About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, May 04, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Friday, May 4, 2018

Kaʻū Valley Farms grows sweet potatoes below the hillside, looking out to Nāʻālehu and the Pacific. See story below. Photo by Lee Neal
A 6.9 EARTHQUAKE SHOOK KA‘Ū at 12:33 p.m. today, rocking vehicles, sending people into doorways and under desks, and shutting down Bank of Hawai‘i in Pāhala early. With multiple earthquakes near the summit of Kīlauea Volcano, and many more downrift, with some into Ka‘ū, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park shut down the entire park to guests, including all accommodations and concessions.
     The epicenter for the 6.9 quake was south of Leilani Estates, the community where lava is burning houses and forests with fountains of ash, rocks, and flames shooting as high as 150 feet.
A 6.9 earthquake and temblors almost every few minutes continued today as more lava broke out
in Leilani Estates and Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park shut its gates to everyone.
USGS map
     Civil Defense ordered mandatory evacuations for all of Leilani Estates and Lanipuna Gardens Subdivisions, where people and friends carried as many belongings away from their homes as they could load into trucks and cars.
     Hawaiʻi Fire Department reports extremely dangerous conditions due to high levels of Sulfur Dioxide gas in the evacuation area. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense states the sulfur gas is “an immediate threat to life for all who become exposed.” Civil Defense also warned that first responders may not be able to come to the aid of residents who refuse to evacuate.
     A Civil Defense statement said the Leilani area “continues to be unstable with multiple volcanic eruptions happening. No one is allowed into the area. Do not attempt to return to your home at this time.” Earthquakes continued into the afternoon every few minutes across lower Puna.
     Reports stated there was no tsunami threat from earthquakes, though sea water rose in Hilo, Honoka‘a, Punalu‘u, and a few other places.
     Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense suggests those residents who felt quakes check utility connections and for other possible damage.
5.0-magnitude earthquake Thursday morning triggered a small collapse at Pu‘u Ō‘ō vent
that sent a rose-colored plume billowing skyward. The plume was visible throughout 

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and neighboring communities, including Kalapana
Gardens
, where this photo was taken. Photo from Janice Wei/NPS
     Ka‘ū and Volcano residents were seen filling up with gas, and buying water and food, to prepare for the possibility that the quakes and the lava could come their way.
     The lava lake within Halema‘uma‘u Crater at the volcano’s summit dropped about 100 feet or more below the vent rim in the last few days. Lava is no longer visible within Halema‘uma‘u.
     The “activity further supports the continued instability in the East Rift Zone,” Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando stated. “Safety of visitors and staff is our highest priority,” she said.

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PUNA GEOTHERMAL VENTURE, close to Leilani Estates, also shut down. Hawai‘i Electric Light Co. released a statement saying the closure will not affect power for the island, HELCO deployed employees to the Leilani Estates to disconnect power in neighborhoods impacted by the active lava flow.
     For customers who are evacuating, the company recommends shutting off electricity at the main breaker or switch and unplugging or turning off electric equipment and appliances.
     “We will continue to work closely with Civil Defense to monitor and assess the situation,” said Rhea Lee-Moku, Hawai‘i Electric Light spokesperson. “We strongly encourage the community to be safe and heed the advice of Civil Defense and first responders.”

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AN EMERGENCY PROCLAMATION, ISSUED BY GOV. DAVID IGE today in Hilo, authorizes “expenditure of state funding for quick and efficient relief caused by the volcanic eruption,” according to an interview on Big Island Video News. Ige said he is also working on federal avenues for assistance.
     “The danger is of such magnitude that it warrants preemptive and protective action in order to provide for the safety, health and welfare of the residents of Leilani Estates and surrounding areas,” said the governor.

