About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Tuesday, April 23, 2019

An officer stands down the street from the fire that raged in HOVE last night, destroying a two-story house.
Photo from Argueta Family
A FIRE DESTROYED A NEW HOUSE IN HAWAIIAN OCEAN VIEW ESTATES at 92-9033 Tree Fern Lane yesterday at around 7 p.m. The two-story home was owned by Orlando Argueta, who works construction, and his wife Roxanna, who works in housekeeping. They have two children and belong to the Miranda family, known for their Kaʻū Coffee.
     Two engines, a tanker, a medic unit, and another fire fighting vehicle were dispatched to the scene, with six responders. The two-story structure was "fully engulfed in flames" when firefighters arrived, with the fire spreading to nearby brush and power lines toward another house.
     It took firefighters almost five hours to extinguish the blaze. The loss is estimated at $110,000. No occupants, neighbors, or fire fighting personnel were reported injured. The cause is under investigation by the fire inspector.
     Maria Miranda, former Miss Kaʻū Coffee and an organizer of the Kaʻū Coffee Festival, was just leaving a meeting of Kaʻū Coffee farmers in Pāhala when she received a short film of the fire from her family. She said family members were shaken but thankful that no one was injured. A funding page is planned in the future to help the Argeta family rebuild their new home. Miranda said her family reported that neighbors saw some one leave the house and it soon went up in flames.
     Anyone with clues or information regarding the possibility of arson is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 961-8300.

Dr. Greg Asner, who leads the airborne observatory team, describes how
specialized instruments allow them to study large areas of ʻōhiʻa forest
from the air. See the video at Big Island Video News
. Photo from DLNR
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FIGHTING RAPID ʻŌHIʻA DEATH HAS TAKEN TO THE AIR with help from the Center for Global Discovery and Conservation Science. The Hilo-based operation of the Arizona State University is conducting overflights to track the march of the Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death disease that devastates native forests.
     The Center flies a turboprop with equipment to detect and map Rapid ʻŌhiʻa Death in the forests on Hawaiʻi Island, Maui, and Kauaʻi. The team surveyed more than a million acres.
     The Center was contracted by the state Department of Land & Natural Resources with funding, in part, from the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority. HTA is interested in preserving the forest and educating visitors to help prevent them from spreading the disease by unwittingly moving diseased branches and foliage around the island, particularly during Merrie Monarch Week, when the festival has banned use of ʻōhiʻa materials.
ʻŌhiʻa forests from the air. Photo from DLNR
     Kalani Ka‘anā‘anā, HTA'’s Director of Hawaiian Cultural Affairs commented, "During this week of the annual Merrie Monarch Festival, it's important for us all to be mindful of the natural and cultural significance of ʻōhiʻa lehua as our keystone native tree species for protecting Hawai‘i's forests and watersheds. ROD is devastating hundreds of thousands of acres of native forest. Forests are life-giving in Hawai‘i in a multitude of ways. They are often the first image visitors see when flying into Hawai‘i and it's critical we do everything possible to keep them healthy."
     Dr. Greg Asner leads the team that operates the airborne observatory. This year was its third time surveying forests to collect data on symptomatic trees. Asner said, "Our January 2019 mapping update on suspected ROD trees will be coming out shortly, which will extend our total coverage of the Big Island for three consecutive years. We've also added parts of Maui and Kaua‘i along the way. Altogether, the mapping will continue to increase our knowledge of the rate, pattern, and overall threat level of ROD in the Hawaiian Islands. We are very proud to be working closely with DLNR, the USDA Forest Service, and all the organizations that depend on island-wide mapping results."
Dr. Greg Asner describes how the instruments on the airborne observatory
allow them to look at individual leaves. Photo from DLNR
     DLNR and its partners conduct regular "sketch mapping" aerial surveys of ʻōhiʻa forests across the state to detect new disease outbreaks. These surveys are done from helicopters, but the data collected by ASU's high-altitude aerial platform is much more precise and provides highly accurate location data on trees suspected to be infected with ROD.
     Rob Hauff, State Protection Forester for the DLNR Division of Forestry and Wildlife, said, "The HTA support has helped expand our outreach to visitors who could potentially move ROD from island to island and allowed us to utilize state-of-the art forest monitoring technologies to better map the disease."
     Over the past year, Hawai‘i Tourism has provided more than $400,000 in funding support for numerous ROD initiatives, including: $20,000 for trailhead sanitation stations and signs, $20,000 for bio-sanitation workshops for eco-tour operators, and support for the annual ʻŌhiʻa Love Fest in Hilo.
     DLNR Chair Suzanne Case remarked, "The support from Hawai‘i Tourism is invaluable in helping get the word out about what each of us can do to help stop the spread of this insidious tree disease."

