About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Ka'ū News Briefs Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Albatross in Flight, a hand-colored block print, as seen in A Perfect Day for an Albatross, a new
book by Volcano artist Caren Loebel-Fried, with book signing and discussion with seabird biologist 
Cynthia Vanderlip on Thursday, Sept. 28. See story below.
FILL DIPLOMATIC APPOINTMENTS is the directive in the letter to Pres. Donald Trump from Sen. Mazie Hirono and nine other U.S. Senators today. Hirono, who serves on the Senate Armed Services Committee, says that diplomacy is key to avoiding war with North Korea.
It may look a little like Florida but
this is the Korean Peninsula where
diplomacy could prevent war, says
Sen. Mazie Hirono. 
Sen. Mazie Hirono 
     The letter to Trump states: "As North Korea continues its illegal nuclear weapons program, commits blatant violations of international law, and makes threats to our country and allies, the confirmation of a U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea must be prioritized to send a concrete signal to reassure not only our ROK allies but also the American people. Just as our diplomatic mission to the ROK deserves leadership of an ambassador to represent our nation's interests, our country's diplomatic and military efforts in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region deserve permanent Assistant Secretaries of State and Defense to coordinate our diplomatic efforts on North Korea, other regional challenges as well as opportunities to advance U.S. interests."
     Hirono and nine Senate Democrats also call on Trump to fill the vacancies for Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs and Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs. "These key positions have gone unfilled in over eight months of the Trump presidency. In the wake of North Korea's actions, Senate-confirmed nominees for these positions would provide stable leadership and coordinate State and Defense Department efforts as our country works with our allies and partners to reach a diplomatic solution," says the letter.
     Hirono and colleagues point out that the United States has diplomatic relations with over 190 nations "but none are as extensive and instrumental to our national security as those with our treaty allies such as the ROK. The U.S.-ROK alliance was strengthened by the bonds forged between U.S. and ROK troops during the Korean War and it continues to be strengthened by the Korean-American community, our economic ties and our mutual defense treaty commitments."
     To date, the Senate has confirmed 20 ambassadorial nominees including six to close allied nations. "It is critical now for our government to affirmatively convey to our ROK allies that our relationship is valued in the same manner as these nations, and as senators we stand ready to consider your nominees," states the letter, which also calls for Trump to respond.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Hawai'i is the most racially and ethnically diverse state, and third
most diverse overall. See the study at WalletHub.com
HAWAI'I IS THE MOST ETHNIC AND RACIALLY DIVERSE STATE, and the second most generationally diverse state, according to a study released today by WalletHub. The company set out to determine where the most idea and identity exchanges have occurred at the highest level in the U.S. — and where the population is relatively more homogeneous. WalletHub's analysts compared the 50 states across five key categories: socio-economic, cultural, economic, household and religious diversity.
     Hawai'i comes in first in Racial & Ethnic Diversity, second in Generational Diversity, third in Income Diversity and Household Size Diversity, fourth in Worker Class Diversity, ninth in Linguistic Diversity, 14th in Birthplace Diversity, 22nd in Industry Diversity, 27th in Educational-Attainment Diversity and 30th in Occupational Diversity. The economic measures covered only the civilian population and did not include the military.
     Hawai'i ranks as the third most diverse state overall, after California and Texas, and just ahead of New Jersey, New York and New Mexico. The least diverse, according to WalletHub is West Virginia, with Maine second and Vermont, New Hampshire, Montana and Kentucky, behind them.
     Read the full report on diversity, how the study was done and what it means at WalletHub.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TELEHEALTH COMES IN OCEAN VIEW and the public is invited to check it out on Thursday, Sept. 28, from 10 a.m. to noon at Ocean View Community Center.
     The Kona Veterans Administration Community Based Outreach Center has helped to bring in the new method of health care. VA staff will share innovations in technology that will increase care for veterans. The public will view telehealth equipment, observe demonstrations and speak with VA providers.
     Ocean View Community Association President Ron Gall said: "The Telehealth equipment was donated to the Ocean View Community Association by GlobalMed Telemedicine. It was installed and tested today and volunteers will be trained on the equipment this week. The VA has targeted November 1st to launch the system. Veterans will be able to have real time visits with a Kona VA doctor without traveling to Kona."
     For more information, Call David Willard at 329-0574 or Ron Gall at 939-7033.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

THE KA'Ū COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PLAN, Bill 52, AND THE ISLANDWIDE STYROFOAM BAN, Bill 13, will be discussed again at tomorrow's Hawai'i County Council Meeting in Kona at the West Hawai'i Civic Center, starting at 9 a.m. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building or by attending the meeting.
     To read more about these bills visit previous Ka'ū News Briefs, Bill 13 - Styrofoam Ban and for Bill 52 - Ka'ū CDP.

Caren Loebel-Fried on Midwahy Atol,
Photo by Dan Clark
A PERFECT DAY FOR AN ALBATROSS is a new book with writing and illustrations by Volcano artist Caren Loebel-Fried. The public is invited to a book signing and discussion with Loebel-Fried and seabird biologist Cynthia Vanderlip on Thursday, Sept. 28, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Volcano Art Center, Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village.
       School Library Journal describes the book as “A wonderful introduction to a magnificent sea bird, this vibrantly illustrated story belongs on every shelf.”
    The artist will share personal experience researching on Midway Atoll, and explain how she created the book, A Perfect Day for an Albatross. She will sign copies of her book, and personalize limited edition prints of the book art. The original art created for the book will also be on display.
       Cynthia Vanderlip has worked in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands since 1989 for National Marine Fisheries Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the state Department of Land & Natural Resources and Oceanic Society as a biologist, technician, naturalist and U.S. Coast Guard-licensed boat captain. Since 2002, Vanderlip has led annual field camps at Kure Atoll for the DLNR, Division of Forestry & Wildlife. 
Cynthia Vanderlip on Kure Atoll.  Photo by Hawane Rios
     See more of Caren Loebel-Fried Art at carenloebelfried.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TWO STORY TIME EVENTS ARE OFFERED AT KA'Ū LIBRARIES the first week of October. Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool staff will read a book aloud to keiki of all ages, with "a fun activity and snack provided following the story,” according to the event flier issued by Hawai‘i State Public Library System.
      Story Time is free to attend and will take place from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Public Library on Monday, Oct. 2, and from 10:30 a.m. to noon at Pāhala Public Library on Thursday, Oct. 5.
      For more information call Nā‘ālehu Public Library at 939-2442 or Pāhala Public Library at 928-2015. For more library events, visit librarieshawaii.org/events.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
Pick up the September edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at kaucalendar.com

UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball
Wednesday, Sept. 20, Ka'ū vs. Konawaena, away.
Friday, Sept. 22, Ka'ū vs. Christian Liberty, home.

