About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Ka‘ū News Briefs Tuesday, January 16, 2018


Sen. Mazie Hirono grilled Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on Tuesday, Jan. 16, on the national oversight
of state emergency warning systems and on DACA. See and hear Hirono.

SOME 15,000 PEOPLE RECENTLY LOST THEIR DACA STATUS, Sen. Mazie Hirono told Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen Tuesday morning, Jan. 16, in a U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee hearing. The Secretary of Homeland Security said she was unaware of the 15,000 and would look into it. She pointed out that a number totaling 21 lost their status through committing crimes.
      Hirono and other Senators, who support a path to citizenship for young people who grew up in the U.S. after being brought here illegally by relatives, grilled the Secretary of Homeland Security on the immigrants' future. The Senators are seeking what they call a "clean" DACA bill, without demands from the Trump administration, which include building a wall along the southern border of the U.S. DACA stands for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals.
     The Trump administration seeks to end DACA, which would lead to deportation of those living in the U.S. under DACA. On Tuesday, the Trump administration filed an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a lower federal court's ruling that DACA must stay in place while legal challenges play out in court.

Secretary of Homeland Security Kristjen Nielsen, before the U.S.
Senate Judiciary Committee on Tuesday, where she was questioned
by Sen. Mazie Hirono
THE FALSE INBOUND BALLISTIC MISSLE ALERT that terrified Hawaiʻi residents Saturday, Jan. 13, was another topic during the Senate Judiciary hearing Tuesday, Jan. 16. Sen. Mazie Hirono asked Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Niewlsen whether Homeland Security has reviewed procedures in all the states to assure prevention of false alarms.
     The Homeland Security Secretary said the federal government provides a backbone for alert systems, but that it was the State of Hawaiʻi's decision on how to use the system.
     Hirono asked whether the Secretary has the authority to convene state emergency managers to make sure that every state's alert system works properly. Hirono also asked whether Nielsen has a role in setting standards and ensuring that state emergency management agencies use best practices.
     The Homeland Security Secretary said that she will work with the states to make sure they can quickly verify whether an alert is accurate.
     Hirono also asked her whether the Department of Homeland Security had been aware of Hawaiʻi not having a way to respond quickly to a false alarm. The Secretary said she was unaware before the incident and promised to make sure that all states have a fail safe way to cancel any false alert more quickly. Hirono also asked to work with Homeland Security to make sure all the states and Guam improve. See the excerpt from the hearing.
     After the hearing, Hirono released a statement saying, “Today, I secured a commitment from Secretary Nielsen to strengthen federal-state cooperation on emergency alerts, assess potential human and systemic failures, and improve overall readiness in Hawaiʻi and across our country. I will continue to pursue all avenues of investigation to learn what happened on Saturday and keep it from happening again.”