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John Cross, land manager with Kaʻū Valley Farms, points to nursery
specimens. Photo by Lee Neal 
DIVERSIFIED AGRICULTURE IS APPARENT AT KAʻŪ VALLEY FARMS. Kaʻū Coffee, tea, sweet potatoes, lettuce, and other vegetables were on display yesterday. The tour marked the first time that Kaʻū Valley Farms held an event for this week's Kaʻū Coffee Festival.
     Guests visited green houses where young plants are started and the fields where they grow out. The farm is on 1,500 acres that climb the slopes of Kahilipali Ahuapua‘a, the hill behind Nāʻālehu. The owners said they plan a tea farm as well as growing food to be sold locally.
     A trip to a water tunnel, lunch from a local restaurant, including locally sourced vegetables, were on the itinerary. Farm manager Lee Segawa explained how crops are grown.
    Land Manager John Cross told the history of the plantation water system and the land itself. The tour’s planned end was a brief walk into the 85-acre Native Forest upon the lands - a forest area that was never converted into sugarcane and provides a glimpse into original, pristine native Hawaiian forest. Visitors received some hands-on experience, helping to plant Camelia sinensis tea plants and sampling hydroponic lettuces.
     Visit kauvalley.com.
Guests help out with the tea planting. Photo by Lee Neal

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Lee Segawa, Kaʻū Valley Farm manager, shows off the
tip of a tea plant. Photo by Lee Neal
THE ‘ĀINA PONO FARM TO SCHOOL INITIATIVE and Harvest of the Month programs are gaining more support from Sen. Mazie Hirono and Lt. Gov. Doug Chin, to increase the use of locally grown produce and beef in public school lunches.
     "The ‘Āina Pono Farm-to-School Initiative and Harvest of the Month connect Hawai‘i's agriculture community with our public schools to supply our keiki with nutritious, locally grown school lunches," said Hirono. "The Mililani High School students I met with today are excited about their school lunch program, and I look forward to seeing these programs expand to schools across the state."
     Said Chin: "U.S. Senator Mazie Hirono has long supported and promoted local agriculture and sustainability programs. It's no surprise that she sees the value in the ‘Āina Pono Hawai‘i State Farm-to-School Program." He said that students have become ambassadors of the program. "It should be expanded throughout our state."
     The state Department of Education School Food Services Branch is working with local farmers to increase the volume of their harvests to meet the demand of serving lunch to 180,000 public school students. Once a month, a new local product is served in all 256 public schools statewide as the Harvest of the Month entrée. Products served since December 2017 include local beef, banana, papaya, ulu (breadfruit), and pineapple.
Hydroponic lettuce in a greenhouse was ready for
the eating at yesterday's Kaʻū Valley Farm event.
Photo by Lee Neal
     In 2014, Hirono met with Haliimaile Maui Pineapple Company and discussed efforts to include pineapples in the U.S. Department of Agriculture's national school lunch procurement process. Following that meeting, Hirono connected Haliimaile Pineapple with the state Department of Education. The Department of Education's School Food Services Branch worked with Haliimaile Pineapple to determine the best packing, distribution, and storing methods, and this month, their fresh pineapple will be served in a Sweet and Sour Pineapple Pork entrée as this month's Harvest of Month product.
     In 2015, Hirono and then- Deputy Secretary of Agriculture Krysta Harden met with student council representatives, Department of Education administrators, and school officials. They discussed the importance of the school lunch program and the unique challenges Hawai‘i farmers face in distributing produce to schools, such as production volume and selecting menus for Hawai‘i's statewide school system.
     Hirono said she advocates programs to provide students, women, children and families, and seniors with better access to healthy and affordable meals, and has continued to push back against the federal Administration's efforts to roll back these important programs while advocating for increased funding for school meals in Hawai‘i.
Lieutenant Governor Doug Chin, Senator Hirono, 
and Greg Christian, head chef of the ʻĀina 
Pono program. Photo from Hirono's office
     Hirono is also cosponsor of Sen. Patrick Leahy's (D-Vt.) Farm to School Act of 2017, which would strengthen the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Farm to School Grant Program and increase the amount of local foods in schools. The State of Hawai‘i previously received approximately $187,000 under this program.

