About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Izaiah Pilanca-Emmsley is up for Wedemeyer Award - Two-Way Player of the Year. The public can vote through Monday,
Nov. 25; see story below. Photo by Tim Wright, Kaʻū '77
HAWAIʻI ISLAND MADE THE TOP TEN IN U.S. VISITOR DESTINATIONS in Trip Advisor's rankings, released this week. This island came in tenth, with first through ninth: New York, Maui, Oʻahu, Las Vegas, Orlando, San Diego, Chicago, New Orleans, and San Francisco.
     Hawaiʻi Island is described in the following way: "Life on the Big Island is a little bit slower… and locals like it that way. The natural beauty and ecological features of the island are a draw for nature lovers and outdoor enthusiasts. Test your chutzpah at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, home to the longest volcanic eruption in recorded history, or climb to the indescribably beautiful summit of Mauna Kea. At the end of the day, there's nothing more refreshing than a quivering plate of fresh poke, followed by a fruity shave ice."
The view to Honuʻapo is included in the description of Hawaiʻi Island, rated number ten destination in the entire
United States for 2019 Trip Advisor's Travelers' Choice Awards. Photo from Trip Advisor
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PROVIDE IMMEDIATE SUPPORT TO CONTROL AND ERADICATE THE INVASIVE QUEENSLAND LONGHORN BEETLE "before it devastates Hawai‘i Island" is the request from Sen. Brian Schatz to U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue and U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt.
     The invasive beetle, known by the official name Acalolepta aesthetica, is causing extensive damage to trees by burrowing through their trunks, and ultimately killing them. The insect poses a threat to Hawai‘i Island's growing number of cacao farmers, and endangers culturally important plants such as kukui and breadfruit trees. If the beetle spreads to the U.S. mainland, it would pose a direct threat to the $3.85 billion citrus industry, stated Schatz.
     Said Schatz, "The threat to U.S. agriculture and Hawai‘i's environment justifies immediate, strong intervention from the federal government in order to prevent harm to the U.S. economy and federally managed lands in Hawai‘i – especially while the threat of A. aesthetica is still confined to a fairly limited area on Hawai‘i Island. Federal land managers should act in coordination with the state, county, and private landowners to implement the practices identified by researchers to contain, mitigate, and hopefully eradicate A. aesthetica."
     Read the letter here.

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DEMAND FOR TECHNOLOGY ON HAWAIʻI FARMS IS INCREASING, according to recent report from U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service, in cooperation with Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture. The Hawaiʻi Farm Technology Use survey was conducted this Fall to "determine the types of technology farmers currently use and the number of specific items farmers wanted in the future."
     This inaugural survey was mailed by NASS, then follow-up phone calls to a sample size of 1,750 farms were made. Farmers in all of Hawaiʻi's counties were sampled.
     Results from the survey are as follows:
     Physical Technology (hardware): 1,210 tablets in use; 1,512 more wanted. 634 satellite phones in use; 737 more wanted. 182 Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in use; 872 more wanted. 1,516 video surveillance systems in use; 3,383 more wanted. 364 hand held sensors – to assess moisture, plant health, etc. – in use; 1,085 more wanted. 251 field sensors – to assess moisture, soil conditions, etc. – in use; 1,153 more wanted. 148 Global Positioning System-guided equipment in use; 414 more wanted. 69 GPS / RFID livestock tracking systems in use; 2,778 more wanted.
    Physical Technology (hardware): 1,263 smart phone applications – to assess field conditions, yield information, etc. – in use; 1,208 more wanted. 1,945 computer applications – for budget, farm operations, etc. – is use; 1,357 more wanted. 322 third party service apps (i.e., fee for service plan) in use; 266 more wanted.
     See nass.usda.gov/hi for more.

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Hilo High School JROTC Cadets present the
Colors, under Direction of Cadet CPT Travis
Puleo at KMC on Veterans Day.
 Photo from KMC
KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP hosted Veterans Day Ceremonies on Monday with more than 300 people attending.
     Hilo High School Junior ROTC Cadets presented the Colors, under direction of Cadet CPT Travis Puleo. D'Andrea Pelletier of Volcano sang the anthem; Charles Mapa, of Mountain View emceed; and Capt. Dylan Nonaka, Company Commander of the 81st EN CO in Hilo, gave the keynote address.

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Keynote speaker Capt. Dylan Nonaka,
Company Commander 87 1st EN, CO,
Hilo. Photo from KMC
SEN. MAZIE HIRONO ISSUED A NO VOTE FOR CHAD WOLF to serve as Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Strategy, Policy, and Plans. Following his confirmation, Wolf will serve as the acting Secretary of Homeland Security.
     In a statement issued today, Hirono said her opposition of Wolf is seated in the fact that he would be the fifth person to lead the Department of Homeland Security – the country's third largest federal agency – in less than three years.
     Said Hirono, "In an administration that has been marked by chaos and cruelty, Chad Wolf was an early author of several of the cruelest anti-immigrant policies we've seen to date. As the former chief of staff to then-Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen, he proposed separating children from their parents at the border to deter the flow of migrants at the southern border. The more than 2,800 children who were used in this cruel way will bear the trauma of separation – likely for life.
     "Chad Wolf was also an early architect of the Remain in Mexico policy. Under this policy, the Trump administration has forced nearly 50,000 migrants, including nearly 500 infants and 16,000 children, to wait in dangerous conditions in Mexico while their asylum claims are being processed in the United States. Again, the use of the cruelest methods to achieve their anti-immigrant ends.
     "These policies do not reflect the values of our country. Chad Wolf's record shows that he will only further the chaos and cruelty of this administration, and he should not ascend to a position where he can do more harm to the most vulnerable among us."