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The School of Pharmacy at University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo
provided diabetes and blood pressure screening.
Photo by Julia Neal
GET YOUR SPRING ON KAʻŪ WELLNESS FAIR last Saturday drew many providers to the Kaʻū District Gym annex, offering medical, dental, mental health, healthy living, and preventative care services.
     Organized by Kaʻū High School teacher, track coach, and events organizer Angie Miyashiro, the gathering of children and families offered blood pressure and diabetes screening, strength and exercise analysis, and opportunities for outdoor experiences.
     The day included an Easter Egg hunt and many educational games for kids as well as
reading with Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries.
    Among those on hand were Bay Clinic, Center for the Study of Active Volcanoes UH-Hilo, and Phi Delta Chi Pharmacists, Hawaiʻi State Teachers Association, United Healthcare, Keiki ID, Blue Zones, Children's Community Council, PATH, Tūtū and Me, Project Aware - Mental Health First Aid, and Ocean Awareness & Safety.

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SUICIDE PREVENTION BILLS go before Gov. David Ige for approval or veto after passing the state House of Representatives yesterday.
Getting to know the Volcano is an opportunity for health
activities shared by young David and Manuel Carvalho
of the Center for Study of Active Volcanoes at UH-Hilo.
Photo by Julia Neal 
     HB330 HD1 SD1 CD1 – co-sponsored by west Kaʻū Rep. Richard Creagan and east Kaʻū Rep. Richard Onishi – appropriates funds to the Department of Health to support youth suicide early intervention, prevention, and education initiatives in all neighbor island counties.
     House Bill 655 HD1 SD1 CD1 designates September as "Suicide Prevention and Awareness Month" to promote public awareness of suicide prevention and education.
     The bills are supported by the Prevent Suicide Hawaiʻi Task Force, comprised of government agencies and private community groups that provide leadership, develop strategies, coordinate activities, and monitor the progress of suicide prevention efforts in Hawaiʻi.

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A fitness station at the health fair. Photo by Julia Neal
FUNDING FOR A NEW PRESCHOOL AND EARLY LEARNING CENTER at Volcano School of Arts & Sciences has been released by Gov. David Ige. East Kaʻū Sen. Russell Ruderman posted the acceptance letter from the governor's office, which shows $450,000 is issued for the Capital Improvement Project.
     Said Ruderman, "Excited to announce the first Capital Improvement Project (CIP) funding release from Governor Ige."