Eight-Man Football
 Thursday, Sept. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, away game at Kea'au Field.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pahoa, home.

Cross Country
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Hawai'i Prep, away.

Bowling
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe at Kona Bowl.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.


OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD meets tomorrow, Wednesday, Sept. 20, at noon in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

MELE AND HULA will be presented by Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa, tomorrow, Wednesday, Sept. 20, at Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, the halau mission is to strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. The event is free. Park entrance fees apply. Hawai'i Volcano National Park's interpretation division is the sponsor.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA'Ū meets Thursday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m. at Nā'ālehu Methodist Church. The new President is Berkeley Yoshida. For more details, call Blossom DeSilva at 929-9731.

IN AN EFFORT TO KEEP KEIKI SAFE, National Child Passenger Safety Certification, a Safe Kids Worldwide program, is offering free car seat checks at Pāhala Community Center on Friday, Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon. Partners for Safe Keiki and Hawai’i County Fire Department co-sponsor the event. All are welcome.
     Those with recalled or structurally unsound car seats will receive a free new car seat, acquired through grant funding from the Department of Transportation. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call or text 808-896-1336. For information about Child Passenger Safety, visit safekids.org.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY HOSTS A VOLUNTEER DAY at its Kona Hema Preserve in South Kona on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     Space is limited so those wanting to volunteer must contact Schubert in advance to reserve a spot on one of the trucks. For more, read the Ka'ū News Briefs from September 8. To contact Schubert, email lschubert@tnc.org or call 443-5401.

Register online by Sept. 21.
For more details, see the Ka'ū News Briefs from Aug. 30, 2017.
HAWAI’I SEED FEST: LOCAL SEEDS FOR LOCAL NEEDS, sponsored by The Kohala Center and Hawai’i Seed Growers Network, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon in Pāhoa and Honalõ.
     "Check out variety trials in progress, learn how to conduct successful trials in your garden, enjoy refreshments and tastings of crops being grown from local seed, talk story with a local seed grower, and meet others in your community interested in improving local food security," says an announcement from The Kohala Center. Attendance is free but space is limited. Reserve online at localseeds.eventbrite.com or call The Kohala Center at 808-887-6411. Visit Hawai'i Seed Growers Network.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place Saturday, September 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

THE 4TH ANNUAL KA'Ū COFFEE TRAIL RUN with races starting and ending at the Ka'ū Coffee Mill will take place this Saturday, Sept. 23. Staggered gun starts begin at 7 a.m. Runners will receive a race goodie bag, including a T-shirt and more. Each registered participant will also be entered into a door prize drawing valued at $700.
     Trail terrains vary between races: the 5K is a family-friendly, run/walk trail through macadamia nut groves and coffee fields; the 10K is a moderate run through macadamia nut groves and coffee fields; and the Half Marathon follows the 5K & 10K course, then continues up to an elevation of 3,100 feet, traverses onto a 4-wheel drive access road, marked trails undulating through grazing pastures. Through midnight on Thursday, Sept. 21, runners can register online at webscorer.com/
register?raceid=94997 with the following prices: 5K/$55, 10K/$65, and HM/$75. 
      Free music and entertainment and post-race massages will also be available for $1.00/Minute at the event.
      Race day registration ends at 6:30 a.m. For more details about the event visit okaukakou.org/kau-coffee-trail-run/.

ACOUSTIC INSTRUMENT PLAYERS, DRUMMERS, SINGERS AND DANCERS ARE WELCOMED for Kanikapila on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Nā‘ālehu Methodist Church Hall. For more, call Desmond at 937-6305.

Palm Trail in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
Photo from NPS/Sami Steinkamp
THE KOHALA CENTER’S DEMONSTRATION FARM HOSTS A FIELD DAY on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (45-434 Lehua St, Honoka’a).
     The Kohala Center’s event description offers "a farm tour, hands-on training, and planting of an agroforestry system designed to diversify crops, control weeds naturally, and improve soil health."
    This event is open to the public, with high school students and teachers encouraged to learn about the upcoming fall High School Sustainable Agriculture Program.
      Contact Dave Sansone at sansone@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411 for more information.

JOIN A GUIDED HIKE ALONG THE PALM TRAIL on Sunday, Sept. 24, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. within the Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. This moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

A VOLLEYBALL CLINIC for five to 14 year-old youth, co-sponsored by the Hawai'i Police Department, will be held at Ka'ū District Gym from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on Monday Sept. 25. The instructor will be Ka'ū High School girls volleyball coach Joshua Ortega and coaching staff, assisted by the Ka'ū High School Girls Volleyball team. Gym or court shoes required. Participants must turn in a signed registration waiver form. For more information, and to register, call Ka'ū District Gym at 928-3102.

http://kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory_2017.swf
ART ENTRIES WILL BE ACCEPTED ON MONDAY, SEPT. 25 for the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce's Annual Art Show. The art show will be open for public viewing from Tuesday, Sept. 26, to Friday, Sept. 29, in the CU Hawai'i Federal Credit Union Annex Building (behind CU) in Nā'ālehu, during normal credit union business hours.
   An Artist Reception for distribution of prizes and art pickup will be the morning of Saturday, Sept. 30.
     Categories include: painting, graphics, photography, craft, lei, weaving, jewelry, quilting, sculpture, and woodworking. There will also be categories for Youth and Keiki entries, for which the entry fee is $1 per artwork - CU Hawai'i has offered to sponsor any and all keiki who ask.
     The winning popular vote piece will be displayed on the cover of The Directory 2018, according to new Chamber co-chairs Alan Stafford and Allen Humble who describe the annual art show as a fundraiser for the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce scholarship program. For more details, visit the Chamber website at kauchamber.org or call 936-5288.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR ART: For Metal Stamped Bracelets, register until Sept. 26. The art class will take place at Pāhala Community Center on Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102.