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Brigadier General Kenneth Hara will review the state's
 emergency management response system, that erred in
sending out a false alert of a ballistic missile headed to
Hawaiʻi on Saturday.
AFTER THE FALSE INBOUND-NUCLEAR MISSILE ALERT on Saturday, Jan. 13, Gov. David Ige signed an Executive Order Monday, Jan. 15, to review the State of Hawaiʻi's emergency management enterprise. He appointed Brigadier General Kenneth Hara, the Deputy Adjutant General, to oversee a comprehensive review. "Hara will also immediately implement necessary changes," said a statement from the governor.
     Ige also spoke to the public with an apology, and turned to the world situation leading to threats of nuclear attacks. "Hawaiʻi knows how to stand strong and defend itself. But we must also work for a more peaceful world. We must demand a de-escalation with North Korea, so sirens and warnings become a thing of the past. In the words of Martin Luther King, Junior, who we remember today, 'The time is always right to do what is right,'" said the governor.
     Ige also spoke of public response to the false alert, saying that people should not be turned away from stores where they were seeking shelter. Families should not have to go down manholes for shelter, nor drive at high speeds on the freeway when alerted. He promised more public education.
     In his Executive Order, the governor noted that residents of "Hawaiʻi, with a population of approximately 1.4 million across eight inhabited islands, are susceptible to a myriad of natural and man-made hazards." He pointed out that "Hawaiʻi is located in the most remote location on Earth separated by great distances and travel time from the continental United States." The governor acknowledged that "Hawaiʻi's location in the Pacific makes it a highly strategic location for government and military interests which necessitates additional emergency management coordination and preparation," and that "Hawaiʻi's location and vulnerability to multiple hazards has helped Hawaiʻi continue to develop an emergency management system intended to protect the public from all natural and man-made hazards."
     "As part of Hawaiʻi's preemptive and protective measures, Hawaiʻi officials have been actively working on warning and response plans that include alerting the public as early as possible in order to maximize preemptive and protective actions to protect the public," states the Executive Order.
Gov. David Ige addresses the public after signing an Executive
Order to review the emergency response system.
See and hear the speech.
     "WHEREAS, on January 13, 2018, an emergency warning of an actual ballistic missile launch was inadvertently issued during a shift change drill conducted by the State Warning Point; and WHEREAS, this false alarm resulted in significant response actions at all levels and sectors in Hawaiʻi; and WHEREAS, while Hawaiʻi's emergency management system is highly evolved, this recent false alarm reinforces the need for continued improvement of all emergency management plans and operations," the Executive Order states.
     It directs "Brigadier General, Kenneth S. Hara, currently serving as the Deputy Adjutant General of the State of Hawaiʻi, Department of Defense, to review the current emergency response system, including notifications and warnings, and make recommendations for improvement with such review to include: 1. Facilitating efforts to identify capability and resource gaps and develop an action plan that recommends prioritization for resources required to enhance resilience, preparedness, and response capabilities. 2. Identifying actions to strengthen and expand government, private, and public partnerships for preparedness for all hazards. 3. Revising and recommending emergency notification procedures to ensure immediate notification, confirmation, or cancellation of threats. 4. Strengthening information sharing, collaboration, and communication. 5. Improving public education to help the public know what to do when an alert goes out. 6. Produce an initial action plan no later than 30 days of this executive order, a final report no later than 60 days of this executive order, and identify any portions of these documents that should not be released to the public for security or other legal reasons." See and hear Ige's speech.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIʻI RANKS NEAR THE BOTTOM IN RETIREMENT AFFORDABILITY and other qualities for retirement life, according to a WalletHub analysis released on Tuesday, Jan. 16.
     "With almost 30 percent of all non-retired adults having no retirement savings or pension, WalletHub today released 2018's Best & Worst States to Retire," says a WalletHub statement. WalletHub compared the 50 states across 41 key metrics. The data set ranges from adjusted cost of living to weather to quality of public hospitals.
     Hawaiʻi ranks 50th in the categories of Adjusted Cost of Living and Elderly-Friendly Labor Market. It ranks 44th in Annual Cost of In-Home Services, meaning that Hawaiʻi is one of the most expensive. It ranks 43rd in Property-Crime Rate, meaning that there is a lot of it, and 40th in Health-Care Facilities per capita. Hawaiʻi ranks relatively high in being tax friendly for retirees - number 20, according to WalletHub. Read the report at wallethub.com/edu/best-and-worst-states-to-retire.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Volcanic ash in this bucket is a gold mine for H.V.O. researchers,
who will explain what it means at the Jan. 23rd After Dark in the Park
at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Photo from U.S.G.S.
VOLCANIC ASH FROM KĪLAUEA VOLCANO'S SUMMIT LAVA LAKE: from the mundane to the unexpected, an After Dark in the Park presentation, takes place Tuesday, Jan. 23, at 7 p.m., in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     Pele's hair, Pele's tears, and other ash are produced by bursting gas bubbles in the lava lake at Kīlauea's summit. The amount of ash erupted daily ranges widely owing to short-term fluctuations in vigor of spattering. The monthly amount of ash, however, varies systematically with time, reflecting changing lake levels, which, in turn, varies with the rate of magma supply. A press release from Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park states, "The methodical collecting of ash unexpectedly discovered a magma supply that pulses over several-month periods - the first such pulsing recognized at any volcano."
     The illustrated lecture, presented by U.S.G.S. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Don Swanson, demonstrates how systematic, long-term collections can lead to surprising but fundamental discoveries. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS BEAT PĀHOA in boys basketball on home court Monday night, Jan. 15. Final score saw Ka‘ū with 49 points to Pāhoa's 47. Izaiah Pilanca Emmsley was the top scorer with 16 points. In the JV competition, Pāhoa got lucky, with 51 points. Ka‘ū scored 31. Top JV scorer for the Trojans was Kyson Toriano.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at 
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/janfebmar/januarycommunity.html.
January print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Boys Basketball: Wednesday, Jan. 17, @ Kohala.
     Saturday, Jan. 20, Kohala @ Ka‘ū.
     Tuesday, Jan. 23, @ Wai‘ākea.
     Saturday, Jan. 27, HPA @ Ka‘ū.

Girls Basketball: Friday, Jan. 19, @ Kealakehe.

Boys Soccer: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Honoka‘a.
     Thursday, Jan. 25, @ Pāhoa.

Swimming: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 26, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, prelims).
     Saturday, Jan. 27, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, finals).

Wrestling: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Hilo.
     Saturday, Jan. 27 @ HPA.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIIAN RANCHOS ROAD MAINTENANCE CORP. MEETS Wednesday, Jan. 17, starting at 4 p.m., in the Hawaiian Ranchos office. For more, call 929-9608 or visit ranchos-road.org.

A VOLCANO AWARENESS PRESENTATION takes place Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. Come and view informative displays about Mauna Loa Volcano. Talk story with scientists, public safety officials, and park rangers. For more, call 939-7033, visit ovcahi.org, or email askHVO@usgs.gov.

WEAVE A TĪ LEAF LEI Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hear park rangers and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association staff share knowledge and love for one of the most popular lei in Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov
/HAVO.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA‘Ū meets Thursday, Jan. 18, starting at 6:30 p.m., at United Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. For more, call Pres. Berkley Yoshida at 747-0197.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETS Thursday, Jan. 18, from noon to 1 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

STORY TIME WITH AUNTIE LINDA FROM TŪTŪ & ME is hosted Thursday, Jan. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, at Nā‘ālehu Public Library. For more, call 929-8571.

