About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Saturday, April 30, 2016

Meet artist Marian Berger, creator of `I`iwi and other bird portraits on display at Volcano Art Center Gallery, at a reception this afternoon. See more below. Image from VAC
RICHARD HA, WHO RECENTLY STOPPED growing bananas and tomatoes, will grow marijuana at his farm in Hamakua. Ha is known as a state Department of Agriculture board member and as a proponent of both geothermal energy and a cooperative to provide electricity in Hawai`i. The state Department of Health announced yesterday that Ha, who applied as Lau Ola, LLC, will be issued a license to grow medical marijuana.
Richard Ha
      DOH selected eight applicants to receive Medical Marijuana Dispensary Licenses. Ha is one of two on Hawai`i Island. The other is Hawaiian Ethos, LLC.
      A licensed dispensary may begin dispensing marijuana no sooner than July 15, 2016 with approval of DOH. Each dispensary licensee may operate up to two production centers and two retail dispensing locations within the county they are licensed to serve. “There are many steps the dispensaries will need to take in order to actually start production and dispensing, so we can’t say exactly when the dispensing will begin,” said Margaret Leong, Supervisor for the Medical Marijuana Dispensary Licensing Program. “But we are excited to start working with the selected licensees on the next steps.”
      Selected applicants are required to pay a licensing fee of $75,000 to DOH within seven days of receiving their written notice of selection to be awarded a dispensary license. If the fee is not timely paid by close of business on the seventh day, the selected applicant will be disqualified, and the department will select the next highest scoring applicant for the county.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