Monday, September 18, 2017

Ka'ū News Briefs Monday, September 18, 2017

Thank a Police Officer Day brought keiki and community together with Ka'ū police on Saturday, with
donations from local people and local businesses. See story below. Photo by Peter Anderson
REPEAL AND REPLACE THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT is on the agenda this week for the U.S. Senate. Hawai'i Sen. Brian Schatz sent out an alert today saying that Senate Republican leader "Mitch McConnell and Donald Trump are lobbying Senate Republicans to try yet again to repeal your health care. And here’s the terrifying part: They only need to flip one vote by the end of September to pass a repeal bill.
     "I am not exaggerating here. I am really alarmed. Millions of Americans are at risk of losing their health care in just two weeks," claims Schatz. "They think if enough people believe Trumpcare is dead, they can rush their bill through Congress before we have a chance to organize and fight back."
     He said that he and other Senate Democrats are taking the Senate floor tonight "to try to stop this disastrous repeal bill, but we cannot win this fight alone."
     Schatz asked constituents to "Sign my petition and tell Senate Republicans we won’t let them strip away care from millions of Americans."
     According to the Hawai'i Senator, three Republicans in the U.S. Senate will be needed "to kill this newer, nastier bill, but we do not have that yet. Two weeks ago, Sen. John McCain, who was the deciding vote against Obamacare repeal, announced he’s willing to support Senator Graham and Cassidy’s awful 'health care' bill. That means this bill could be passed in a matter of days."
     Schatz contended that "If this repeal bill passes the Senate, 32 million Americans will lose coverage. The bill ends Medicaid expansion, cuts coverage for low-income seniors, children, and people with disabilities, targets women’s health and family planning, and increases insurance rates. Republicans know these health care cuts are nothing short of a massive tax break for insurance companies, drug companies, and the wealthy -- that’s why they’re working on this disastrous legislation behind closed doors."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Gov. David Ige is in NYC this week,
joining states committed to dealing
with climate change. See the report.
CLIMATE WEEK HAS DRAWN GOV. DAVID IGE TO THE U.N. ASSEMBLY in New York where governors and mayors are huddling with leaders of countries from around the world. The New York Times reported that California Gov. Jerry Brown said today that the Trump Administration did not send representatives to Climate Week, which is taking place at the same time as the U.N. Assembly. "That's why we have governors here. Because we don't have someone from Washington D.C., the states are picking up the baton."
      The New York Times reported the Hawai'i governor saying, "We certainly believe if the federal government won't lead in this area we want the world to understand there are states across the country that are committed." The New York Times pointed out that Hawai'i was the first state to enact the 100-percent-renewable energy standard.
      Hawai'i is one of 14 states and Puerto Rico that joined the United States Climate Alliance to continue the commitment to the Paris Accord after the Trump Administration vowed to drop out. According to the New York Times, North Carolina is expected to join the Alliance and its governor has gone to Climate Week.
       Organizers of Climate Week, today, released a report entitled ‘States, cities and businesses leading the way: a first look at decentralized climate commitments in the US’. It concludes that the U.S. can already meet half of its climate commitments under the Paris Agreement by 2025, if the 342 commitments included in the analysis are implemented.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

AS CLIMATE WEEK PROCEEDS, SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ is drumming up support to block Pres. Donald Trump's appointments of climate change deniers to key positions in the federal government.
      Said Schatz, "President Trump has made it a top priority to dismantle the progress we’ve made on climate - and now he’s working with Congress to make it happen. Right now, he is drumming up support for climate change denier and birther, Sam Clovis, who isn’t even a scientist, to be the next Chief Scientist of the USDA. He is campaigning to put Representative Jim Bridenstine, who doesn’t believe climate change is caused by humans, in charge of NASA.
     "President Trump and Scott Pruitt are ramping up their attacks to please their climate denier base -- there’s no doubt about it."
Dr. Sam Clovis, whom Sen. Brian Schatz calls a climate change denier
and birther, has been nominated by the Trump Administration to
become the chief scientist of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Photo from Sam Clovis' YouTube
      Over the weekend Schatz launched a "fundraising drive to get ahead of the Trump administration’s attacks on climate." He said the donations are needed because "Coal, oil, and gas industries funneled over $90 million to candidates who publicly deny climate change to build a 'Climate Denier Caucus' in Congress  - and now they’re looking for a return on their investment.            
     "Withdrawing from the Paris climate accord was first. Confirming Sam Clovis and Jim Bridenstine is next. And the only thing that’s stopping them is what we are willing to do about it. When President Obama was in office, climate change deniers had little reason for optimism. Under President Trump, they’re growing more influential. But if they see that their attacks trigger a wave of grassroots activism urging the administration and Congress to provide a solution to climate change, they will have to take a step back."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

DACA RECIPIENTS IN HAWAI'I fear "being separated from their families despite being brought here as minors, through no choice of their own," said Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard. Over the weekend she met with a group of those protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals policy, who came to the country illegally with relatives when they were children. She said, "Those in Hawai'i and the hundreds of thousands across the country have been able to come out of the shadows and use DACA to obtain an education, serve our country, find work, support their families, and build a future for themselves without fear of deportation in the only home they have ever known.
DACA residents in Hawai'i met with Rep. Tulsi Gabbard over the
weekend to talk about their fears of being deported.
Photo from Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
     "President Trump’s ending of the DACA program requires each and every one of us to stand up, speak out, and take action to enact a permanent solution for the 800,000+ DACA recipients in this country. The time is now for you to speak up to tell the President and Congress that we want our young people here in America on DACA to stay." The Congresswoman said she encourages everyone to "Sign on as a citizen cosponsor to the DREAM Act and urge Congress to pass this bipartisan bill."
    According to Gabbard, DACA has allowed more than 600 young people in Hawai'i to realize the opportunity promised to all Americans. "We cannot allow them to be deported to a foreign land or be forced back into the shadows. To do so would betray the trust they placed in our government, and runs contrary to the spirit of aloha that we try to live by.
     "We cannot afford any more band-aid temporary fixes. Congress must show compassion to those who have put their faith in the hands of the federal government, and now face uncertainty, wondering if that trust will be used against them," stated Gabbard.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Celebrated Saturday in Nā'ālehu
and nationally.