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EARTH DAY, celebrated yesterday, April 22, drew comments from Hawaiʻi politicos:
Deedee Davis reads to a child for Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries.
Photo by Julia Neal
     Gov. David Ige said, "Happy #EarthDay19. Hawaiʻi has come together with island leaders to renew our commitment to building sustainability in our islands and islands across the globe. Let us all do our part to help save our island Earth. #HIGov #ActOnClimate."
     Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, "All people deserve clean air, clean water, & the promise of a bright future. My OFF Act will end our addiction to fossil fuels & transition the country to a 100% clean energy economy—laying a just and economic pathway toward a cleaner, more secure future for all. Happy #EarthDay."
     Rep. Ed Case said, "Aloha #EarthDay, the birthday of the modern environmental movement. Proud to have voted for a historic public lands package, held months of hearings on climate change and cosponsored H.R. 9, the Climate Action Now Act, which restores our commitment to the #ParisAgreement."
Bay Clinic Spin at the Health Fair.
Photo by Julia Neal
     Sen. Brian Schatz said, "We know that climate change is already increasing the frequency and severity of extreme weather events. This report from @SenGaryPeters and @HSGAC shows that every $1 invested in mitigation saves taxpayers $6. I'm leading the new Special Committee on the Climate Crisis because this Earth Day, we can't wait any longer to take action on climate."
     Sen. Mazie Hirono said, "Climate change is real and the impacts are already being felt across the country. We need to take immediate action and protect our world for the generations to come. Whether it's planting trees or whatever you’re doing today to defend the environment, Happy #EarthDay."

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SEN. MAZIE HIRONO has more to say about Thursday's release of the redacted version of the Mueller Report, which can be read through a link from Kaʻū News Briefs from Thursday, April 18. In an email to constituents, she said the release was preceded by "a partisan press conference by Attorney General Bill Barr to spin the findings in President [Donald] Trump's favor.
Angie Miyashiro is the organizer of the annual health fair.
Photo by Julia Neal
     "Barr revealed he took it upon himself to share the report with Trump and the White House before sharing it with the public and lawmakers, and without consulting Mueller. He also proclaimed numerous times that there was 'no collusion,' to Trump's delight, despite evidence that suggests otherwise. In fact, Mueller lays out a strong case that Trump did obstruct justice. This was no exoneration, no matter what Trump says.
     "We knew from Day 1 that Trump's hand-picked attorney general would side with him, given that Barr sent the President an unsolicited 19-page memo before he was hired for the job that outlined his opinion that a president essentially could not obstruct justice. What a coincidence.
     "The American people deserve to know the full truth, and we deserve an attorney general who defends our country, not one who acts like the President's personal attorney."
     Hirono asks the public to sign a petition to "demand further transparency and call on Mueller to testify before Congress as soon as possible to help us make sense of this mess."

