About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, November 20, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Monday, November 20, 2017


Thy Word Ministries Praise Team dances for Kauaha'ao Congregational Church's annual Bazaar
in Wai`ohinu last Saturday. See more below. Photo by Helena Sesson
THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT MAY ELIMINATE NET NEUTRALITY. According to numerous reports, Ajit Pai, Chair of the Federal Communications Commission, plans to present plans to the FCC on Tuesday to dismantle rules that require internet providers like AT&T, Hawaiian Telcom and Spectrum to treat web traffic equally.
     Hawai`i  Sen. Brian Schatz said the move will hinder internet access needed to participate in democracy. Schatz explained, "The Internet works because the people who charge you for access to it cannot charge different amounts for different content, depending on their commercial interests. You pay the ISP, you get the whole Internet. What the FCC is doing is revoking that rule."
       The Hawai`i Senator said, "The truth is we don't know what will happen in the marketplace. But if this rule passes and is held up in court, the only reason that an ISP would honor net neutrality is if it would make them more money."
     According to Schatz, "Without Net Neutrality, companies can block, throttle or charge you more to visit certain websites. The FCC is making a grave error this week."
     Earlier this year, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said that "Maintaining free, open, and equal access to the Internet is a cornerstone of our democracy in today’s digital age. The Internet is constantly defining and redefining what is possible—from breaking down barriers in education, to expanding access to jobs and employment, to driving innovation in healthcare, and so much more."
     She was responding to a federal court decision in June that, according to Gabbard, would "help ensure that access to the Internet continues to be a place of equal opportunity for all Americans, not reserved for those with the money to purchase special access rights.”
     The  D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling reclassified broadband as a telecommunications service under Title II of the Telecommunications Act, which allows the FCC to regulate internet service as a public utility. By regulating high-speed internet as a public utility, the FCC is able to prevent Internet Service Providers (ISP’s) from charging consumers to speed up certain online content over others, and require all online content be treated equally. The court upheld the FCC’s rules in a 2-1 vote.

 To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

The bell tower at Kilauea Military Camp, with the cafeteria behind it.
Photo courtesy of the Geoffrey Mower collection
KMC'S ROLL AS DETENTION CENTER in World War II, confining Japanese Americans after the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, will be explained on Wednesday, Nov. 22. A one hour guided walk at 1:30 p.m. is open to the public.
       Entitled KMC Remembered, it will be led by a Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park ranger and will begin at the Kīlauea Military Camp flagpole, within Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.                    "Learn why the citizens were detained, what their experiences at KMC were, and see new exhibits that interpret the history of the military camp," says a statement form Hawai`i Volcanoes National park. Park entrance fees apply.

 To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

KA‘Ū COMMUNITY MEMBERS CAME TOGETHER at Kauaha'ao Congregational Church's annual event in Wai‘ōhinu last Saturday. Minister Debbie Wong Yuen said, "We would like to send out a heart felt Mahalo Nui Loa to the people of Ka‘ū for their wonderful support and participation. The bazaar was not just for the Church, but an outreach for the community, allowing various individuals and groups to participate as vendors in the open space flea market."
Kauaha`ao Church Bazaar brought its grace
and community gathering to 
Wai`ohinu Saturday.
Photos by Helena Sesson
     Vendors came from Kona and Puna "to be a part of this beautiful, spirit filled day," she said. "Everyone that came was blessed with entertainment from Thy Word Ministry Praise Team, and Hannah's Makana 'Ohana Halau, the perfect weather, fellowship, and a variety of handmade crafts, baked goods, goodies, books and rummage that were being sold by 23 different vendors."
       Many vendors have already committed to be a part of the Church's annual bazaar in November 2018. "Blessings and God's grace be with everyone throughout the Thanksgiving and Christmas season," said Wong Yuen.

 To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

AN OPEN HOUSE FOR KA‘Ū COFFEE AND OTHER FARMERS will be held Thanksgiving Day, this Thursday, at Pāhala Plantation House  at 11 a.m. to meet representatives of the manufacturers of the Japanese Organic Plant Vitalizer called HB-101. Some Ka‘ū Coffee farmers are using HB-101.
     HB-101 is described by its proponents as a liquid growth-enhancing formula for plants, created through blending extracts of Japanese cedars, pines, cypress trees and plantain grass. Dr. Tomoaki Kato, HB-101's Laboratory Manager and a Doctor of Engineering, will give a workshop and host a question and answer session. Other workshops will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 21 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at University of Hawai`i's CTAHR Extension Office Conference Room in Kona  and on Wednesday, Nov. 22 from 10 a.m. to noon at USDA Agricultural Research Services facilities in Hilo.
       The Pāhala event is a potluck with turkey, ham and drinks provided. For more information, call Reggie Hasegawa at 960-6614 or Max Maemori at 756-4888.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