DO YOU KNOW OF A SPECIAL PROPERTY in Hawai`i County that should be permanently preserved? The Public Access, Open Space and Natural Resources Preservation Commission encourages the public to propose properties that should be purchased. Forms to suggest properties can be downloaded from the at http://records.co.hawaii.hi.us/Weblink8/Browse.aspx?startid=13770&dbid=1 or by obtaining a form at the address below. Suggestion forms are due by June 30.
      Commissioners review the suggestion forms and consider significant factors of each property such as historic and culturally important features; opportunities for outdoor recreation and education; public access to beaches or mountains; preservation of forests, beaches, coastal areas, and natural beauty; protection of natural resources and watershed lands; potential partners for management; and general benefits to the public. Potential acquisitions are then prioritized and listed in a report sent to the mayor at the end of each year. The mayor then forwards his recommendations to Hawai`i County Council, which adopts resolutions to authorize property purchases. 
      For more information on the process, see http://records.co.hawaii.hi.us/WebLink8/DocView.aspx?id=71938&dbid=1.
      Past open space purchases total 1,287 acres and include Kawa oceanfront parcels.
      PONC funds are derived from two percent of Hawai`i County’s annual real property tax revenues. The county has also been able to obtain more than $7.5 million in matching funds and donations from other sources to help purchase open space properties. A Maintenance Fund has also been established to provide stewardship assistance to community organizations to maintain properties that are acquired with PONC funds.
      The nine PONC commissioners represent each of the nine County Council districts. The commission meets every other month, and public testimony is welcome.
      For further information, contact Alexandra Kelepolo of the County of Hawai`i Property Management Division, 25 Aupuni Street, Suite 1101 at 961-8069, or see http://records.co.hawaii.hi.us/Weblink8/browse.aspx?dbid=1&startid=13770.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Human Resources Manager Renae Akau came from Hilo to help
 Operations Supervisor Erin Santos and Branch Manager Mako
Okazaki 
hand out goodies and gifts during CU Hawai`i's
Member Appreciation Day. Photo by Ron Johnson
YESTERDAY WAS MEMBER APPRECIATION DAY at CU Hawai`i Credit Union. Members enjoyed bentos and cake at the Na`alehu branch, and cupcakes at the Pahala branch. Branch Manager Mako Okazaki handed out LED flashlights at both branches. Members also entered to win a grand prize of $200 at each branch. Winners will be announced on Monday.
      Chartered in 1955, CU Hawai`i has been serving its membership for over 60 years.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA recognized Ka`u’s state Sen. Josh Green for his work to expand free community college programs.
      Since the beginning of his Administration, Obama has vowed to make working families a priority and create ladders of opportunity, including an affordable education. During his 2015 State of the Union address, Obama unveiled the America’s College Promise, a proposal to make two years of community college free for responsible students. In his announcement, the President laid out a vision for free community college that can be achieved through shared responsibility from states, schools, employers, nonprofits, students and families.
Sen. Josh Green
      At least 27 new free community college programs have launched in states, local communities, and individual community colleges since the President’s 2015 State of the Union address. Collectively, these new programs add over $70 million in new public and private investments to serve nearly 40,000 students at community colleges. Seventeen other states have introduced legislation to make community college free nation-wide.
      “Universal access to higher education for Americans will provide a true way for us to improve our country,” Green said. “Free tuition for community college in America is a necessary first step that can help us to defeat chronic cycles of poverty, and in many cases defeat hopelessness, for vast numbers of our people. I'm honored to be a part of this movement with the President.”
      Green said he is “honored to be recognized by the White House but mostly proud to stand with the American people on this very important issue. Access to higher education should be available to all those with a desire to learn, not restricted to those who can afford it.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Chris Kanazawa
USDA SEEKS GRANT APPLICATIONS to help agricultural producers increase product value. Up to $44 million is available to farmers, ranchers and businesses looking to develop new bio-based products and expand markets through the USDA Value-Added Producer Grant program.
      “The uniqueness of island life requires items not produced locally to be shipped to the region,” said Chris Kanazawa, USDA Rural Development State Director for Hawai`i and the Western Pacific. “The Value-Added Producer Grant program is a great resource for our local agricultural producers looking to generate new products, increase product values and grow markets and customer bases. In addition to diversifying locally produced and grown products, economic opportunities for producers, their families and local communities increase.”
      Value-Added Producer Grants may be used to develop new products and create additional uses for existing ones. Priority is given to veterans, members of socially disadvantaged groups, beginning farmers and ranchers, and operators of small- and medium-sized family farms and ranches. Additional priority is given to applicants who seek funding for projects that will create or increase marketing opportunities for these types of operators.
      More information on how to apply is on page 20607 of the April 8 Federal Register. The deadline to submit paper applications is July 1, 2016. Electronic applications submitted through grants.gov are due June 24, 2016. Additional information and assistance is available through local offices.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

GET UP CLOSE TO HAWAI`I’S endemic birds. In Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Art Center Gallery’s new exhibition opening today features Marian Berger’s dramatic, close-up watercolor portraits of native birds. 
      The exhibit runs through June 5 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is open to the public and free of charge; park entrance fees apply.
      Meet the artist at an opening reception today from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
      For more information, see volcanoartcenter.org.

THE BIRTH OF KAHUKU is a free program at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park tomorrow. From 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., participants explore the rich geologic history of Kahuku. Traverse the vast 1868 lava flow, see different volcanic features and formations and identify many parts of the Southwest Rift Zone of Mauna Loa. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku.
      See nps.gov/havo.

MAY DAY IS LEI DAY at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. The gallery holds its festive May Day program tomorrow from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the gallery porch. Participants learn tips to sewing the perfect lei, proper protocol of giving and receiving a lei and more.
      Join the Lono Kanaka`ole Trio featuring Christy Lassiter with impromptu hula by Noe Noe Kekaualua and lei making with Desiree Moana Cruz.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.








See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April_2016.pdf.

