About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, September 30, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Saturday, September 30, 2017

Looking somewhat like an old plantation tunnel in Ka‘ū, this tunnel was bored after a volcanic eruption landslide
 plugged the outflow of a lake, preventing its overflow and catastrophic flooding. It is an example
of managing conditions around a volcano, this one Mount St. Helens. See Volcano Watch below. 
HELP FOR SISTER COFFEE FARMS in Puerto Rico, devastated by Hurricane Maria, and in Mexico, devastated by its own natural disasters, is the call from Specialty Coffee Association, Barista Guild of America, Roasters Guild and others. These organizations represent a number of Ka‘ū Coffee farms and host events that have showcased Ka‘ū Coffee.
Specialty Coffee Association, a new unifying
organization of Specialty Coffee Associations of
America, Europe and others, is calling for help
for Puerto Rico and Mexican coffee farmers.
     A statement from SCA yesterday said, "Coffee communities around the world are coming together to raise funds for general relief efforts. As always, specialty coffee professionals are supporting one another and we encourage all SCA members to participate in these activities."
     SCA is searching for organizations working to support the coffee sector in each country. "We hope to help amplify their message and connect them to professionals within the SCA’s membership who are willing and able to volunteer their skills and time to help the Puerto Rican and Mexican coffee communities recover." Coffee farmers and other coffee professionals interested in supporting relief efforts for the coffee sectors in these two countries, can submit their information using this form.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.


A 3.3 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE shook Pāhala at 10:33 a.m. this morning. The epicenter was along Wood Valley Road, just above town in macadamia orchards. No damage reported.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

THE U.S. COFFEE INDUSTRY is valued at $48 billion. WalletHub came out with statistics this week showing the location of the most intense coffee culture cities in the country, many of them places where Ka‘ū Coffee is sold at such outlets as Starbucks and other specialty coffee shops. WalletHub lists the 2017's Best Coffee Cities in America.
Rusty's Hawaiian is a local Ka‘ū Coffee that has penetrated a number of 
coffee intense markets, like New York, New Jersey, Portland and
Seattle, as well as Honolulu and its international airport. Ralph Gaston 
and Lorie Obra are two of the team. Photo by Julia Neal
     To determine the best local coffee scenes, WalletHub compared the 100 largest cities across 14 key indicators of a strong coffee culture. The data set ranges from coffee shops, coffee houses and cafés per capita to average price per pack of coffee.
    Identified as the Top 20 Cities for Coffee Lovers are Seattle, Portland, San Francisco, New York, Los Angeles, San Diego, Chicago, Denver, Boston and Washington, D.C, followed by Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Honolulu, Miami, Atlanta, Long Beach, Austin, Las Vegas and Jersey City.
    WalletHub reported that Miami has the lowest average price for a pack of coffee, $3.43, which is 2.3 times lower than in Honolulu, the city with the highest at $7.87.
     Fremont, California, has the highest average annual spending on coffee per household, $185.00, which is three times higher than in Detroit, the city with the lowest at $61.29.
     Gilbert, Arizona, has the highest share of households that own a single-cup/pod-brewing coffee maker, 21.1 percent, which is 2.9 times higher than in Hialeah, Florida, the city with the lowest at 7.3 percent.
    New York has the most coffee shops, coffee houses and cafés (per square root of population), 1.0739, which is 45.5 times more than in Laredo, Texas, the city with the fewest at 0.0236.
     Portland has the most coffee and tea manufacturers (per square root of population), 0.0180, which is 36 times more than in Riverside and San Bernardino, California, the cities with the fewest at 0.0005. To view the full report.  visit: wallethub.com/edu/best-cities-for-coffee-lovers/23739/

