko, 896-6272, kalanihale@gmail.com. Sponsored by Kalanihale, kalanihale.org

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, Jun 2 - Jul 14, statewide and online. Register (starting Jun 2) and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, and adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

yART Sale! Gigantic Rummage Sale, Sat, Jun 2, 8:30-2pm, Volcano Art Center’s Hale Ho‘omana. Benefits VAC programs and workshops. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Stained Glass Basics II, Sat & Sun, Jun 2, 3, 9 & 10, 9-noon, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Prerequisite: Stained Glass Basics I. $90/VAC Member, $100/non-Member, plus $30 supply fee. Register in advance. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Realms and Divisions of Kahuku, Sat, Jun 2, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, two-mile, guided hike on Kahuku Unit's newest trail, Pu‘u Kahuku, explores the traditional Hawaiian classification system. Bring snack.

SUNDAY, JUNE 3
Stained Glass Basics II, Sat & Sun, Jun 3, 9 & 10, 9-noon, Volcano Art Center's Niʻaulani Campus, Hale Hoʻomana at 19-4074 Old Volcano Road. Prerequisite: Stained Glass Basics I. $90/VAC Member, $100/non-Member, plus $30 supply fee. Register in advance. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Palm Trail, Sun, Jun 3, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. nps.gov/HAVO

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sun, Jun 3, noon-2pm, Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. Sponsored by South Point Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Emergency Service. View sites.google.com/site/southpointarc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

MONDAY, JUNE 4
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue/Wed, Jun 4 and 5 (Committees)/6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Mon, Jun 4 and 18, 1pm, Ocean View Community Center. A parent-led homeschool activity/social group building community in Ka‘ū. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

Ocean View Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Mon, Jun 4, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JUNE 5
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue/Wed, Jun 5 (Committees)/6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Volunteer Clean-Up w/Hawai‘i Outdoor Institute, Tue, Jun 5, contact in advance for meet up time at Wai‘ōhinu Park. Space limited. Free; donations appreciated. kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, wildhawaii.org

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue, Jun 5, 4-6pm, Jun 19, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue, Jun 5, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Wed, Jun 6 (Council), Hilo. Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

AdvoCATS, Wed, Jun 6, 7-5pm, Ocean View Community Center. Free Cat Spay & Neuter Clinic. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org

*Open Mic Night, Wed, Jun 6, 6-10pm, Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Singers, Bands, Comedians, etc. Call 967-8365 after 4pm to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests 21 years+. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 7
Veteran's Center, Thu, Jun 7, 8:30-12:30pm, Jun 21, 8:30-11:30am, Ocean View Community Center. VA benefits and individual counseling services. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu, Jun 7, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

NEW & UPCOMING
THE LOW INCOME HOME ENERGY ASSISTANCE PROGRAM, sponsored by the Hawai`i Office of Economic Opportunity,  will be open for  June 1 through 29, except June 11 due to Kamehameha Day holiday. Ka‘ū will host three locations to sign up.
     - Nā‘ālehu: Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wednesdays - Fridays, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 929-9263
     - Ocean View: Ocean View Community Center, Mondays and Tuesdays, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m.
     - Pāhala: Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
     Eligibility requirements include: household members must be U.S. citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents; all adults must sign application and provide picture ID; and household members over one year must provide social security card. Household income must be below 150% of Federal Poverty Level.
     See http://hceoc.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/2018-LIHEAP-APPLICATION.pdf for full list of requirements, what needs to be brought to apply, and to download forms.

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ONGOING


Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, August 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases August 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.

5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

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