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Vote through Monday, Nov. 25 for Izaiah Pilanca-Emmsley as
best Two-Way Player of the Year.
Photo by Tim Wright, Kaʻū '77
VOTE FOR IZAIAH "BOBBY" PILANCA-EMMSLEY FOR THE WEDEMEYER AWARD - Two-Way Player of the Year, at khon2.com/uncategorized/vote-2019-cover2-hawaii-high-school-football-awards/. Voting remains open through Monday, Nov. 25. The winners will be announced on Thanksgiving by the L.A. Rams. Pilanca-Emmsley is the only candidate from Kaʻū. The seventh annual Cover2 Hawaiʻi High School Football Awards candidates were selected by a panel of coaches and media members representing all divisions from Hawaiʻi Island, Oʻahu, Maui, and Kauaʻi. Fans can vote for six of the seven awards presented as can 19 coaches and media members. See khon2.com/uncategorized/vote-2019-cover2-hawaii-high-school-football-awards/ for more.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
THURSDAY, NOV. 14
Birding at Kīpukapuaulu, Thursday, Nov. 14, 8-10a.m., Kīpukapuaulu - Bird Park - parking lot, HVNP. Led by retired USGS Biologist Nic Sherma. Two hour birding tour. $40/person. Register online. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.org, fhvnp.org

‘Alalā Project Update, Thursday, Nov. 14, 6:30-8p.m., Volcano Art Center. $5 donation suggested. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thursday, Nov. 14, 6:30p.m., United Methodist Church, Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkeley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, NOV. 15
Health Insurance Sign-Up, Friday, Nov. 15, 10a.m.-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

SATURDAY, NOV. 16
Small Group Kama‘oa Cleanup, Saturday, Nov. 16. Limited space available. Contact to be added to waitlist. 769-7629, mattieHWF@gmail.com, or kahakai.cleanups@gmail.comwildhawaii.org

Mobile Spay & Neuter Waggin', Saturday, Nov. 16, 7:30a.m.-4p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Low income pet parents and those with limited transportation qualify for mobile spay/neuter service. Free. Surgery by phone appointment only. Hawai‘i Island Humane Society, 796-0107, hihs.org

Art Fair, Saturday, Nov. 16, 8a.m.-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Hand-crafted and locally produced items on display and for sale by Ka‘ū artists and craftspeople. DeeDee, 785-1158

Fundraising Bazaar, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9a.m.-2p.m., Kauaha‘ao Congregational Church, Wai‘ōhinu. Free entry. Hot lunches and baked goods for sale. Vendor booths. Debbie Wong Yuen, 928-8039

Free Haircut Day, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church. Kady and Drew Foster. 12 slots available. Also, Free Shower Day and The Big Island Giving Tree will hand out clothes and items like razors and toothbrushes. 939-7000, stjudeshawaii.org

Nature & Culture, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate hike, approx. 2 miles. nps.gov/havo

Guided Hike On A 60 Year Old Lava Lake, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-2p.m., Kīlauea Iki Overlook, HVNP. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderate to challenging 2.4 mile (one way) hike. $80/person. Register online. Park entrance fees may apply. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

Mixed Media Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-3p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $30 supply fee. Supplies provided. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Mtg., Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-1p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting and training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Kahiko - Kumu Ha‘amauliola Aiona with haumana (students) of Ke Kula ‘O Nāwahīokalani‘ōpu‘u Public Charter School, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10:30-11:30a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.comvolcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula with Wes Awana, Saturday, Nov. 16, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery porch. Hands-on cultural demonstration. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.comvolcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, NOV. 17
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sunday, Nov. 17, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/havo

MONDAY, NOV. 18
P&R T-Ball League Registration, Nov. 18 - Jan. 6, Kahuku Park. Ages 5-6. Athletic shoes required. Program takes place Jan. 13 - Apr. 16, day and time TBA. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Nature Wreath Registration, Nov. 18-25, program takes place Tuesday, Nov. 26, 3-4p.m. Ages 6-14. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

TUESDAY, NOV. 19
Scholastic Book Fair, Tuesday, Nov. 19, Open to public: 7:30-8a.m. and 2:07-3:30p.m.; Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2:07-7p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 21, 7:30a.m.-3:30-p.m.; and Friday, Nov. 22, 7:30a.m.-2p.m., Nā‘ālehu Elementary School Library.

Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, Nov. 19 (Committees), Wednesday, Nov. 18, (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Cultural Understanding through Art and the Environment: Ti Leaf Lei Making with Jelena Clay, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20
Ocean View Community Association Board of Directors Mtg., Wednesday, Nov. 20, 12:30-1:30p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Nāʻālehu School Family Reading Night, Wednesday, Nov. 20, 6-7p.m., Nāʻālehu School Cafeteria. Family reading, make & take activities, and snacks provided. Free.

ONGOING
West Hawai‘i Master Gardeners Program Accepting Applications through Friday, Nov. 15cms.ctahr.hawaii.edu/whmgprogram/HOME/West-Hawaii. Classes take place Jan. 14 - April 17, 2020, every Tuesday, 9a.m.-noon. $200/person.

P&R Track & Field Practice Registration, through Wednesday, Nov. 20Kahuku Park. Ages 6-14. Athletic shoes required. Program takes place Dec. 2 - Feb. 8, day and time TBA. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Vendor Booth Space is Available for the Kamahalo Craft Fair. The 12th annual event will be held Thanksgiving weekend, Friday, Nov. 299 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 30, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Cooper Center. Booths are open for crafters with quality homemade and homegrown products. Food vendors must prepare all food items in a certified kitchen and must have a Department of Health permit displayed prominently at their booth. Application online at thecoopercenter.org. Direct questions to 936-9705 or kilaueatutu@gmail.com.

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call Tata Compehos and Melody Espejo at 808-938-1088.

King Cab 2016 Nissan Frontier for Sale by Holy Rosary Church of Pāhala and the Sacred Heart Church of Nāʻālehu. The parishes are selling the truck to raise funds to benefit both churches. The truck is a great 6 cylinder, 2WD automobile. The churches are asking for $21K or best offer. Only cash or cashier's check will be accepted. Anyone interested should contact the parish secretary Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at 928-8208.

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Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Tuesday, November 12, 2019

Raising the minimum wage has been a long term struggle at the Hawaiʻi Legislature and a goal of HAPA and
Hawaiʻi Appleseed Center for Law & Economic Justice. Photo from hiappleseed.org

INCREASING MINIMUM WAGE IN HAWAIʻI is the goal of HAPA, the Hawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive Action, and Gary Hooser, its Executive Director and a former state Senator. Hooser released this editorial, published this week in the Honolulu Star Advertiser, to The Kaʻū Calendar:
     Every Hawaiʻi legislator will receive a pay raise starting January 2021. Likewise, the governor, the lieutenant governor, all state judges, and most top executives in state government will receive substantial pay raises. Minimum wage workers will get nothing.
     Legislators accepted their own pay raise with one hand, while blocking a raise for low-income workers with the other. Multiple hearings were held on House Bill 1191 during the 2019 session. Thousands of people from all walks of life testified in support. Many took off from work and others paid to fly in from the Neighbor Islands. Countless hours were spent, waiting patiently for their name to be called, to offer heartfelt and compelling testimony.
     As a result, HB 1191 was amended to increase Hawaiʻi's minimum wage to $15 per hour (phased in), and ultimately made it to the final conference committee. But the state House then pulled the plug: The excuse given was that a provision intended to help business was 'possibly flawed' and there was not enough time remaining in the session to fix it.
     Rather than pass a strong, reasonable minimum-wage measure phasing in a $15 per hour wage over several years, the joint House/Senate conference committee swallowed the poison pill provided to them by the business community and killed the entire measure.
      Rather than pass the bill, they chose to pass the buck, doing nothing for another year. The consequences of this decision are devastating to Hawaiʻi's working families, who will never catch up on the lost year. Some stats: $17.50 per hour (approximately) is a "subsistence" wage for a single person without children. This means a person needs $17.50 an hour to simply survive, show numbers from the state Department of Business, Economic Development, and Tourism. 48 percent of Hawaiʻi residents are either already living in poverty or one paycheck away from being on the streets, according to the ALICE Report. Hawaiʻi leads the nation in the number of houseless, per capita, says the U.S. Government Council on Homelessness.
     With January 2020 opening the second year of the Legislature's biennium session, legislators could simply, if they so choose, pick up bills exactly where they were left off at the end of the 2019 session.
Image from livingwagehawaii.com
     HB 1191 HD1 SD2, increasing Hawaiʻi's minimum wage to $15, remains stuck in conference committee purgatory. Upon the start of the 2020 session, with the concurrence of Senate/House leadership, the committee could schedule a hearing, amend the bill as needed, and pass it to the floor for a full vote. In two weeks, by the end of January, it could be done. There's no reason to force thousands of citizens to jump through the hoops of multiple hearings in the House and Senate, to take off work, arrange childcare, and incur the cost of traveling interisland - only to end up in exactly the same place.
     Legislators have had many months since the close of the 2019 session to work out the kinks, to meet with stakeholders, staff, and the administration. They could, and should, have already come to agreement on a clean bill, one that can be passed promptly upon the opening of the 2020 Legislature.
     Regarding potential negative economic impacts of raising the minimum wage, the data is unequivocal: There is no credible research correlating elevated levels of unemployment, bankruptcy, or inflation when wage increases are phased in gradually.
     While not a living wage, or even a subsistence wage, $15 represents a strong step in the right direction. If tied to annual cost-of-living adjustments and future modest incremental increases, eventually a true living wage would be achieved.
     Imagine that: A future where every Hawaiʻi resident who works a 40 hour week can afford a dry, safe place to live, three meals a day, and basic health care.
     See more at Hawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive Action.

