About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, June 30, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Sunday, June 30, 2019

Most Patriotic float in Saturday's Nā‘ālehu Independence Day Parade went to Thy Word Ministries. See the
Most Creative winner below. Photo by Peter Anderson 
PRENATAL AND KEIKI HEALTH EDUCATION came to Pāhala Community Center on Saturday, June 29 at Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Oiwi's third annual Mālama Nā Keiki Festival. Each year, kids and parents experience activities, music, food, health screenings, education, and prizes. This festival aims to serve expecting and first-time mothers, women considering pregnancy, and young families.
     Nā Keiki Fest also supports all families. Mabel De Silva, Chair of Hui Mālama Ola Nā ‘Oiwi, said she wishes to focus on keiki health and services "to show keiki we care and to show them the value of life."
     The festival featured a trail map to direct keiki and families to local agencies offering health resources and wellness services. The map led to surprises. Once a keiki completed the trail on the map to agencies in the room, the award was a backpack with school supplies. Participants also entered a raffle for more prizes, including car seats, diapers, and more from donors like KTA Super Store, ACE Hardware, Mizuno Superette, Hana Hou Restaurant, and Punaluʻu Bake Shop.
Many families choose between buying diapers and food, says Jessica Histo, President and founder of the 
Hawaiʻi Diaper Bank. She attended Mālama Nā Keiki Festival on Saturday. Photo by Julia Neal
     Hawaiʻi Diaper Bank invited families to donate and receive diapers. According to Diaper Bank founder and President Jessica Histo, one in three American families have to choose between diapers and food. This agency accepts diapers (unopened or opened packs) and wipes to "help Hawaiʻi island families meet their keiki's basic needs." Diaper Bank also accepts new and gently used blankets, books, clothing, diaper bags, hygiene products (new only), pacifiers and other teething items (new only), school supplies, and toys for children ages 0-5.
     To make diaper and/or wipe donations, visit Hawaiʻi Diaper Bank's drop-off locations, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., in Nāʻālehu at Parents, Inc. 95-5657 Mamalahoa Hwy, Unit 5; in Hilo at Ohana Pregnancy Center, 280 Ponahawai Street, Ste. 203, or the Crib, 26 B Waianuenue Avenue; or in Kona at The Pregnancy Center, 75-5565 Luhia Street Ste. A3B.
     To make diaper and/or wipe donations online, visit Hawai`i Diaper Bank's Amazon Wish List: bit.ly/HDB_WishList. For all other donations, contact info@hawaiidaiperbank.org to schedule a pick-up.
     Partners in Development Foundation, which sponsors Tutu & Me in Kaʻū, came to Mālama Nā Keiki Fest to explain its early childhood education program and to encourage participation in foster care. Partners aims "to inspire and equip families and communities for success and service, using timeless Native Hawaiian values and traditions," states the information provided at Keiki Fest.
Nadine Ebert carries Uncle Sam in the Nā‘ālehu Independence
Day Parade to take first place in the Creative Division.
Photo by Leilani Esperanza
     The Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes from the University of Hawaiʻi, Hilo, came to Mālama Nā Keiki Fest to provide information on volcanic and natural hazards that occur in Hawaiʻi and worldwide. Its programs on learning about volcanoes are aimed at bringing families together for fun and educational activities.
     See more about Mālama Nā Keiki Festival in this week's Kaʻū News Briefs.

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WINNERS OF THE NĀʻĀLEHU INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE are announced. Organizer Lee McIntosh said the judges named Thy Word Ministries as producing The Most Patriotic, Nadine Ebert producing The Most Creative Entry. See more parade photos, including horses and riders, local businesses, and community groups in this week's Kaʻū News Briefs.

Thy Word Ministries at their home church in Nā‘ālehu Hongwanji following winning Most Patriotic
entry into ʻO Kaʻū Kākou's  annual Nā‘ālehu Independence Day Parade. Photo by Lee McIntosh
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PREVENTING ELECTRIC OUTAGES RELATED TO WIND AND TREES is the aim of Hawaiian Electric Co. testing new utility poles. The poles feature insulated conductors and "spacer cables" as part of a pilot project to prevent wind and tree-related outages during the stronger and more frequent storms that are expected to impact the Hawaiian Islands.
     Last year, branches and trees falling onto power lines caused nearly 30 percent of all outages in Hawaiʻi. Chris Reynolds, a HECO system operations director, said, "While we proactively manage vegetation encroaching on power lines, they often come down in forested areas during high winds or storms. Spacer cables are installed on spans where trees are prone to falling on the electrical equipment and causing extended outages."
A Hawaiian Electric lineman working on installing taller, stronger poles with spacers to reduce power outages
during stronger and more frequent storms expected by the utility. Photo from HECO
     As part of the eight-week construction project in a test area, crews replaced about a mile of power lines stretching across 22 spans and replaced 15 poles with ones rated for higher wind gusts. For several spans over particularly steep terrain where a bucket truck could not be used, crews used climbing gear to ascend the 45-foot poles and a seat harness that fastens the lineman directly to the heavy-gauge support wire. For workers to safely complete the installation, planned outages were scheduled and communicated to affected customers.
     The pilot program uses the Hendrix Aerial Cable System: three coated conductors supported by a heavy-gauge wire that provides structural support. The cables are cinched into polyethylene spacers placed every 30 feet along the spans to prevent the cables from touching, even under extreme stress. The system does not require cross arms or a neutral wire on the poles, reducing visual impact. The cable spacers are engineered to withstand high winds, falling trees, and long installation spans where undergrounding electrical equipment isn't practical.
     "We're always looking for ways to strengthen our electrical system with resilient energy solutions, especially as our islands are experiencing increasing and intensifying storms. Installation of stronger poles and the spacer cables designed to weather the elements mean we can bounce back faster to restore power to one of the more remote communities after a storm," said Reynolds.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TROPICAL STORM BARBARA, the second named storm of the Pacific hurricane season, is on track to move across the Pacific toward Hawaiʻi. She is forecast to develop into a hurricane by Tuesday. As of 6 p.m., Barbara was a little over 2,800 miles east southeast from Hawaiʻi, traveling west at 22 miles per hour, with 50 mph winds. She is forecast to pass from Eastern to Central Pacific waters next weekend.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
2019 Kaʻū High School Athletics Schedule through August
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates; Bowling TBA.