THURSDAY NIGHT AT THE VOLCANO ART CENTER OFFERS AN ‘Alalā Outreach Presentation on Jan. 18, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., in Volcano Village. ‘Alalā Project staff present an update on the most recent reintroduction efforts to establish a wild population of the endemic and endangered Hawaiian crow. The presentation is free to attend - $5 donation appreciated. For more, visit volcanoartcenter.org.

STEWARDSHIP OF KĪPUKAPUAULU takes place at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18, with volunteers meeting in the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot on Mauna Loa Road off Hwy 11 in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers will help remove invasive plants, like morning glory, from an area said to be home to an "astonishing diversity of native forest and understory plants." The event will take place again on Jan. 25. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, contact Marilyn Nicholson at nickem@hawaii.rr.com or visit nps.gov/HAVO.

A GLITTER SNOWFLAKE ARTS & CRAFTS ACTIVITY takes place at Kahuku Park (92-8607 Paradise Circle Mauka, Ocean View) on Friday, Jan. 19, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The class is for keiki ages 6 to 12 years. Register Tuesday, Jan. 16, through Jan. 19. For more, contact Hawai’i County Parks and Recreation Technician Teresa Anderson at 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT takes place Friday, Jan. 19, with volunteers removing invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Interested volunteers should meet Paul and Jane Filed at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Other opportunities this month take place Jan. 26. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more see nps.gov/HAVO.

BUNCO & POTLUCK takes place Saturday, Jan. 20, starting at 6 p.m., in Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Bunco is a popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring a dish to share. For more, contact Margie Hack at 541-954-8297. See more at discoveryharbour.net.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM meets Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

DOCUMENTARY POETRY WORKSHOP is offered with Author Susan M. Schultz on Jan. 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Volcano Art Center. Schultz teaches - poets and non-poets alike - the techniques of documentary poetry; a form of poetry that seeks to document historical events as well as expresses political, social, or cultural issues. The class is $35 for Volcano Art Center members and $40 for non-members. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

MONGOLIAN BBQ is hosted Saturday, Jan. 20, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

THE ART EXRESS, a monthly class, is held Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions will be on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size is limited to 25. For more, contact Meliha Corcoran at 319-8989 or himeliha@yahoo.com, or visit discoveryharbour.net/art-express.

PEOPLE & LAND OF KAHUKU, a free, guided hike takes place on Sunday, Jan. 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., within Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike takes participants over rugged terrain and focuses on the area's human history. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

HEATHER METTLER'S GLASSWORK - handblown, chiseled, and etched - is showcased in a new Volcano Art Center Gallery Exhibit: Passage and Place. The display will continue to be displayed until Sunday, Feb. 11, during normal gallery hours - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Mettler's unique collection of glass explores the themes of migration, navigation, and immigration - how plants, animals, and people find their way to Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Monday, January 15, 2018

Ka‘ū News Briefs Monday, January 15, 2018

Lei from Hawai‘i on leaders of the Civil Rights movement in Alabama on March 21, 1965. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
expressed joy in the diversity and goodwill among the multiethnic people of the Islands. The lei were
hand carried from Hawai‘i to the marchers. Photo from Ebony Magazine in 1965
HAWAIIANS DECLARED SOLIDARITY in the 1960's with much of the work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., for whom the national holiday was celebrated this Monday - Jan. 15.
     King befriended the Rev. Abraham Kahikina Akaka, and visited with him several times in Hawai‘i to work on civil rights and promote non-violence and racial harmony, an approach embedded in aloha. In King's own words, "True peace is not merely the absence of tension; it is the presence of justice."
     In 1964, King spoke at the first state Civil Rights Commission established in the United States - in Hawai‘i, where Akaka served as its first commissioner.
Glenn Izutsu, Robert Browne, Nona Springel Ferdon, Charles Campbell, and
Linus Pauling, Jr. carried lei and a banner from Hawai‘i for the Selma to
Montgomery civil rights marchers. Photo from the Human Flower Project
     Akaka, the longtime Reverend of Kawaiaha‘o Church and elder brother of Sen. Daniel Akaka, was among those who suggested sending lei from Hawai‘i for the Selma to Montgomery civil rights marches. They were planned after Jimmy Lee Jackson, a black teenager, was shot and killed by a state trooper during a peaceful demonstration in Perry County, Alabama in February, 1965. King and his associates led a march wearing Hawaiian lei. Also brought from Hawai‘i was a banner stating "Hawai‘i Knows Integration Works."
     Those who brought the lei and banner from Hawai‘i were Glenn Izutsu, Robert Browne, Nona Springel Ferdon, Charles Campbell, and Linus Pauling Jr.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AN UPDATE ON THE REPAIRS TO RESTORE STANDARD WATER SERVICE from the Ocean View Deepwell was recently provided by the water department's Manager-Chief Engineer Keith Okamoto. He predicted completion this month and a return to the well serving the community with potable drinking water that can also be put to other uses.
     Okamoto said the motor for the pump for the well water became inoperable in November and is being replaced, while the pump is being refurbished. Concerning the cause of the breakdown, he noted that conditions in the well are unusual in that the water has more solids and is warmer than most drinking water from wells around the island. During the repair period, the public has been limited to drawing only necessary drinking water from spigots at the well water storage site. Commercial water haulers are turned away to other spigots on the island.
     See Big Island Video News coverage at HOVE Well Repair Update (Jan. 11, 2018).