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EXPANDING COMMERCIAL LENDING FOR VETERANS is the goal of a bill introduced today by Sen. Mazie Hirono and Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-AK). The Veterans Members Business Loan Act, S. 2834, would further enable veteran business owners and entrepreneurs through local credit unions, by exempting current caps on member business lending. The bill covers loans made to veterans who served on active duty and were discharged or released under conditions other than dishonorable. There are approximately 11,000 veteran-owned businesses in Hawaiʻi.
     The bill is the companion to similar legislation introduced earlier this year in the U.S. House of Representatives. The Hawaiʻi Credit Union League and the Credit Union National Association support the legislation, stated a release from Hirono.
     Said Hirono, "Veteran business owners and entrepreneurs play an important role in Hawaiʻi's economy. The Veterans Members Business Loan Act will help to help make entrepreneurship an
option for more veterans as they transition back to civilian life, or give established veteran-owned businesses access to capital to grow and create more local jobs. I thank my colleague, Senator Sullivan, for working with me to introduce this important legislation as we mark Veterans and Military Families Month."
     Said CUNA President/CEO Jim Nussle, "This bipartisan bill will make it easier for America's veterans to access credit and invest in their future and their communities. Credit unions proudly serve tens of millions of active duty and veteran members and fully support veteran entrepreneurs and their families."
      Said HCUL President Dennis Tanimoto, "Hirono has been a long-time credit union member herself, as well as a strong supporter of credit unions and the role they play in their members' lives. She is also a member of the Senate Committee on Armed Services who recognizes the importance of the military in our national security and the economy. Timing of this bill she is cosponsoring is especially fitting since it coincides with Veterans Day. The bill helps to ensure veterans of access to affordable loans and other services from nonprofit financial cooperatives known as credit unions."
     Last week, Hirono cosponsored a resolution to recognize National Veterans Small Business Week in the United States. The resolution passed the Senate by unanimous consent.
     Said Sullivan, "Our veterans have sacrificed so much to serve our country and it is important that they are afforded every opportunity to succeed after leaving the military. Service members develop broad expertise across numerous areas while in the military, learning skills that can provide tremendous value to the economy. This bill eliminates common barriers of entry for veteran entrepreneurs to ensure they have access to the capital and resources they need to establish businesses and succeed in their ventures."
     As a member of the U.S. Senate Small Business and Entrepreneurship Committee, Hirono has been an advocate for veteran business owners and entrepreneurs. Earlier this year, Senator Hirono and Senator Mike Rounds (R-SD) reintroduced the Veterans Small Business Export Promotion Act, which would waive upfront guarantee fees for veterans participating in the U.S. Small Business Administration's export promotion programs.

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Maria Miranda, loaned her crown to a little astronaut-princess "so she could represent," while spreading the word about
Kaʻū Coffee in Taiwan. Photo from Miranda
MARIA MIRANDA, of Discovery Harbour, has been traveling throughout Taiwan in November promoting Kaʻū Coffee in stores called RT-Mart. From Taiwan, she reported that RT-Mart is called a hyper-market, a combination of food, bakery, and Costco-type offerings in stores across Asia.
Maria Miranda, representing
Kaʻū Coffee in Taiwan.
Photo from Miranda
     She said she is learning some of the language, and enjoys the people and the culture. She will be attending the Taiwan International Coffee Show this weekend, along with other representatives of Hawaiʻi Coffee who traveled from Kaʻū. Her family's Miranda's Coffee will also be featured at the show.
     Miranda served as the 2015 Miss Kaʻū Coffee.