Friday, April 29, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Friday, April 29, 2016

Hike to the top of Pu`u o Lokuana tomorrow. See more below. NPS Photo by Jessica Ferracane
HAWAI`I COUNTY’S LAND CLASSIFICATION system is what allowed development of a 6.75-megawatt solar project in Ocean View Ranchos and other subdivisions, former Hawai`i Public Utilities Commission Chair Mina Morita explained on her blog at minamoritaenergydynamics.com
      “The problem starts with the number of substandard subdivisions that were created over 40 years ago on Hawai`i Island,” Morita said. “Not wanting to have to bear the responsibility and costs of providing county services to these remote subdivisions, these non-conforming residential subdivisions with substandard infrastructure were identified as Agriculture rather than Rural in the state land use classification system.
Map shows residences in relation
to solar project lots.
      “While the Office of Planning is advocating to tackle the issue with a broad stroke, the situation needs to be addressed with finesse, as it has nothing to do with the use of agricultural lands. 
      “This classification was done for the county’s convenience of not wanting to provide county services rather than the use and preservation of agricultural lands for agricultural purposes. Therefore, these early subdivisions should be recognized for what they are, non-conforming residential subdivisions, not agricultural lots.
      Morita argued in support of House Bill 2636, which is moving forward at Hawai`i’s Legislature. The bill would require special permit approval in order to place solar energy facilities with a capacity of more than twenty-five kilowatts in certain lots within the agricultural district.
      “Siting of solar projects on agricultural classified lands is not the sole issue here,” Morina said. “This bill is necessary as the result of multiple and systemic failures regarding our land use classification system, permitting processes and the misapplication of the feed-in-tariff program by an opportunistic developer taking full advantage of failures and loopholes within various state and county agencies with disparate missions and functions and uncoordinated actions.
      “These solar projects confound the purpose of FIT program and in the aggregate, obviated the competitive bidding process for utility scale projects. The FIT program which was approved in 2010 by the PUC was a way to incentivize renewable energy installations with a standardized tariff for projects that were ‘shovel-ready,’ that could come online quickly. The developer went on a buying acquisition in Ocean View, and while the lots sat in escrow, the developer went on to dominate the FIT program, placing these supposedly ‘shovel-ready’ projects in the queue back in 2011.
      “Almost six years later, these projects still would require PUC approval for a new substation and transmission line (the applications are currently pending before the PUC) before they can be built. So much for being ‘shovel-ready’ and with the huge drops in panel pricing, the changing energy landscape, the FIT tariff would be a huge windfall for the opportunistic developer.”
      “Hawai`i’s 100 percent renewable goal should not be done at any cost, and this type of project is no longer needed, no longer timely and, therefore, not in the public interest. Just because this is in a remote area, this gross calamity should not be overlooked. This is just another eye-opener as to the failure of our land-use policies and a disconnection with our energy policies.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Aedes aegypti carries dengue fever and other mosquito-borne
diseases. Photo from Hawai`i Department of Health
DENGUE FEVER IS A SEASONAL DISEASE, Na`alehu resident Edward Rau has determined through his research. Rau recently retired as Environmental Health Director in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, where he was on active duty for 30 years. He also has over 40 years of professional experience in environmental health practice and is a Licensed Environmental Health Specialist. 
      “After studying outbreak patterns from previous outbreaks in Hawai`i, it was apparent to me that dengue is typically a seasonal disease significantly regulated by the temperature exposure of mosquitos, not rainfall or wind levels,” Rau said. “Based on this, in late November near the height of the outbreak, I predicted that the outbreak would end soon, first in the eastern side of Hawai`i Island where Aedes aegypti, the most efficient mosquito vector of dengue, is largely absent. Then the outbreak would end islandwide by mid-winter, or continue with a low level of sporadic cases. I compiled data to support these predictions and recommended that it be used in planning response activities. This information was sent to multiple civil defense and elected officials but no response was received.
      “The course of the outbreak followed exactly the pattern that I predicted. A State of Emergency was declared, and response efforts were ramped up after the outbreak was essentially over.
      “While I am glad to see that the outbreak has abated, I question the timing of both the Emergency Declaration and now the pending official announcement that it is over. While the outbreak may not meet DOH’s technical criteria for being over, in my opinion, it effectively ended two months ago.
      “I don’t mean to diminish the risks posed by dengue, zika, chikungunya and other emerging mosquito-borne diseases in Hawai`i. There is a dire need to rebuild control programs, make concerted efforts to reduce or eradicate populations of mosquitos, rats and other disease vectors and greatly improve preparedness for future outbreaks. However, we will waste resources and confuse the public if declarations and response efforts are ill-timed, ignoring the seasonal patterns of diseases. Yes, we need to continue to ‘Fight the Bite,’ but we also learn to ‘Fight the Bite Smart.’”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