Football, Division II:
Mon., July 15, first day Conditioning, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Mon., July 22, first day Full Pads, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 24, 1 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kamehameha

Girls Volleyball, Kaʻū District Gym:
Mon., July 29, 3 to 5 p.m., first day practice
Tue., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Hilo
Fri., Aug. 23, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts St. Joseph
Wed., Aug. 28, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kohala

Cross Country:
Mon., Aug. 5, 2:30 to 4 p.m., first day practice
Sat., Aug. 31, 10 a.m., @Christian Liberty


To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
MONDAY, JULY 1
Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Mtg., Monday, July 1, 4-6p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JULY 2
Flameworking - An Introductory Class with Nash Adams-Pruitt, Tuesday, July 2, 5-8p.m., Volcano Art Center. $75/VAC member, $80/non-member, plus $40 supply fee. Class size limited. Register early. Advanced registration required. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Mtg., Tuesday, July 2, 6-8p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

After Dark in the Park -Kīlauea 2018 Volcanic Pollution: from Source to Exposed Communities, Tuesday, July 2, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Volcanologist Dr. Evgenia Ilyinskaya presents new information about what volcanic pollution really contains and its potential implications for environmental impacts. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3
Early Head Start, Wednesday, July 3 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 10-noon, Ocean View Community Center. Social get together for keiki and parents; open to public. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Voices with Kumu Hula Stacey Kapuaikapolipele Ka‘au‘a, Wednesday, July 3 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 5:30-7p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Desiree Moana Cruz moderates the talk story session. Free. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

THURSDAY, JULY 4
July 4th Breakfast Buffet, Thursday, July 4, 6:30-11a.m., Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp. Includes: Waffles with Toppings, Omelet Station, Meats, Breakfast Potatoes, Steamed Rice, Fresh Fruit, Assorted Baked Breads, and a beverage. $12.50/Adult, $6.50/Child, ages 6-11. No reservations required. Open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

Volcano Village 4th of July Parade and Craft Fair, Thursday, July 4. Parade starts 9a.m., craft fair at Cooper Center open until 1:30p.m.. Parade starts at Volcano Post Office, down Old Volcano Road, turns up Wright Road, and ends at Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Activities, food, entertainment. Sponsored by Volcano Community Association and Cooper Center Council. Leashed dogs allowed. Parade entry form at volcanocommunity.org. Vendor application at thecoopercenter.org, email to idoaloha@gmail.com. Tara Holmes, 464-3625, 8a.m.-5p.m.

Keiki Jiggle Bums, Thursday, July 4 and 18 – 1st and 3rd Thursday, monthly – 9-10:30a.m., Ocean View Community Center. Discover the joy of early learning through song and musical instruments. For keiki 0-4 years. Nicola, 238-8544

Women's Expression Group, Thursday, July 4 – 1st Thursday monthly – 3-4:30p.m., PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Women welcome to drop in. Free. Lindsey Miller, 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Mtg., Thursday, July 4, 6-7p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Mtg., Thursday, July 4, 6:30-8:30p.m., Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

SATURDAY, JULY 6
Ka‘ū Roping & Riding Association's 42nd Annual 4th of July Buckle Rodeo, Saturday and Sunday, July 6 and 7, slack starts at 8a.m., show starts at noon, at the rodeo grounds behind Nā‘ālehu Park. Tickets available at gate, $8/person. Pre-sale tickets available $7/person around town from Rodeo Queen contestants. Ralph or Tammy, 929-8079

Stewardship at the Summit, July 6, 12, 20, and 26, 8:45a.m.-noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteers remove invasive, non-native plants. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks, and water. Gloves/tools provided. Parental/guardian accompaniment or written consent required for those under 18. Free; park entrance fees apply. Paul and Jane Field, field@hawaii.edu, nps.gov/havo

Edible Landscaping for Backyards and Beyond with Zach Mermel of Ola Design Group, Saturday, July 6, 9a.m.-noon, Volcano Art Center. Learn how to transform lanai and lawn, field and fence into an abundant oasis of edible and multifunctional plants. $30/VAC member, $40/non-member, plus $15 materials fee. Class size limited. Register early. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Alternative Handbuilding - East African Pottery with Erik Wold, Saturday, July 6 through August 31, 10a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. No class August 24. $180/VAC members, $200/non-member, plus $15 materials fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Zentangle Inspired Labyrinth Cartouches with Lois and Earl Stokes, Saturday, July 6, 10a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. All welcome, no experience necessary. Potluck - bring dish to share. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Keiki Science Class, Saturday, July 6 – 1st Saturday, monthly – 11a.m.-noon, Ace Hardware Stores islandwide; Nā‘ālehu, 929-9030 and Ocean View, 929-7315. Free. acehardware.com