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CHRISTMAS IN KAHUKU, presented by Friends of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, will be held Saturday, Dec. 14, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park, Highway 11 at mile marker 70.5. This second annual event is free and open to the public. Music all day featuring the Shootz band playing rock & roll and motown, the Queen of Opera, D’Andrea Pelletier, and a surprise guest performing Hawaiian music.
     Crafters from Kaʻū and beyond will sell locally made items: jewelry, pottery, holiday decorations, and more. Hawaiʻi Pacific Park's Association's Book store will be open and providing many unique Park-associated books and items.
     Food will be available for purchase by Volcano House. Friend's will be selling shave ice, drinks, chips, and logo merchandise, with proceeds supporting park projects and educational programs.
     Crafters may apply for this event – $20 booth fee – by visiting fhvnp.org, emailing admin@fhvnp.org, or calling (808) 985-7373. Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is a non-profit 501(c) 3, operating under a formal philanthropic partnership agreement with Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE WONDER OF CHRISTMAS, the 26th Annual Winter Concert Presented by Volcano Festival Chorus will be held Saturday, Dec. 14, 7:30 p.m. at KMC's Kilauea Theater. The 25-member chorus is under the direction of Roch Jones, with accompaniment by Melanie Oldfather. Also joining the chorus will be Cheryl Shine on flute.
    This year's concert features both sacred and secular music. Many of the chorus' favorites are being performed. The Carols of Gathering by Joseph Martin will open the program, which is varied and includes a number of tunes with classical music themes, as well as variations on familiar Christmas carols. Popular carols Do You Hear What I Hear?, Have You Heard The News, and a medley of songs about angels titled Angels Sing Glory! are featured. The choir will perform some of their past favorites: African Alleluia, Ding, Dong! Merrily on High, and the politically incorrect version of Baby, It's Cold Outside. An audience sing-along is included.
     The chorus, started 1994 by renowned music director Camille Almy, is now sponsored by the Kilauea Drama & Entertainment Network. This the 26th concert that is presented as a gift to the Volcano community as a mahalo for their support of KDEN.
     Please attend this evening of holiday music in the cool air of Volcano. Admission is free; however, donations will be gratefully accepted. Park entrance fees may apply. For more information, call 982-7344.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
Nā Pa‘ani Hula, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 10a.m.-noon, outside Hale Noa o Kīlauea, across from Volcano Art Center Gallery, HVNP. Hula practitioner Amy Kaʻawaloa demonstrates the instruments used to provide rhythmic structure to hula. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo/

Trail Less Traveled, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 10a.m.-noon, Devastation Trail parking lot, HVNP. Moderate, 2 mile, two hour roundtrip hike. $40/person. Register online. Family friendly. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.org, fhvnp.org

THURSDAY, NOV. 14
Birding at Kīpukapuaulu, Thursday, Nov. 14, 8-10a.m., Kīpukapuaulu - Bird Park - parking lot, HVNP. Led by retired USGS Biologist Nic Sherma. Two hour birding tour. $40/person. Register online. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.org, fhvnp.org

‘Alalā Project Update, Thursday, Nov. 14, 6:30-8p.m., Volcano Art Center. $5 donation suggested. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thursday, Nov. 14, 6:30p.m., United Methodist Church, Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkeley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, NOV. 15
Health Insurance Sign-Up, Friday, Nov. 15, 10a.m.-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

SATURDAY, NOV. 16
Small Group Kama‘oa Cleanup, Saturday, Nov. 16. Limited space available. Contact to be added to waitlist. 769-7629, mattieHWF@gmail.com, or kahakai.cleanups@gmail.comwildhawaii.org

Mobile Spay & Neuter Waggin', Saturday, Nov. 16, 7:30a.m.-4p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Low income pet parents and those with limited transportation qualify for mobile spay/neuter service. Free. Surgery by phone appointment only. Hawai‘i Island Humane Society, 796-0107, hihs.org

Art Fair, Saturday, Nov. 16, 8a.m.-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Hand-crafted and locally produced items on display and for sale by Ka‘ū artists and craftspeople. DeeDee, 785-1158

Fundraising Bazaar, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9a.m.-2p.m., Kauaha‘ao Congregational Church, Wai‘ōhinu. Free entry. Hot lunches and baked goods for sale. Vendor booths. Debbie Wong Yuen, 928-8039

Free Haircut Day, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church. Kady and Drew Foster. 12 slots available. Also, Free Shower Day and The Big Island Giving Tree will hand out clothes and items like razors and toothbrushes. 939-7000, stjudeshawaii.org

Nature & Culture, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate hike, approx. 2 miles. nps.gov/havo

Guided Hike On A 60 Year Old Lava Lake, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-2p.m., Kīlauea Iki Overlook, HVNP. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderate to challenging 2.4 mile (one way) hike. $80/person. Register online. Park entrance fees may apply. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

Mixed Media Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-3p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $30 supply fee. Supplies provided. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Mtg., Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-1p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting and training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Kahiko - Kumu Ha‘amauliola Aiona with haumana (students) of Ke Kula ‘O Nāwahīokalani‘ōpu‘u Public Charter School, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10:30-11:30a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.comvolcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula with Wes Awana, Saturday, Nov. 16, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery porch. Hands-on cultural demonstration. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.comvolcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, NOV. 17
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sunday, Nov. 17, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/havo

MONDAY, NOV. 18
P&R T-Ball League Registration, Nov. 18 - Jan. 6, Kahuku Park. Ages 5-6. Athletic shoes required. Program takes place Jan. 13 - Apr. 16, day and time TBA. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Nature Wreath Registration, Nov. 18-25, program takes place Tuesday, Nov. 26, 3-4p.m. Ages 6-14. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

TUESDAY, NOV. 19
Scholastic Book Fair, Tuesday, Nov. 19, Open to public: 7:30-8a.m. and 2:07-3:30p.m.; Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2:07-7p.m.; Thursday, Nov. 21, 7:30a.m.-3:30-p.m.; and Friday, Nov. 22, 7:30a.m.-2p.m., Nā‘ālehu Elementary School Library.

Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, Nov. 19 (Committees), Wednesday, Nov. 18, (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Cultural Understanding through Art and the Environment: Ti Leaf Lei Making with Jelena Clay, Tuesday, Nov. 19, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

ONGOING
West Hawai‘i Master Gardeners Program Accepting Applications through Friday, Nov. 15cms.ctahr.hawaii.edu/whmgprogram/HOME/West-Hawaii. Classes take place Jan. 14 - April 17, 2020, every Tuesday, 9a.m.-noon. $200/person.

P&R Track & Field Practice Registration, through Wednesday, Nov. 20Kahuku Park. Ages 6-14. Athletic shoes required. Program takes place Dec. 2 - Feb. 8, day and time TBA. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Vendor Booth Space is Available for the Kamahalo Craft Fair. The 12th annual event will be held Thanksgiving weekend, Friday, Nov. 299 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 30, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Cooper Center. Booths are open for crafters with quality homemade and homegrown products. Food vendors must prepare all food items in a certified kitchen and must have a Department of Health permit displayed prominently at their booth. Application online at thecoopercenter.org. Direct questions to 936-9705 or kilaueatutu@gmail.com.

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call Tata Compehos and Melody Espejo at 808-938-1088.

King Cab 2016 Nissan Frontier for Sale by Holy Rosary Church of Pāhala and the Sacred Heart Church of Nāʻālehu. The parishes are selling the truck to raise funds to benefit both churches. The truck is a great 6 cylinder, 2WD automobile. The churches are asking for $21K or best offer. Only cash or cashier's check will be accepted. Anyone interested should contact the parish secretary Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at 928-8208.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.


Monday, November 11, 2019

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Monday, November 11, 2019

Youth Challenge, which volunteers for ʻO Kaʻū Kākou and Nā Mamo O Kaʻū events, paraded for Veterans Day in
Hilo on Saturday. OKK held its Veterans Day event in Nāʻālehu. See photos in tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs.
Photo by David Corrigan/Big Island Video News
"WE HONOR THE SERVICE OF MILLIONS OF AMERICANS," said Sen. Mazie Hirono in her Veterans Day message. She wrote that veterans, "through their commitment, defended the values and freedoms we cherish. Today, we also renew our commitment to serve our veterans and express our sincere gratitude for the personal sacrifices they have made for us. From the Filipino World War II veteran hoping to reunite with their family in the United States to the young veteran returning home from Afghanistan, it is incumbent on all of us serving in Congress to uphold the promises we've made to those who wore the uniform of our country.
     "As a member of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee, I will continue to push for legislation and hold officials accountable to ensure our veterans receive the care and benefits they've earned."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TULSI GABBARD, CANDIDATE FOR PRESIDENT, KAʻŪ'S CONGRESSWOMAN, and a Major in the Hawaiʻi Army National Guard, tweeted this morning: "On this day and every day, let us all pledge — as Americans, as patriots, as those who love our country — to honor our men and women in uniform by making sure that no veteran is left behind, that they're always taken care of." She also spoke at the inaugural Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Veterans Day celebration.
     She honored the men and women throughout history "who have worn the cloth of this country,"
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, speaking today at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.
 Photo from Gabbard
with a promise to support and defend, even when it requires making the ultimate sacrifice to do so. She described their spirit as "Acta Non Verba - action, not words."
     Gabbard said Veterans Day celebrates men and women across generations who have "put service above self - to put the wellbeing of American people and our country above all else.
     "Now at a time when we have too many leaders who are looking out for their own selfish interests, for power or fame or profit, let this day, this Veterans Day, be that shining example of what service really means for the leaders of our country to follow.
     She said that the terrorist attack on 9/11 "completely changed my life. It's what motivated my decision to enlist in the military and go after and to destroy the evil that visited on that day."
     She reviewed her service including first working in a medical unit in 2005, about 40 miles north of Baghdad where her first task of the day in a field unit was to go through a list, name by name, of every American service member injured or hurt in the previous 24 hours. "It was heart wrenching every day because I knew that their names were not just names on a page, that these were my brothers and sisters, and that behind every single one of them, waiting anxiously at home, were moms and dads, husbands and wives, children, brothers and sisters. So many never got to make that trip home, never got to say that final goodbye, leaving their families with an emptiness that could never be filled. We will never forget our brothers and sisters."
     She told of her own return from the war zone to Hawaiʻi, landing at Hickham Air Force Base where she walked off the plane "to the sweetest trade wind breezes that I have ever felt. We stood in that formation that we had been looking forward to for so long, hundreds of us standing shoulder to shoulder, listening to the final speech from our commanding officer, waiting for that most important word, 'dismissed.'
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard celebrated the anniversary of the U.S. Marines on Sunday in New Hampshire and addressed the
LA County's Veterans Day celebration on Monday. Photo from Gabbard
     "We were met by our families there who held 'Welcome Home' signs and were cheering." Gabbard said that when her dad hugged her, it was the first time she had seen him cry. "As I hugged him I felt him sobbing with tears of relief. My mom then joined in the hug and for me, in that moment, that was really when I began to realize the great sacrifice that military families and our loved ones make while we're gone. While we're deployed, we're focused on our mission; we're focused on getting the job done, and thank God, it's our families who are at home who are holding down the fort. But it is our families who lay awake at night, fearing that that knock on the door may come."
     She said that as she reviewed the daily list of injured in Iraq, "thinking about those who pay the price for these wars, I also wondered how many of our politicians who make this decision also laid awake at night, worrying about our brothers and sisters in uniform. My guess was not that many.
     "Those of us who've been deployed were all too familiar with the quick stops in country that politicians make. They come in, touch down for a few hours, bring troops together for a quick photo op, and then go home. We're tired of these self-serving politicians; tired of those who are unwilling to sacrifice their own lives for our freedom and our safety, but are all too willing to sacrifice the lives of our men and women in uniform. Politicians - you send us into harm's way, to be the world's police, to topple dictators we don't like, to fight unnecessary wars that actually undermine our national security; squandering taxpayer dollars, destroying entire countries, and then, turning their backs on us when we come home."
     She gave the example of toxic burn pits in the Middle East, where the U.S. military set fire to its waste. Those suffering and dying from exposure - before they can get the care, said Gabbard, "We've got to provide proof of that mixing pot of trash and ash that we inhaled every single day of our multiple deployments."
     She also pointed to the high suicide rate and opioid epidemic among veterans who need more help. See the entire speech at facebook.com/TulsiGabbard/videos/685296228625789/.