George D. Szigeti
“KNOWING THE DENGUE FEVER outbreak has been halted is welcome news for Hawai`i’s tourism industry, especially for the travel partners, employees and residents who rely on its continued success,” said George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of Hawai`i Tourism Authority, who participated in Hawai`i officials’ announcement yesterday that 30 days have passed since the last confirmed case of dengue fever. “Travelers considering a visit to the Hawaiian Islands in the coming months can make their plans with confidence and without the hesitation that dengue may have been causing them.”
      Commenting on Hawai`i’s visitor statistics for March 2016, Szigeti said, “Hawai`i’s tourism industry is fortunate to have enjoyed a strong first quarter, one that has the state ahead of last year’s record-setting pace. However, success in tourism is never guaranteed from year-to-year and even month-to-month. We all know too well in Hawai`i how rapidly tourism’s prospects can falter due to factors beyond our control.
      While HTA plans to continue an aggressive marketing campaign, “it’s the aloha, hospitality and commitment to celebrating the Hawaiian culture by our residents and tourism industry professionals that sets these beautiful islands apart from our competing destinations,” Szigeti said. “We will continue to strive for that important balance of welcoming our visitors, protecting our environment, supporting the industry and respectfully honoring our culture. Mahalo everyone for contributing to tourism’s success and making Hawai`i such a wonderful place to live and visit.”
Paul and Jane Field lead tomorrow's Centennial Hike. Photo from NPS
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

SAVE THE SUMMIT UNDERSTORY during Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park’s Centennial Hike tomorrow at 9 a.m. Meet near the flagpole outside Kilauea Visitor Center to lop invasive Himalayan ginger from the native Hawaiian rainforest.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.

KAHUKU UNIT OF HAWAI`I VOLCANOES National Park offers a free one-hour program tomorrow. Pu`u o Lokuana is a short, moderately difficult 0.4-mile hike to the top of the grassy cinder cone. Participants learn about the formation and various uses of this hill over time and enjoy a breathtaking view of lower Ka`u. Meet near the parking area at 9:30 a.m.

TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE for Jazz in the Forest. Two shows tomorrow at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village feature guitarists Reggie Griffin and Curt Warren with Volcano Art Center's Jazz Ensemble.
Volcano Art Center Gallery celebrates May Day
on Sunday. Photo from VAC
      See volcanoartcenter.org, or call 967-8222.

MAY DAY IS LEI DAY at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. The celebration honors the unique way Hawai`i’s multi-cultural traditions are woven together to create a more interesting, more tolerant and more beautiful community.
      Volcano Art Center Gallery holds its festive May Day program on Sunday from 11a.m. to 1 p.m. on the gallery porch.
      With hundreds of fragrant blossoms and plant materials provided by the Volcano Art Center Gallery, participants learn tips to sewing the perfect lei, the proper protocol of giving and receiving a lei and more.
      Join the Lono Kanaka`ole Trio featuring Christy Lassiter with impromptu hula by Noe Noe Kekaualua and lei making with Desiree Moana Cruz.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.









See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April2016.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.