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A PERFORMANCE FEATURING NA KUMU PELEHONUAMEA HARMON AND KEKOA HARMON with Hālau I Ka Leo Ola O Nā Mamo has been announced. On Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., it will kick off Volcano Art Center's 2018 Hula Kahiko series, outdoors at the kahua hula (hula platform) in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
Hawaiian language immersion K-12 school - Ke Kula ʻO Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu
- students in Hālau I Ka Leo Ola O Nā Mea perform Hula Kahiko on the
kahua hula (hula platform) in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National 
Park Saturday, Jan. 20. Photo from volcanoartcenter.org
     Audience members are encouraged to bring sun/rain gear and sitting mats. Park entrance fees apply.
     The students of Hālau I Ka Leo Ola O Nā Mamo come from the Hawaiian language immersion K-12 school Ke Kula ʻO Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu. The event description says that "For the past seven years, their mission has been to perpetuate the Hawaiian language and culture through mele and hula. All classes are conducted through the medium of Hawaiian."
     The free series is supported in part by a grant from the County of Hawaiʻi Department of Research and Development and the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority, and individual funding from members of the Volcano Art Center's ʻohana. For more, see volcanoartcenter.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Ka‘iulani Carvalho demonstrates
‘Ohe Kāpala - bamboo stamping
on Saturday in Volcano.
Photo from Volcano Art Center
A NĀ MEA HULA DEMONSTRATION WITH NATIVE HAWAIIAN PRACTITIONER KA‘IULANI CARVALHO on the lānai of the Volcano Art Center Gallery follows the Hula Kahiko from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturday, Jan. 20.
     For her Nā Mea Hula debut, Carvalho will present a workshop on the art of ‘Ohe Kāpala, bamboo stamping.
     Carvalho was born in Hilo and raised in Puna. She is a 2012 graduate of Ke Kula ʻO Nāwahīokalaniʻōpuʻu, a Hawaiian Language Immersion Public Charter School. She holds a Bachelor's degree in Hawaiian Studies and Psychology from the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo, and is currently pursuing certification from Kahuawaiola – the Indigenous Teacher Education Graduate Program.
     For more, see volcanoartcenter.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A RELAY RACES PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM HAS BEEN ANNOUNCED for Kahuku Park on Paradise Circle in Ocean View for keiki ages 6 to 12 years old on Friday, Jan. 26, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Keiki are required to wear covered shoes. Register Monday, Jan. 22, through Thursday, Jan. 25. For more, contact Hawai’i County Parks and Recreation Technician Teresa Anderson at 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at 
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/janfebmar/januarycommunity.html.
January print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.
KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Boys Basketball: Wednesday, Jan. 17, @ Kohala.
     Saturday, Jan. 20, Kohala @ Ka‘ū.
     Tuesday, Jan. 23, @ Wai‘ākea.
     Saturday, Jan. 27, HPA @ Ka‘ū.

Girls Basketball: Friday, Jan. 19, @ Kealakehe.

Boys Soccer: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Honoka‘a.
     Thursday, Jan. 25, @ Pāhoa.

Swimming: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 26, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, prelims).
     Saturday, Jan. 27, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, finals).

Wrestling: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Hilo.
     Saturday, Jan. 27 @ HPA.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS Tuesday, Jan. 16, from 10 a.m. to noon, at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576 or visit discoveryharbour.net.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT ERUPTION: STORY OF THE HALEMA‘UMA‘U LAVA LAKE is presented on Tuesday, Jan. 16, starting at 7 p.m., in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. U.S.G.S. Hawai‘i Volcano Observatory geologist Janet Babb, co-producer and co-writer of the recently released U.S.G.S. documentary, introduces the 24-min film. After the show, U.S.G.S. H.V.O. geologist Matt Patrick provides an update on what is happening at Halema‘uma‘u today, and answers questions about the summit eruption. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WINE & WATERCOLOR takes place Tuesday, Jan. 16, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Artist Nancy DeLucrezia shows how to transfer a photo onto watercolor paper, and introduces basic techniques in watercolor painting. Sampling of several wines from Hilo wine store "Grapes" is included. Class fee is $30 for Volcano Art Center members and $35 for non-members, plus a $17 supply fee. Register online, volcanoartcenter.org.

HAWAIIAN RANCHOS ROAD MAINTENANCE CORP. MEETS Wednesday, Jan. 17, starting at 4 p.m., in the Hawaiian Ranchos office. For more, call 929-9608 or visit ranchos-road.org.