Sen. Kai Kahele and his family. Photo from Kahele
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CANDIDATE TO REPRESENT KAʻŪ IN CONGRESS, KAI KAHALE, released this Veterans Day statement:
     "Please join me in thanking the millions of men and women who have donned a uniform in service to our country. Today, we remember all veterans who have bravely safeguarded our daily freedoms and democracy that are the pillars of our society, to which we have gratefully grown accustomed. We honor their sacrifices, commitment, and selfless service. We also honor the sacrifice of men and women who do their jobs to protect the freedoms we all are fortunate to have today.
     "On this Veterans Day, we honor all who have served. We thank you and your families for your service to our country. May God bless our veterans, their families, and the United States of America."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A 4.9 EARTHQUAKE SHOOK KAʻŪ LIGHTLY at 6:36 a.m., with its epicenter about 11 miles southwest of Laupāhohoe at a depth of 20 miles, reports U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
In red, foreshocks, the main shock, and aftershocks
of this morning's Manakea quake. USGS map
     Light to moderate shaking, with a maximum Intensity of V on the Mercalli Intensity Scale, was reported around the island, with weak shaking reported from as far away as Oʻahu. The USGS "Did you feel it?" service, http://earthquake.usgs.gov/dyfi/, received over 1,000 felt reports within an hour of the earthquake.
     A magnitude-2.6 foreshock occurred in the same area about three minutes prior to the main shock. Aftershocks have already been recorded; more are likely, and some could be felt.
     The depth, location, and recorded seismic waves of the M4.9 earthquake suggest a source due to bending of the oceanic plate from the weight of the volcanoes in the Hawaiian Island chain, a common source for earthquakes in this area.
     According to HVO Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal, "HVO monitoring networks have not detected any significant changes in activity on Kīlauea or Mauna Loa Volcanoes due to the earthquake." The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center has stated that there is no tsunami threat from this earthquake. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense reports that Department of Public Works personnel will be checking roadways in the area for rockfalls.
     For information on recent earthquakes in Hawaiʻi and eruption updates, visit the USGS HVO website, volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/earthquakes/.
     Daily updates about ongoing eruptions, recent images and videos of summit and East Rift Zone volcanic activity, maps, and data about recent earthquakes in Hawaiʻi are posted at volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
TUESDAY, NOV. 12
Turkey Trot Event Registration, Nov. 12-27, Ka‘ū District Gym. Event takes place Wednesday, Nov. 27, noon-2p.m. Grades Pre-K to 6. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Turkey Windsock Activity Registration, Nov. 12-19, Ka‘ū District Gym. Program takes place Wednesday, Nov. 20, 3:30-5p.m., multipurpose room. Grades K-6. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Birding at Kīpukapuaulu, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 8-10a.m., Kīpukapuaulu - Bird Park - parking lot, HVNP. Led by retired USGS Biologist Nic Sherma. Two hour birding tour. $40/person. Register online. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.org, fhvnp.org

Cultural Understanding through Art and the Environment: Lauhala Weaving with Ku‘uipo Kakahiki-Morales, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

After Dark in the Park - Sixty Years Later: 1959 Eruption of Kīlauea Iki and its Impacts on Volcanology, Tuesday, Nov. 12, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientist emeritus Don Swanson presents. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo/

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 13
Nā Pa‘ani Hula, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 10a.m.-noon, outside Hale Noa o Kīlauea, across from Volcano Art Center Gallery, HVNP. Hula practitioner Amy Kaʻawaloa demonstrates the instruments used to provide rhythmic structure to hula. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo/