Thursday, April 28, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Thursday, April 28, 2016

Koa and `ohia trees line the entrance to Namakanipaio Campground, which was closed to remove dangerous, invasive eucalyptus trees. Photo from NPS
COUNTY PROSECUTOR MITCH ROTH met with about 50 Ocean View residents yesterday. Topics ranged from preventing crime, domestic violence and setting up more Neighborhood Watch teams to increased communication between the community and the prosecutor’s office.
      County Council member Maile David also attended and said she is working on controlling drinking at the county Kahuku Park in Ocean View.
      Roth said the root of much of the crime is domestic violence. Youth coming from homes with domestic violence are six times more likely to commit suicide, 24 times more likely to become sex abuse victims or offenders and 60 times more likely to be involved with drugs.
Mitch Roth
      He encouraged community members to keep the prosecutor’s office up-to-date in its relationship with the Hawai`i Police Department and the efforts of the police department, successful and unsuccessful, in solving crimes. He encouraged residents to give their opinions to the prosecutor’s office on how well or poorly the police are performing. Numerous people said that they felt that police officers were often unhelpful. 
      One resident said she had a garage sale and that an attendee stole her belongings. When the police officer arrived, she claimed, instead of going after the thief, he asked to see her permit to sell items and said that maybe the thief needed the money more than she did. Despite her having a video of the theft, the woman claimed that the police officer was uncooperative and even said he wanted to see whether her tax returns showed garage sale income.
      Roth said that when he ran for prosecutor four years ago, he said, “The system is broken, and we need to fix it.” Making such reports to the prosecutor’s office could help, he said.
      A crime at the community center 13 months ago has not been solved, community member Ron Gall said. Roth promised to get back to the community on the status of the case within a week.
      A Neighborhood Watch coordinator for the island urged Ocean View residents to become involved by setting up and supporting Neighborhood Watches. The Ocean View meeting is first Thursday of each month at Ocean View Community Center, downstairs at 7 p.m. The coordinator also stated that the island needs more police officers. For all of Ka`u, there are only two officers on duty at any given time. “We have to help ourselves,” she said.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

WITH NO REPORTS OF RECENT INCIDENTS of locally acquired dengue fever in 30 days, the state and County of Hawai`i announced that they are standing down certain emergency response activities related to the outbreak. This decision rests on the fact that three periods of the maximum human incubation period of ten days have passed. The final day of the infectious period for the last reported case was March 27. However, as per routine operations, the state Department of Health continues to immediately investigate all travel-related cases and conduct mosquito assessments and/or treatment of potential areas of mosquito exposure.
Gov. David Ige announced that response to mosquito-borne
illnesses will continue. 
      While the outbreak seems to have come to a halt, Gov. David Ige, along with other state and local officials, caution the public not to let their guard down in the fight against mosquitoes and the diseases they transmit.
      “This milestone could not have been reached without the diligent efforts and teamwork by the Department of Health and the Hawai`i County Civil Defense Agency,” Ige said. “While this outbreak seems to be ending, our statewide response to mosquito-borne diseases must continue. We must remain vigilant in our mosquito prevention and abatement practices, be ready to respond to the Zika virus, and continue working together as a state to ‘Fight the Bite.’”
      As of yesterday, 264 cases of locally acquired dengue fever have been confirmed on Hawai`i Island, with illnesses occurring as early as Sept. 11, 2015.
Government officials urge Hawai`i Island
residents to continue to Fight the Bite.
      “By no means are we out of the clear,” said Darryl Oliveira, administrator of the Hawai`i County Civil Defense Agency. “Cooperation and collaboration between the state and county have been exemplary, but we continue to identify actions and efforts that we can improve on in the future. We appreciate the tremendous initiative shown by the community in assisting with mosquito abatement and encourage everyone to continue taking proactive measures around their homes and neighborhoods to keep our state safe.”
      Over the course of the outbreak, DOH’s Vector Control team surveyed a total of 523 private properties and 310 public spaces. Of that count, 220 private properties and 65 public spaces were sprayed and/or treated for mosquitoes. A total of more than 1,900 reported potential cases were evaluated and/or tested by DOH disease investigators and state Laboratories Division staff.
      Health Director Dr. Virginia Pressler said, “The fight against mosquitoes is far from over, and we must do everything in our power to protect ourselves and our communities from the risk of mosquito borne diseases. We continue to receive and investigate reports of travel-related suspect cases of dengue fever, Zika virus and chikungunya on all islands. As Zika continues to spread rapidly overseas, we must take precautionary measures to prevent any locally acquired cases from taking hold in our state.”
      As part of a supplemental proclamation to extend the state’s emergency period for mosquito-borne illnesses, a statewide public awareness and education campaign will kick off this year to ensure people understand the risks of such diseases and how to best prevent them in Hawai`i.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Freshly cut ucalyptus logs line the road to Namakanipaio tent sites
and pavilion. Photo from NPS
NAMAKANIPAIO CAMPGROUND in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park has reopened. Hawai`i Volcanoes Lodge Company, which manages the campground under a concession contract for the park, is taking reservations immediately. 
      The popular campground has been closed since last September for removal of large, falling and hazardous non-native eucalyptus trees in the area.
      Originally scheduled to reopen last Thursday, workers discovered unforeseen electrical issues that delayed reopening.
      “We mahalo the public for their patience while we ensure the campground is safe again,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “We are delighted to reopen ahead of summer.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