SUNDAY, JULY 7
Postcards from the Edge - Painting Workshop with Artist-in-Residence Alice Leese, Sunday, July 7, 10a.m.-noon, edge of Kīlauea, behind Volcano House. Meet and paint with Leese. Limited to 12 people, attendees will receive a postcard-sized blank canvas but must bring their own paints and a small travel easel. $75/person includes lunch at Volcano House. Register, fhvnp.org/events/postcards-from-the-edge-painting-workshop-with-artist-in-residence-alice-leese. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

Sunday Clay - High Fire! with Erik Wold, July 7 to Sept. 1, morning session 11:30a.m.-2:30p.m., or afternoon session 2:45-5:45p.m., Volcano Art Center. No class Aug. 25. Eight wheel-throwers and three hand builders slots per session. Per 8-week session, $180/VAC member, $200/non-member, plus $15 materials fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sunday, July 7 – 1st Sunday, monthly – noon-2p.m., Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. View sites.google.com/site/southpointarc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

ONGOING
Seamless Summer Program, open to all people under age 18, no registration required, offers free breakfast at Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School cafeterias. Meals are available weekdays through July 11; no meal Thursday, July 4. Kaʻū High serves breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call (808) 939-2413 for Nāʻālehu Elementary mealtimes.

Volcano Village 4th of July Parade, Festival, and Craft Fair happens Thursday, July 4 from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The parade starts at the Volcano Post Office, travels down Old Volcano Road, and ends at Cooper Center on Wright Road. Free entry to activities, food, and entertainment. Leashed dogs allowed. Provided by Cooper Center Council, Volcano Community Association, and more. To be in the parade, download the entry form at volcanocommunity.org and email to vcainfo@yahoo.com. Vendors, download applications at thecoopercenter.org and email to idoaloha@gmail.com, or call Tara Holmes, 464-3625, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Head Coaches for Coed Judo, Coed Swimming, and Boys Basketball are wanted by Kaʻū High School for the 2019-2020 school year. Applications, due Monday, July 8, can be picked up at the school office weekdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Coaches hired by Hawaiʻi Department of Education are required to pass a criminal background check. Contact Kaʻū High Athletic Director Kalei Namohala 313-4161 with questions.

Experience Volcano Festival is still looking for vendors.Booths for the event are $25 per day for Saturday, July 27, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday, July 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event is coordinated with the new ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash on the 27th. Apply at experiencevolcano.com/vendor-application.
     Experience Volcano is a group of businesses and residents helping to rebuild the economy of Volcano, following last year's volcanic disaster that shut down Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and drastically reduced the visitor county which is now recovering.

ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register at ohialehuahalf.com.

Exhibit -The Joy of the Brush: Paintings by Linda J. Varez, daily through Aug 4, 9a.m.-5p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Free; park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Saturday, June 29, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Saturday, June 29, 2019

The farming community of Kaʻū is represented by the Nāʻālehu Methodist Church entry to the annual 
Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade today. See more below and in upcoming Kaʻū News Briefs.
Photo by Leilani Esperanza
ACTING VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK SUPERINTENDENT Rhonda Loh is set to remain in her position for a year, while Superintendent Cindy Orlando completes a detail as Acting Deputy Regional Director in the National Park Service Pacific West Regional office in San Francisco.
     Loh, selected this Spring by the National Park Service to serve as Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's Acting Superintendent, has extensive experience at Hawai‘i Volcanoes, and continues to serve as the Park's Chief
of Natural Resources Management. She also detailed as acting superintendent for other parks in the region, including Haleakalā National Park, Kalaupapa National Historical ParkKaloko-Honokōhau National Historical Park Hawai‘i, Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park, World War II Valor In The Pacific National Monument, and Honouliuli National Monument, "which have prepared her for this important role," said a Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park social media statement.
Rhonda Loh is Acting Superintendent of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National
Park while Superintendent Cindy Orlando is on detail as Deputy
Regional Director for the parks in the western states.
NPS photo
     Orlando returns to Volcanoes and her home in Kaʻū each month and served as a judge at the Nāʻālehu Independence Day parade today.
     While on detail on the mainland, based at the NPS regional office in San Francisco, Orlando recently spoke at the 50th Annual Manzanar Pilgrimage, a gathering of 2,000 people to commemorate the 10,000 Japanese Americans who were placed in the internment camp during World War II. She said that Manzanar National Historic Site, located in Owens Valley near Lone Pine, Ca., is a good model for presenting the history of the tragedy of the internment.
     She spoke about Kīlauea Military Camp in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and its use as an internment camp for the Japanese.
     Also attending the Manzanar Pilgrimage was Carole Hayashino, formerly of the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawaiʻi in Honolulu, who assists with the Honouliuli site on Oʻahu and other Japanese confinement sites in the west, such as Tule Lake and Minidotka. See more on Manzanar.
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MORE ELECTRIC VEHICLE CHARGING STATIONS AND ELECTRIC BUSES will be funded, in part through an $8.1 million settlement from Volkswagen, according to the July edition of Capitol Connection. Gov. David Ige's newsletter says that "Hawai‘i earns A+ for planned use of VW settlement." It says the funds will "accelerate the Ige administration's goals for more sustainable energy generation and use."
     Hawai‘i and Washington were the only two states to earn a perfect A+ score on their electric vehicle infrastructure and mass transit plans, according to the Volkswagen Settlement Scorecard. "Electric vehicles are far less polluting than gas-powered cars, with half the carbon footprint, as well as fewer emissions of pollutants that contribute to poor air quality and respiratory diseases," said the VW Settlement State Scorecard report. Hawai‘i was praised for its plan to take full advantage of the opportunity to invest in transportation electrification. Thirty-seven states received a "D" or "F."
     In 2016, Volkswagen admitted to installing illegal emissions control software on more than half a million vehicles in the U.S. and entered into a massive multibillion dollar settlement with federal authorities. The majority of the funds went to compensating owners of offending vehicles, but nearly $3 billion was allocated to provide each state with funds to promote electric vehicles.

