About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Friday, April 24, 2015

Lava in Halema`uma`u Crater at the summit of Kilauea has reached its highest level since the crater opened in 2008.
Photo from USGS/HVO
THE SURFACE OF HALEMA`UMA`U’S LAVA LAKE came into view yesterday afternoon, when observed from the Jaggar Museum overlook, and remains in view this morning. The lake is the highest it has been since forming in 2008. According to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, the high level triggered a small collapse from the overhanging west wall and rim of the Overlook crater at about 5:20 a.m. this morning, triggering a small explosive event that threw spatter out onto the Halema`uma`u crater floor.
Alison Yahna, who operates Artemis Smiles Honeybee Sanctuary in Ka`u, is
treasurer of Ha`ao Springs & Mountain House Ag Water Cooperative.
Photo from artemissmiles.com
      HVO also reports increased seismicity continuing beneath Kilauea’s summit and upper East Rift Zone. Seismologists recorded a 3.0-magnitude earthquake near the summit at 9:38 p.m. yesterday. 
      See daily updates at hvo.wr.usgs.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HA`AO SPRINGS & MOUNTAIN HOUSE Ag Water Co-op could have memoranda of understanding and agreement completed by May or June, Pres. Jeremy Buhr announced at the organization’s meeting yesterday. The agreements would allow beginning of construction of pipes to bring overflow water from the Ha`ao Springs area to near Wai`ohinu Park for agricultural use.
      Originally, plans called for more pipes going to Green Sands subdivision, but a new idea being considered is for a tank and fill station near the park, which would allow more area residents to join the co-op and have access to the non-potable water. The possibility of having a water delivery truck to fill members’ tanks is another option on the table.
      The co-op also elected officers yesterday. Jeremy Buhr is president; Mel Davis, vice president; Bill Savage, secretary; and Alison Yahna, treasurer.
      The next meeting is Thursday, July 16 at 4 p.m. at Wai`ohinu Park.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

UH is considering early decommissioning of Caltech Submillimeter Observatory.
Photo from wikipedia
UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI`I IS CONSIDERING expedited decommissioning of some telescopes on Mauna Kea in response to protests over construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope, according to a Hawai`i Tribune-Herald story by Tom Callis and Chris D’Angelo. Construction at the site is currently on hold. 
      “There’s been some internal discussion of essentially putting a more definite timetable on what’s in the current decommission plan,” Bob McLaren, associate director of UH’s Institute for Astronomy, told the reporters.
      Caltech Submillimeter Observatory is scheduled for decommissioning between next year and 2018. United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, Very Long Baseline Array and another submillimeter telescope are currently to be decommissioned by 2033, McLaren said.
      Jodi Leong, speaking for Gov. David Ige, said, “Progress is being made, but it will take time to come to a comprehensive solution to this matter.”
      UH Board of Regents reconvene last week’s meeting about management of Mauna Kea Sunday at 11:30 a.m. at UH-Hilo Performing Arts Center. “This meeting is fulfilling a promise made by the board at the end of last Thursday’s meeting to give everyone who wants to testify before the board the opportunity to do so,” UH spokesman Dan Meisenzahl said.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