RESULTS OF AN AUTOPSY on the body of a man who died Monday while in police custody outside of a house in Ocean View are inconclusive pending toxicology results. The medical examiner determined that 46-year-old Jonathan Watson, of Ocean View, had a non-life-threatening gunshot wound to his left leg. According to police, evidence found at the scene indicated that the wound was most likely accidentally self-inflicted.
      The Police Department’s Area II Criminal Investigations Section is conducting an investigation into the death and the circumstances leading to it, and the Office of Professional Standards is conducting an administrative investigation.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Learn professional brewing techniques
at the Ka`u Coffee Experience.
Photo from Ka`u Coffee Festival
KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL invites everyone to the Ka`u Coffee Experience and Ka`u Coffee College.
      The Ka`u Coffee Experience takes place during the Ho`olaule`a on Saturday, May 21 at Pahala Community Center. “The Ka`u Coffee Experience is one of our most popular events,” said festival organizer Chris Manfredi. “It will again feature locally grown coffees prepared in a number of ways during guided tastings by accomplished baristas. From pour-over to French Press, cold-brew and espresso drinks, you can explore the best ways to brew Ka`u coffee to unlock all of the distinctive and complex flavors.”
      On Sunday, May 22, also at Pahala Community Center, is Ka`u Coffee College. Said Manfredi, “the theme this year is ‘Coffee Quality.’ Guest speakers include UH-CTAHR extension agent Andrea Kawabata paired with Greenwell Farms biologist Arturo Ballar. They will discuss how to maximize efficiencies surrounding Integrated Pest Management.”
      Also at Ka`u Coffee College, local coffee professionals will team to present a coffee quality workshop where producers can enhance and maintain high quality and recognize and minimize defects. “If you’re in the coffee business, these sessions should not be missed,” Manfredi said.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

DONATIONS FOR DOLLARAMA can be dropped off at Ocean View Community Center tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. At the event on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., everything is $1 or less, including food and beverages. Funds raised go toward a new roof for the facility.

TOMORROW IS MEMBER APPRECIATION DAY at CU Hawai`i. Chartered in 1955, CU Hawai`i has been serving its membership for over 60 years.
Tomorrow is Member Appreciation Day at both
Ka`u branches of CU Hawai`i.
Image from CU Hawai`i
      “From our very humble beginnings, we now have over 26,000 members, and that is something to celebrate!” said a statement from the credit union. “On this very special day, we want to say ‘Mahalo’ to all of our members across Hawai`i Island.” 
      At each of its branches, including Na`alehu and Pahala, the day features refreshments and member gifts while supplies last. Members can also enter to win a grand prize of $200 at each branch. Grand prize winners will be announced on Monday, May 2.