THANK A POLICE OFFICER DAY, the national celebration, brought appreciation to Ka'ū police, with a gathering organized by Lizzie Stabo and volunteer fire fighters from Engine 11 Alpha in Nā'ālehu. Stabo said that having law enforcement in her family made it even more important to organize the event. She thanked Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee, J&J Coffee farms, Wiki Wiki Mart, Ace Hardware of Nā'ālehu, Punalu'u Bake Shop, Hana Hou Restaurant, The Bee Boyz, Crooked C  Ranch, Engine 11 A and Engine 11 D. She also thanked many individuals, including photographer Peter Anderson, Renee Vetter, Sherri McDaniels and Taylor and Alton Spurgeon, "who all donated amazing items to complete our Big Blue bucket full of Aloha and thank you's!"

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

GIVE ALOHA: FOODLAND’S ANNUAL COMMUNITY MATCHING GIFTS PROGRAM will match a portion of each Maika’i member donation to PARENTS, Inc. (Providing: Awareness, Referrals, Education, Nuturing, Therapy, Support) for the rest of September 2017.
     Donations can be made of up to $249 at the checkout with the organization name PARENTS, Inc. and donation code 77251, at any Foodland, Foodland Farms or Sack N Save store statewide during the month of September. Foodland and the Western Union Foundation will match all donations up to a total of at least $300,000 for all organizations combined.
     PARENTS, Inc. says they are looking to reach a goal of $5,000, with “.95 cents of every dollar donated going directly to programs in our communities” and contributions “directly [benefiting] families right here in Hawai’i.” PARENTS, Inc., has a Ka'ū office located in Nā’ālehu, where its mission is to “strengthen families by providing resources, skills, support and advocacy to create cycles of positive parenting.” For more about PARENTS, Inc. visit hawaiiparents.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
Pick up the September edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at kaucalendar.com

UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball
Wednesday, Sept. 20, Ka'ū vs. Konawaena, away.
Friday, Sept. 22, Ka'ū vs. Christian Liberty, home.

Eight-Man Football
 Thursday, Sept. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, away game at Kea'au Field.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pahoa, home.

Cross Country
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Hawai'i Prep, away.

Bowling
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe at Kona Bowl.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR ART: For Tissue Art, register until tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 19. The art class will take place at Pāhala Community Center on Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102. For Metal Stamped Bracelets, register until Sept. 26. The art class will take place at Pāhala Community Center on Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD meets Wednesday, Sept. 20, at noon in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.
Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa comes to Kīlauea Visitor 
Center auditorium this Wednesday evening. Photo from NPS

MELE AND HULA will be presented by Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa, this Wednesday, Sept. 20, at Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, the halau mission is to strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. The event is free. Park entrance fees apply. Hawai'i Volcano National Park's interpretation division is the sponsor.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA'Ū meets Thursday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m. at Nā'ālehu Methodist Church. The new President is Berkeley Yoshida. For more details, call Blossom DeSilva at 929-9731.

IN AN EFFORT TO KEEP KEIKI SAFE, National Child Passenger Safety Certification, a Safe Kids Worldwide program, is offering free car seat checks at Pāhala Community Center on Friday, Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon. Partners for Safe Keiki and Hawai’i County Fire Department co-sponsor the event. All are welcome.
     Those with recalled or structurally unsound car seats will receive a free new car seat, acquired through grant funding from the Department of Transportation. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call or text 808-896-1336. For information about Child Passenger Safety, visit safekids.org.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY HOSTS A VOLUNTEER DAY at its Kona Hema Preserve in South Kona on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     Space is limited so those wanting to volunteer must contact Schubert in advance to reserve a spot on one of the trucks. For more, read the Ka'ū News Briefs from September 8. To contact Schubert, email lschubert@tnc.org or call 443-5401.

Register online by Sept. 21.
For more details, see the Ka'ū News Briefs from Aug. 30, 2017.
HAWAI’I SEED FEST: LOCAL SEEDS FOR LOCAL NEEDS, sponsored by The Kohala Center and Hawai’i Seed Growers Network, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon in Pāhoa and Honalõ.
     "Check out variety trials in progress, learn how to conduct successful trials in your garden, enjoy refreshments and tastings of crops being grown from local seed, talk story with a local seed grower, and meet others in your community interested in improving local food security," says an announcement from The Kohala Center. Attendance is free but space is limited. Reserve online at localseeds.eventbrite.com or call The Kohala Center at 808-887-6411. Visit Hawai'i Seed Growers Network.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place Saturday, September 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

ACOUSTIC INSTRUMENT PLAYERS, DRUMMERS, SINGERS AND DANCERS ARE WELCOMED for Kanikapila on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Nā‘ālehu Methodist Church Hall. For more, call Desmond at 937-6305.

THE KOHALA CENTER’S DEMONSTRATION FARM HOSTS A FIELD DAY on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (45-434 Lehua St, Honoka’a).
     The Kohala Center’s event description offers "a farm tour, hands-on training, and planting of an agroforestry system designed to diversify crops, control weeds naturally, and improve soil health."
    This event is open to the public, with high school students and teachers encouraged to learn about the upcoming fall High School Sustainable Agriculture Program.
      Contact Dave Sansone at sansone@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411 for more information.

JOIN A GUIDED HIKE ALONG THE PALM TRAIL on Sunday, Sept. 24, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. within the Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. This moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.


Sunday, September 17, 2017

Ka'ū New Briefs Sunday, September 17, 2017

HI-SEAs crew explored outside their dome, but only when wearing spacesuits, during their eight
months of isolation on Mauna Loa, where they simulated living on Mars. Photo from HI-SEAS
HI-SEAS MISSION V CREW MEMBERS EXITED EIGHT MONTHS of isolation today after simulating life on Mars on Mauna Loa, living in and around a dome. The six crew members of the fifth Hawai‘i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation belong to a University of Hawai'i at Manoa team, funded by NASA. They are Laura Lark, Ansley Barnard, Samuel Payler, James Bevington, Josha Ehrlich and Brian Ramos. See their diversified backgrounds, from engineering to biology and agriculture, with hobbies from sewing to fiddle playing, singing, cooking and SCUBA at hi-seas.org.
     A story at phys.org describes the return to civilization and the mission: "Their first order of business after subsisting on mostly freeze-dried and canned food: Feast on fresh-picked pineapple, papaya, mango, locally grown vegetables and a fluffy, homemade egg strata cooked by their project's lead scientist.
The six members of the HI-SEAS V crews. See their very varied 
backgrounds and their interests at hi-seas.org. Photo from HI-SEAS
     "The crew of four men and two women were quarantined on a vast plain below the summit of the world's largest active volcano in January. All of their communications with the outside world were subjected to a 20-minute delay—the time it takes for signals to get from Mars to Earth.
     "They are part of a study designed to better understand the psychological effects that a long-term manned mission to space would have on astronauts. The data they gathered will help NASA better pick crews that have certain traits and a better chance of doing well during a two-to-three year Mars expedition. The space agency hopes to send humans to the red planet by the 2030s.
     "The Hawai'i team wore specially-designed sensors to gauge their moods and proximity to other people in the small, 1,200 square-foot (111-square meter) dome where they have lived.
     "The devices monitored, among other things, their voice levels and could sense if people were avoiding one another. It could also detect if they were next to each other and arguing.
     "The crew played games designed to measure their compatibility and stress levels. And when they got overwhelmed by being in such close proximity to teach other, they could use virtual reality devices to escape to tropical beaches or other familiar landscapes."
    Phys.org reports the opinion of Laura Lark, an IT specialist and crew member with HI-SEAS V: “Long term space travel is absolutely possible,”she said. "There are certainly technical challenges to be overcome. There are certainly human factors to be figured out, that’s part of what HI-SEAS is for. But I think that overcoming those challenges is just a matter of effort. We are absolutely capable of it.”  Read more at phys.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