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

RA‘IĀTEA HELM WILL HEADLINE HO‘OKUPU HULA NO KA‘Ū CULTURAL FESTIVAL at Pāhala Community Center, on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Helm is a famed singer and 'ukulele player from Moloka‘i.
 Community members who would like to volunteer and support the event are invited to a public meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 6:30 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center.
     Hālau from Tokyo, Okinawa, Honolulu, Mexico and West Virgina will come to Pāhala for the festival. Cultural practitioners from Lana‘i will share their skills.
      Those interested in becoming vendors for Ho‘okupu Hula No Ka‘ū can also call 649-9334 for an application. There are openings for craft vendors, food vendors, informational booths, and game vendors for children. Deadline to apply is Oct. 27. Craft vendors fee is $50.00. Food vendors fee is $75.00. Informational booths are free. Game Vendors fee is $50.00.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Aerial view of Spirit Lake looking north from above the crater of Mount St. Helens. The lake’s outlet to the west (left) 
was blocked by the 1980 landslide, which required a new engineered outlet to maintain the lake at a safe level. A 
tunnel was drilled through a bedrock ridge on west side of the lake in 1984-1985. Glacier covered Mount Rainier 
in distance. USGS photo by M. Logan, 2005.
A CASE STUDY IN MANAGING RESPONSE TO VOLCANIC ERUPTIONS is the subject of this week's Volcano Watch, written by scientists at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. While it involves Mount St. Helens, it also brings up Ka‘ū history when horizontal tunnels were hand-dug into Mauna Loa to bring out water. In this case, sophisticated mechanical borers did the job:
      Thirty-seven years after the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, scientists, engineers, land managers, and federal, state, and county officials are still grappling with a challenge created by the eruption—how to prevent potentially massive downstream flooding by the release of water from Spirit Lake, located at the base of the volcano.
      A new report published this summer by the U.S. Forest Service describes the complex and interrelated natural hazards—volcanic, seismic, and hydrologic—and risks associated with several options to manage the water level of Spirit Lake (fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/54429). The USFS is the agency charged with management of the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument, including an engineered outlet for Spirit Lake.
A tunnel was constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers after
the Mount St. Helens eruption, to allow Spirit Lake water to flow again
into the Toutle River, in order to prevent catastrophic flooding below
the lake. Photo from Army Corps of Engineers
      The 1980 eruption began with an enormous landslide, released as a series of massive blocks of rock and ice from the volcano. Most of the sliding debris sped 22 km (13.7 mi) down the North Fort Toutle River, filling the valley to an average depth of about 45 m (148 ft) in about ten minutes.
      Part of the landslide slammed into Spirit Lake, blocking its natural outlet and raising the lake level by 60 m (197 ft). In the area between Spirit Lake and the North Fork Toutle River to the west, the landslide deposit is as thick as 195 m (640 ft).
      Without an outlet, the lake rose with each rainstorm and seasonal snowmelt. By August 1982, the lake level had risen another 16.5 m (54 ft). At that filling rate, water was projected to possibly breach the blockage and produce a catastrophic flood by 1985.
      Such a flood would likely lead to loss of life and extensive damage (more than $1 billion) in communities downstream along the Toutle, Cowlitz, and Columbia rivers.
A mammoth tunnel boring machine used to give relief to water in Spirit
 Lake after Mount St. Helens erupted. Photo from Army Corps of Engineers
      To mitigate this potential flood hazard, President Ronald Reagan, on Aug. 19, 1982, directed the Federal Emergency Management Agency to develop a strategy to prevent breaching of the landslide blockage. While various outlet alternatives were proposed and studied, a temporary pumping facility was installed to lower and stabilize the lake level.
     Ultimately, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed a 2.6-km (8,500 ft) long, 3.4-m (11 ft) diameter tunnel through a bedrock ridge on the west side of Spirit Lake to deliver its water back into the North Fork Toutle River. The tunnel has successfully controlled the lake level since 1985.
     However, several major and costly repairs to the tunnel, owing to damage caused by surrounding rock squeezing it, were necessary in 1995, 1996, and 2016. Additional repairs are expected in the future.
      When sections of the tunnel are repaired or upgraded, the tunnel is closed for many months. Repairs always happen during the winter rainy season to ensure adequate streamflow downstream for fish. With the tunnel closed, the lake level rises, and during each repair water has approached its maximum “safe” level.
Tunnel from Spirit Lake, following Mount Saint
Helens eruption's landslide blocking natural outflow of
water in the lake. Photo from Army Corps of Engineers
      Such high water levels raise concern. If the lake rises only a few meters (yards) higher than it has during prior repairs, for example during an exceptional weather event coincident with an extended tunnel closure, the consequences could be “severe” according the USFS report.
      To address this concern, an interagency task force evaluated risks associated with the current tunnel and alternative outlets. The new report summarizes those potential risks, including those to an engineered open channel just below the volcano’s north-facing crater, an option exposed to volcanic events that could block or damage the channel, and a buried pipe through the chaotic landslide deposit.
     Another much anticipated report is expected soon from the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (dels.nas.edu/Study-In-Progress/Long-term-Management-Spirit/DELS-BESR-15-03). This report will focus on a “framework for technical decision making related to the long-term management of risks related to the Spirit Lake/Toutle River system” and take into consideration “regional economic, cultural, and societal priorities.”
       As yet, the USFS has not made any decisions regarding a new outlet strategy. The new reports will help inform such decisions given the volcanic, seismic, and hydrologic hazards that threaten each alternative as well as the long-term costs.
     Visit HVO website for past Volcano Watch articles, volcano updates and photos, recent earthquake info, and more. Call for summary updates at 808-967-8862 (Kīlauea) or 808-967-8866 (Mauna Loa). Email questions to ask HVO@usgs.gov.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com
UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball 
Friday, Oct. 6, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe, home.
Wednesday, Oct. 11, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, away.
Friday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. Honoka'a, home.

Eight-Man Football
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, home.

Cross Country
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kea'au, away.
Saturday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. BIIF, away.

Cheerleading
Wednesday, Oct. 4, at Konawaena.
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at Kamehameha.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN ART CLASS until Tuesday, Oct. 3. The class, Cupcake Liner Owl, takes place from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at the Pāhala Community Center. For more, call 928-3102.

HAM RADIO OPERATORS POTLUCK PICNIC takes place Sunday, Oct. 1, at Manukā Park. All American Radio Emergency Service members, anyone interested in learning how to operate a ham radio and families are invited to attend. For more details, contact Dennis Smith at 989-3028.

VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS MONDAY, Oct. 2, at 4 p.m., at the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

TWO STORY TIME EVENTS ARE OFFERED AT KA'Ū LIBRARIES the first week of October. Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool staff will read a book aloud to keiki of all ages, with "a fun activity and snack provided following the story,” according to the event flier issued by Hawai‘i State Public Library System.
      Story Time is free to attend and will take place from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Public Library on Monday, Oct. 2, and from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Pāhala Public Library on Thursday, Oct. 5.
      For more information call Nā‘ālehu Public Library at 939-2442 or Pāhala Public Library at 928-2015. For more library events, visit librarieshawaii.org/events.

DANCE IMAGINED, a class lead by Karen Masaki that “encourages exploration and builds strength and fluidity for pure exhilaration of movement,” will be held on Tuesdays this month: Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31. The classes will take place at the Volcano Art Center from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and incur a fee of $20 non-members and $15 for Volcano Art Center members or $50 for the entire series. For more, call 967-8222.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY COUNCIL MEETS Tuesday, Oct. 3, and Wednesday, Oct. 4. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

KA‘Ū COFFEE GROWERS MEET TUESDAY, Oct. 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Pāhala Community Center.

NATIONAL COFFEE WITH A COP DAY takes place on Wednesday, Oct. 4. All are welcome to celebrate with Ka‘ū police officers from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Ka‘ū District Gymnasium Conference Room in Pāhala. The event is a casual talk-story opportunity with no agenda, where attendees can meet local police officers. Coffee and pastries will be available at no cost.

OPEN MIC NIGHT AT KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S LAVA LOUNGE, in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more details, call 967-8371.