SAVE THE SUMMIT UNDERSTORY during Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park’s Centennial Hike Saturday at 9 a.m. Meet near the flagpole outside Kilauea Visitor Center to lop invasive Himalayan ginger from the native Hawaiian rainforest.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.

TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE for Jazz in the Forest. Two shows on Saturday at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village feature guitarists Reggie Griffin and Curt Warren with Volcano Art Center's Jazz Ensemble.
      See volcanoartcenter.org, or call 967-8222.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.









See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April_2016.pdf.


Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Ka`u Coffee growers and festival organizers urge everyone to Buy Local for a chance to win $1,000. See kaucoffeefest.com for details. Photo by Chris Cook
THE KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL is once again launching its Buy Local-It Matters promotion in partnership with the state Department of Agriculture. Ka`u Coffee farmers and supporters met last night to get ready for the May 13 - 22 festival and urge everyone to participate and build their opportunity to win $1,000.
      Festival organizer Chris Manfredi said, “This promotion is designed to drive customers to local businesses, where they can collect invoices, receipts or business cards and redeem them at our Ho`olaule`a on May 21 for chances to win valuable prizes. The more they collect, the more chances to win.” 
      See kaucoffeefest.com for a list of participating businesses. 
      See more Ka`u Coffee Festival updates in future Ka`u Calendar News Briefs.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A HAWAI`I LAW THAT “PITS RURAL against urban communities” is how Life of the Land Executive Director Henry Curtis describes a law that allows large solar projects in rural neighborhoods zoned agricultural. Developers are using the law for a proposed project in Ocean View Ranchos and neighboring subdivisions.
Henry Curtis
      “The solar project pits rural residents against the alleged ʻpublic interest,’ Curtis said on his blog at ililani.media. “Renewable energy projects are good for the local construction industry. The projects generally reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Often, they keep money within the state that would have been used to import oil.
      “Developers often target large, open, undeveloped land in rural and agricultural areas. These areas are used to generate electricity necessary to power more urban areas.
      “At the southern end of the Big Island, a developer proposed segmenting a solar project into more than two dozen little projects. The proposals date from 2011 and have yet to be built. Combined, the projects require a new utility substation and electric lines crossing a state highway.
      “If combined into one package, the project would need to sign a Power Purchase Agreement with Hawai`i Electric Light Company, which would then need approval from the Public Utilities Commission.
      “By segmenting the project into separate ʻindependent’ proposals, each one can be approved through the existing Feed-in Tariff mechanism.
     “The Feed-in Tariff rate is much higher than recently signed Solar Power Purchase Agreements. Thus, the impact to Big Island ratepayers will be larger.”
      As an example, Curtis quoted from the PUC’s ruling regarding its PPA with Hu Honua, a power plant in Hamakua. “Because HELCO’s renewable energy generation output is in excess of the statutory 40 percent level, for any new generation project (renewable or fossil) or any significant change in the type of fuel supply proposed in the future, HELCO must demonstrate that the project provides cost reduction benefits to ratepayers, directly or indirectly, by improving and maximizing integration of additional lower cost renewable energy.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard
U.S. REPRESENTATIVES TULSI GABBARD, a member of the House Armed Services Committee, advocated and worked to ensure provisions critical to Hawai`i were included in the Fiscal Year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act draft. The full committee was scheduled to consider amendments to the Act today, when members will have the opportunity to further amend the bill before it comes before the full House of Representatives. 
      “Hawai`i’s strategic role in the Asia-Pacific region is recognized and reinforced in this year’s National Defense Authorization bill,” Gabbard said. “The bill includes funding for critical infrastructure and facilities in Hawai`i, strengthened missile defense capabilities against the threat posed by North Korea and improved protections for our environment. Also included is Talia’s Law, which we passed through the House earlier this year in order to protect military children from abuse. Unfortunately, there are some problem areas included within the bill, to include a continuation of harmful arbitrary sequestration cuts which negatively impact our service members, readiness and capabilities. I will be highlighting areas of concern in the committee markup tomorrow, in order to ensure that the national strategic military assets of Hawai`i, and of our country, are maintained and supported.”
