About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Ka‘ū News Brief Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Last Night at Halemaʻumaʻu
Last Night at Halemaʻumaʻu, at about 7:30 p.m., with lava bubbling about 34 feet below the rim of the crater in Kīlauea Volcano. 
Scientists report increased pressure in the volcano which could lead to breakouts of lava on the east side of Kīlauea. From above, Civil
 Defense warns of lightning, heavy rains and flooding through Saturday. See story below. Photo by Peter Anderson
MAYOR HARRY KIM PRESENTED THE LATEST DRAFT OF THE COUNTY BUDGET TO THE COUNTY COUNCIL yesterday. The proposed fiscal 2018-2019 County of Hawaiʻi budget is almost $516 million. It's an increase of 5.1 percent over last year.
     Pointing to his plan to cut 100 percent of each County Council member's discretionary funding for special projects that come up during the year, Kim said, "I know that's a hard pill to swallow." The discretionary funding for each council member was $90,000 in 2016-2017 and $75,000 for 2017-2018.
     Maile David, whose council district runs from Puna through Ka‘ū and South Kona, will use part of her funds in the near future to subsidize the expense for the Summer Fun Program, build a Scenic Byways kiosk at Manuka State Park, and for an O Ka‘ū Kakou highway cleanup effort. She is also helping with transportation for Ka‘ū residents to travel to Keaʻau for Tropic Care medical services in June. All these happen before next year's budget period that begins in summer.
Mayor Harry Kim says he will adjust the
county budget if more tax revenues come
in from the state.
     David has helped fund the Emergency Go Bags for keiki, with volunteers making them for the CERT team at Discovery Harbour. She helped with the Filipino Sakada Day celebration in Pāhala, provided vouchers for acquiring citric acid to fight coqui frog infestation, and helped fund a kiln for senior citizens in Nāʻālehu. She also helped fund the Veterans Day Parade, the Ka‘ū Police Station anniversary event, and the Ka‘ū Rural Health Community Association's floating lantern ceremony at Punaluʻu Beach.
     When Brenda Ford was a County Council member, she said, she gave to a program to train teens on dating violence, bought a new refrigerator for a battered women's shelter, gave $50,000 for West Hawaiʻi Community Health Center to start a keiki dental clinic, and gave $35,000 for the fire department to train CERT volunteers. She also paid for a refrigerator for Nāʻālehu and Pāhala Food Basket, and for air conditioning at an adult day care. At the request of the police union, she said, she provided $35,000 for radios and battery backup for every patrol officer in the county - so they could be safe, having a police radio with them at all times, on and off duty.
     During Tuesday's Council meeting, the Mayor reviewed the budgeting process: For the first round of budgeting, the county Finance Department recommended "zero growth," in spending. During the second round, departments were advised to cut their budgets by 3 percent. For the third round, they were asked to come up with additional cuts. The mayor said the departments know what's best and were asked to cut budgets "with general guidance of, above all, no service cuts."
     Kim said it was particularly difficult to hold down spending increases in the Hawaiʻi Police Department, where there is need for more officers in growing communities. He noted that Hawaiʻi Island is "the fastest growing island by county in the state of Hawaiʻi." Referring to a lack of large increases in tax revenues with people moving here, he said, "I think we know that that percentage of growth is not loaded with people of high revenues."
     He stated he is grateful for outside help for needy families, including state Department of Education programs that supply free food for students whose families live at the poverty line.
     He said he is also aware that most residents are concerned with the possibility of raising local taxes. The Mayor said the state could help with county expenses by providing counties with a larger share of tax revenues collected statewide, like the Transient Accommodations Tax and the General Excise Tax. He promised that if the County were to receive more tax revenue from the state, he would go to the Council with a revised budget.
     Addressing an increase in the Mayor's office staff by one person, Finance Department Director Deanna Sako said the position was a lateral transfer from the Housing Department to the Mayor's Office. The position is for a Homelessness Coordinator. The Council will continue budget reviews over the next several days. See the meeting at bigislandvideonews.com.

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COFFEE WITH A COP happens tomorrow, Thursday, April 19, 8:30 to 10:3 a.m., at Miloli‘i Beach Park, at the bottom of Miloli‘i Road. Everyone is invited to this casual, no-agenda, talk-story opportunity to meet Kailua-Kona police officers that serve in Miloli‘i.
     For more information, please call the Hawaii Police Department Kona Community Policing Section at (808) 326-4646 extension 259.