HULA VOICES takes place on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Desiree Moana Cruz moderates this free event, with Kumu hula Iwalani Kalima of Hula Hālau O Kou Lima Nani E presenting her hula experiences. Park entrance fees apply.

OCEAN VIEW NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETS THURSDAY, Oct. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Ocean View Community Center.

SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS WHO HELP WITH ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGES IN THE COMMUNITY is offered by The Nature Conservancy. The Nature Conservancy has announced a call for applications through Nov. 3 for student projects that develop nature-based, green infrastructure solutions to an environmental challenge in their community. For full details on requirements, eligibility, and how to apply go to NatureWorksEverywhere.org/#grants.







Friday, September 29, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Friday, September 29, 2017

A monk seal rests along the Ka‘ū Coast. Photo by Julia Neal

MONK SEALS AND OTHER MARINE MAMMALS will be further protected as Hawai‘i conservation programs receive nearly $200,000 in National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funding for the recovery and treatment of stranded marine animals. Sen. Mazie Hirono said this morning, "Marine mammals are threatened by climate change, development, and pollution. This funding will help two Hawai‘i organizations with a history in marine mammal protection to conduct research on marine mammal mortality and rehabilitate and release monk seals."
     This year's John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance grant was awarded to The University of Hawai‘i and The Marine Mammal Center for their work to support conservation research. As part of the grant funding, UH will receive $100,000 to investigate causes of mortality in Pacific Island marine mammals.
     "Whales and dolphins are sentinels of ocean health, and like a canary in a coal mine are one of our first indicators of change to Hawai‘i's marine ecosystem," said Dr. Kristi West, standing director for the University of Hawai‘i at Manoa. "As the only entity in the state that conducts cause of death investigations for stranded dolphins and whales, we rely heavily on the Prescott grant to determine what threatens the survival of 20 different species of dolphins and whales that call Hawai‘i home."
Keiki play behind a monk seal at Honu‘apo years ago, during the
early efforts to conserve the Ka‘ū Coast. Photo by Julia Neal
     In addition, The Marine Mammal Center will receive $98,951 to support its Hawaiian Monk Seal Rehabilitation Program.
     "Public-private partnerships are essential for the successful conservation of the endangered Hawaiian monk seal," said Dr. Jeff Boehm, Executive Director of The Marine Mammal Center, which operates Ke Kai Ola in Kailua-Kona, a dedicated hospital for monk seals. "The critical funds from this award allow us to continue to rehabilitate vulnerable seals, understand health trends in the population, and enhance community involvement in recovery efforts."
     A statement from Hirono's office says that she continues to advocate for the protection of federal funding for NOAA. Earlier this year Hirono and Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) led a bipartisan letter to the Trump administration urging reconsideration of proposed cuts to NOAA's budget that would disproportionately hurt Hawai‘i and other coastal states.
     The Trump administration's 2018 budget proposal currently threatens to zero out funding for the John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program and other NOAA programs.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

ONE OF KA‘Ū'S SISTER COFFEE PRODUCING REGIONS IN THE U.S. IS PUERTO RICO where coffee plantations were recently ripped to shreds by Hurricane Maria. Puerto Rico and Hawai‘i are the only places coffee is grown in any quantity in the U.S. Ka‘ū coffee farmers have met their Puerto Rican counterparts numerous times at the annual Specialty Coffee Association of America conventions across the country as both regions have developed a specialty coffee. Coffee pickers from Puerto Rico also come to work in Ka‘ū.
     Jayson Harper, a professor of agricultural economics at Penn State University, who has spent time in Puerto Rico, told the Associated Press, which reported yesterday, that Hurricane Maria destroyed the high value crop that cannot be simply replanted like corn taken out by a tornado in the Midwest.
Coffee tree from Hacienda Pamarossa were ready for picking before
Hurricane Maria destroyed them and the industry. Only Hawai‘i
and Puerto Rico grow coffee in the U.S. Photo from Pamarossa
     He told AP writer David Pitt that coffee trees, when destroyed by wind, take several years to mature enough to produce beans again.
     The story stated that the Puerto Rican "coffee industry was hit at the worst time, just before the beans are picked, said Eva Legner, who with her husband Kurt operates Hacienda Pomarrosa in Ponce, a city on the island's southern coast where they have eight acres of coffee plants. The couple operates a small specialty coffee growing operation and a cottage where guests can stay on the coffee farm, tour the field and experience production. It is part of the island's growing agri-tourism industry.
     "She said the storm cut right through the island's mountainous coffee-growing area. The specialty beans their farm produces grow on bushes that are planted beneath taller trees to protect them from direct sun.
     "We've lost many trees which fell on the bushes and broke them," Legner said. "My husband tells me we lost a complete harvest," Legner told AP.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Image from change.org
THE STYROFOAM REDUCTION BILL is expected to be signed by Mayor Harry Kim, after passing the County Council and after much campaigning from individuals and non-profit organizations. The Hawai‘i County Council passed the bill last week. The council vote was 7 to 2, with Ka‘ū member Maile David in favor and only Aaron Chung and Sue Lee Loee Loy in opposition. It goes into effect July 1, 2019.
     Bill 13 reduces styrofoam use on the island by food vendors.
     The measure prohibits “food vendors from dispensing prepared food in disposable polystyrene food service ware.” The bill “exempts food packaged outside the limits of the County.” 
     It also allows for use of styrofoam ice chest and coolers; and packaging for raw meat, fish, and eggs that have not been further processed, 
     For years, proposals to cut back use of styrofoam have been proposed to the County Council but all have failed until now. Recently, Puna councilwoman Eileen O’Hara resurrected the effort by paring it back from an outside, business-wide, islandwide ban to use by those involved with county government.
     Mayor Harry Kim said he is grateful that the council gave him lead time for the transition. “They did a great job packing it into a tight bill,” he told West Hawai‘i Today.
     During the months prior to the bills passing, local non-profit Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund made many public posts on Facebook asking community members to send in written testimony in support of the bill using the hashtag reference #HOLDTHEFOAM. Foam Free Hawai‘i, another non-profit organization, shared an online petition found on change.org that sought to encourage Hawai‘i County Council to “Ban Single-Use EPS (Styrofoam) Containers in Hawai‘i County.”
     Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund’s Megan Lamson said there are solid reasons to ban styrofoam: negative impact to Hawai‘i’s marine environment, the economy, solid waste management, and common sense. To read more of her testimony, visit the Sept. 6 Ka‘ū News Briefs.
     See the films on the council meetings at Big Island Video News.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us Instagram and Twitter.
on 