      The bill includes $31 million for a National Guard combined support maintenance shop in Hilo to support ongoing training at Pohakuloa Training Area.
      It also calls for a Medal of Honor Review for Asian American and Native American Pacific Islanders. The Department of Defense will conduct comprehensive reviews of the service records of these war veterans to determine whether they should be awarded the Medal of Honor. Often times, these awards were not given due to discrimination.
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U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono
SEN. MAZIE HIRONO TOOK to the Senate floor to call for unanimous consent to confirm Hawai`i’s Clare Connors and other judicial nominees from courts across the country who have been waiting months, and in some cases over a year, for a floor vote. Sen. Mitch McConnell blocked Hirono’s request. Hirono also called on Senate Republicans to take up the nomination of Merrick Garland, President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court.
      “While my colleagues and I attempted to fulfill our duties as senators by voting to fill urgent vacancies on the federal bench, Senate Republicans continue to refuse to do their jobs, which delays justice from our district courts to the Supreme Court,” Hirono said. “Clare Connors was approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee on a bipartisan basis, but she and other qualified nominees are being kept in limbo by Republican inaction. I call upon my Republican colleagues to enable all of us to do our jobs and begin the advice and consent process, which we are required to do under the Constitution.”
      Earlier this month, Connors was unanimously approved by the Senate Judiciary Committee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. District Court for the District of Hawai`i created by Chief Judge Susan Oki Mollway’s retirement from active service.
      Although there are 79 federal judicial nominations pending, 28 of which are judicial emergencies, Senate Republicans called to stop the confirmation process in July. This would leave federal courts across the country, including the Supreme Court and Hawai`i’s U.S. District Court, understaffed for months, or even years.
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A KA`U MAN DIED AFTER POLICE responded to a report of a shooting. He has been identified as 46-year-old Jonathan Watson, of Ocean View.
      At 9:51 a.m. Monday, the Police Department received a 9-1-1 call from a man who said he had been shot. When officers arrived at a home on the 92-2600 block of Hukilau Drive in Ocean View, a man with a bandage on his left leg came out of the house in an aggressive manner and began fighting with the officers. The officers took him into custody.
      While some of the officers went into the house to check for possible suspects or victims, Watson tried to kick the officers who were with him, and then he became unresponsive.
      Police attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation until Fire Department personnel arrived a few minutes later and took over unsuccessful efforts to revive him. Watson was later taken to Kona Community Hospital, where he was officially pronounced dead at 3:40 p.m.
      Police have requested an autopsy to determine the exact cause of death. The case is classified as a coroner’s inquest.
      The Police Department’s Area II Criminal Investigations Section will conduct an investigation into the death and circumstances leading to it, and the Office of Professional Standards will conduct an administrative investigation.
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Mitch Roth
DOLLARAMA ACCEPTS DONATIONS for the event this Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Drop off items at Ocean View Community Center through Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Everything is $1 or less, including food and beverages. Funds raised go toward a new roof for the facility.

OCEAN VIEW’S CRIME WAVE is the topic of a meeting at Ocean View Community Center today at 6 p.m. Mike and Debbie Dubois invited Hawai`i County Prosecuting Attorney Mitch Roth and a Police Department representative to discuss crime with concerned citizens. The meeting follows break-ins and burglaries at Ocean View Community Center, area churches and Ocean View Market.

LEGAL AID SCHEDULED FOR TOMORROW at Ocean View Community Center has been cancelled.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.









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See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April_2016.pdf.