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ʻO Kaʻū Kākou members lead off today's Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, as sponsors of the event.
Photo by Peter Anderson
THE INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE BROUGHT RAIN AND SHINE to Nāʻālehu today, with tractors, trucks, cars, four-wheelers, riders, and walkers moving along a shiny Highway 11.
     The annual event drew the Hawaiʻi County Band, County Council member Maile David, and Miss Kaʻū Coffee and her court. Women on horseback represented the islands, with lei for themselves, their escorts, and their steeds. Churches, community groups, and local businesses participated. After, the parade the crowd convened at Nāʻālehu Community Center for entertainment and food. The event is sponsored by ʻO Kaʻū Kakou. See more photos and details in tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs.

Four-wheelers are popular among farmers, hunters, ranchers, and
parade participants. Photo by Peter Anderson
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THE VISITOR COUNT WAS HIGHER THIS MAY on Hawaiʻi Island than last May, when Kīlauea Volcano began erupting and earthquakes were more than a daily event. This May's total reached 138,520, some 7,000 more than this April. The state reports that visitor expenditures were $153 million on this island in May, dropping from expenditures in May of 2018, which reached $173 million.
     For the fist five months of 2019, the number of visitors totaled 719,000. They spent $950 million, while last year, trough May, 780,000 visitors spent $1.1 billion on Hawaiʻi Island.

Nāʻālehu Volunteer Fire Department. Photo by Leilani Esperanza
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A NEW ART GALLERY AND GIFT SHOP is on schedule to open in Nāʻālehu in late summer at the location of Kamaʻaina Kuts.
     Well-known hair care specialist, Corrine Kaupu, will close her longtime business and reopen as Kaʻū Art Gallery and Gift Shop. She invites local artists to show their specialty works "for a possible placement at the gallery" on Saturday, Aug. 10, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The official opening of the gallery is planned for Sunday, Sept. 1.
     Kaupu said she's "looking forward to helping local artists and our community. I'm open to see what our community wants."
Pāhala Volunteer Fire Department. Photo by Leilani Esperanza
     A hairdresser for 31 years, in Nāʻālehu as Kamaʻaina Kuts for the last 18, Kaupu told The Kaʻū Calendar that, though her clients begged her not to retire, she was suffering burnout, and has taken only exclusive clients since January. With support and suggestions from her clients, she said, "Kaʻū Art Gallery and Gift Shop was born."
     With the help of her husband, of Wai Moku Deliveries, she is renovating the Kamaʻaina Kuts location to become a gallery where unique hand made and locally made items will be for sale, targeted to both locals and visitors. She has already lined up Happy Wahine and SewDaKine items.
     Call 937-1840 or email kauartgallery@hawaiiantel.biz for more. See KauArtGallery.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
Kaʻū Auto Repair is a regular participant in rescuing vehicles and in joining the parade. See photos of horses and
riders, Miss Kaʻū Coffee, businesses, churches, and community groups in this week's Kaʻū News Briefs.
Photo by Peter Anderson
HIGH SURF is expected along all Kaʻū shorelines until Monday. The National Weather Service warns coastal residents to secure property and for beach-goers to limit or postpone shoreline activity.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
2019 Kaʻū High School Athletics Schedule through August
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates; Bowling TBA.

Football, Division II:
Mon., July 15, first day Conditioning, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Mon., July 22, first day Full Pads, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 24, 1 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kamehameha

Girls Volleyball, Kaʻū District Gym:
Mon., July 29, 3 to 5 p.m., first day practice
Tue., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Hilo
Fri., Aug. 23, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts St. Joseph
Wed., Aug. 28, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kohala

Cross Country:
Mon., Aug. 5, 2:30 to 4 p.m., first day practice
Sat., Aug. 31, 10 a.m., @Christian Liberty

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
MONDAY, JULY 1
Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Mtg., Monday, July 1, 4-6p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JULY 2
Flameworking - An Introductory Class w/Nash Adams-Pruitt, Tuesday, July 2, 5-8p.m., Volcano Art Center. $75/VAC member, $80/non-member, plus $40 supply fee. Class size limited. Register early. Advanced registration required. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Mtg., Tuesday, July 2, 6-8p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

After Dark in the Park -Kīlauea 2018 Volcanic Pollution: from Source to Exposed Communities, Tuesday, July 2, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Volcanologist Dr. Evgenia Ilyinskaya presents new information about what volcanic pollution really contains and its potential implications for environmental impacts. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3
Early Head Start, Wednesday, July 3 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 10-noon, Ocean View Community Center. Social get together for keiki and parents; open to public. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Voices w/Kumu Hula Stacey Kapuaikapolipele Ka‘au‘a, Wednesday, July 3 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 5:30-7p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Desiree Moana Cruz moderates the talk story session. Free. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

THURSDAY, JULY 4
July 4th Breakfast Buffet, Thursday, July 4, 6:30-11a.m., Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp. Includes: Waffles with Toppings, Omelet Station, Meats, Breakfast Potatoes, Steamed Rice, Fresh Fruit, Assorted Baked Breads, and a beverage. $12.50/Adult, $6.50/Child, ages 6-11. No reservations required. Open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

Volcano Village 4th of July Parade and Craft Fair, Thursday, July 4. Parade starts 9a.m., craft fair at Cooper Center open until 1:30p.m.. Parade starts at Volcano Post Office, down Old Volcano Road, turns up Wright Road, and ends at Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Activities, food, entertainment.
     Sponsored by Volcano Community Association and Cooper Center Council. Leashed dogs allowed. Parade entry form at volcanocommunity.org. Vendor application at thecoopercenter.org, email to idoaloha@gmail.com. Tara Holmes, 464-3625, 8a.m.-5p.m.