A VOLCANO AWARENESS PRESENTATION takes place Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. View displays about Mauna Loa Volcano. Talk story with scientists, public safety officials, and park rangers. For more, call 939-7033, visit ovcahi.org, or email askHVO@usgs.gov.

WEAVE A TĪ LEAF LEI Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Hear park rangers and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association staff share knowledge and love for one of the most popular lei in Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA‘Ū meets Thursday, Jan. 18, starting at 6:30 p.m., at United Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. For more, call Pres. Berkley Yoshida at 747-0197.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETS Thursday, Jan. 18, from noon to 1 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

STORY TIME WITH AUNTIE LINDA FROM TŪTŪ & ME is hosted Thursday, Jan. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, at Nā‘ālehu Public Library. For more, call 929-8571.

THURSDAY NIGHT AT THE VOLCANO ART CENTER OFFERS AN ‘Alalā Outreach Presentation on Jan. 18, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., in Volcano Village. ‘Alalā Project staff present an update on the most recent reintroduction efforts to establish a wild population of the endemic and endangered Hawaiian crow. The presentation is free to attend - $5 donation appreciated. For more, visit volcanoartcenter.org.

STEWARDSHIP OF KĪPUKAPUAULU takes place at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18, with volunteers meeting in the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot on Mauna Loa Road off Hwy 11 in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers will help remove invasive plants, like morning glory, from an area said to be home to an "astonishing diversity of native forest and understory plants." The event will take place again on Jan. 25. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, contact Marilyn Nicholson at nickem@hawaii.rr.com or visit nps.gov/HAVO.

A GLITTER SNOWFLAKE ARTS & CRAFTS ACTIVITY takes place at Kahuku Park (92-8607 Paradise Circle Mauka, Ocean View) on Friday, Jan. 19, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The class is for keiki ages 6 to 12 years. Register Tuesday, Jan. 16, through Jan. 19. For more, contact Hawai’i County Parks and Recreation Technician Teresa Anderson at 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT takes place Friday, Jan. 19, with volunteers removing invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Interested volunteers should meet Paul and Jane Filed at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Other opportunities this month take place Jan. 26. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more see nps.gov/HAVO.

HEATHER METTLER'S GLASSWORK - handblown, chiseled, and etched - is showcased in a new Volcano Art Center Gallery Exhibit: Passage and Place. The display will continue to be displayed until Sunday, Feb. 11, during normal gallery hours - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Mettler's unique collection of glass explores the themes of migration, navigation, and immigration - how plants, animals, and people find their way to Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply.

BUNCO & POTLUCK takes place Saturday, Jan. 20, starting at 6 p.m., in Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Bunco is a popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring a dish to share. For more, contact Margie Hack at 541-954-8297. See more at discoveryharbour.net.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM meets Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

DOCUMENTARY POETRY WORKSHOP is offered with Author Susan M. Schultz on Jan. 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at Volcano Art Center. Schultz teaches - poets and non-poets alike - the techniques of documentary poetry: a form of poetry that seeks to document historical events as well as expresses political, social, or cultural issues. The class is $35 for Volcano Art Center members and $40 for non-members. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

MONGOLIAN BBQ is hosted Saturday, Jan. 20, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

STAINED GLASS BASICS I is offered with Glass Artist Lois Polluck at Volcano Art Center. The class takes place Saturdays and Sundays -  Jan. 20, 21, 27 and 28, from 9 a.m. to noon. Pollock shares expertise and knowledge, and teaches basic skills in working with stained glass. The class is $90 for Volcano Art Center members and $100 for non-members, plus a $15 supply fee. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

THE ART EXRESS, a monthly class, is held Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions will be on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size is limited to 25. For more, contact Meliha Corcoran at 319-8989 or himeliha@yahoo.com, or visit discoveryharbour.net/art-express.

PEOPLE & LAND OF KAHUKU, a free, guided hike, takes place on Sunday, Jan. 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., within Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike takes participants over rugged terrain and focuses on the area's human history. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.



Sunday, January 14, 2018

Ka‘ū News Briefs Sunday, January 14, 2018

Mangos can beautiful, like the ones displayed by the National Mango Board, above, or infected
like those shown below, displaying anthracnose disease. Read University of Hawai‘i's advice on
how to protect mango and other food trees. Photo from National Mango Board
CALLS FOR NEGOTIATIONS WITH NORTH KOREA after Saturday's false alarm of a ballistic missile headed toward Hawai‘i, were all over media on Sunday, largely promoted by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. Some of the headlines are: New York Daily News - "Hawai‘i Rep. Gabbard calls for Trump to Negotiate with Kim Jong Un;" Yahoo News - "Hawai‘i Rep. Tulsi Gabbard: Trump and Kim Should Talk after False Alarm."
     Interviewed Sunday morning on CNN's State of the Union, Gabbard said that describing Saturday's scare as "traumatic" to the people of Hawai‘i and its visitors is an understatement. Such errors, accidents and misunderstandings could lead to an accidental nuclear war, Gabbard declared. "I have been calling on President Trump to directly negotiate with North Korea - to sit across the table from King Jon Un, work out the differences, so that we can build a pathway towards denuclearization to remove this threat."
      Gabbard is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, a veteran, and serves as a Major in the Army National Guard. She emphasized that negotiations should be without pre-conditions since North Korea sees keeping nuclear weapons as its only defense against a regime change. "North Korea is now in a position where Kim Jong Un is saying, 'No way, I’m not going to give up these nuclear weapons,' because he doesn't see that credible message coming from the United States that we don't — we're not interested in overthrowing your government. We're interested in removing this nuclear threat from our country and the world," said Gabbard on State of the Union with Jake Tapper.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