The sunrise ceremony at dawn at Punalu'u, which opens the Ho'okupu Hula No Ka'ū Cultural Festival.
This year the main festival day will by Saturday, Nov. 4 at Pāhala Community Center.
Photo by Julia Neal
HO'OKUPU HULA NO KA'Ū CULTURAL FESTIVAL will be held, with main events at 
Pāhala Community Center, on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Sponsored by Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawai'i, Inc., the festival is directed by Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder, who teaches hula on Wednesday evenings to all ages at Pāhala Community Center.
      Organizers are holding a meeting on Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 6:30 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center. Ryder said the meeting is for "all interested volunteers to come and kōkua your community. We invite all organizations to come and join us. Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawai'i, Inc. needs your support to showcase our Ka‘ū hospitality to all the participants who are coming from afar and here in our islands to experience the true aloha spirit of Ka‘ū."
The late Bobby Gomes and his granddaughter dancing
at a Ho'okupu Hula No Ka'ū Cultural Festival in
Pāhala. Photo by Julia Neal
      Community members interested in becoming vendors for Ho'okupu Hula No Ka‘ū can also call 649-9334 for an application. There are openings for craft vendors, food vendors, informational booths, and game vendors for children. Deadline to apply is Oct. 27. Craft vendors fee is $50.00. Food vendors fee is $75.00. Informational booths are free. Game Vendors fee is $50.00. 
     The festival started in 2009 on the island of Lana'i and resulted in a cultural exchange between Pāhala and Lana'i residents.
     Volunteers from Pāhala, including Dane Galiza, the late Bull, and Jamie Kailiawa, Jarrett Pestana, Harry Evengelista and Robert Ahia, along with the late Bobby Tucker, Pāhala Plantation Cottages and Olson Trust, helped with the event.
      The Pāhala based Hālau Hula O Leionalani, under the direction of Ryder, traveled to Lana'i for the 2013 festival. Ryder and her family soon moved to Pāhala and brought the festival with them.
     Ryder said that Lana'i folks, and hālau from Japan and Honolulu are planning to come here for the 2017 Ho'okupu Hula No Ka‘ū.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

AFFORDABLE CHILDCARE FOR HAWAI'I FAMILIES is an effort by U.S. Sen. Mazie K. Hirono and Sen. Patty Murray, state of Washington, who partnered to introduce the Childcare for Working Families Act.
     Said Hirono, “For many of Hawai'i’s working parents, child care has become unaffordable —exceeding other household costs and expenses and eating into their hard-earned income. This legislation represents a long-term investment in our keiki to ensure that every family has access to high-quality early learning and child care programs that are affordable.”
     Most Hawai'i families can expect to spend more than 11 percent of their household income on child care this year—exceeding the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ standard of affordable care, Hirono pointed out.
      Murray, Ranking Member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, said, “At a time when far too many working families are struggling, finding quality child care that doesn’t break the bank shouldn’t be another thing keeping parents up at night. As a former preschool teacher, I know what quality early learning and care can do for a child’s development, so I’m proud to introduce the Child Care for Working Families Act to address our child care crisis and support access to high-quality preschool so that all children are ready for kindergarten and beyond. This is not only the right to thing to for working families, but it’s a smart investment in our children, our future, and our economy.”
     The Child Care for Working Families Act would:
· Ensure that no families below 150 percent of state median income pay more than seven percent of their income on child care. Last year in Hawai'i, this would have included families of four making less than $128,034.
· Promote universal access to high-quality preschool programs for all three and four year olds.
· Improve compensation and training opportunities for the child care workforce.
     Hirono has advocated for high-quality early childhood and child care programs during her career as an elected official. As Hawai'i’s Lieutenant Governor, she introduced the Pre-Plus program to provide for preschool facilities on public school campuses. As Hawai'i’s U.S. Representative and Senator, she authored and continues to advocate for the Providing Resources Early for Kids Act, legislation that provided a structure for the Preschool Development Grant program established by the Obama Administration and funded by Congress. Hawai'i was awarded a four-year Preschool Development Grant in December 2014. A new program was authorized by the Every Student Succeeds Act signed into law in December 2015.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

KA'Ū HOSPITAL CHARITABLE FOUNDATION is making great progress on its lānai and garden area for long term residents and patients who are enjoying the outdoors, says a news release from the organization.
Long-term resident Richard at Ka'ū Hospital enjoys
the outdoors and the new lānai and garden area.
Photo from Ka'ū Hospital Charitable Foundation
Hospital Administrator Merilyn
Harris and Nursing Director Sherrie
Brazin with new Desert Rose plants.
Photo from Ka'ū Hospital
Charitable Foundation
     The Foundation gives an example: "Richard is a resident at Ka'ū Hospital and he is thrilled to see the progress being made on the garden/ lānai project. He likes being outdoors with the guys when they are working on the project because he enjoys socializing! He says being in the garden in the soft air and breezes is very healing for him and he is so happy to have this space to go to!"
     Hospital Administrator Merilyn Harris and Nursing Director Sherrie Bazin said they are thrilled to see the forms in place for the concrete work, which will be accomplished soon to provide more access to the outdoors for residents in wheelchairs, using walkers and other assistive devices that help them be more independent.
     Last week Joah and Vicki Swift donated Desert Rose plants. The Swifts said they look forward residents being able to see beautiful views, colorful flowers and feel the soft breezes on a regular basis.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