Keiki Jiggle Bums, Thursday, July 4 and 18 – 1st and 3rd Thursday, monthly – 9-10:30a.m., Ocean View Community Center. Discover the joy of early learning through song and musical instruments. For keiki 0-4 years. Nicola, 238-8544

Women's Expression Group, Thursday, July 4 – 1st Thursday monthly – 3-4:30p.m., PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Women welcome to drop in. Free. Lindsey Miller, 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Mtg., Thursday, July 4, 6-7p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Mtg., Thursday, July 4, 6:30-8:30p.m., Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

SATURDAY, JULY 6
Ka‘ū Roping & Riding Association's 42nd Annual 4th of July Buckle Rodeo, Saturday and Sunday, July 6 and 7, slack starts at 8a.m., show starts at noon, at the rodeo grounds behind Nā‘ālehu Park. Tickets available at gate, $8/person. Pre-sale tickets available $7/person around town from Rodeo Queen contestants. Ralph or Tammy, 929-8079

Stewardship at the Summit, July 6, 12, 20, and 26, 8:45a.m.-noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteers remove invasive, non-native plants. Wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants. Bring hat, rain gear, day pack, snacks, and water. Gloves/tools provided. Parental/guardian accompaniment or written consent required for those under 18. Free; park entrance fees apply. Paul and Jane Field, field@hawaii.edu, nps.gov/havo

Edible Landscaping for Backyards and Beyond w/Zach Mermel of Ola Design Group, Saturday, July 6, 9a.m.-noon, Volcano Art Center. Learn how to transform lanai and lawn, field and fence into an abundant oasis of edible and multifunctional plants. $30/VAC member, $40/non-member, plus $15 materials fee. Class size limited. Register early. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Alternative Handbuilding - East African Pottery w/Erik Wold, Saturday, July 6 through August 31, 10a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. No class August 24. $180/VAC members, $200/non-member, plus $15 materials fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Zentangle Inspired Labyrinth Cartouches w/Lois and Earl Stokes, Saturday, July 6, 10a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. All welcome, no experience necessary. Potluck - bring dish to share. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Keiki Science Class, Saturday, July 6 – 1st Saturday, monthly – 11a.m.-noon, Ace Hardware Stores islandwide; Nā‘ālehu, 929-9030 and Ocean View, 929-7315. Free. acehardware.com

ONGOING
Seamless Summer Program, open to all people under age 18, no registration required, offers free breakfast at Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School cafeterias. Meals are available weekdays through July 11; no meal Thursday, July 4. Kaʻū High serves breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call (808) 939-2413 for Nāʻālehu Elementary mealtimes.

Volcano Village 4th of July Parade, Festival, and Craft Fair happens Thursday, July 4 from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The parade starts at the Volcano Post Office, travels down Old Volcano Road, and ends at Cooper Center on Wright Road. Free entry to activities, food, and entertainment. Leashed dogs allowed. Provided by Cooper Center Council, Volcano Community Association, and more. To be in the parade, download the entry form at volcanocommunity.org and email to vcainfo@yahoo.com. Vendors, download applications at thecoopercenter.org and email to idoaloha@gmail.com, or call Tara Holmes, 464-3625, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Head Coaches for Coed Judo, Coed Swimming, and Boys Basketball are wanted by Kaʻū High School for the 2019-2020 school year. Applications, due Monday, July 8, can be picked up at the school office weekdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Coaches hired by Hawaiʻi Department of Education are required to pass a criminal background check. Contact Kaʻū High Athletic Director Kalei Namohala 313-4161 with questions.

Hi-Employment Seeks Student Employees to work in a macadamia nut orchard on weekends and holidays. Duties include hand-harvesting macadamia nuts, filling and transporting nut bags and buckets, loading 25-plus pound bags into truck beds, and possible clearing of brush and branches. Applicants must be at least 15 years old, have a work permit, two forms of ID, and transportation to "Panaʻewa Stretch." Call for more details, 238-3741, hi-employment.com.

Experience Volcano Festival is still looking for vendors. Booths for the event are $25 per day for Saturday, July 27, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday, July 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event is coordinated with the new ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash on the 27th. Apply at experiencevolcano.com/vendor-application.
     Experience Volcano is a group of businesses and residents helping to rebuild the economy of Volcano, following last year's volcanic disaster that shut down Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and drastically reduced the visitor county which is now recovering.

ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register at ohialehuahalf.com.