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Kaʻū photographer Peter Anderson caught this lava in
Halemaʻumaʻu last night. Photo by Peter Anderson
HAZARDS FROM ABOVE AND BELOW: While Hawaiian Volcano Observatory predicts possible lava outbreaks on the east flank of Kīlauea Volcano, the National Weather Service predicts rains and possible flooding through this weekend. A hazardous weather message from Civil Defense, issued at 2:20 p.m. today, says, " The National Weather Service forecasts heavy rainfall and thunderstorms for Hawai‘i Island starting tonight through Saturday. This means conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding.
     "Due to last week's heavy rain, residents in flood-prone areas are advised to be on the alert for possible flooding conditions. Motorists are urged to exercise caution while driving. Road closures may occur without notice. Thunderstorms are expected. If lightning threatens your area, the safest place to be is indoors."
     Hawaiian Volcano Observatory issued a statement yesterday concerning increased pressure in Kīlauea Volcano. See yesterday's Ka‘ū News Briefs.

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Brenda Ford, running for State Senate.
STATE SENATORIAL CANDIDATE BRENDA FORD has announced a Ka‘ū meeting for input from the community. The gathering will be held on Monday, May 7, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle.
     Also a fundraiser, tickets at the door will be issued for donations of $1 to no more than $1,000. However, no tickets are required to participate.
     Ford said she invites community members to come to the event, to meet her, and present requests for improvements in the Ka‘ū community, as well as to the County of Hawai‘i and the State of Hawai‘i. She promised to explain issues she views as important and initiatives that she supports.

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RAINA WHITING WAS SELECTED FOR THE NATIONAL RURAL SCHOOL LEADERSHIP ACADEMY. An academy event was held last weekend in Idaho. Whiting is a kindergarten teacher at Nā‘ālehu Elementary School, who came to Ka‘ū with Teach For America. A Pāhala resident, she is also running for state House of Representatives.
     The Rural School Leadership Academy is a cohort of 43 teachers from across the nation, all serving as teachers in rural regions. "RSLA recognizes that, in rural regions across the country, there is a strong demand for committed, effective school leaders. To respond to this need, Teach For America created the Rural School Leadership Academy in 2013. The past four years RSLA has focused on growing and developing RSLA with TFA corps members and alumni," says a statement from Whiting.
Raina Whiting - back row, second to right from middle - with other members of the Rural School Leadership Academy in Idaho this past weekend. Photo from Whiting
     Earlier this year, Whiting visited model Rural School Leadership Academy schools in New Mexico and Eastern North Carolina. She said she plans to "continue her advocacy for our children in leadership, instructional strategies and professional development implementation skills learned through RSLA program through legislative, union community and school level advocacy."
     RSLA's website describes the program as: "Two yearlong streams, both to develop the knowledge and skills necessary for school leadership roles, while building a powerful network of aspiring school leaders in rural communities." Learn more at teachforamerica.org.

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Susan Field Sensei teaching a section of a kata. 
Photos from Karate League Ka‘ū Dojo
KA‘Ū INTERNATIONAL KARATE LEAGUE DOJO in Pāhala is wishing a farewell to Senseis Cliff and Suz Field. Dr. Field, who was medical director at Ka‘ū Hospital and Suz Field, a nurse practitioner, moved to the mainland after living here for nearly a decade, their home in the neighborhood mauka of Punalu‘u Beach.
     The Fields founded the dojo in 2009 and held classes Tuesdays and Fridays at Pāhala Community Center. The new Sensei is Francisco Villa, who trained under the Fields.
     Cliff Fields, himself a Rokyudan, Sixth Degree Blackbelt, IKL membership administrator, and member of the IKL board of directors, said: "I am proud of all my students that are in our dojo; especially those that have achieved higher rank and have assumed leadership roles. I am very confident the dojo will continue to flourish under the leadership of Villa Sensei."
Lt to Rt: Sensei Susan Field, Senpai Maiki Cofer, 
Sensei Francisco Villa, and Sensei Cliff Field.
     Villa is a Nidan Second Degree Blackbelt, training with the dojo since it opened in 2009. He served as Sensei of the beginner's class for the past year, taking over for Suz Field, who is a Sandan, Third Degree Blackbelt.
     Maiki Cofer, who began to instruct the keiki class for the last two years, is promoted to Shodan, First Degree Blackbelt.
     International Karate League Ka‘ū Dojo class is held Tuesdays and Fridays, open year-round to new students. The Kieki Class, from 5 to 5:30 p.m., physically and mentally prepares young learners to participate in beginner class, with instructor attention for children 5 - 10 years old; others are welcome, too.
Francisco Villa performing kata Wanshu for his Nidan. Villa 
is the new Sensei in charge of the karate dojo in Pāhala.
     Beginners Class, from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., gives emphasis on basics, beginner karate techniques, kata, and kumite, for all ages. Advanced Class, from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m., gives emphasis on advanced karate techniques, self-defense, kata, and kumite, with instructor attention to Brown and Black belts; minimum green belt, sensei permission required.
     The Dojo is one of 31 dojos in the IKL organization. IKL and the Pāhala Dojo are a nonprofit 501c3 organization.