EVENTS CELEBRATING WORLD FOOD DAY, presented by Hawai’i Island Food Alliance, KTA Super Stores, and The Kohala Center, are set for Tuesday, Oct. 24, at KTA locations - Puainako, Waimea, Waikoloa, and Keauhou - from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
     The Kohala Center describes the event as following, “Support local farmers showcasing their value-added products at this in-store event. Enjoy tastings, samples, and purchase a selection of products direct from farmers." The Kohala     Center will distribute plant starts as supplies last. Farmers and value-added producers who would like to distribute samples at KTA for World Food Day, may contact Nicole Milne at nmilne@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411. See a short slide show called The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World by the Food & Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

KA'Ū TROJANS BEAT KOHALA 48-0 on Saturday in eighT-man football, after traveling to Kapa'au on the north end of the island. The Trojans put 40 points on the board by halftime: J. Badua ran for an 18-yard touchdown, with extra point by Echalas. Z. Kai made a one yard touchdown, with extra point by I. Pilanca-Emmsley. Pilanca-Emmsley intercepted and ran 73 yards for a touchdown, with extra point by Kai. Kai ran a 32-yard touchdown with extra point by Badua. Pilanca-Emmsley ran for a 28-yard touchdown. The extra point was good.
       The final touchdown for Ka'ū came in the fourth quarter when Kai ran 83 yards, Naboa made the extra point.
Pick up the September edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at kaucalendar.com

UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball
Monday, Sept. 18, Ka'ū vs. Makualani, away.
Wednesday, Sept. 20, Ka'ū vs. Konawaena, away.
Friday, Sept. 22, Ka'ū vs. Christian Liberty, home.

Eight-Man Football
 Thursday, Sept. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, away game at Kea'au Field.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pahoa, home.

Cross Country
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Hawai'i Prep, away.

Bowling
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe at Kona Bowl.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR ART:  For Tissue Art, register until Tuesday, Sept. 19. The art class will take place at Pāhala Community Center on Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102.
     For Metal Stamped Bracelets, register tomorrow, Monday, Sept. 18, to Sept. 26. The art class will take place at Pāhala Community Center on Wednesday, Sept. 27 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102.

MELE AND HULA shared by Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa, is on the Wednesday, Sept. 20 agenda at Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel and her halau perform. Park entrance fees apply. The event is sponsored by Hawai'i Volcano National Park's interpretation division. See details on park events.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD meets Wednesday, Sept. 20, at noon in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

Register online by Sept. 21.
For more details, see the Ka'ū News Briefs from Aug. 30, 2017.
HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA'Ū meets Thursday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m. at Nā'ālehu Methodist Church. The new President is Berkeley Yoshida. For more details, call Blossom DeSilva at 929-9731.

IN AN EFFORT TO KEEP KEIKI SAFE, National Child Passenger Safety Certification, a Safe Kids Worldwide program, is offering free car seat checks at Pāhala Community Center on Friday, Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon. Partners for Safe Keiki and Hawai’i County Fire Department co-sponsor the event. All are welcome.
     Those with recalled or structurally unsound car seats will receive a free new car seat, acquired through grant funding from the Department of Transportation. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call or text 808-896-1336. For information about Child Passenger Safety, visit safekids.org.

THE NATURE CONSERVANCY HOSTS A VOLUNTEER DAY at its Kona Hema Preserve in South Kona on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     Space is limited so those wanting to volunteer must contact Schubert in advance to reserve a spot on one of the trucks. For more, read the Ka'ū News Briefs from September 8. To contact Schubert, email lschubert@tnc.org or call 443-5401.

HAWAI’I SEED FEST: LOCAL SEEDS FOR LOCAL NEEDS, sponsored by The Kohala Center and Hawai’i Seed Growers Network, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon in Pāhoa and Honalõ. "Check out variety trials in progress, learn how to conduct successful trials in your garden, enjoy refreshments and tastings of crops being grown from local seed, talk story with a local seed grower, and meet others in your community interested in improving local food security," says an announcement from The Kohala Center. Attendance is free but space is limited. Reserve a spot online at localseeds.eventbrite.com or call The Kohala Center at 808-887-6411. Visit Hawai'i Seed Growers Network.

ACOUSTIC INSTRUMENT PLAYERS, DRUMMERS, SINGERS AND DANCERS ARE WELCOMED for Kanikapila on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Nā‘ālehu Methodist Church Hall. For more, call Desmond at 937-6305.

A field day is set for Kohala Center's Demonstration Farm next
Saturday, Sept. 23. Photo from Kohala Center
THE KOHALA CENTER’S DEMONSTRATION FARM HOSTS A FIELD DAY on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.  at 45-434 Lehua St. in Honoka’a.
     The Kohala Center’s event description offers "a farm tour, hands-on training, and planting of an agroforestry system designed to diversify crops, control weeds naturally, and improve soil health."
    This event is open to the public, with high school students and teachers encouraged to learn about the upcoming fall High School Sustainable Agriculture Program.
      Contact Dave Sansone at sansone@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411 for more information.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place Saturday, Sept. 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. See details on park events.


Saturday, September 16, 2017

Ka'ū News Briefs Saturday, September 16, 2017

Less than a week left to sign up online for the annual Ka'ū Coffee Trail Run starting at Ka'ū Coffee Mill
up Wood Valley Road. See poster below. Photo by Pam Taylor
CLIMATE WEEK IS Gov. David Ige's destination. He left for New York City on Friday to attend one of the key international summits that has driven climate action since it was launched in 2009. It will be held at the Morgan Library & Museum.
     The Climate Group is hosting the summit, which will be the first international climate conference in the United States since Pres. Donald Trump announced the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris Agreement.
Gov. David Ige heads to New
York for Climate Week.
     The summit brings together international government, business and community leaders to discuss global climate action. Climate Week takes place alongside the United Nations General Assembly. Ige will speak at the opening session and and participate in moderated discussion between the speakers.
    The governor is traveling with Scott Glenn, director of the Office of Environmental Quality Control and a member of the governor’s security team. Ige departed for Los Angeles Friday for a brief lay-over. He arrives in New York City on Sunday. He returns to Hawai‘i on Wednesday, Sept. 20.
     Attorney General Douglas Chin is acting governor while Ige is out of town.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