THE ANNUAL ART SHOW WINNERS will be announced tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 30, between 10:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. at an Artist Reception, which is arranged by Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce in the CU Hawai'i Federal Credit Union Annex Building (behind CU) in Nā'ālehu.
     Door prizes and art show winner prizes will be distributed.
     The winning popular vote piece will be displayed on the cover of The Directory 2018, according to new Chamber co-chairs Alan Stafford and Allen Humble who describe the annual art show as a fundraiser for the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce scholarship program. For more details, visit the Chamber website at kauchamber.org or call 936-5288.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com

UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball 
Friday, Oct. 6, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe, home.
Wednesday, Oct. 11, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, away.
Friday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. Honoka'a, home.

Eight-Man Football
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, home.

Cross Country
Saturday, Sept. 30, Ka'ū vs. Waiakea, away.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kea'au, away.
Saturday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. BIIF, away.

Bowling
Saturday, Sept. 30, Ka'ū vs. Kamehameha at Kona Bowl.

Cheerleading
Wednesday, Oct. 4, at Konawaena.
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at Kamehameha.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN ART CLASS until Tuesday, Oct. 3. The class, Cupcake Liner Owl, takes place from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at the Pāhala Community Center. For more, call 928-3102.

Birth of Kahuku is offered tomorrow. Photo from nps.gov/HAVO
HAWAI'I FARMERS UNION United will hold its annual Ka'ū chapter meeting at Pāhala Plantation House, at 96-3209 Maile St. tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 30, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Members and friends are invited to participate in the Ka'ū Chapter business and Convention discussion, election of board members and a potluck dinner.

BIRTH OF KAHUKU a free hike within the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offered tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 30, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Explore the rich geologic history of Kahuku on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, with different volcano features and formations. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. Visit nps.gov/HAVO for more details.

NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY IS TOMORROW, SATURDAY, Sept. 30, and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering free entrance and two opportunities to help to remove invasive plant species, one in the park and the other in the Ocean View community.
     To join the Stewardship at the Summit program from 9 a.m. to noon, meet volunteers Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m., then head into the forest to remove Himalayan ginger from the summit of Kīlauea. Volunteers receive a free park pass to use on another date of choice. 
     In Ocean View, volunteers will remove invasive fountain grass. Meet at the Ocean View Community Center this Saturday, Sept. 30, at 9 a.m.; bring lunch, water, a hat and sun protection. Contact Park Ecologist David Benitez at 985-6085 or email him at david_benitez@nps.gov for more information about this project.

HAM RADIO OPERATORS POTLUCK PICNIC takes place Sunday, Oct. 1, at Manukā Park. All American Radio Emergency Service members, anyone interested in learning how to operate a ham radio and families are invited to attend. For more details, contact Dennis Smith at 989-3028.

VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS MONDAY, Oct. 2, at 4 p.m., at the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

TWO STORY TIME EVENTS ARE OFFERED AT KA'Ū LIBRARIES the first week of October. Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool staff will read a book aloud to keiki of all ages, with "a fun activity and snack provided following the story,” according to the event flier issued by Hawai‘i State Public Library System.
      Story Time is free to attend and will take place from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Public Library on Monday, Oct. 2, and from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Pāhala Public Library on Thursday, Oct. 5.
      For more information call Nā‘ālehu Public Library at 939-2442 or Pāhala Public Library at 928-2015. For more library events, visit librarieshawaii.org/events.

DANCE IMAGINED, a class lead by Karen Masaki that “encourages exploration and builds strength and fluidity for pure exhilaration of movement,” will be held on Tuesdays this month: Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31. The classes will take place at the Volcano Art Center from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and incur a fee of $20 non-members and $15 for Volcano Art Center members or $50 for the entire series. For more, call 967-8222.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY COUNCIL MEETS Tuesday, Oct. 3, and Wednesday, Oct. 4. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

KA‘Ū COFFEE GROWERS MEET TUESDAY, Oct. 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Pāhala Community Center.

OPEN MIC NIGHT AT KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S LAVA LOUNGE, in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more details, call 967-8371.

HULA VOICES takes place on Thursday, Oct. 5, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Desiree Moana Cruz moderates this free event, with Kumu hula Iwalani Kalima of Hula Hālau O Kou Lima Nani E presenting her hula experiences. Park entrance fees apply.

OCEAN VIEW NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETS THURSDAY, Oct. 5, at 7 p.m. in the Ocean View Community Center.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED TO HELP REMOVE INVASIVE, NON-NATIVE PLANT SPECIES that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This Stewardship at the Summit event will take place four times in October - Saturdays, Oct. 7 & 21, and Fridays, Oct. 13 & 27, at 9 a.m.
     To join the efforts, meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. on any of the aforementioned dates. Volunteers should wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants and bring a hat, rain-gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools will be provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, but park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.