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Hoʻaikāne headlines entertainment for tenth annual Kaʻū Coffee Festival
Hoʻolauleʻa tomorrow, Saturday, May 5. Photo from Hoʻaikāne

SATURDAY'S KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS
     Tenth Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a, Saturday, May 5, 9 a.m - 5 p.m. p.m., Pāhala Community Center. Celebrate Ka‘ū Coffee with free music, hula entertainment, and coffee tastings all day long. Local vendor booths. Food and beverage sales. Free to attend.
     Entertainer lineup includes: Ho‘aikāne, emcee Makana Kamahele, Hands of Time, Hannah's Makana ‘Ohana Halau, Shootz, Halau Hula O Leionalani, Keaiwa & Demetrius, El Leo - The Jarican Express, The Lucky Lizard Band, Backyahd Braddahs, Christy Keinaʻala Lassiter, and Bolo.
     Free to attend. Ka‘ū Coffee Experience: 9:30-noon, 1-3:30 p.m., discover the methods behind brewing the perfect cup while enjoying free coffee tastings. Farm & Mill Tours 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., $20/person.

SUNDAY'S KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS
     Ka‘ū Coffee College, Sun, May 6, 9-noon, Pāhala Community Center. Informative talks given by visiting coffee experts. Free; donations appreciated.
     Presentations will be made by Fred Seeber of Shore Systems; University of Hawai‘i's Andrea Kawabata and Tom Greenwell, president and long-time coffee farmer of Greenwell Farms; and Brian Webb of Pacific Coffee Research.
     The Fuji Royal, Ltd. Mini Roaster from Japan - designed for coffee shops, small farmers with their own brand, and for home - will be presented by Yoshiyuki Asano at a demonstration on Saturday, May 5, at the Ka‘ū Coffee Festival Ho‘olaule‘a at Pāhala Community Center and at a workshop at Pāhala Plantation House on Sunday, May 6, after the Coffee College. Also attending will be Tatsuo Fukushima, President of Fuji Royal, and Tokyo manager Yuuki Sugii.
     The roasting quality is the same as with large professional coffee roaster machines, said Max Maemori, who represents Fuji Royal in Hawai‘i. The Fuji Royal mini roaster can process as little as a half pound, 250 grams of green beans and 200 grams of roasted beans. "The top quality micro roaster brings the same efficiency of high performance models to your coffee life," said Maemori. The machine weighs about 70 lbs and can fit on a 14 by 28 inch space with a height of two feet.

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See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
SATURDAY, MAY 5
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: 10th Annual Ho‘olaule‘a, Sat, May 5, 9-5pm, Pāhala Community Center. Celebrate Ka‘ū Coffee and with free music, hula entertainment and coffee tastings. Local vendor booths. Food and beverage sales. Free to attend. Ka‘ū Coffee Experience: 9:30-noon, 1-3:30pm, discover the methods behind brewing the perfect cup while enjoying free coffee tastings. Farm & Mill Tours, shuttle to Ka‘ū Coffee Mill,$20/person, at 9:30am, 11am, 12:30pm, 2pm, & 3:30pm. kaucoffeefestival.com

Realms and Divisions of Kahuku, Sat, May 5, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, two-mile, guided hike on Kahuku Unit's newest trail, Pu‘u Kahuku, explores the traditional Hawaiian classification system.

Cinco de Mayo Dinner, Sat, May 5, 3-5pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. discoveryharbour.net

Cinco de Mayo Buffet, Sat, May 5, 5-8pm, Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp, inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Build Your Own Fajita Bar; menu includes Cheese Quesadillas, Black Beans, Spanish Rice, Soup, Salad/Potato Bar, Beverage, and Ice Cream Sundae Bar. $15.50/Adult, $8.25/Child (6-11 yrs). Regular menu available. KMC patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

SUNDAY, MAY 6
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Ka‘ū Coffee College, Sun, May 6, 9-noon, Pāhala Community Center. Informative talks given by visiting coffee experts. Free; donations appreciated. kaucoffeefestival.com

Palm Trail, Sun, May 6, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, 2.6-mile loop traverses scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. nps.gov/HAVO

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sun, May 6, noon-2pm, Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. Sponsored by South Point Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Emergency Service. View sites.google.com/site/southpointartc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

MONDAY, MAY 7
Ka‘ū Homeschool Co–op Group, Monday, May 7 & 21, 1 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. A parent led homeschool activity/social group building community in Ka‘ū. Laura Roberts, 406-249-3351

Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Meeting, Mon, May 7, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Community Meeting with State Senatorial Candidate Brenda Ford, Mon, May 7, 6-9pm, Ocean View Community Center. Free; donations from $1 to $1,000 accepted.