Exhibit -The Joy of the Brush: Paintings by Linda J. Varez, daily through Aug. 4, 9a.m.-5p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Free; park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com

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Friday, June 28, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Friday, June 28, 2019

Merle Becker of Aikane Plantation in Kaʻū is organizing riders for both the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade
tomorrow, Saturday, June 29 at 11 a.m. and the Fourth of July Parade in Volcano. Photo by Ron Johnson
SUPREME COURT DECISIONS on Thursday exemplify "how elections have consequences for years and even generations to come," said Sen. Mazie Hirono in a statement today.
     "While the Court paused the Trump Administration's racist citizenship question on the 2020 Census, which is clearly part of his anti-immigrant agenda, the conservative majority on the bench made another decision that will undoubtedly have far-reaching negative impacts on voters and elections: they refused to ban hyper-partisan gerrymandering.
     "What does that mean exactly? It means that Republicans in control of local, state, and federal government can continue to draw unfair, ridiculous districts, picking and choosing who their own voters will be to better ensure their victory in future elections. It's undemocratic, and the five justices who allowed this to continue have lifetime appointments on the Court!
     "But I can't say I didn't see this coming. This is all part of Mitch McConnell's, Donald Trump's, and the GOP's plans to shape the future of our country, even when they're long out of office. They're doing it right now as they continue to rush right-wing ideologues through the judicial confirmation process here in the Senate, and I'm fed up.
The largest child migrant detention camp in the U.S. is in Homestead, FL.
 Rep. Tulsi Gabbard and otherpresidential candidates attempted to
 go inside this week but were turned away.
Image from Department of Health & Human Services
     "The only reason we have as many conservatives on the Supreme Court and in our federal courts across the country as we do is because of Donald Trump and Mitch McConnell. Elections matter, and that's why we must take back the Senate and vote Trump out of office in 2020," said Hirono.

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THE PRESIDENTIAL DEBATE ON WEDNESDAY SAW TULSI GABBARD reviewing the history of her views on the LGBTQ community. During the event in Miami, where she debated ten of the 20 contenders for U.S. President, Kaʻū's member of the U.S. House of Representatives said, "Let me say that there is no one in our government, at any level, who has the right to tell any American who they should be allowed to love or they should be allowed to marry. My record in Congress for over six years shows my commitment to fighting for LGBTQ equality. I serve on the equality Caucus and recently voted for passage of the equality act.
     "Maybe many people in this country can relate to the fact that I grew up in a socially conservative home, held views when I was very young that I no longer hold today. I've served with LGBTQ service members both in training and deployed downrange. I know that they would give their life for me and I would give my life for them. It is this commitment that I'll carry through as president of the United States, recognizing that there are still people who are facing discrimination in the workplace, still people who were unable to find a home for their families. It is this kind of discrimination that we need to address."

Lei from dryland forest foliage at Kāwā.
Photo by Kaweni Masaniai-Ibarra
AFTER THE DEMOCRATIC DEBATE, presidential candidate Tulsi Gabbard visited the Homestead, FL detention center, which holds some 2,300 migrant children. Like other candidates who made the trip to Homestead this week, she was denied entry and told she needs to apply two weeks ahead of any visit.
     Gabbard, who traveled to the center yesterday afternoon, told The Hill, "It's a heart-wrenching situation and it is absolutely despicable."  She took issue with the operation of the center by a corporation, Caliburn International. "Their business model - literally built around keeping those beds full rather than having the objective that we should all have in this country, which is reuniting these children with their families, immediately."
     After Gabbard and other presidential candidates made the trip to Homestead, the Miami Herald published the following headline: "Recess time, education, and legal services will be restored at Homestead detention center, agency says."

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Kupu affiliates prepare native plants for planting at Kāwā this week.
Photo by Kaweni Masaniai-Ibarra
KUPU'S HAWAIʻI YOUTH CONSERVATION CORPS WORKED AT KĀWĀ this week with Kaʻū's own Nā Mamo o Kāwā stewardship hui. As part of its summer program, Kupu sent five affiliates to stay in Pāhala and help with Kāwā conservation projects.
     With three members enrolled in college, one college graduate, and one high school graduate, the group traveled to Kaʻū to learn about collaborative conservation. Under the guidance of Nā Mamo o Kāwā, Kupu aided in the stewardship efforts of Kāwā and continued their mission to revitalize connections to the ʻāina. Both Kupu and Nā Mamo o Kāwā members, including spiritual leader Duane Pua, offered daily cultural protocol to begin work along the beach trail and coastal lands.
     The group focused on Nā Mamo o Kāwā's efforts to care for the land, with such activities as clearing invasive plant species, propagating native plants, and maintaining integrity of coastal areas. In accordance with Kupu's mission to encourage pono through environmental stewardship and service-learning opportunities, Nā Mamo o Kāwā led the group through its plans while teaching the cultural importance of the area. Among native species planted, and cared for are ʻulu, ʻūlei, and alaheʻe.
     James Akau, executive director of Nā Mamo o Kāwā, said the progress has been increasingly impactful as more groups have come in to contribute to the effort. Nā Mamo o Kāwā aims to clear invasive plants to increase the presence of native plant species, such as ʻaʻaliʻi and milo, while incorporating useful plants that can benefit the community. This ties in to their effort to restore a native dryland forest to the area. The fruits of the organization's labor have become apparent through an increase native plants along the coast. At the end of the week, Kupu gathered ʻaʻaliʻi from Kāwā and local plumeria to craft lei.
Kupu's mission to encourage pono was in action at Kāwā this week.
Photo by Kaweni Masaniai-Ibarra
     Pāhala Plantation Cottages hosted the Kupu affiliates during their stay in Kaʻū.

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CHANGING THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR A MEDICAL RELEASE FROM PRISON for terminally ill inmates  may not happen if Gov. David  Ige vetoes HB629. This bill would allow inmates or inmates' relatives to apply for early release due to "terminal or debilitating diseases or illnesses" for low-risk incarcerated persons. Ige said a Medical Release Program has been in place since December 2014, and this bill does not provide more funding for the additional tasks assigned.