Thursday, September 28, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Thursday, September 28, 2017

Michael Newman, working with KUPU at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Photo from KUPU
ENCOURAGING YOUNG PEOPLE TO VISIT AND WORK IN NATIONAL PARKS was the subject of a public hearing yesterday in Washington, D.C., convened by Sen. Mazie Hirono. Witnesses included John Leong, Chief Executive Officer of KUPU, an AmeriCorps program that provides young people with service learning and educational opportunities through maintaining and preserving Hawai‘i’s natural resources.
     “The work being done to improve our national parks is a vehicle that is helping to unlock the potential in our youth and it’s really allowing them to explore careers in conservation. But, at the same time they are getting transferable job skills like leadership, communication, teamwork, responsibility, the value of hard work, and transferable technical skills that they can take with them throughout life,” said Leong.
National Parks Subcommittee Chairman Sen. Steve Daines, Sen. Mazie 
Hirono, and John Leong, of KUPU. Photo from Mazie Hirono
    Said Hirono, “While America is growing more diverse and urban, and younger generations are making up a greater share of the population, these trends are not reflected in visitors to our national parks. KUPU and programs like it are helping to fill this gap by training our keiki to become stewards of the ‘āina and serve our communities as Hawai‘i’s future conservationists.”
     Hirono also heard from leaders at the National Park Service and Niantic, the makers of Pokemon Go, regarding challenges and opportunities for national parks to engage the next generation of park visitors and conservation workers.
     According to a 2015 report, only seven percent of National Park Service employees were 29 or younger, while 75 percent were 40 or older. However, said Hirono, the Trump administration’s budget proposes a 13 percent cut to the NPS’s overall budget and an 11 percent cut to visitor services.
     A statement from Hirono's office noted that shte Senator, who is the Ranking Member of teh senate Energy and Natural Resouces Subcommittee on National Parks, "has been a strong advocate for federal funding to support workforce development for future leaders in conservation and to ensure that people of all ages have access to our national parks." In August, Hirono met with leaders and interns from KUPU and the state Department of Land & Natural Resources.
     Programs like KUPU help provide job training and opportunities for youth interested in pursuing
careers in conservation. As a result of this partnership, there are many DLNR workforce who are
KUPU corps members or alumni, Hirono stated.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

LOW INCOME HOUSING FOR NATIVE HAWAIIANS was on Rep. Tulsi Gabbard's agenda today when she joined a bipartisan coalition of lawmakers in introducing the reauthorization of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self Determination Act. She said it has empowered more than 1,400 low-income families in Hawaiʻi over the past two decades, along with native communities across the country. In addition to the introduction of the bill today in the House, U.S. Senator Tom Udall has also introduced companion language in the U.S. Senate.
    “Reauthorizing NAHASDA is critical to fulfill our nation’s trust responsibility to Native Americans, Alaska Natives, and Native Hawaiians. Safe, secure, and affordable housing is essential to the wellbeing of our country’s native people which leads to better health, education, and economic outcomes that strengthen native communities,” said Gabbard.
     “In Hawaiʻi, almost 30 percent of the homeless population is comprised of Native Hawaiians—a statistic that is far too high in the most prosperous country in the world. Reauthorizing NAHASDA provides needed financial support to native communities in Hawaiʻi and across the country. We must continue to fight for the programs that will improve housing and wellness resources for Native American, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities throughout the country,” said Gabbard.
In Hawaiʻi, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands is the sole recipient of the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant as provided for by the law. DHHL administers 203,000 acres of trust land; 99 percent of those lands are located in Hawai‘i’s Second Congressional District: from the southernmost tip of Hawai‘i Island to Kauaʻi and Niʻihau; it includes every Hawaiian Island, but excludes urban Honolulu. Ka‘ū lands are at Ka Lae and above Punalu‘u.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

THE ANNUAL KA‘U COFFEE TRAIL RUN organizer ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou has announced the success of last weekend's event that drew 188 runners, joggers and walkers who crossed the finish line at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Six flew in from Austria, Canada, United Kingdom and New Zealand and 20 from 11 states outside of Hawai‘i.
Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Flower, Evalyn Ornelas,
 was one of the greeters for the Ka‘ū Coffee Trail
 Run finishers, giving them a koa lei and a high five.
Photo by Trini Marques
     OKK brought much entertainment to the scene, including Eddie O of Nutrex Hawai‘i, who announced the winners on a sunny day that began with the Hilo Okinawa Kohudo Taiko Drummers pounding out an inspiring rhythm to the start line. Volunteers numbered, including OKK members, the Hawai‘i National Guard Youth Challenge Academy who closed the event with a ceremonial drill, the Ka‘ū High School Athletic teams, Team BioAstin, retired Police Officers, the Ham Radio Operators from Ocean View and the Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Court.
      The race, sponsored by County of Hawai‘i, Edmund C. Olson Trust II,  Ka‘ū Coffee Mill, HPM Building Supplies, and Pacific Quest, was followed by local food from several vendors, live entertainment and award presentations.
      The statement from ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou promises that "all proceeds from the event go back into the Ka‘ū community in the form of providing school supplies and scholarships to students; fundraising assistance for schools, athletic teams and other organizations; producing the annual Keiki Fishing Tournament; performing minor home repairs and installing grab bars and ramps for seniors; running stewardship projects for the highway, beaches, cemeteries and much more."
     Read more about the organization and the race at www.okaukakou.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com
UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball 
Friday, Sept. 29, Ka'ū vs. Pahoa, away.
Friday, Oct. 6, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe, home.
Wednesday, Oct. 11, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, away.
Friday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. Honoka'a, home.

Eight-Man Football
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, home.

Cross Country
Saturday, Sept. 30, Ka'ū vs. Waiakea, away.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kea'au, away.
Saturday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. BIIF, away.

Bowling
Saturday, Sept. 30, Ka'ū vs. Kamehameha at Kona Bowl.

Cheerleading
Wednesday, Oct. 4, at Konawaena.
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at Kamehameha.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN ART CLASS until Tuesday, Oct. 3. The class, Cupcake Liner Owl, takes place from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at the Pāhala Community Center. For more, call 928-3102.

