About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, May 28, 2015

Ka`u High School Trojan Kai Enriques is BIIF Volleyball Player if the Year. Photo from Taylor Sport Photography
KA`U’S FORMER COUNTY COUNCIL member Brenda Ford has lost her lawsuit claiming that Bobby Jean Leithead Todd is not qualified to be director of Department of Environmental Management. Ford filed the lawsuit in 2013, citing the county charter’s requirement that the director hold “an engineering degree or a degree in a related field.” Leithead Todd has a bachelor of arts degree in English.
Bobby Jean Leithead Todd
      In his ruling, Third Circuit Judge Ronald Ibarra said Ford “has not raised or presented any evidence that there exists a genuine issue of material fact relating to whether the County Council or the mayor abused their discretion in interpreting the charter.” Ibarra also noted that both sides agreed that language in the charter is ambiguous.
      Ford voted against Mayor Billy Kenoi’s appointment of Leithead Todd. It passed 6-3.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Tom Hutton
KA`U LEARNING ACADEMY is asking the state Public Charter School Commission to accept revisions to pre-opening assurances. KLA originally had a target enrollment of 111 students but is now expecting 85. According to a statement from commission Executive Director Tom Hutton, KLA requested the reduction “because the school believes it is important to complete its pre-opening criteria as soon as possible.” 
      KLA also provided a revised budget for years one through three. Year One provides for a revised enrollment of 85 students, 105 students in Year Two and 125 in Year Three.
      “KLA’s revised budget appears to be reasonable,” Hutton stated. “The school expects to end each year with a surplus, and even without any grants in Year One, the year would end at break-even. Further, all positions in the revised staffing plan are accounted for, although … there are some questions surrounding the pay for some of the positions.”  
      According to Hutton, the most significant cost saving comes from cutting clerical salaries, a technology services position and an instructional leadership position.
      The revised staffing plan includes four teachers (three of whom will be contracted through Teach For America), two Education Assistants, an Executive Director, a Managing Director, a part-time office assistant, a bus driver/lunch program person, a meals program/office assistant person and a custodian/driver/maintenance person.
      To demonstrate that the revised staffing plan is sufficient to deliver the academic plan, KLA also provided a school schedule.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Gregory Javar, Jr. accepts Ken Wicks scholarship
from chair Lee McIntosh.
GREGORY K. JAVAR, JR. wrote the winning essay for 2015 Ken Wicks Ka`u Chamber of Commerce Scholarship. Javar graduated from Ka`u High School and attended University of Hawai`i as a freshman. He was an exchange student at University of Alaska during his sophomore year and returns to UH-Manoa this fall. 
      Entitled Local Lands in Local Hands, Javar’s essay considers the current controversy regarding stewardship of Mauna Kea and construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope there.
      “A`ole TMT! A`ole TMT!” These are the chants of Native Hawaiians speaking from their hearts to stop production on our sacred Mauna Kea, Javar wrote. The preservation of our Hawaiian lands plays such an important role in the Hawaiian culture, while advancing technology plays an important role in the science world. There seems to be no peaceful solution to these rising conflicts. Why can’t the native people and the scientists find peace? Different mindsets. In the Hawaiian culture, the people know the significance in the Mauna and see it as a sacred and holy place. While on the scientific end, the Mauna is just as equally significant, only for a different reason, scientific discovery. The mountain reveals that there are two different sides, the cultural and the scientific. Although there are many scientists who try to preserve the Hawaiian culture, I believe there is not enough. This is part of the reason why I am pursuing my goal in becoming a civil engineer.
        Pursuing my engineering career would not only benefit the technological world, it would also benefit my Hawaiian culture. My future plan is to move back to Ka`u and work as an engineer on the Big Island. If I am back on the Big Island, I’d be able to be a bridge or a mediator between conflicting sides. I would be able to tailor the projects so that they would be advanced in a modern way without interfering with Hawaiian culture. I feel like that is very important in this day and age because of the rapid growth of industry and modernization. With the current issue of Mauna Kea going on, I feel like Hawaiian engineers should work on ways to prevent future conflicts. As a native of Ka`u, I feel like it is my Kuleana to “keep country, country” and at the same time keep us intact with the modern world. 
Ka`u Chamber of Commerce presented its 2015 Ken Wicks scholarships Tuesday.
        Growing up in Ka`u, kids learn many values that many other kids do not have the privilege to learn. I’ve been to a lot of places and have seen the lifestyle and can honestly say that Ka`u is one of a kind. Our keiki learn respect, values, and learn that if you take care of the land, the land will take care of you. That’s what’s special about our district, we all are one with our land, and as locals we do what we can to protect it. As a future engineer, I see this as a great opportunity to make a long-lasting impression. For our people, for Ka`u.
      Other Ken Wicks Ka`u Chamber of Commerce Scholarship recipients for 2015 are Layla Abellera, Tyler Amaral, Evan Enriques, Annie Mae Flores, Kaweni Ibarra, Nysa M. Kaniho, Kamrie Koi, Jennifer Kau`i Losalio, Crystal McIntosh, Denisha Navarro, Siena Okimoto, Tiare-Lee Shibuya, Jennifer Flores Tabios and Jenisha Young.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Ka`u High named Athletes and Scholar Athletes
of the Year Tuesday. Photo from KHPES
TUESDAY AT ITS ATHLETIC ASSEMBLY, Ka`u High School congratulated Athletes of the Year. Female Athlete of the Year is Kerrilynn Domondon, and Male Athlete of the Year is Cameron “Kai” Enriques. 
      Principal’s Female Scholar Athlete of the Year is Jennifer Tabios and Principal’s Male Scholar Athlete of the Year is Mike Tamayo.
      Councilwoman Maile Medeiros David was on hand and presented Ka`u High School, its Athletic Program and eight-man football team with a Certificate of Recognition for winning the first BIIF eight-man championship.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