TUESDAY, MAY 8
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue/Wed, May 8 (Committees)/9 (Council), Kona; Mon/Wed, May 21 (Committees)/23 (Council), Hilo. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

C.E.R.T. Discovery Harbour/Nā‘ālehu, Tue, May 8, 4-6pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Public invited to see what Community Emergency Response Team is about, and participate in training scenarios. Dina Shisler, dinashisler24@yahoo.com, 410-935-8087

Return to Abundance: A Vision for Healthy Oceans, Tue, May 8, 7pm, Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Kēhau Springer describes how Conservation International Hawai‘i works collaboratively to revitalize pono (responsible) Hawaiian fishing values and practices. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNESDAY, MAY 9
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Wed, May 9 (Council), Kona; Mon/Wed, May 21 (Committees)/23 (Council), Hilo. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

THURSDAY, MAY 10
Disability Legal Services, Thu, May 10, 9:30-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. Provided by Paula Boyer of Big Island Disability. ovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com


Ka‘ū Scenic Byway Dedication Ceremony, Thursday, May 10, at 2:00 p.m., Manuka State Wayside. Light refreshments will be served.

Papa ‘Olelo Hawai‘i: Beginning Hawaiian Language Classes, Thu, May 10, Part II, 5-6:30pm, Part V, 6:30-8pm, Volcano Art Center. 8 week courses. Hawaiian language experience preferred (basic for part II). $80/VAC Member, $90/non-Member. Register online, volcanoartcenter.org, or call 967-8222

Volcano School of Arts and Sciences Middle School Theater Night Spring Show, Thu, May 10, 6pm, Kīlauea Military Camp, Kīlauea Theater. VSAS 6th, 7th and 8th graders each perform a one-act play. Free admission; donations accepted.

FRIDAY, MAY 11
Mother's Day Card - Arts & Crafts, Fri, May 11, 2-3pm, Kahuku Park, H.O.V.E. Ages 6 to 12. Register May 7-11. Teresa Anderson, 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Pancake Breakfast & Raffle, Sat, May 12, 8-11am, Ocean View Community Center. To volunteer, call 939-7033, ovcahi.org

NEW & UPCOMING
Learn about how collaborate work can revitalize responsible Hawaiian
fishing values and practices. Event details at right. Photo from Kēhau Springer
KĒHAU SPRINGER, OF CONSERVATION INTERNATIONAL HAWAI‘I, gives a presentation in the Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Tuesday, May 8, at 7 p.m.
     Her talk, Return to Abundance: A Vision for Healthy Oceans, describes how Conservation International Hawai‘i - a local non-governmental organization focused on ocean health and abundance in Hawai‘i - works collaboratively to revitalize pono (responsible) Hawaiian fishing values and practices. 
     Attendees of the After Dark in the Park presentation will learn how the organization promotes social equity and cultural connections and cultivates future generations of stewards. Free; however, park entrance fees apply. Donations help support park programs. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

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Summer Fun - Registration, May 7-10, Nā‘ālehu Community Center. For grades K-6. $40 per child. $50 portion of registration fee funded by Councilwoman Maile David. Program runs Mon-Fri, Jun 12-Jul 20, 8-2pm. Richard Karasuda, 939-2510. hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

ONGOING
Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool Fundraiser runs through Wednesday, May 9. Support the Partners In Development Foundation programs in Nā‘ālehu and Pāhala, for keiki ages birth to 5 years, by purchasing tickets for a 15 oz. bag of Maebo Noodle Factory’s famous One-Ton chips for $12 each. Contact the Ka‘ū office, located in Nā‘ālehu, at 929-8571.

5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Art Center Gallery Presents Hoʻokuʻi I Nā Kiko, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222

One Community and One Parent Representative are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.

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