About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014

The new Hawai`i Growth Model data visualization website allows the community to track progress at the Pahala campus and other Hawai`i public schools. Photo by Julia Neal
KA`U COFFEE MILL AND ITS SISTER BRAND Ka`u Coffee Trading Co. recently launched sales of Ka`u Coffee Singles. “Great innovations can come in small packages,” says Ka`u Coffee Mill founder Edmund C. Olson. 
      Designed for the popular Keurig coffee brewer, each Single offers .35 ounce (10 grams) of pure Ka`u Coffee. “Singles allow coffee drinkers to prepare the exact amount perfect for one cup of precious Ka`u Coffee,” Olson said. Both Ka`u Coffee Mill and Ka`u Coffee Trading Co. Singles are Ka`u Estate Grown Medium Roast.
Ka`u Coffee Singles have the exact amount to brew one cup.
Photo from Ka`u Coffee Mill
      Olson said that distribution of Singles will broaden Ka`u Coffee Mill’s program to make 100 percent Ka`u Coffee a household name. Ka`u Coffee Singles come in packs of a dozen and are available at the new Big Island Trading Co. near the corner of Hwy 11 and Hwy 19 in Hilo. Ka`u Coffee Singles are also available at Ka`u Coffee Mill, www.kaucoffeemill.com and Hamakua Macadamia Nut Co., www.hawnnut.com.
      Look to the future for an expanded line of roasts and brands in Ka`u Coffee Singles, Olson said.

HAWAI`I’S RENEWABLE ENERGY GOALS are on lawmakers’ minds during this year’s state Legislature that opens tomorrow, according to a story in Civil Beat.
      According to Sophie Cocke, Ka`u’s Sen. Russell Ruderman, vice chair of the Senate Energy and Environment Committee, hopes to legalize industrial hemp as a crop that can be harvested for biofuel.
      She also reports that leaders of Hawai`i’s energy and environmental committees hope to pass a law requiring the state to derive 100 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources by 2050. Currently, the goal is 40 percent renewable energy by 2030.
      Rep. Chris Lee, chair of the House Energy and Environmental Protection Committee, said the mandate would ensure that liquefied natural gas, if it is imported to Hawai`i in hopes of lowering consumer electricity bills, is eventually phased out and ensure that it remains a bridge fuel to more renewables.
Sen. Russell Ruderman
      Lawmakers hope to further the state’s renewable energy efforts by encouraging introduction of hydrogen cars to the Hawai`i market, boosting biodiesel and stimulating a market for biofuels in the transportation sector, Cocke says.
      One bill calls for building hydrogen fuel stations throughout the state.
      Blue Planet Foundation is supporting legislation that requires that five percent of diesel fuel sold in the state contain at least five percent locally produced biodiesel.
      Sen. Mike Gabbard, chair of the Senate Energy and Environment Committee, told Cocke he wants legislation requiring state regulators to review technological and economic obstacles to creating a modern grid system that can accept larger amounts of renewable energy.
      Another bill would create energy storage targets for the utilities in order to integrate more renewable energy into grids without causing power disruptions.
      Lawmakers and clean energy advocates seek legislation that would help community-based renewable energy projects. “Half or more of Hawai`i residents are simply unable to participate in clean energy because they don’t have a roof directly above their head, they live in a shady area, a condo or are a renter,” said Jeff Mikulina, executive director of Blue Planet Foundation, a clean energy advocacy group. Under the program, solar arrays could be placed in communal areas such as on warehouse roofs or in fields, allowing neighboring residents access to the solar energy.
      Hawai`i’s $1.05 per barrel oil tax, which expires June 2015, is also on the agenda this session. Lawmakers hope to extend the deadline through 2030 and allocate more of the funds to support energy and food security programs.
      See civilbeat.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Summaries of 2013 legislative activity by members of Hawai`i's congressional delegation are available at GovTrack.us.
From left, Sen. Mazie Hirono, Sen. Brian Schatz, Rep. Colleen Hanabusa and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard.
THE GOVERNMENT TRANSPARENCY WEBSITE GovTrack.us has released its 2013 report cards for members of Congress. The report cards summarize legislative activity for each lawmaker, including Hawai`i’s Democratic delegation. 
      During her first year in the Senate, Mazie Hirono missed only one vote. Hirono ranked first among Senate freshmen who worked on legislation with the House. She also wrote bipartisan bills, with 60 percent of them having co-sponsors who are not Democrats.
      Sen. Brian Schatz had one of his nine bills enacted – the Native American Veterans’ Memorial Amendments Act. It was co-sponsored by Hirono, Alaska’s two senators and the vice chair of Indian Affairs. Schatz also co-sponsored 211 bills or resolutions. He missed four votes.
      Of the 131 bills Rep. Colleen Hanabusa co-sponsored, 40 percent were introduced by lawmakers who are not Democrats. She missed 17 votes.
      Rep. Tulsi Gabbard introduced only three bills, and one of them – the Helping Heroes Fly Act – was enacted into law. Gabbard was among the highest 10 percent of legislators in joining bipartisan proposals. She missed 18 votes.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION has made available to parents, students and the Hawai`i community a public version of the Hawai`i Growth Model data visualization website at growthmodel.hawaiipublicschools.org/growth_model/public/index.htm.
      This interactive website allows users to click among multiple data streams comparing the state’s Complex Areas, schools and student groups, generating bubble charts that plot how those groups are faring according to two key yardsticks: Proficiency and Growth.
      “The launch of the public Hawai`i Growth Model data visualization website is an exciting step in the department’s journey to provide better information about school performance in timely, easy-to-access, user-friendly ways,” deputy superintendent Ronn Nozoe said.
      “The ability to visualize growth data in context with how a school or complex is performing in relation to others over time is critical to building understanding and collaborative action,” Nozoe said.
      The public can explore the website at HawaiiPublicSchools.org for key information about this new tool.
      Since summer 2013, DOE teachers and key staff have been using a private version of the Growth Model website to analyze student achievement data that helps inform instruction and guide school initiatives. The staff website is protected by federal and DOE regulations from being released publicly. Users of the public Growth Model website cannot view data for populations of fewer than 20 students.
      By making comprehensive data sets easily sortable and searchable, the Growth Model website supports all three goals of the department’s Strategic Plan: Student Success, Staff Success, and Successful Systems of Support.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

 USGS geologist Matt Patrick Photo from HVO
GEOLOGIST MATT PATRICK, OF USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, presents an update on Kilauea’s summit eruption, including an overview of the volcanic processes occurring within the vent, today at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. $2 donations support park programs; park entrance fees apply.

KA`I HO`OPI`I SHARES MUSIC OF HIS `OHANA during a Na Leo Manu: Heavenly Voices program tomorrow at 6:30 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free; park entrance fees apply.

KA`U AGRICULTURAL WATER COOPERATIVE DISTRICT holds its next meeting at Royal Hawaiian Orchards Macadamia Field Office Thursday at 4 p.m. For more information, call Jeff McCall at 928-6456.

KA`U HOSPITAL URGES RESIDENTS to complete its Community Health Needs Assessment at surveymonkey.com/s/93HQ5MX. The deadline has been extended to Jan. 31.

SEE THE DIRECTORY from the Ka`u Chamber of Commerce at http://snack.to/fzpfg59c.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.