The two largest earthquakes in Hawai'i
in the last two days were in the sea-
bed off O'ahu and near Pahala. Map
 from Hawai`i Volcano Observatory
A MAGNITUDE-4.2 EARTHQUAKE was felt on Hawai'i Island last night, though its epicenter was 20 miles northeast of Kaneohe on O'ahu below the seabed. It struck at 8:40 p.m. and according to Hawai'i Volcano Observatory Seismic Manager Brian Shiro, "The earthquake was likely due to bending of the oceanic plate from the weight of the island chain and poses no significant hazard.” 
     On Thursday, a 3.04 earthquake struck at 3:45 p.m. 0.6 miles south, southeast of Pahala at a depth of 22 miles.
     Learn more on HVO's website at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

MORE JAPANESE VISITORS ARE EXPECTED to travel to Ka'ū to Green Sands Beach, Punalu'u Black Sand Beach and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park, with the return yesterday of Japan Airline's daily flights to the Ellison Onizuka Kona International Airport. Gov. David Ige was on island to welcome the inaugural flight from Narita International Airport.
Gov. David Ige welcomes the return of daily JAL flights to
the island. Photo from the Office of Governor David Ige
    The new service is expected to generate $9.8 million in tax revenue and create 900 new jobs, according to the Hawai‘i Tourism Authority.
    Said the governor, “We warmly welcome Japan Airlines back to Kona. We are extremely excited about the daily service to Kona, which is on its way to becoming Hawai‘i’s second major international port of entry. JAL has offered excellent service to the Aloha State for more than 60 years, and has played a significant role in expanding and supporting our tourism industry and economy. We are also thankful for the opportunity for cultural exchange with Japan.”
Hawai'i Tourism Authority predicts
 $9.8 million in tax revenues and
 900 jobs from new JAL daily flights.
Photo from Office of Gov. David Ige
     George Szigeti, President and Chief Executive officer of Hawai‘i Tourism Authority, said, “Our thanks go to Japan Airlines and Chairman Masaru Onishi for being such a great and loyal friend to Hawai'i’s tourism industry. This new non-stop flight connecting Tokyo and Kona reinforces Japan Airlines’ commitment to support travel to the Hawaiian Islands, while offering its customers an enticing new vacation experience to discover the allure and natural beauty found on the island of Hawai‘i.” 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

MELE AND HULA will be presented by Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa, this Wednesday at Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium at 6:30 p.m. Led by Kumu Hula Meleana Manuel, the halau mission is to strive to perpetuate the native Hawaiian culture through mele (song) and hula. The event is free. Park entrance fees apply. The event is sponsored by Hawai'i Volcano National Park's interpretation division.
Hālau Ke ‘Olu Makani O Maunaloa performs this Wednesday
at Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium. Photo from NPS
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

ONLINE NATIVE HAWAIIAN CULTURAL RESOURCES will be more accessible to remote Ka'ū residents as more online programs receive funding. Sen. Mazie Hirono announced yesterday that Native Hawaiian organizations will receive more than $500,000 from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services to enhance access to Native Hawaiian language and cultural resources.
     Hirono said that “By increasing access to Native Hawaiian manuscripts and historic materials, the projects supported by this grant will help to preserve Native Hawaiian traditions and culture. I will continue working to see that Native Hawaiian programs receive the federal support they need to implement important projects like these.”
     Yesterday's federal investment announcement includes four grants that support research, archival, and educational projects from the Bishop Museum, Hawai'i Maoli, Hula Preservation Society, and Papahana Kuaola.
Digitizing and providing online accessibility
to songs of old Hawai'i come with the
Welo Hou project.
Image from Bishop Museum
     “Mele are an invaluable primary resource for Hawaiian scholarship and cultural connection. Welo Hou: Building Connections to the Roberts Mele Collection will improve the digitization, indexing, and accessibility of a unique and treasured collection of mele dating from pre-Western contact to the early 1900s. This pilot project will serve as a model for improved access to and increased engagement with the Bishop Museum Library & Archives’ other mele collections,” said Leah Caldeira, Library & Archives Collection Manager for the Bishop Museum. “In support of the Museum’s mission to inspire our community and visitors through the exploration and celebration of extraordinary history, culture, and environment of Hawai'i and the Pacific, Welo Hou honors the connections between Hawaiian voices of the past and our community of the present.”
      Maile Alau, Executive Director of Hawai'i Maoli, said, “Our teachers are on the frontlines of addressing the critical learning needs of Native Hawaiian students. Through Nana I Ke Kumu (Look to the Source), we will offer professional development to train librarians and other educational leaders to use Hawaiian cultural repositories and resources that support curricular goals of Hawaiian students. With so much culturally relevant digital content available at any computer, tablet, or smartphone, we believe that teachers and students will be able to expand and deepen their knowledge of Hawaiian history, culture, genealogy, chant, and language.” The project will provide library research skills training for 40 Native Hawaiian students and Hawaiian resource database workshops for at least 125 educators.
Hula Preservation Society preserves oral
histories and creations of hula elders, like
the late George Na'ope who mentored
kumu hula and wrote songs for Ka'ū.
Image from Hula Preservation Society
     Maile Loo, Executive Director of the Hula Preservation Society, said: “Hula Preservation Society’s cultural library is built upon the oral histories and associated materials of our late hula elders, who helped lay the groundwork for the Hawaiian Renaissance in the last century. This grant from the Institute of Museum & Library Services will assist the Hula Preservation Society in providing first-time direct online access to these resources, digitally preserve an additional 700 treasured historical items under are care, dating back to 1890, and provide internship opportunities for Native Hawaiian youth entering the Library Information Science and Hawaiian Studies fields."
     The project will develop online tutorials and digital preservation of 150 audio pieces and 550 historic photos.
     Papahana Kuaola's Makaikai Mele a Moolelo project will provide moolelo/mele tours specifically designed for kupuna and the general community to nurture understanding and appreciation of traditional Hawaiian literature and the places to which they are connected.
     Hirono said she continues to support federal funding for Native Hawaiian programs and services, and has consistently supported the Institute for Museum & Library Services, National Endowment for the Arts, and National Endowment for the Humanities during her time in Congress. Earlier this year, she signed letters with her colleagues requesting support for Institute for Museum & Library Services Office of Museum Service. She said it is the country’s largest dedicated commitment "to our nation’s museums, which support around 400,000 Americans and contributes $21 billion to the U.S. economy ever year."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Ka`u Chamber of Commerce logo by Tanya Ibarra
CU HAWAI'I OFFERS TO PAY $1 ENTRY FEE FOR KEIKI ARTISTS submitting art to the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce's Annual Art Show, which accepts entries on Monday, Sept. 25. The art show will be open for public viewing from Tuesday, Sept. 26, to Friday, Sept. 29, in the CU Hawai'i Federal Credit Union Annex Building (behind CU) in Nā'ālehu, during normal credit union business hours.
   An Artist Reception for distribution of prizes and art pickup will be the morning of Saturday, Sept. 30.
     Categories include: painting, graphics, photography, craft, lei, weaving, jewelry, quilting, sculpture, and woodworking. There will also be categories for Youth and Keiki entries, for which the entry fee is $1 per artwork.
     The winning popular vote piece will be displayed on the cover of The Directory 2018, according to new Chamber co-chairs Alan Stafford and Allen Humble who describe the annual art show as a fundraiser for the Ka'ū Chamber of Commerce scholarship program. For more details, visit the Chamber website at kauchamber.org or call 936-5288.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Hawaiian Petrel
Photo by Jim Denny
THE ENDANGERED HAWAIIAN PETREL, ‘UA‘U, will be the subject of discussion at Coffee Talk on Friday, Sept. 29, from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. inside the Visitor Center at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park.
     The ‘ua‘u, an endangered Hawaiian seabird that spends the majority of its life at sea, lands only to nest and raise its young in deep burrows. Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park Avian Research Technician Charlotte Forbes-Perry will present a talk about the life of the ‘ua‘u and the National Park’s efforts to monitor and protect them.
     Coffee Talk at Kahuku, an informal conversation on a wide variety of topics, is open to the public, and takes place on the last Friday of every month. Ka‘ū coffee, tea and pastries will be available for purchase. Entrance to the event and park is free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TROJANS TRAVELED TO KOHALA today, Saturday, for the eight-man Ka'ū High School football team to take on the Cowboys. Ka'ū beat Kohala on Sept. 2 with a score of 26-6. In other games this season, Ka'ū traveled to Lana'i, losing 58-90. Ka'ū lost to Pāhoa, 8-32.
    Ka'ū's Cross Country team traveled to Kea'au on Saturday.  The bowling team  went to Kona.