BIG ISLAND INTERSCHOLASTIC FEDERATION Volleyball Player of the Year is Ka`u High School’s Kai Enriques, and Coach of the Year is Joshua Ortega. Other Trojans also have received BIIF accolades. Outside hitter Enriques and middle blocker Brian Gascon are on Division II’s first team. Outside hitter Damon Hertz made second team. Honorable mention went to outside hitter Anthony Emmsley-Ah Yee and middle blocker Mike Tamayo.
      According to Kevin Jakahi, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald, Enriques performance at states, with 41 kills on 100 swings, was “one of the most dominant performances by a Trojan in the school’s history.”
      “I never realized how many kills I had. I was enjoying the game so much,” Enriques told Jakahi. “When I heard, I was pretty excited.”
      Enriques will play for Briar Cliff College’s new men’s volleyball program this fall.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

PAHALA PUBLIC & SCHOOL LIBRARY on the campus of Ka`u High and Pahala Elementary School currently has open recruitment for Student Helper II positions to fill any future vacancies.
      This is a part-time position. Requirements include being a full-time college student taking online classes or classroom classes, being able to work in the mornings Mondays through Thursdays and Friday afternoons, and having computer skills.
       For more information, call Debbie Wong Yuen at 928-2015.

KA`U’S STATE SEN. RUSSELL RUDERMAN hosts a talk story at Cooper Center in Volcano Village a week from today on Thursday, June 4 from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. Ruderman will discuss newly passed legislation and seek input on bills to be introduced next year.
      For more info, call 586-6890 or email   senruderman@capitol.hawaii.gov.

KA`U MOKU, PART OF AHA MOKU Advisory Committee, holds a community and informational meeting today from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at Na`alehu Youth Center behind the community center to discuss local issues and concerns. 
      For more information, call Darlyne Vierra at 640-8740 or Elizabeth Kuluwaimaka at 339-0289.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY Development Corp. meets tomorrow at 5 p.m. at Hawaiian Ranchos offices.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.



See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_May2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Direectory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.