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PARKS STARS, THEME OF THIS YEAR'S NATIONAL PARK WEEK, brings a variety of events to Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The week kicks off with a fee free day - entrance fees are waived for all entering fee-charging national parks in the U.S. - on Saturday, April 21.
     A free Guided Hike in Kahuku: ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua is offered, from 9:30 to 11 a.m., on Sunday, April 22, which is also Earth Day. Learn about this Hawaiian forest's most important tree, the ‘ōhi‘a, on an easy, one-mile walk in Kahuku. ‘Ōhi‘a are blooming now, but they are threatened by the new fungal disease, Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death. Sturdy footwear, water, raingear, sun protection, and a snack are recommended. Kahuku is a 50 minute drive south of the park's main entrance, located on the mauka (inland) side of Highway 11, near mile marker 70.5.
     On Tuesday, April 24, two free programs are offered in Volcano: 
A bell tower that was later used as a guard tower at Kīlauea Military Camp while it was
used as a detainment camp for Japanese-Americans. Join Park Ranger Keoni Kaholo‘a‘ā
for Guided Walking Tour: Kīlauea Military Camp Remembered on Tuesday, April 24.
Event details left. Photo courtesy of Geoffrey Mowrer
     Guided Walking Tour: Kīlauea Military Camp Remembered is offered from 1 to 2 p.m., with participants asked to meet Park Ranger Keoni Kaholo‘a‘ā at the Kīlauea Military Camp Flagopole. During World War II, Kīlauea Military Camp was transformed overnight from a military recreation area to a detainment camp for Japanese-Americans. Follow in their footsteps with Kaholo‘a‘ā, a military veteran, on this easy, half-mile guided tour through Kīlauea Military Camp. Hear how detainees describe their experiences, and gain perspectives of those detained just hours after the war began. Park entrance fees apply.
     Getting a Handle on Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death, an After Dark in the Park presentation, is offered at 7 p.m. at Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Rapid ‘Ōhia Death (ROD) is a threat to ‘ōhi‘a forests island wide, including many heavily visited areas in the park. Scientists working on the disease have now learned a lot about the fungus, how it spreads to new areas, and how it might be treated. J.B. Friday, extension forester with the University of Hawai‘i, shares the current understanding of Rapid ‘Ōhia Death, how affected forests are being managed, and what people can do to avoid spreading the disease. Park entrance fees apply.

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THE SANDALWOOD TRADE IN HAWAI‘I: UNFORESEEN CONSEQUENCES is Volcano Art Center's April 26 Thursday Night at the Center. Retired Professor of History at Windward Community College Paul Field leads the discussion from 7 to 9 p.m.
‘Iliahi, native Hawaiian sandalwood, was traded internationally in the 
early nineteenth century. Learn about the historical consequences on 
Thursday, April 26. Photo from volcanoartcenter.org
     ‘Iliahi (sandalwood) trade in the early nineteenth century marked the Kingdom of Hawai‘i's first foray into international economic activity. The resulting destruction of the sandalwood forests is well known.
     Field discusses how the sandalwood trade affected relations between commoners and chiefs, altered the concept of mana, and led to the first official interference of the United States government in the affairs of the Hawaiian Kingdom. "Hawaiian studies and history enthusiasts will enjoy this informative, engaging evening," says the event description.
     Free once-a-month Thursday Night at the Center series at the Volcano Art Center focuses on art, Hawaiian culture and environment; it is intended to inspire and enhance appreciation of art and life experience, while fostering community connections. Suggested $5 donation to Volcano Art Center. volcanoartcenter.org

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Print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE
Boys Volleyball: Friday, Apr 20, Parker @ Ka‘ū

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THURSDAY, APRIL 19
Veteran's Center & VA Medical Services, Thu, Apr 19, 8:30 a.m. - noon, Ocean View Community Center. No appointment needed to visit w/ VA counselor & benefit specialist. Matthew, 329-0574, ovcahi.org

Hawai‘i Disability Legal Services, Thu, Apr 19, 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. ovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

Story Time with Auntie Linda from Tūtū & Me, Thu, Apr 19, 10:30 a.m. - noon, Nā‘ālehu Public Library. 929-8571

Family Reading, Thu, Apr 19, 6 - 7 p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Apr 19, 6:30 p.m., United Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, APRIL 20
‘Ohe Kapala, Hawaiian Bamboo StampingFri, Apr 20, 10 a.m. - noon, Kahuku Unit, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free. nps.gov/HAVO

SATURDAY, APRIL 21
Fee-Free Day at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Sat, Apr 21. Park entrance fees waived in celebration of National Park week. nps.gov/HAVO

Miss Kaʻū Coffee 2017 Jami Beck turns over the reign to the
new Miss Kaʻū Coffee this Saturday at Kaʻū District Gym.
Photo by Pamela Taylor
National Park Week, Sat - Sun, Apr 21 - Apr 29, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park & Kahuku Unit. "Park Stars" themed events (nighttime star party, guided hikes, ranger-led adventures, volunteer opportunities) to be announced. nps.gov/HAVO

Realms and Divisions of Kahuku, Sat, Apr 21, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderately difficult, two-mile, guided hike on Kahuku Unit’s newest trail, Pu‘u Kahuku, explores the traditional Hawaiian classification system. Bring a snack.