Brennen Nishimuar, a senior at Kaʻū
High gets into the Blue Zone.
Photo by Julia Neal
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KAʻŪ COFFEE FESTIVAL EVENTS START FRIDAY, April 26 and run through Sunday, May 5. All events are open to the public; some require reservations. Celebrate Kaʻū Coffee at:
     Pā‘ina and Open House is Friday, April 26 at Pāhala Plantation House, 5:30 p.m. Meet the Miss Kaʻū Coffee Court on the evening before the pageant. Enjoy live entertainment  with Bolo, Sammi Fo and Boni Norito. Refreshments. Potluck. Call Pāhala Plantation Cottages, 928-9811.
     Miss Kaʻū Coffee Pageant is Saturday, April 27, 6 p.m. at Kaʻū District Gym. To volunteer or donate, call Pageant Director Trini Marques at 928-0606.
     Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest is Sunday, April 28, 11 a.m. at Kaʻū Coffee Mill. Applications for the all-ages, fee-free contest are open through Saturday, April 27. Enter a pūpū, entrée, or dessert, divided into adult and youth categories. The public is invited to come enjoy free tastings. Contest entry info at KauCoffeeMill.com or KauCoffeeFest.com, or call 928-0550.
     Kaʻū Mountain Hike and Lunch is Wednesday, May 1, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., starting at Kaʻū Coffee Mill. Ride through the coffee plantation, up the mountains, and into the rainforest to walk along waterways from sugar days of old. Reservations required; $45 per person. Call 928-0550.
     Kaʻū Valley Farms Tour and Lunch is Thursday, May 2, 9 a.m. to noon. Above Nāʻālehu, visit a plant nursery, food farm, coffee and tea plantings, native forest, and hidden valley. $40 per person, reservations required. Call 987-4229 or 731-5409.
     Kaʻū Coffee and Cattle Day is Friday, May 3, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Aikane Plantation Coffee Farm. Includes farm tours, BBQ buffet, and hayride. Visit this historic Ka‘ū Coffee farm and ranch. $25, reservations required. Call 927-2252.
     Kaʻū Stargazing on Friday, May 3, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., takes guests to the top of sacred Makanau during a new-moon. Learn about the ancient Hawaiian temple and see the Hawaiian night sky and stars. Reservations required; $45 per person, includes refreshments. Call 938-0550.
 Kaʻū Mountain Hike and Lunch on Wednesday, May 1, starts with a ride through the coffee plantation, up the 
mountains, and into the rainforest, to walk along waterways from sugar days of old. See details, above. 
Photo from Andrew Richard Hara
     Kaʻū Coffee Festival Hoʻolauleʻa is Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., at Pāhala Community Center. Full day of music, dance, coffee tasting, demonstrations, food, snacks, educational booths, and games. Free entry. Vendor deadline is Friday, April 26. Booth fees are $100 for food vendors; $60 for non-food items and crafts, including coffee and coffee samples; and $35 for pre-approved information displays. No campaign or other political displays. Fifty percent discounts for non-profit organizations and cooperatives selling food, crafts, and coffee. Vendors must also obtain county vendor permits costing $30 each and a Department of Health permit, if serving food. Call Gail Nagata 933-0918. Space for booths and presentations are limited, reservations required. Vendor applications at KauCoffeeFest.com.
     Closing out the Kaʻū Coffee Festival, Kaʻū Coffee College is held at Pāhala Community Center from 9 a.m. to noon on Sunday, May 5. Get served education and see demonstrations for coffee farmers and Kaʻū Coffee enthusiasts.
     See KauCoffeeFestival.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
Kaʻū Trojans Spring Sports Schedule
Baseball:
Fri., April 26, BIIF Finals
Sat., April 27, BIIF Finals
Wed.-Sat., May 8-11, HHSAA
Softball:
Wed., May 1-4, HHSAA
Boys Volleyball:
Wed., April 24, BIIF Semi-Finals
Thu., April 25, BIIF Finals
Thu.-Sat., May 2-4, HHSAA
Track:
Fri., April 26, 2 p.m., BIIF Semi-Finals
Sat., April 27, 3 p.m., BIIF Finals
Fri.-Sat., May 3-4, HHSAA

REMINDER
After Dark in the Park: Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 Lower East Rift Zone Eruption, Tuesday, April 23, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Carolyn Parcheta recounts the progression and shares her experiences monitoring this dramatic eruption. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

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UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24
Hawai‘i County Council Mtg., Wednesday, April 24, Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

Kōkua Kupuna Project, Wednesday, April 24, 9 a.m. – 11 a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Seniors 60 years and older encouraged to attend, ask questions, and inquire about services offered through Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i. Referral required: 961-8626 for free legal services. Under 60, call 1-800-499-4302. More info: tahisha.despontes@legalaidhawaii.org, 329-3910 ext. 925. legalaidhawaii.org

Merrie Monarch Festival Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Wednesday, April 24, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Learn/play the Hawaiian board game kōnane, learn about the tools, alter and plants that symbolize hula. Ti "Kawehi" Chun and Pōki‘i Seto perform. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

THURSDAY, APRIL 25
Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, April 25, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for community members. Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, April 25, 4 p.m. – 6 p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 26
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Vendor Application Deadline for Ho‘olaule‘a, Friday, April 26. To become a vendor, contact Brenda Iokepa-Moses at biokepamoses@gmail.com or 731-5409

Coffee Talk at Kahuku - The Price of Paradise: The Story of Sandalwood in Hawai‘i, Friday, April 26, 9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Talk story with John Stallman, biologist and former Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park ranger. Free. nps.gov/havo

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Pā‘ina & Open House, Friday, April 26, 5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. Free; donations accepted for Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Scholarship Fund. Julia Neal, 928-9811, mahalo@aloha.net. kaucoffeefestival.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 27
Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest Entry Deadline is extended to Saturday, April 27. The all-ages, fee-free contest is Sunday, April 28, 11 a.m. at Kaʻū Coffee Mill. Enter a pūpū, entrée, or dessert, divided into adult and youth categories. The public is invited to enjoy free tastings. Contest entry info at KauCoffeeMill.com or KauCoffeeFest.com, or call 928-0550.