GOV. DAVID IGE ISSUED ON SUNDAY AN APOLOGY FOR THE FALSE INCOMING-MISSILE ALARM SENT TO CELL PHONES ON SATURDAY.  He wrote. "On Saturday, Hawai‘i's residents and visitors experienced an unfortunate situation that has never happened before and will never happen again – a false alert issued by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency that a ballistic missile was on its way to the Hawaiian Islands.
     "On behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I deeply apologize for this false alert that created stress, anxiety and fear of a crisis in our residents and guests. I can personally assure each and every resident
and visitor that steps have already been taken by the Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency to ensure that a situation of this type never happens again.
     "The Hawai‘i Emergency Management Agency is committed to protecting the people of Hawai‘i, and over the past year it has been taking responsible measures to prepare for the highly unlikely event of a missile attack. As a state government, we must learn from this unfortunate error and continue to prepare for any safety threat to Hawai‘i's residents and visitors – whether it is a man-made threat or a natural disaster such as a hurricane or tsunami.
    "In the next few days, I will continue meeting with our emergency preparedness team and personally talking with families, individuals and leaders from around our state to ensure we reach every household. We must also do what we can to demand peace and a de-escalation of tensions with North Korea. Again, on behalf of the State of Hawai‘i, I apologize for yesterday's events and any hardship and inconvenience this created for you, your family and loved ones."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAI‘I COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY is setting its agenda, and Chair Margaret Wille asks citizens to serve on Legislative Priority Huis and to come to precinct meetings, Wednesday, March 7.
     The Economic and Social/Cultural Wellbeing Committee is expected to work on the:
          Protect Workers focus: $15 minimum wage by 2020;
          Protect Students focus: Raise quality of education;
          Protect Kupuna focus: Death with Dignity rights with appropriate assurances that each person
Big Island Democratic Party Chair Margaret Wille, a former County
Council member, encourages everyone to join committees and to go
to precinct meetings on March 7 to help set the party platform.
 Photo from Big Island Video News
is making choice of own free will;
       Protect Local Farmers focus: Coffee Truth in Labeling; monitor cannabis legislation; and
       Protect The People focus: Affordable health care.
       The Environmental Wellbeing Legislative Committee is expected to work on the:
       Protect Marine Life focus: Ban oxybenzone (harms coral and other marine life);
       Climate Crisis focus: Prevent degradation of the sensitive ecosystems/mitigation;
       Pesticide/Herbicide Restriction focus: Establish buffers around sensitive areas, facilities. 
     Precinct meetings with elections are set for Wednesday, March 7, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Precinct Officers and Delegates to the county and state conventions will be selected to create the County and State Party Platforms. Area locations for the precinct meetings are: Precincts 5, 6, & 7 - Volcano Art Center; 19-4074 Old Volcano Rd, Volcano. This year will mark the first time in 30 years that the Democratic Party State Convention will be held in a place other than on O‘ahu. It will be at the Waikoloa Hilton on May 25 and 26.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A FUNDRAISER FOR KA‘Ū VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS has reached $500 in donations. It is sponsored by Raina Whiting, who is running for the House of Representatives in West Ka‘ū and Kona. 
     Whiting writes, "The men and women who volunteer their time to keep the Nā‘ālehu and Pāhala communities safe deserve our support. In the past couple of months, they have responded to two large, multi-day fires by volunteering their time.
     "I would like to use the money raised to stock up their fire house with water bottles, snacks and a few extra fire shirts for times when they have to respond quickly.
     "Please join me in supporting the brave women and men that volunteer for our community," states Whiting on the fundraising site https://www.facebook.com/donate/218531162021536/