THE ANNUAL ART SHOW, organized by Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce, will be open for public viewing through tomorrow, Friday, Sept. 29, in the CU Hawai'i Federal Credit Union Annex Building (behind CU) in Nā'ālehu, during normal credit union business hours.
   An Artist Reception for distribution of prizes and art pickup will be the morning of Saturday, Sept. 30.  The winning popular vote art will be displayed on the cover of The Directory 2018, according to new Chamber co-chairs Alan Stafford and Allen Humble who describe the annual art show as a fundraiser for the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce scholarship program. For more details, visit the Chamber website at kauchamber.org or call 936-5288.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP. MEETS tomorrow, Friday, Sept. 29, at 5 p.m., at the Hawaiian Ranchos office.

THE ENDANGERED HAWAIIAN PETREL, ‘UA‘U, will be the subject of discussion at Coffee Talk tomorrow, Friday, Sept. 29, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. inside the Visitor Center at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' National Park.
     Hawai‘i Volcanoes' National Park Avian Research Technician Charlotte Forbes-Perry will present a talk about the life of the ‘ua‘u and the National Park’s efforts to monitor and protect them.
     Ka‘ū coffee, tea and pastries will be available for purchase. Entrance to the event and park is free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

HAWAI'I FARMERS UNION United will hold its annual Ka'ū chapter meeting at Pāhala Plantation House, at 96-3209 Maile St. this Saturday, Sept. 30, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Members and friends are invited to participate in the Ka'ū Chapter business and Convention discussion, election of board members and a potluck dinner.

BIRTH OF KAHUKU a free hike within the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offered Saturday, Sept. 30, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Explore the rich geologic history of Kahuku on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, with different volcano features and formations. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. Visit nps.gov/HAVO for more details.

NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY IS SATURDAY, Sept. 30, and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering free entrance and two opportunities to help to remove invasive plant species, one in the park and the other in the Ocean View community.
     To join the Stewardship at the Summit program from 9 a.m. to noon, meet volunteers Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m.,  who will lead the effort to remove Himalayan ginger from the summit of Kīlauea. Volunteers receive a free park pass to use on another date of choice. 
     In Ocean View, volunteers will remove invasive fountain grass. Meet at the Ocean View Community Center this Saturday, Sept. 30, at 9 a.m.; bring lunch, water, a hat and sun protection. Contact Park Ecologist David Benitez at 985-6085 or email him at david_benitez@nps.gov for more information about this project.

HAM RADIO OPERATORS POTLUCK PICNIC takes place Sunday, Oct. 1, at Manukā Park. All American Radio Emergency Service members, anyone interested in learning how to operate a ham radio and families are invited to attend. For more details, contact Dennis Smith at 989-3028.

VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS MONDAY, Oct. 2, at 4 p.m., at the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

TWO STORY TIME EVENTS ARE OFFERED AT KA'Ū LIBRARIES the first week of October. Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool staff will read a book aloud to keiki of all ages, with "a fun activity and snack provided following the story,” according to the event flier issued by Hawai‘i State Public Library System.
      Story Time is free to attend and will take place from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Public Library on Monday, Oct. 2, and from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Pāhala Public Library on Thursday, Oct. 5.  For more information call Nā‘ālehu Public Library at 939-2442 or Pāhala Public Library at 928-2015. For more library events, visit librarieshawaii.org/events.

DANCE IMAGINED, a class lead by Karen Masaki that “encourages exploration and builds strength and fluidity for pure exhilaration of movement,” will be held on Tuesdays this month: Oct. 3, 10, 17, 24, and 31. The classes will take place at the Volcano Art Center from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and incur a fee of $20 non-members and $15 for Volcano Art Center members or $50 for the entire series. For more, call 967-8222.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY COUNCIL MEETS Tuesday, Oct. 3, and Wednesday, Oct. 4. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

KA‘Ū COFFEE GROWERS MEET TUESDAY, Oct. 3, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Pāhala Community Center.

OPEN MIC NIGHT AT KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S LAVA LOUNGE, in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, is scheduled for Wednesday, Oct. 4, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. to sign up. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more details, call 967-8371.

HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS ARE ENCOURAGED TO ENROLL in the The Kohala Center’s High School Sustainable Agriculture Program. The next session is at TKC's Demonstration Farm in Honoka’a, Oct. 9 to 13, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The Kohala Center's Rural and Cooperative Business Development Services says, “The weeklong program features hands-on training in sustainable agriculture practices and visits to important traditional Hawaiian agricultural sites and farms. Students will also learn about opportunities in farming and supporting Hawai'i's food security. Contact Dave Sansone at 808-887-6411 or dsansone@kohalacenter.org for more information.”





Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Wednesday, September 27, 2017