Healing Through Words with Dr. Heather Rivera, Saturday, April 27, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Volcano Art Center. Creative writing workshop. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Sauerkraut and Kombucha with Jasmine Silverstein, Saturday, April 27, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant, Saturday, April 27, 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m., Ka‘ū District Gym. Tickets: $10 donation. Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant Director Trinidad Marques, 928-0606, TrinidadMarques@yahoo.com, or Facebook Trinidad Marques. kaucoffeefestival.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 28
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Ka‘ū Coffee Recipe Contest, Sunday, April 28, 11 a.m. – 2 p.m., Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Free coffee and recipe tastings. sales@kaucoffeemill.com, kaucoffeemill.com,
kaucoffeefestival.com

TUESDAY, APRIL 30
Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, April 30, 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival events continue May 1 through May 5, see kaucoffeefestival.com for details.

May Day is Lei Day, May 1, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hands on lei making demonstrations, live music and hula. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Arts and Crafts Activity: Boy's Day Craft, Wednesday, May 1, 2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Kahuku Park, H.O.V.E. Register keiki ages 6-12 April 23-30. Free. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Arts and Crafts Activity: Thumbprint Art, Wednesday, May 1, 3:30-5p.m., multi-purpose room, Ka‘ū District Gym. Register keiki grades K-6 April 22-30. Free. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

ONGOING
Kaʻū Coffee Fest invites non-profits, clubs, cooperatives, and businesses to sign up for booths at the 11th annual Kaʻū Coffee Fest Hoʻolauleʻa on Saturday, May 4 at Pāhala Community Center. The all-day event comes with music, hula, coffee tasting, and meeting the famous Kaʻū Coffee farmers. See
KauCoffeeFestival.com.
     Booth fees are $100 for food vendors; $60 for non-food items and crafts, including coffee and coffee samples; and $35 for pre-approved information displays. No campaign and other political displays. Fifty percent discounts for non-profit organizations and cooperatives selling food, crafts, and coffee. Vendors must also obtain county vendor permits costing $30 each and a Department of Health permit, if serving food. Call Gail Nagata 933-0918. Apply by Friday, April 26. Application at KauCoffeeFestival.com. Email to biokepamoses@gmail.com; mail to Brenda Iokepa-Moses, P.O. Box 208PāhalaHI 96777; or call 808-731-5409.

Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest Entry Deadline is extended to Saturday, April 27. The all-ages, fee-free contest is Sunday, April 2811 a.m. at Kaʻū Coffee Mill. Enter a pūpū, entrée, or dessert, divided into adult and youth categories. The public is invited to enjoy free tastings. Contest entry info at KauCoffeeMill.com or KauCoffeeFest.com, or call 928-0550.

Hi-Employment Seeks Student Employees to work in a macadamia nut orchard on weekends and holidays. Duties include hand-harvesting macadamia nuts, filling and transporting nut bag and buckets, loading 25-plus pound bags into truck beds, and possible clearing of brush and branches. Applicants must be at least 15 years old, have a work permit, two forms of ID, and transportation to "Panaʻewa Stretch." Call for more details, 238-3741, hi-employment.com.

Exhibit: On Sacred Ground by Dino Morrow is open daily through Sunday, May 5 at Volcano Art Center Gallery. The public is invited to see documentary and protrait photography of Hula Arts at the Kīlauea Program. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more information.

Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade happens Saturday, June 29 at 11 a.m. The parade route begins at the Nāʻālehu Elementary School and ends at the Nāʻālehu Hongwanji Mission. To participate, call Debra McIntosh, 929-9872.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.