Gold Leaf and Illumination w/Rose Adare, Sat, Apr 21, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Volcano Art Center. Students learn how to use gold, copper or silver leaf. Includes metallic pigments and paints. Class fee $60/VAC member, $65/non-member, plus $15 supply fee. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

The Art Express, Sat, Apr 21, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums; old or new projects. Monthly class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.com, discoveryharbour.net/art-express

Bunco & Potluck, Sat, Apr 21, 6 p.m., Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring dish to share. Margie Hack, 541-954-8297

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant, Sat, Apr 21, 6 p.m., Ka‘ū District Gym. Tickets, $10 donation. Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant Director Trinidad Marques, 928-0606, TrinidadMarques@yahoo.com, or Facebook Trinidad Marques. kaucoffeefestival.com

Ka‘ū High School Students Compete on It's Academic - Hawai‘i, re-air, Sat, Apr 21, 6:30 p.m., Channel 5 (KFVE). Watch live stream on KFVE.com. More info.

SUNDAY, APRIL 22
‘Ōhi‘a Lehua, Sun, Apr 22, 9:30 - 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn about the vital role of ‘ōhi‘a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, and the many forms of the ‘ōhi‘a tree and its flower on this free, easy, one-mile walk. nps.gov/HAVO

MONDAY, APRIL 23
Fishery Council Monthly Meeting, Monday, April 23; new membership encouraged - especially recreational, commercial and regional fishers - to provide feedback for the council on a regular basis, passed on to the Department of Land and Natural Resources. Visit westhawaiifisherycou.ipower.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 24
HOVE Road Maintenance Monthly Meeting, Tue, Apr 24, 10 a.m., RMC Office in Ocean View. hoveroad.com, 929-9910

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tue, Apr 24, 11:30 a.m. - 1 p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View.

Getting a Handle on Rapid ‘Ōhi‘a Death, Tue, Apr 24, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. J.B. Friday, extension forester with University of Hawai’i, shares current understanding, management, and how to avoid spreading the disease. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

WEDNEDAY, APRIL 25
Kōkua Kupuna Project, Wed, Apr 25, 9 - 11 a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Seniors, 60 years & older, encouraged to attend, ask questions, and inquire about services offered through Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i; referral required from Hawai‘i County Office of Aging at 961-8626 for free legal services. Under 60, call 1-800-499-4302. More info: tahisha.despontes@legalaidhawaii.org, 329-3910 ext. 925. legalaidhawaii.org

Kāhili Demonstration, Wed, Apr 25, 10 a.m. - noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Learn to make a small hand-held feather standard - an example of Hawaiian art. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes' ‘Ike Hana No‘eau "Experience the Skillful Work" workshops. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/HAVO

ONGOING
National Park Week, Sat - Sun, Apr 21 - Apr 29, Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park & Kahuku Unit. "Park Stars" themed events (nighttime star party, guided hikes, ranger-led adventures, volunteer opportunities) to be announced. nps.gov/HAVO

One Community and One Parent Representative are sought by Nāʻālehu Elementary School Community Council. Nominations will be accepted from April 2 through April 16 at 3 p.m. The community representative will serve a two-year term for school year 2018-2019 and 2019-2020. The parent representative will serve a one-year term for school year 2018-19. The parent rep cannot be a Nāʻālehu Elementary School employee.
     The campaign for the positions starts April 16. Voting is April 30 through May 11. Those interested, contact Leilani Rodrigues at 313-4020 or pcnc@naalehu.org, or name and number at the main office line, by calling 313-4000.

Volcano Art Center Gallery Presents Hoʻokuʻi I Nā Kiko, Connecting the Dots, by Natalie Mahina Jensen and Lucia Tarall. "A curated collection of photographs, paintings, sculptures, and feather work items deliver a sublime message, connecting the viewer artistically with the provenance of the design." Daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Sunday, May 6. volcanoartcenter.org or 967-8222

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 646-9634.

Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest registration open through Friday, April 20, limit one entry per category, per contestant. Recipes will be judged Sunday, April 29, 11 a.m., at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Youth and adult submissions judged separately. Categories are pūpū, entrée, and dessert; all recipes must be made with (any) Ka‘ū Coffee. Entry info at kaucoffeemill.com or kaucoffeefestival.com, or call 808-928-0550. Entry forms can also be found at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill or Mizuno Market; forms below. Email for info/with questions sales@kaucoffeemill.com

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