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

ANTHRACNOSE, A FUNGAL PATHOGEN MOST COMMONLY ASSOCIATED WITH MANGO, can also affect other fruiting plants such as banana, avocado, papaya, coffee, and more, according to University of Hawai‘i
Mango anthracnose, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, can also
affect other fruits grown in Hawai‘i. Photo by Scot Nelson
Kona Cooperative Extension Service and Research Station. Wet, humid, and warm weather conditions favor anthracnose, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, infections in the field.
     On mango, anthracnose symptoms occur on leaves, twigs, petioles, flower clusters (panicles), and fruits.     Visit flickr.com/photos/scot
nelson/8292071578/in/photo
stream for photos by Scot Nelson of anthracnose (and powdery mildew, Oidium mangiferae) on mango.
     Anthracnose and powdery mildew control methods differ, though symptoms may appear similar. Submit samples to the U.H. Agricultural Diagnostic Service Center to identify the pathogen responsible for symptoms you see on your tree or fruits. The cost is $12 per sample for a general disease diagnosis.
Image from U.H. C.T.A.H.R.
     "During this time of year, early control is critical for reducing the inoculum and spread of these diseases within trees and throughout the farm. Field sanitation – the removal and destruction of diseased fruit, branches, and old panicles in the tree and on the ground – help to decrease the amount of latent and active fungal spores that may contribute to further disease infestation," says U.H. C.T.A.H.R. Extension Agent Andrea Kawabata. Learn more about these diseases, their symptoms and methods of control by visiting ctahr.hawaii.edu
/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-48.pdf for mango anthracnose and ctahr.hawaii.edu/oc/freepubs/pdf/PD-46.pdf for powdery mildew.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

VOLCANO ART CENTER ANNOUNCES AUTHOR SUSAN M. SCHULTZ will teach a Documentary Poetry writing workshop on Saturday, Jan. 20, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., at  Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. Poets and non-poets are invited to learn techniques to create documentary prose or poetry.
Photo from Volcano Art Center
    The event description says, "Documentary poetry is a form of poetry that seeks to document historical events, as well as expresses political, social or cultural issues. In Joseph Harrington’s essay, Docupoetry and Archive Desire, he defines documentary poetry as poetry that contains quotations from or reproductions of documents or statements not produced by the poet and relates historical narratives, whether macro or micro, human or natural."
     The workshop begins by discussing some readings from documentary poetry, such as Donovan Kuhio Colleps's Proposed Additions. Students are asked to bring such documents as a family photograph, a sketch/plan of a house, instructions for working a familiar machine, a neighborhood map, and the definition of the name of a street.
     The workshop involves writing about the photograph, street name, and other personal documents, and the bringing together of the private and public materials. In the final step, participants will discover how private lives intersect with public histories.
English Professor and Author Susan M. Schultz on left.
Photo from hawaii.edu
     Schultz is a professor of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa and has lived in Hawai‘i since 1990. She is author of many books of poetry and poetic prose, including two volumes of Dementia Blog (Singing Horse Press), as well as Memory Cards. She has also authored a book of literary criticism and edited two others. She founded Tinfish Press, which publishes experimental poetry from the Pacific.
     The class is $35 for Volcano Art Center members and $40 for non-members. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A BADMINTON PROGRAM FOR ADULTS at Ka‘ū District Gym in Pāhala begins with registration starting Tuesday, Jan. 16. Badminton will be held Mondays and Thursdays, from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., starting Jan. 22 and ending Feb. 27. For more, contact Hawai‘i County Parks and Recreation Technician Director Nona Makuakane or Technician Elijah Navarro at 928-3102, or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

THE KA‘Ū DISTRICT GYM RECREATION ROOM FITNESS STATION is open in Pāhala to members of the public, ages 15 and older. Public use hours are Saturday through Thursday from 3 p.m. to 7:45 p.m., until Sunday, March 31. For more, contact Hawai‘i County Parks and Recreation Technician Director Nona Makuakane or Technician Elijah Navarro at 928-3102, or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.
See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment at 
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/janfebmar/januarycommunity.html.
January print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available free on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū TROJANS SPORTS SCHEDULE

Boys Basketball: Monday, Jan. 15, Pāhoa @ Ka‘ū.
     Wednesday, Jan. 17, @ Kohala.
     Saturday, Jan. 20, Kohala @ Ka‘ū.
     Tuesday, Jan. 23, @ Wai‘ākea.
     Saturday, Jan. 27, HPA @ Ka‘ū.

Girls Basketball: Monday, Jan. 15, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 19, @ Kealakehe.

Boys Soccer: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Honoka‘a.
     Thursday, Jan. 25, @ Pāhoa.

Swimming: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ HPA.
     Friday, Jan. 26, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, prelims).
     Saturday, Jan. 27, @ Kamehameha (BIIF Championships, finals).

Wrestling: Saturday, Jan. 20, @ Hilo.
     Saturday, Jan. 27 @ HPA.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A FEE-FREE DAY IS OFFERED AT HAWAI‘I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK in observance of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day - no entrance fees will be collected at any fee-charging National Parks on Monday, Jan. 15. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR NEIGHBORHOOD WATCH MEETS on Monday, Jan. 15, from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576 or visit discoveryharbour.net.

PAINTING WITH PEGGY, an acrylic painting class with Margaret "Peggy" Stanton is set for Monday, Jan. 15, from noon to 3 p.m., at Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus in Volcano Village. It is part of an ongoing series of workshops for artists of all levels headed by Stanton. The class is $15 for VAC members and $20 for non-members per session. Register online at volcanoartcenter.org.

DISCOVERY HARBOUR VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETS Tuesday, Jan. 16, from 10 a.m. to noon, at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. For more, call 929-9576 or visit discoveryharbour.net.