The first event will be the Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant,
Saturday, April 27, 2018 at Ka‘ū District Gym. 
Photo by Pam Taylor
KA‘Ū COFFEE FESTIVAL COMMITTEE has announced its schedule for 2018.
    Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant will be held Saturday, April 21at the Ka‘ū District Gym.
    Ka‘ū Coffee Pa`ina Open House will be Friday, April 27 at Pāhala Plantation House
    Ka‘ū Coffee Recipe Contest will be Sunday, April 29 at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.
    Ka‘ū Mountain Water System HIke will be Wednesday, May 2, leaving from Ka‘ū  Coffee Mill.
    Ka‘ū Coffee & Cattle Day will be Friday, May 4 at Aikane Plantation Coffee.
    Ka‘ū Stargazing will be Friday, May 4, leaving from Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.
    Ka‘ū Coffee Ho`olaulea will be Saturday, May 5 at Pāhala Comunity Center.
    Ka‘ū Coffee College will by Sunday, May 6 at Pāhala Community Center.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

REGISTER KEIKI, GRADES K-8, BY TUESDAY, NOV. 28, FOR A FELT WINTER HANGING CRAFT class that takes place Wednesday, Nov. 29, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Pāhala Community Center. For more, call 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events for November including monthly meetings at 
kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/novemberevents.html
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily and weekly community events at 
kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/novembercommunity.html.
Pick up the November print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar, 
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com.
REGISTRATION FOR THE FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY AT PUNALU‘U remains open through Monday, Nov. 20. The annual event to honor past, present and future generations will be on Saturday, Nov. 25, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park, Medicine Pond.
      Taiko Drummers will join the celebration, as will hula dancers, local musicians and Gi Gong practitioners. Floating lanterns for inscribing messages will be provided to the first 50 registrants. Donations are tax deductible and will be used toward college scholarships through the events sponsor Ka‘ū Rural Health Community Association. Call 928-0101 to register.

REGISTER KEIKI OF ALL AGES FOR AN ANNUAL RUBBERBAND TURKEY art class at Pāhala Community Center that takes place on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

REGISTER KEIKI AGES 6 TO 12 TO MAKE A THANKSGIVING NATURE WREATH at Kahuku Park on Wednesday, Nov. 22,  from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. For more, call 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

CREATE A SMALL KĀHILI PA‘A LIMA, a hand-held kāhili, on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the lānai of Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Kāhili are a form of Hawaiian leatherwork that traditionally acknowledged a person’s status and genealogy, and offered spiritual protection. Free, park entrance fees apply. For more, see nps.gov/HAVO.

DENNIS AND CHRISTY SOARES PERFORM Thursday, Nov. 23, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. No cover charge. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

A THANKSGIVING BUFFET takes place Thursday, Nov. 23, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at KMC’s Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The menu features Roast Turkey, Pineapple Honey Glazed Ham and all the fixings. $21.95/adult, $11.85/child (ages 6-11). Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

A FREE COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER is hosted at the Ocean View Community Center on Thursday, Nov. 23, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the main hall. The dinner is open to all and boasts a full turkey dinner with "all the fixings." For more details, call 939-7033 or email ovcahawaii@gmail.com.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI'S 31ST ART STUDIO TOUR & SALE is Friday, Nov. 24, through Sunday, Nov. 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., six artists studios in Volcano Village. Meet artists, view and purchase wide variety of artwork from local artists. Special drawing held at sales end. For more call 987-3472. Find a map of the six participating artists studios at VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP. meets Friday, Nov. 24, at 5 p.m., in Hawaiian Ranchos' office.

THE ANNUAL DECORATED COTTAGES HOLIDAY CHALLENGE at Kīlauea Military Camp within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park takes place Friday, Nov. 24, through Friday, Jan. 1. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8371 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

THE TENTH ANNUAL KAMAHALO CRAFT FAIR has been announced for Cooper Center and is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 24, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 25, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. More than 30 local artisans participate, offering unique gifts. See facebook.com/coopercentervolcano/
Email Linda Ugalde kilaueatutu@gmail.comThe event will be located at 19-4030 Wright Rd, Volcano.

KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP ANNOUNCES AUGIE T IN CONCERT on Saturday, Nov. 25, at KMC’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Tickets on sale at Hirano Store or online at AugieT.com. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more call, 967-837, kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED TO HELP REMOVE INVASIVE, NON-NATIVE PLANTS that prevent native plans from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. This Stewardship at the Summit event is Saturday, Nov. 25, at 8:45 a.m.
     To join the effort, mMuld wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants and bring a hat, rain-gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools will be provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, though park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/summit_stewardship.htm.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place Saturday, Nov. 25, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. The hike will be offered again on Nov. 25. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

JOIN A GUIDED HIKE ALONG THE PALM TRAIL in the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park on Sunday, Nov. 26, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The hike will also be offered on Nov. 26, Dec. 3 and Dec. 23.
     Palm Trail is a moderately difficult 2.6-mile loop traversing scenic pastures along an ancient cinder cone, with some of the best panoramic views Kahuku has to offer. Highlights include relics of the ranching era, sections of remnant native forest and amazing volcanic features from the 1868 eruptive fissures.
     For more, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION IS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.








kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory_2017 

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Sunday, November 19, 2017

Ka`u Multicultural Society held its first annual pig tournament Saturday with islandwide hunting
and the weigh in at Wai‘ōhinu Park. See more below. Photos by Helena Sesson
THE OCEAN VIEW DEEP WELL CLOSURE is the subject of research and story by West Hawai`i Today reporter Max Dible, who is looking into the history of its operation by the county Department of Water Supply. The story in the Sunday newspaper states that "HOVE deep well appears to be another in a string of downed Hawai`i Island wells that have fallen victim to premature equipment failure. It’s not possible yet to make that determination with certainty, as HOVE failed Thursday and the Hawai`i County Department of Water Supply has only just begun troubleshooting to assess the cause. But if the well went down due to a problem with the pump or motor, the timeline provided by DWS via email Friday would place HOVE in a group of deep wells that all failed far more quickly
Ka`u Multicultural Society promises the
new pig hunt will be an annual event.
Photos by Helena Sesson
than expected — including those at the Hualalai, Keahuolu, Waiaha and Honokohau sites in North Kona."
     According to West Hawai`i Today, the Department of Water Supply reports the Ocean View Well was repaired in September 2016 and April 2013. It went online to provide potable water for residents and for commercial operators to haul water in May 2011.
     The purpose of the Deep Well is to serve Ocean View and Ranchos neighborhoods and commercial operations through pickup of the water at spigots and a standpipe. There is no piping of water in the Ocean View area and most residents rely not only on the well but on catchment tanks and water hauling by commercial trucks. 
     With the well inoperable, the county is allowing pickup of potable water only by local residents and directing commercial haulers to  Nā‘ālehu. Department of Water Supply cautions those with catchment to conserve water in their tanks until the well is repaired.
     Money has been approved by the Hawai‘i
Legislature to plan for a second well in Ocean View to help support the economy and services to the community. Rep. Richard Creagan said he would work next session, starting in January, to secure it toward developing the second well.
     The West Hawai`i Today story reports that in North Kona, "four wells remain down — those at Hualalai, Keahuolu, Waiaha and Keopu. Thus, a mandatory 25 percent water usage restriction remains in effect for the entire system. The Keopu deep well, undergoing its first repair since it was constructed in 2009, is slated to return to service Dec. 20," reports West Hawai`i Today See more at West Hawai`i Today.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

A HUNTER AND HIS DOGS WERE RESCUED out of the Volcano forest on Saturday after he became lost beyond the end of Kahaulea Street. Through e911, fire dispatch was able to locate a GPS position. The Hawai`i Fire Department helicopter located the the man, in his 60s, and lifted the hunter, his gear and hunting dogs in a Billy Pugh Net to a landing zone.
     The call at 3:12 p.m. came from the hunter's friend who said he was unable to orient the lost hunter back to the vehicle using a horn. The hunter was missing for about 1.5 hours. According to the Hawai`i County Fire Department report, the hunter was "lost after following dogs in pursuit of a wild pig in the forest." The state Department of Land & Natural Resources is investigating, according to the Fire Department.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