Firefighters are watching over the 1,645 acre Waikapuna fire which is largely contained, but at risk of reigniting.
WHAT CAUSED THE WAIKAPUNA BRUSHFIRE THAT BURNED 1,645 ACRES along the Ka‘ū Coast and spread inland with smoke across ranches, Discovery Harbour, Mark Twain, South Point and Wai‘ōhinu residential neighborhoods? While no evacuations were ordered, it was a fire that brought some residents to consider leaving their homes.
Due to limited 4x4 access roads, the location of the fire,
and strong trade winds, it tool ground crews two hours
 to reach the fire.
     The most common cause of remote brushfires, according to firefighters, are cigarettes thrown on the ground and camp and cooking fires not fully extinguished. Sometimes a spark from a vehicle can ignite a fire. Another possibility is arson. The Fire Department is investigating and clues can be shared by calling Crime Stoppers at 961-8300.
     The fire was first seen and reported by area residents before dawn on Thursday, Sept. 21. It was hard to reach and the Fire Department reported: "Due to the location of the fire" and "limited 4x4 access roads," when the first units were eventually able to arrive at the scene, almost two hours later, approximately five acres of grass and brush were “actively burning.” 
     According to the Fire Department, 14 county firefighters and 12 volunteer firefighters responded. Bulldozers to make firebreaks, water hauling vehicles, and helicopters to track the fire and drop water arrived. However, strong trade winds caused the fire to spread on Thursday. With much of the area inaccessible to ground vehicles, the Fire Department reported, as of 6 p.m. Thursday, 840 acres had burned.
     Civil Defense warned residents and travelers to be on the lookout for emergency vehicles. "Smoke from the fire may affect visibility for driving and air quality for Wai‘ōhinu area including Green Sands, Mark Twain Estates and Discovery Harbour. The public is requested to stay out of the active fire area.”
Fire crews worked day and night for five days before
the brushfire could be called contained.
     Through the firefighters efforts, however, the spreading fire "slowed down throughout nighttime hours," on Thursday, though "much of area [was] still actively burning" on Friday, announced the Fire Department. By mid-morning Saturday, the winds picking up, the fire had grown again, "substantially" with "about 1,400 acres" burned, the Fire Department reported.
     The brushfire "is long, reaching from Waikapuna Bay to within 0.75 miles of Green Sands Subdivision, and has more than a dozen spot fires outside the main burn area,” said Saturday’s release. It has "continued to burn through uneven terrain with variable fuel/vegetation mixtures." The "spot fires range from 100 square feet to several acres. Air support by two helicopters using water drops assisted ground units who were extinguishing fires that had jumped firebreaks.”
     The Fire Department reported that by nightfall on Saturday, “the fire was contained, with no further fires outside of [4-wheel drive] roads widened by bull dozers, creating a perimeter for the approximately 1,600 acre fire.”
    After weekend rains helped douse the fire, brining it to a crawl, Sunday's release said 1,645 acres were the total consumed.
     The Fire Department described the location as "rugged plains with limited 4x4 vehicle access" over "primarily cattle pasture, with some native trees and archeology of unknown periods."
County and volunteer crews, private bulldozer operators, water haulers
and helicopter pilots, worked together to tame the flames. 
Police and fire officials said today that the cause of the fire
remained undetermined. No structures burned.
     Area residents posted about the fire on The Ka‘ū Calendar Facebook:
     From Thomas Pasquale: "Thank you for reporting on this. As we smelled smoke and watched the fire spread closer and closer to Green Sands and Mark Twain subdivisions on Saturday, we kept checking back on the Civil Defense website all day for any update. Even now, at 10 a.m. on Sunday, their latest alert is dated last Thursday at 6 p.m. Don't get me wrong, we are infinitely thankful for the hard work of all the County and volunteer firefighters. They are our heroes. But, the County could have at least updated their message to reassure us that we did not, in fact, need to start planning to evacuate. Am I wrong?"
     From Leah Silver Kotuby: “How tragic. Hope no animals or people have been injured.”
     From Sherrie LaRue Bazin: “Thank you for all who have served to keep our community safe… you are appreciated!!!”
1,645 acres burned along the Ka‘ū coast near Waikapuna,
most of which was cattle ranch land, with some native trees
and archeological sites.
     From Candy Casper: “Love to all of our firefighters, volunteer and paid. Lizzy Stabo (volunteer firefighter), you are really something! Thanks!!!”
     From Alikka Tag: “Be safe out there, we see & appreciate your efforts.”
     Some Ka‘ū community members voiced concern on other public Facebook pages about the preservation of cultural sites while bulldozing firebreaks.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

CANDIDATES FOR THE KA‘Ū COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN ACTION COMMITTEES are sought by the County of Hawai‘i Planning Department. "Action Committee members should be community-minded, reflect a wide variety of perspectives, and represent a broad spectrum of the community," says a statement from the Planning Department. County of Hawai‘i Website. The Planning Department encourages Ka‘ū residents to share this opportunity "within your personal and professional networks."
      A memo from the Planning Director briefly outlining the role of Action Committee members is available on the County of Hawai`i Website.
     Applications are accessible at Hawai‘i County Mayor's Website; Mayor Harry Kim's offices in Hilo at 25 Aupuni Street, and his office in Kona at 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Highway, Bldg C, Kailua-Kona.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TWO COUNTY DEPARTMENT HEADS AND A DEPUTY HAVE RESIGNED. A news alert from Nancy Cook Lauer, of West Hawai‘i Today, says that county Human Resources Director Sharon Toriano resigned today, “following a critical audit that showed ‘questionable hiring practices,’ and a Monday newspaper article indicating preferential treatment of job applicants through her use of sticky notes on official hiring documents.”
     Cook Lauer reported that Mayor Harry Kim said he told the Merit Appeals Board and County Council chairs, about the importance of restoring public confidence in county hiring practices. He said he did not ask for Toriano’s resignation. Cook Lauer reported the mayor saying, “My goal is to resolve this as best we can without creating an atmosphere of a circus.”
      Deputy Human Resources Deputy Director William Brilhante, a former Deputy County Attorney, was accepted by the Merit Board as Acting Director.
Bill Brilhante is acting Human Resources Director. He
is a former Deputy County Attorney.
     County Department of Parks & Recreation Director Charmaine Kamaka and Deputy Director Ryan Chong resigned earlier, according to an announcement this week by the mayor. Regarding Parks & Recreation, the statement from the mayor’s office said that Kim thanked Kamaka and Chong, “and praised them for their very good and hard work. We are very grateful for all that Charmaine and Ryan have done for the community,” the Mayor said. “They took on a very difficult task and did good work.”
    Roxcie Waltjen, the Department’s Culture Education Administrator, has been asked to fill in as the interim Director of Parks & Recreation. Kim said that a letter to the County Council for Waltjen’s confirmation will be drafted this week.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Seniors Daryl Moreira and Revis Petitt
at Kea‘au High School on Sept. 16.
Next race is at Waiakea High School 
on Sept. 30.
Senior Revis Petitt, Freshmen Bernadette 
Ladia and Angel Morton-Dahlstedt 
cool off after 5K race at Kamehameha 
High School on Sept. 9.