KĪLAUEA SUMMIT ERUPTION: STORY OF THE HALEMA‘UMA‘U LAVA LAKE is presented on Tuesday, Jan. 16, starting at 7 p.m., in the Kīlauea Visitor Center auditorium of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. U.S.G.S. Hawai‘i Volcano Observatory geologist Janet Babb, co-producer and co-writer of the recently released U.S.G.S. documentary, introduces the 24-min film. After the show, U.S.G.S. H.V.O. geologist Matt Patrick provides an update on what's happening at Halema‘uma‘u today, and answers questions about the summit eruption. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF WINE & WATERCOLOR takes place Tuesday, Jan. 16, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Artist Nancy DeLucrezia shows how to transfer a photo onto watercolor paper and introduces basic techniques in watercolor painting. Sampling of several wines from Hilo wine store "Grapes" is included. Class fee is $30 for Volcano Art Center members and $35 for non-members, plus a $17 supply fee. Register online, volcanoartcenter.org.

HAWAIIAN RANCHOS ROAD MAINTENANCE CORP. MEETS Wednesday, Jan. 17, starting at 4 p.m., in the Hawaiian Ranchos office. For more, call 929-9608 or visit ranchos-road.org.

A VOLCANO AWARENESS PRESENTATION takes place Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. Come and view informative displays about Mauna Loa Volcano. Talk story with scientists, public safety officials, and park rangers. For more, call 939-7033, visit ovcahi.org, or email askHVO@usgs.gov.

WEAVE A TĪ LEAF LEI Wednesday, Jan. 17, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai in Hawai’i Volcanoes National Park. Hear park rangers and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association staff share knowledge and love for one of the most popular lei in Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, visit nps.gov
/HAVO.

HAWAIIAN CIVIC CLUB OF KA‘Ū meets Thursday, Jan. 18, starting at 6:30 p.m., at United Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. For more, call Pres. Berkley Yoshida at 747-0197.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION BOARD MEETS Thursday, Jan. 18, from noon to 1 p.m., at Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

STORY TIME WITH AUNTIE LINDA FROM TŪTŪ & ME is hosted Thursday, Jan. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to noon, at Nā‘ālehu Public Library. For more, call 929-8571.

THURSDAY NIGHT AT THE VOLCANO ART CENTER OFFERS AN ‘Alalā Outreach Presentation on Jan. 18, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., in Volcano Village. ‘Alalā Project staff present an update on the most recent reintroduction efforts to establish a wild population of the endemic and endangered Hawaiian crow. The presentation is free to attend - $5 donation appreciated. For more, visit volcanoartcenter.org.

Learn more about the most recent efforts to reintroduce the ‘Alalā to Hawai‘i.
Photo from volcanoartcenter.org
STEWARDSHIP OF KĪPUKAPUAULU takes place at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 18, with volunteers meeting in the Kīpukapuaulu parking lot on Mauna Loa Road off Hwy 11 in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Volunteers will help remove invasive plants, like morning glory, from an area said to be home to an "astonishing diversity of native forest and understory plants." The event will take place again on Jan. 25. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more, contact Marilyn Nicholson at nickem@hawaii.rr.com or visit nps.gov/HAVO.

A GLITTER SNOWFLAKE ARTS & CRAFTS ACTIVITY takes place at Kahuku Park (92-8607 Paradise Circle Mauka, Ocean View) on Friday, Jan. 19, from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. The class is for keiki ages 6 to 12 years. Register Tuesday, Jan. 16, through Jan. 19. For more, contact Hawai‘i County Parks and Recreation Technician Teresa Anderson at 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/recreation.

STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT takes place Friday, Jan. 19, with volunteers removing invasive, non-native plant species that prevent native plants from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Interested volunteers should meet Paul and Jane Filed at Kīlauea Visitor Center at 8:45 a.m. Other opportunities this month take place Jan. 26. Free; park entrance fees apply. For more see nps.gov/HAVO.

HEATHER METTLER'S GLASSWORK - hand-blown, chiseled, and etched - is showcased in a new Volcano Art Center Gallery Exhibit: Passage and Place. The display will continue to be displayed until Sunday, Feb. 11, during normal gallery hours - 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., daily. Mettler's unique collection of glass explores the themes of migration, navigation, and immigration - how plants, animals, and people find their way to Hawai‘i. Free; park entrance fees apply.

BUNCO & POTLUCK takes place Saturday, Jan. 20, starting at 6 p.m., in Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Bunco is a popular game played with nine dice, also known as Bonko or Bunko. Bring a dish to share. For more, contact Margie Hack at 541-954-8297. See more at discoveryharbour.net.

Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café.
Photo from kilaueamilitarycamp.com
OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY EMERGENCY RESPONSE TEAM meets Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033 or visit ovcahi.org.

MONGOLIAN BBQ is hosted Saturday, Jan. 20, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. KMC is open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

THE ART EXRESS, a monthly class, is held Saturday, Jan. 20, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions will be on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size is limited to 25. For more, contact Meliha Corcoran at 319-8989 or himeliha@yahoo.com, or visit discoveryharbour.net/art-express.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.