Trail Less Traveled, Wednesday, Nov. 13, 10a.m.-noon, Devastation Trail parking lot, HVNP. Moderate, 2 mile, two hour roundtrip hike. $40/person. Register online. Family friendly. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.org, fhvnp.org

THURSDAY, NOV. 14
Birding at Kīpukapuaulu, Thursday, Nov. 14, 8-10a.m., Kīpukapuaulu - Bird Park - parking lot, HVNP. Led by retired USGS Biologist Nic Sherma. Two hour birding tour. $40/person. Register online. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.org, fhvnp.org

‘Alalā Project Update, Thursday, Nov. 14, 6:30-8p.m., Volcano Art Center. $5 donation suggested. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thursday, Nov. 14, 6:30p.m., United Methodist Church, Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkeley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, NOV. 15
Health Insurance Sign-Up, Friday, Nov. 15, 10a.m.-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

SATURDAY, NOV. 16
Small Group Kama‘oa Cleanup, Saturday, Nov. 16. Limited space available. Contact to be added to waitlist. 769-7629, mattieHWF@gmail.com, or kahakai.cleanups@gmail.comwildhawaii.org

Mobile Spay & Neuter Waggin', Saturday, Nov. 16, 7:30a.m.-4p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Low income pet parents and those with limited transportation qualify for mobile spay/neuter service. Free. Surgery by phone appointment only. Hawai‘i Island Humane Society, 796-0107, hihs.org

Art Fair, Saturday, Nov. 16, 8a.m.-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Hand-crafted and locally produced items on display and for sale by Ka‘ū artists and craftspeople. DeeDee, 785-1158

Fundraising Bazaar, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9a.m.-2p.m., Kauaha‘ao Congregational Church, Wai‘ōhinu. Free entry. Hot lunches and baked goods for sale. Vendor booths. Debbie Wong Yuen, 928-8039

Free Haircut Day, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church. Kady and Drew Foster. 12 slots available. Also, Free Shower Day and The Big Island Giving Tree will hand out clothes and items like razors and toothbrushes. 939-7000, stjudeshawaii.org

Nature & Culture, Saturday, Nov. 16, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate hike, approx. 2 miles. nps.gov/havo

Guided Hike On A 60 Year Old Lava Lake, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-2p.m., Kīlauea Iki Overlook, HVNP. Organized by Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Moderate to challenging 2.4 mile (one way) hike. $80/person. Register online. Park entrance fees may apply. 985-7373, admin@fhvnp.orgfhvnp.org

Mixed Media Encaustic with Mary Milelzcik, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-3p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $30 supply fee. Supplies provided. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Ocean View C.E.R.T. Mtg., Saturday, Nov. 16, 10a.m.-1p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting and training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Kahiko - Kumu Ha‘amauliola Aiona with haumana (students) of Ke Kula ‘O Nāwahīokalani‘ōpu‘u Public Charter School, Saturday, Nov. 16, 10:30-11:30a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula with Wes Awana, Saturday, Nov. 16, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery porch. Hands-on cultural demonstration. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.comvolcanoartcenter.org

SUNDAY, NOV. 17
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sunday, Nov. 17, 9:30-11:30a.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/havo

MONDAY, NOV. 18
P&R T-Ball League Registration, Nov. 18 - Jan. 6, Kahuku Park. Ages 5-6. Athletic shoes required. Program takes place Jan. 13 - Apr. 16, day and time TBA. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Nature Wreath Registration, Nov. 18-25, program takes place Tuesday, Nov. 26, 3-4p.m. Ages 6-14. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

ONGOING
West Hawai‘i Master Gardeners Program Accepting Applications through Friday, Nov. 15cms.ctahr.hawaii.edu/whmgprogram/HOME/West-Hawaii. Classes take place Jan. 14 - April 17, 2020, every Tuesday, 9a.m.-noon. $200/person.

P&R Track & Field Practice Registration, through Wednesday, Nov. 20Kahuku Park. Ages 6-14. Athletic shoes required. Program takes place Dec. 2 - Feb. 8, day and time TBA. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/departments/parks-and-recreation/recreation

Vendor Booth Space is Available for the Kamahalo Craft Fair. The 12th annual event will be held Thanksgiving weekend, Friday, Nov. 299 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, Nov. 30, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Cooper Center. Booths are open for crafters with quality homemade and homegrown products. Food vendors must prepare all food items in a certified kitchen and must have a Department of Health permit displayed prominently at their booth. Application online at thecoopercenter.org. Direct questions to 936-9705 or kilaueatutu@gmail.com.

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call Tata Compehos and Melody Espejo at 808-938-1088.

King Cab 2016 Nissan Frontier for Sale by Holy Rosary Church of Pāhala and the Sacred Heart Church of Nāʻālehu. The parishes are selling the truck to raise funds to benefit both churches. The truck is a great 6 cylinder, 2WD automobile. The churches are asking for $21K or best offer. Only cash or cashier's check will be accepted. Anyone interested should contact the parish secretary Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. at 928-8208.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.