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A BILL TO IMPLEMENT A TWENTY-FOUR/SEVEN BAIL AND RELEASE SCHEDULE may be vetoed by Gov. David Ige. SB1423 would allow defendants to pay bail seven-days-a-week,  any time, day or night,  upon posting or payment of bail. Ige said this bill is redundant within HB1552, also on Ige's desk to sign, and does not include funding or staff.

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OTHER BILLS THE GOVERNOR IS CONSIDERING VETOING are: HB407, which would require the Board of Education to obtain approval before terminating a Dept. of Education complex area superintendent; HB1032, which would establish a state boating facility lease pilot program within the Department of Land and Natural Resources, specific to Manele Small Boat Harbor; HB1133, which would limit commercial use permits for Molokini Shoal marine life conservation district; SB551, which would allow condominium associations to conduct non-judicial foreclosures; SB1530, which would change financing for Hawaiʻi Community Development Authority staff from Hawaiʻi Community Development revolving fund to the general fund, specific to Kakaʻako Community Development District transfer to the City and County of Honolulu.

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FLIGHT PLANS FOR HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK for July include a U.S. Geological Survey contractor that will deploy LIDAR (Light, Detection, and Ranging) technology over Kīlauea summit and the Southwest Rift Zone. Data gathered will be used to document and map ground changes resulting from last year's major summit collapse events. Flights will be slow and repetitive "lawnmower" grids at about 1,300 feet above ground level (agl) to as low as 500 feet agl.
Overflight areas for LIDAR mapping of Kīlauea summit and the Southwest
Rift Zone in July. USGS Map
     Monday, July 1, 8 a.m. to 10 a.m.: Transport fence construction materials along Chain of Craters Road near ‘Āinahou.
     Tuesday, July 2, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Backcountry trail support from Keauhou Shelter to Hōlei Flats. 8 a.m. to noon: Survey and control invasive guinea grass along Keauhou Trail from sea level to 3,000-ft. elevation.
     Wednesday, July 3, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Transport feral ungulate fence construction material near the top of Mauna Loa Road.
     Monday, July 8, 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. and Tuesday, July 9, 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.: Petrel monitoring from Kīlauea summit to Mauna Loa at about 9,000-ft. elevation.
     Thursday, July 11, 8 a.m. to noon: Survey and control invasive fountain grass from coastal areas to southwest boundary below 3,000-ft. elevation.
     Monday through Thursday, July 15-18, 9 a.m. to noon: Feral ungulate fence construction projects in the Southwest Rift Zone. 
     Tuesday, July 23, 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Pepeiao Cabin maintenance from Hilina Pali Road to Pepeiao Cabin.
     Tuesday, July 30, 6 a.m. to 9 a.m.: Ungulate survey and control work within the Kahuku Unit paddock area. 8 a.m. to 11 a.m.: Pepeiao Cabin maintenance from Hilina Pali Road to Pepeiao Cabin.
     Wednesday, July 31, 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.: Survey invasive vegetation along Mauna Loa Road from 4,000- to 6,000-ft. elevation.
     The park regrets any noise impact to residents and park visitors. Dates and times are subject to change based on aircraft availability and weather. Management of the park requires the use of aircraft to monitor and research volcanic activity, conduct search-and-rescue missions and law enforcement operations, support management of natural and cultural resources, and to maintain backcountry facilities.

Still south of Baja, California, former Hurricane Alvin is expected to peter
out over the weekend. NOAA image
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STORM ALVIN, the Pacific's first hurricane of the season just yesterday, is still about 2,400 miles from Kaʻū, and is expected to slip into a Tropical Depression, then fade away over the weekend. Another disturbance near where Alvin formed is looking to shape up into a larger storm, but no forecast yet on how powerful it will be come or if it will also head in Hawaiʻi's general direction.

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Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
2019 Kaʻū High School Athletics Schedule through August
See khpes.org/athletics-home for details and updates; Bowling TBA.

Football, Division II:
Mon., July 15, first day Conditioning, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Mon., July 22, first day Full Pads, 2:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Sat., Aug. 24, 1 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kamehameha

Girls Volleyball, Kaʻū District Gym:
Mon., July 29, 3 to 5 p.m., first day practice
Tue., Aug. 20, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Hilo
Fri., Aug. 23, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts St. Joseph
Wed., Aug. 28, 6 p.m., Kaʻū hosts Kohala

Cross Country:
Mon., Aug. 5, 2:30 to 4 p.m., first day practice
Sat., Aug. 31, 10 a.m., @Christian Libert

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
SATURDAY, JUNE 29
Mālama Nā Keiki Festival happens Saturday, June 29, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center. This third annual free event, presented by Health Resources and Services Administration, offers health screenings, education, and activities. Expectant and first-time mothers, women considering pregnancy, young families, and supporting ʻohana from across the county are especially invited to attend. Prizes, entertainment, free food, and keiki activities are offered. Health screenings include hearing, vision, height, weight, and blood pressure. Health education includes prenatal information and breastfeeding education with lactations specialists. Health activities include Grow Your Own Plant and Makahiki games.
     For more, call 808-969-9220, or see hmono.orgfacebook.com/hmono.org, or hui_malama on Instagram.