Pick up the September edition of The Ka'ū Calendar delivered
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka'ū, from Miloli`i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online at kaucalendar.com
UPCOMING FALL TROJAN SPORTS:

Girls Volleyball
Monday, Sept. 18, Ka'ū vs. Makualani, away.
Wednesday, Sept. 20, Ka'ū vs. Konawaena, away.
Friday, Sept. 22, Ka'ū vs. Christian Liberty, home.

Eight-Man Football
 Thursday, Sept. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pāhoa, away game at Kea'au Field.
Saturday, Oct. 7, Ka'ū vs. Kohala, home.
Saturday, Oct. 21, Ka'ū vs. Pahoa, home.

Cross Country
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Hawai'i Prep, away.

Bowling
 Saturday, Sept. 23, Ka'ū vs. Kealakehe at Kona Bowl.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

PEOPLE & LAND OF KAHUKU is a free, guided, 2.5 mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain through the Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park that focuses on the area’s human history from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. tomorrow, Sunday, Sept. 17.

REGISTER KEIKI GRADES K-8 FOR ART CLASSES IN PĀHALA.
     Tissue Art: register until Sept. 19. The art class will take place at Pāhala Community Center on Wednesday, Sept. 20, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD meets Wednesday, Sept. 20, at noon in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA'Ū meets Thursday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m. at Nā'ālehu Methodist Church. The new President is Berkeley Yoshida. For more details, call Blossom DeSilva at 929-9731.

IN AN EFFORT TO KEEP KEIKI SAFE, National Child Passenger Safety Certification, a Safe Kids Worldwide program, is offering free car seat checks at Pāhala Community Center on Friday, Sept. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon. Partners for Safe Keiki and Hawai’i County Fire Department co-sponsor the event. All are welcome.
     Those with recalled or structurally unsound car seats will receive a free new car seat, acquired through grant funding from the Department of Transportation. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call or text 808-896-1336. For information about Child Passenger Safety, visit safekids.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Register online by Sept. 21.
For more details, see the Ka'ū News Briefs from Aug. 30, 2017.
THE NATURE CONSERVANCY HOSTS A VOLUNTEER DAY at its Kona Hema Preserve in South Kona on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     Space is limited so those wanting to volunteer must contact Schubert in advance to reserve a spot on one of the trucks. For more, read the Ka'ū News Briefs from September 8. To contact Schubert, email lschubert@tnc.org or call 443-5401.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place Saturday, September 23, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

ACOUSTIC INSTRUMENT PLAYERS, DRUMMERS, SINGERS AND DANCERS ARE WELCOMED for Kanikapila on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., at the Nā‘ālehu Methodist Church Hall. For more, call Desmond at 937-6305.

THE KOHALA CENTER’S DEMONSTRATION FARM HOSTS A FIELD DAY on Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (45-434 Lehua St, Honoka’a).
     The Kohala Center’s event description offers "a farm tour, hands-on training, and planting of an agroforestry system designed to diversify crops, control weeds naturally, and improve soil health."
Seeds adapted to Hawai`i's environmental niches
will be exchanged on Saturday, Sept. 23.
Photo from Hawai`i Seed Growers Network
    This event is open to the public, with high school students and teachers encouraged to learn about the upcoming fall High School Sustainable Agriculture Program.
      Contact Dave Sansone at sansone@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411 for more information.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI’I SEED FEST: LOCAL SEEDS FOR LOCAL NEEDS, sponsored by The Kohala Center and Hawai’i Seed Growers Network, is scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 23, from 9 a.m. to noon in Pāhoa and Honalõ.
     "Check out variety trials in progress, learn how to conduct successful trials in your garden, enjoy refreshments and tastings of crops being grown from local seed, talk story with a local seed grower, and meet others in your community interested in improving local food security," says an announcement from The Kohala Center. Attendance is free but space is limited. Reserve a spot online at localseeds.eventbrite.com or call The Kohala Center at 808-887-6411. Visit Hawai'i Seed Growers Network.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.