SCIENCE CAMPS OF AMERICA RETURNS to Hawai`i Island for its third summer, offering local teens entering grades eight through 12 the opportunity to take an active approach to learning about science in the outdoors. Camp founder Michael Richards said he started the camp in 2013 so teens could “do” science rather than just reading about it in a classroom.
Science campers explore the Ka`u Coast this summer.
Photo from Science Camps of America
      Pahala Plantation Cottages is home base for campers. Richards is a board member of the Ka`u Learning Academy in Na`alehu, which is set to open this fall. He worked with founder Kathryn Tydlacka and other board members to get the academy approved by the state’s Charter School Commission. It was the only applicant authorized to become a public charter school last year.
      “The Big Island is such an amazing place geographically, climatically and culturally that I knew I wanted to create a camp that encompasses what makes this place so unique,” Richards said. “Ka`u is such a beautiful and remote place where the people and their needs often get overlooked. Helping to get Ka`u Learning Academy approved by the Charter School Commission was something all of us involved put a lot of energy and effort into because we believe in its importance.”
      Campers will get the chance to explore the environmental diversity that the Big Island has to offer from beaches and rainforests to snow-covered mountains. Some of the destinations include Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Mauna Lani Sea Turtle Restoration Project, Mauna Kea Visitor Center, USGS Mauna Loa Climate Observatory, Punalu`u Black Sand Beach and many more.
      The first camp session, Land and Sea, is held June 29 to July 8 and focuses on volcanology, geology and oceanography. Campers will explore Hawai`i’s unique flora and fauna and learn how events in the natural world affect every living creature, including humans.
      The second session, Air and Space, is from July 9 to 18 and focuses on astronomy, climatology and alternative energy. Campers will gain a better understanding of climate change and the creation and use of alternative energy to help curb global warming.
      To extend this experience to more local teens, Science Camps of America, a Hawai`i-based nonprofit corporation, offers a limited amount of financial aid and also welcomes contributions from the public to the Science Camps of America Scholarship Fund.
      To help out or to learn more about and register for Science Camps of America, see ScienceCampsAmerica.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.
Andrea Kawabata discusses the most current techniques for managing coffee berry borers Thursday in Kona. Photos from UH-CTAHR
UH-CTAHR AND USDA’s Areawide Mitigation and Management for Coffee Berry Borer Control program hosts an informational workshop for new coffee farmers about CBB, proper CBB management and a subsidy program that can help offset CBB control costs. CTAHR’s Coffee and Orchard Crops Extension Agent, Andrea Kawabata, provides growers with the most current techniques to managing CBB with a presentation on Thursday, April 30 from 
3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at 
Kona Cooperative Extension Service Conference Room
, 79-7381 Mamalahoa Highway, Kealakekua. 
       

Call Gina at 322-4892 to RSVP or by email at ginab@hawaii.edu by Tuesday, April 28.
      A farm walk to actively look for and identify CBB on cherry follows the workshop. Suzanne Shriner, of the Synergistic Hawai`i Agriculture Council, explains the SHAC subsidy program that helps offset the cost of products used to spray and kill CBB. 


      This workshop is geared toward new coffee farmers, but those wanting a refresher and to join the SHAC subsidy program are welcome to attend. New subsidy program participants are required to attend a SHAC subsidy workshop, such as this one, with Shriner.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Bolo, who performs during today's Pa`ina at Pahala Plantation House, is nominated
for a Na Hoku Hanohano Award, with winners announced Saturday, May 23.
TODAY IS THE LAST DAY to enter Ka`u Coffee Recipe Contest. Categories are pupu, entrée and dessert in adult and student divisions with prizes as high as $300.
      The contest begins at 2 p.m. tomorrow at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Enjoy culinary treats using Ka`u Coffee as an ingredient. Free entry and tasting for the public.
      For more information, see kaucoffeefest.com or call 928-0550.

NO HOKU HANOHANO 2015 AWARD NOMINEE Bolo performs at this evening’s Pa`ina at Pahala Plantation House from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. The opening event for Ka`u Coffee Festival also features music by Jr. Volcano Choy, Keoki Kahumoku and the South Side Serenaders. Miss Ka`u Coffee Amery Silva will dance hula. 
      Meet Miss Ka`u Coffee contenders, and donate to the scholarship fund. Co-sponsored by Ka`u Chamber of Commerce. Call 928-6471. For a complete Ka`u Coffee Festival schedule see kaucoffeefest.com.

PARTICIPANTS DISCOVER PELE AND HI`IAKA and the natural phenomena they represent through epic stories depicted in the natural landscape tomorrow from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. This easy 1.7-mile walk is on the main road in Kahuku.

Volcano Art Center presents a hula performance tomorrow.
Photo from VAC
KUMU HA`AMAULIOLA AIONA and Kumu Kawelo Kong Kee with Ke Kula o Nawahiokalani`opu`u present a hula performance tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. on the hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park Na Mea Hula: All Things Hula with Loke Kamanu and `ohana takes place on the gallery’s porch from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. 

A WEEK FROM TODAY is Coffee & Cattle Day at Aikane Plantation Coffee farm on Friday, May 1 at 10 a.m. Participants find out how descendants of Ka`u’s first coffee farmer integrate coffee with other agriculture. $25 includes all-you-can-eat buffet. Sign up at aikaneplantation.com or 808-927-2252.

KA`U STAR GAZING IS ALSO NEXT Friday, May 1 from 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m., when participants observe the heavens from the summit of Makanau. $35 includes refreshments and shuttle transportation. The old plantation water hike above Ka`u Coffee mill into the rainforest had one slot available for next Wednesday and two for Thursday, as of this morning. These events are part of ten days of Ka`u Coffee Festival events.
      Reserve at kaucoffeemill.com or 928-0550.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.




See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_April2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.