Paint Your Own Silk Scarf with Patti Pease Johnson, Saturday, June 29, 9a.m.-12:30p.m., Volcano Art Center. $45/VAC member, $50/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou's Annual Nāʻālehu 4th of July Parade and Summer Fun Fest happens Saturday, June 29. The Nā‘ālehu Independence Day Parade begins at 11 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Elementary School and ends at the Nā‘ālehu Hongwanji Mission. The parade features floats, Paʻu riders, Kaʻū Coffee Court members, and more.
     The Fest, which begins after the parade, features water slides and bounce castles, hot dogs, watermelon, and shave ice, plus Senior Bingo and lunch at the community center for seniors. The free event is open to the public, no registration required. okaukakou.org

Arts & Tea Culture Workshop Series #2, Saturday, June 29, 1-4p.m., Volcano Art Center. Learn tea propagation techniques with Eva Lee. Pre-event for A Taste of Tea Pottery Fundraiser - August 25. Workshops designed to be attended as a series - #3 set for July 27. No experience necessary. $60/VAC member, $75/non-member for series. Individual workshop $25 each. Requires minimum of 6 participants to be held. Registration limited. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

MONDAY, JULY 1
Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Mtg., Monday, July 1, 4-6p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, JULY 2
Flameworking - An Introductory Class w/Nash Adams-Pruitt, Tuesday, July 2, 5-8p.m., Volcano Art Center. $75/VAC member, $80/non-member, plus $40 supply fee. Class size limited. Register early. Advanced registration required. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Mtg., Tuesday, July 2, 6-8p.m., Pāhala Community Center.

After Dark in the Park -Kīlauea 2018 Volcanic Pollution: from Source to Exposed Communities, Tuesday, July 2, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Volcanologist Dr. Evgenia Ilyinskaya presents new information about what volcanic pollution really contains and its potential implications for environmental impacts. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, JULY 3
Early Head Start, Wednesday, July 3 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 10-noon, Ocean View Community Center. Social get together for keiki and parents; open to public. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Voices w/Kumu Hula Stacey Kapuaikapolipele Ka‘au‘a, Wednesday, July 3 – 1st Wednesday, monthly – 5:30-7p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Desiree Moana Cruz moderates the talk story session. Free. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

THURSDAY, JULY 4
July 4th Breakfast Buffet, Thursday, July 4, 6:30-11a.m., Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp. Includes: Waffles with Toppings, Omelet Station, Meats, Breakfast Potatoes, Steamed Rice, Fresh Fruit, Assorted Baked Breads, and a beverage. $12.50/Adult, $6.50/Child, ages 6-11. No reservations required. Open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

Volcano Village 4th of July Parade and Craft Fair, Thursday, July 4. Parade starts 9a.m., craft fair at Cooper Center open until 1:30p.m.. Parade starts at Volcano Post Office, down Old Volcano Road, turns up Wright Road, and ends at Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Activities, food, entertainment. Sponsored by Volcano Community Association and Cooper Center Council. Leashed dogs allowed. Parade entry form at volcanocommunity.org. Vendor application at thecoopercenter.org, email to idoaloha@gmail.com. Tara Holmes, 464-3625, 8a.m.-5p.m.

Keiki Jiggle Bums, Thursday, July 4 and 18 – 1st and 3rd Thursday, monthly – 9-10:30a.m., Ocean View Community Center. Discover the joy of early learning through song and musical instruments. For keiki 0-4 years. Nicola, 238-8544

Women's Expression Group, Thursday, July 4 – 1st Thursday monthly – 3-4:30p.m., PARENTS Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Women welcome to drop in. Free. Lindsey Miller, 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Mtg., Thursday, July 4, 6-7p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Mtg., Thursday, July 4, 6:30-8:30p.m., Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

ONGOING
Seamless Summer Program, open to all people under age 18, no registration required, offers free breakfast at Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School cafeterias. Meals are available weekdays through July 11; no meal Thursday, July 4. Kaʻū High serves breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call (808) 939-2413 for Nāʻālehu Elementary mealtimes.

Volcano Village 4th of July Parade, Festival, and Craft Fair happens Thursday, July 4 from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The parade starts at the Volcano Post Office, travels down Old Volcano Road, and ends at Cooper Center on Wright Road. Free entry to activities, food, and entertainment. Leashed dogs allowed. Provided by Cooper Center Council, Volcano Community Association, and more.
     To be in the parade, download the entry form at volcanocommunity.org and email to vcainfo@yahoo.com. Vendors, download applications at thecoopercenter.org and email to idoaloha@gmail.com, or call Tara Holmes, 464-3625, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Head Coaches for Coed Judo, Coed Swimming, and Boys Basketball are wanted by Kaʻū High School for the 2019-2020 school year. Applications, due Monday, July 8, can be picked up at the school office weekdays, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Coaches hired by Hawaiʻi Department of Education are required to pass a criminal background check. Contact Kaʻū High Athletic Director Kalei Namohala 313-4161 with questions.

Hi-Employment Seeks Student Employees to work in a macadamia nut orchard on weekends and holidays. Duties include hand-harvesting macadamia nuts, filling and transporting nut bags and buckets, loading 25-plus pound bags into truck beds, and possible clearing of brush and branches. Applicants must be at least 15 years old, have a work permit, two forms of ID, and transportation to "Panaʻewa Stretch." Call for more details, 238-3741, hi-employment.com.

Experience Volcano Festival is still looking for vendors. Booths for the event are $25 per day for Saturday, July 27, 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Sunday, July 28, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event is coordinated with the new ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash on the 27th. Apply at experiencevolcano.com/vendor-application.
     Experience Volcano is a group of businesses and residents helping to rebuild the economy of Volcano, following last year's volcanic disaster that shut down Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and drastically reduced the visitor county which is now recovering.

ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register at ohialehuahalf.com.

Exhibit -The Joy of the Brush: Paintings by Linda J. Varez, daily through Aug 4, 9a.m.-5p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Free; park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.