KA‘Ū HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY team is traveling to meets, from Kea‘au High to Kamehameha School with the next race at Waiakea High School, this Saturday, Sept. 30, at 10 a.m. Coach Erin Cole has been working with the team after school on weekdays, running through the spacious Ka‘ū High campus in Pahala.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

KA‘Ū HIGH GIRLS VOLLEYBALL suffered a setback Wednesday evening, losing to Ehunui at home. With only a varsity match, scores were 25-18, 25-16, 24-26, 15-25 and 8-15. Next game is Thursday on the road against Pahoa.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Pick up the October edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli'i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com
UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball
Friday, Sept. 29, Ka'ū vs. Pahoa, away.
Friday, Oct. 6, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe, home.
Wednesday, Oct. 11, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, away.
Friday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. Honoka'a, home.

Eight-Man Football
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, home.

Cross Country
Saturday, Sept. 30, Ka'ū vs. Waiakea, away.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kea'au, away.
Saturday, Oct. 13, Ka'ū vs. BIIF, away.
Bowling
Saturday, Sept. 30, Ka'ū vs. Kamehameha at Kona Bowl.

Cheerleading
Wednesday, Oct. 4, at Konawaena.
Wednesday, Oct. 18, at Kamehameha.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

THE ANNUAL ART SHOW, organized by Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce, is open for public viewing through Friday, Sept. 29, in the CU Hawai'i Federal Credit Union Annex Building (behind CU) in Nā'ālehu, during normal credit union business hours.
   An Artist Reception for distribution of prizes and art pickup will be the morning of Saturday, Sept. 30.
     Categories include: painting, graphics, photography, craft, lei, weaving, jewelry, quilting, sculpture, and woodworking. There will also be categories for Youth and Keiki entries.
     The winning popular vote piece will be displayed on the cover of The Directory 2018, according to new Chamber co-chairs Alan Stafford and Allen Humble who describe the annual art show as a fundraiser for the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce scholarship program. For more details, visit the Chamber website at kauchamber.org or call 936-5288.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR AN ART CLASS until Tuesday, Oct. 3. The class, Cupcake Liner Owl, takes place from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at the Pāhala Community Center. For more, call 928-3102.

A SPECIAL OPEN HOUSE FOR VETERANS TO PREVIEW the newly installed Telehealth Medical Equipment at Ocean View Community Center is planned for tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 28, from 10 a.m. to noon. For more information, read the Ka'ū News Briefs from September 10 and September 19, or call 939-7033.

A PERFECT DAY FOR AN ALBATROSS is a book for signing by Volcano artist Caren Loebel-Fried during her talk story with seabird biologist Cynthia Vanderlip tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 28, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Volcano Art Center, Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village.
     The artist shares personal experience researching on Midway Atoll, and explains how she created the book. She will sign copies and personalize limited edition prints of book art, and display original work.
     Vanderlip will share her work experience in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands since 1989 for National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the state Department of Land & Natural Resources and Oceanic Society as a biologist, technician, naturalist and U.S. Coast Guard-licensed boat captain. She leads annual field camps at Kure Atoll for the DLNR, Division of Forestry & Wildlife. 
     See more of Caren Loebel-Fried Art at carenloebelfried.com.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP. MEETS Friday, Sept. 29, at 5 p.m., at the Hawaiian Ranchos office.

THE ENDANGERED HAWAIIAN PETREL, ‘UA‘U, will be the subject of discussion at Coffee Talk on Friday, Sept. 29, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. inside the Visitor Center at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' National Park.
     Hawai‘i Volcanoes' National Park Avian Research Technician Charlotte Forbes-Perry will present a talk about the life of the ‘ua‘u and the National Park’s efforts to monitor and protect them.
     Ka‘ū coffee, tea and pastries will be available for purchase. Entrance to the event and park is free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

HAWAI'I FARMERS UNION United will hold its annual Ka'ū chapter meeting at Pāhala Plantation House, at 96-3209 Maile St. this Saturday, Sept. 30, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. Members and friends are invited to participate in the Ka'ū Chapter business and Convention discussion, election of board members and a potluck dinner.

BIRTH OF KAHUKU a free hike within the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offered tomorrow, Sept. 30, from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Explore the rich geologic history of Kahuku on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, with different volcano features and formations. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. Visit nps.gov/HAVO for more details.

NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY IS SATURDAY, Sept. 30, and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is offering free entrance and two opportunities to help to remove invasive plant species, one in the park and the other in the Ocean View community.
     To join the Stewardship at the Summit program from 9 a.m. to noon, meet volunteers Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m., then head into the forest to remove Himalayan ginger from the summit of Kīlauea. Volunteers receive a free park pass to use on another date of choice. 
     In Ocean View, volunteers will remove invasive fountain grass. Meet at the Ocean View Community Center this Saturday, Sept. 30, at 9 a.m.; bring lunch, water, a hat and sun protection. Contact Park Ecologist David Benitez at 985-6085 or email him at david_benitez@nps.gov for more information about this project.

HAM RADIO OPERATORS POTLUCK PICNIC takes place Sunday, Oct. 1, at Manukā Park. All American Radio Emergency Service members, anyone interested in learning how to operate a ham radio and families are invited to attend. For more details, contact Dennis Smith at 989-3028.

VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS MONDAY, Oct. 2, at 4 p.m., at the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

TWO STORY TIME EVENTS ARE OFFERED AT KA'Ū LIBRARIES the first week of October. Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool staff will read a book aloud to keiki of all ages, with "a fun activity and snack provided following the story,” according to the event flier issued by Hawai‘i State Public Library System.
     Story Time is free to attend and will take place from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Public Library on Monday, Oct. 2, and from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Pāhala Public Library on Thursday, Oct. 5.
     For more information call Nā‘ālehu Public Library at 939-2442 or Pāhala Public Library at 928-2015. For more library events, visit librarieshawaii.org/events.