The No-Gun Hunt relied on dogs and
knives to bring the pigs home.
Photos by Helena Sesson
THE FIRST KA`U MULTICULTURAL SOCIETY PIG HUNT drew many enthusiasts to Kaʻū for the weigh-in and celebration Saturday at Wai‘ōhinu Park. The No-Guns Hunt was islandwide. It was organized by Darlyne Vierra, President of Kaʻū Multicultural Society, Vice President Liz Kuluwaimaka, and Kalani Vierra who headed up the pig hunt and the weigh-in. They promise it will be an annual event.
      Categories included: heaviest boar (lahoʻole), biggest tusk, heaviest sow, heaviest overall. Hunting was allowed with dogs, no firearms, and at least one teammate was required to have a hunting license.
      Supporters included ACE Hardware, Wikiwiki Mart, Ka‘ū Gas, R&G Mini Mart, Kaʻū Business Services LLP, Kahuku Gifts and Garden Shop; Delʻs Feed Store, Miranda's and Hilo Surplus Store; Aloha Gas;  J. Hara's Store Inc.;  Pearl's, Oshima's, Mauka Napa, Lako St. Chevron, Fujihara's Store and Paul's Place. See the results in the December issue of The Ka`u Calendar newspaper.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE OFF ACT, a bill in congress designed to get America Off Fossil Fuel, received a push from its co-sponsor Rep. Tulsi Gabbard on Sunday following a Keystone Pipeline oil spill and the U.S. House of Representatives passing a bill to axe electric vehicle and solar tax credits.
      Gabbard sent out a statement: "The Keystone Pipeline just spilled 210,000 gallons of oil in South Dakota, near the Lake Traverse Indian Reservation. Clean up crews are racing to protect surrounding wetlands, aquifers, and land, but the worst damage has already been done. The pipeline should never have been operating in the first place.
     "The Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate tribe, who remain vehemently opposed to the pipeline, will be the ones dealing with the long-term repercussions of this spill, not TransCanada and big bank executives. It was for reasons like this that thousands of people traveled to the Oceti Sakowin camp at Standing Rock, just a few hours north of where this spill occurred, to oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline last year.
Rep. Tulsi Gabbard visited Standing Rock last winter, opposing the Keystone 
Pipeline. It spilled 210,000 gallons of oil last week. She called for support of
 OFF Fossil Fuel, a bill she co-introduced into the House of Representatives.
    
     "Meanwhile, the corporate giveaway tax bill that just passed the House would eliminate tax credits for electric vehicles and solar energy, while cutting credits for wind power by one-third and eventually phasing them out completely—yet it protects $14 billion in federal subsidies to the fossil fuel industry and makes them permanent. This is unacceptable, and this oil spill is yet another example of how dangerous Big Oil is to the health of our planet and our future. We should be investing in the technology of the future now, not paying corporate welfare to prop up a poisonous industry.
     "Donald Trump, Scott Pruitt, and other friends of the fossil fuel industry will compromise the health of our people and our planet to secure greater profits for their corporate friends. We need your help to make sure that doesn't happen. She asks her constituents to "Sign your name as a citizen co-sponsor of the OFF Act and help us lead the way to create a 100% sustainable, clean energy economy by 2035."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Aikido lessons will be every Saturday at 10 a.m. at Ocean View Community Center, sponsored by Sensei
 Alan Moores and 
Pāhala Dojo. Photo by Geri Childs.         

AIKIDO IN OCEAN VIEW: Aikido of Pāhala opened a dojo at Ocean View Community Center on Saturday.  Classes are every Saturday at 10 a.m. Sensei Alan Moores launched the Ocean View classes, accompanied by members of Pāhala Dojo. They presented a demonstration in Aikido for the Ocean View Community. For more information call 808-925-9677.

PEOPLE AND LAND OF KAHUKU, a free guided, 2.5 miles, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain is scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 19, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The guide will focus on the area’s human history. For more details, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

REGISTRATION FOR THE FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY AT PUNALU‘U remains open through Monday, Nov. 20. The annual event to honor past, present and future generations will be on Saturday, Nov. 25, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park, Medicine Pond.
      Taiko Drummers will join the celebration, as will hula dancers, local musicians and Gi Gong practitioners. Floating lanterns for inscribing messages will be provided to the first 50 registrants. Donations are tax deductible and will be used toward college scholarships through the events sponsor Ka‘ū Rural Health Community Association. Call 928-0101 to register.
See public Ka‘ū events, meetings entertainment at 
 kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/novemberevents.html
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily, weekly events at 
kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/novembercommunity.html.
November print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar is 
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com.

A VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETING is scheduled for Monday, Nov. 20, at 4 p.m. in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

REGISTER KEIKI OF ALL AGES FOR AN ANNUAL RUBBERBAND TURKEY art class at Pāhala Community Center that takes place on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

REGISTER KEIKI AGES 6 TO 12 TO MAKE A THANKSGIVING NATURE WREATH at Kahuku Park on Wednesday, Nov. 22,  from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. For more, call 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

CREATE A SMALL KĀHILI PA‘A LIMA, a hand-held kāhili, on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the lānai of Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Kāhili are a form of Hawaiian leatherwork that traditionally acknowledged a person’s status and genealogy, and offered spiritual protection. Free, park entrance fees apply. For more, see nps.gov/HAVO.

A FREE COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER is hosted at the Ocean View Community Center on Thursday, Nov. 23, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the main hall. The dinner is open to all and boasts a full turkey dinner with "all the fixings." For more details, call 939-7033 or email ovcahawaii@gmail.com.

DENNIS AND CHRISTY SOARES PERFORM Thursday, Nov. 23, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. No cover charge. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

A THANKSGIVING BUFFET takes place Thursday, Nov. 23, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at KMC’s Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The menu features Roast Turkey, Pineapple Honey Glazed Ham and all the fixings. $21.95/adult, $11.85/child (ages 6-11). Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP. meet Friday, Nov. 24, at 5 p.m., in Hawaiian Ranchos' office.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI'S 31ST ART STUDIO TOUR & SALE is Friday, Nov. 24, through Sunday, Nov. 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., six artists studios in Volcano Village. Meet artists, view and purchase wide variety of artwork from local artists. Special drawing held at sales end. For more call 987-3472. Find a map of the six participating artists studios at VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com.

THE ANNUAL DECORATED COTTAGES HOLIDAY CHALLENGE at Kīlauea Military Camp within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park takes place Friday, Nov. 24, through Friday, Jan. 1. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8371 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

THE TENTH ANNUAL KAMAHALO CRAFT FAIR has been announced for Cooper Center and is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 24, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday, Nov. 25, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. More than 30 local artisans participate, offering unique gifts. See facebook.com/coopercenter
volcano/Email Linda Ugalde kilaueatutu@gmail.comThe event will be located at 19-4030 Wright Rd, Volcano.

KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP ANNOUNCES AUGIE T IN CONCERT on Saturday, Nov. 25, at KMC’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Tickets on sale at Hirano Store or online at AugieT.com. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more call, 967-837, kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED TO HELP REMOVE INVASIVE, NON-NATIVE PLANTS that prevent native plans from growing in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. This Stewardship at the Summit event is Saturday, Nov. 25, at 8:45 a.m.
     To join the effort, meet project leaders Paul and Jane Field at Kīlauea Visitor Center. Volunteers should wear sturdy hiking shoes and long pants and bring a hat, rain-gear, day pack, snacks and water. Gloves and tools will be provided. No advance registration is required, and there is no cost to participate, though park entrance fees apply. Visit the park website for additional planning details: nps.gov/havo/planyourvisit/
summit_stewardship.htm.

NATURE & CULTURE: AN UNSEVERABLE RELATIONSHIP, a moderate hike approximately 2 miles takes place Saturday, Nov. 25, from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at Kahuku Unit of Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change (hulihia) and subsequent restoration (kulia) can be observed as the land transitions from the 1868 lava flow with its pioneer plants to deeper soil with more diverse and older flora. Learn about native plants that play a vital role in Hawaiian culture. Free. Visit nps.gov/havo for more.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION IS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.








kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory_2017 

Saturday, November 18, 2017

Ka‘ū News Briefs Saturday, November 18, 2017

A double splash booth added to the coolness of the Friendraiser Day on Saturday. See story below.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
THE TAX PLAN THAT PASSED THE U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES this week is the focus of a survey by Hawai‘i Sen. Mazie Hirono who wants constituents' opinions before arguing it before the U.S. Senate. She went further: "There’s no getting around it. The GOP tax plan is just another one of Trump’s broken promises to the middle class, and this scam will force 13 million Americans to lose their health insurance."
     Hirono said, "It’s time Republicans stop pretending this massive giveaway to corporations, and the One Percent, is a tax cut for everyday Americans, and start admitting that this plan is funded by the billions of dollars from Medicare they aim to cut over the next decade."
     Hirono contended that "This tax scam could raise taxes on 123,000 Hawai‘i families and drive health care premiums up by 10 percent per year." She asked for citizens to take a quick survey at hirono-taxes.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

THE PROPOSED GOP TAX PLAN DREW CONCERN FROM SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ, who urged everyone to study graphs from the Joint Committee on Taxation, a nonpartisan entity serving both the U.S. Senate and U.S. House of Representatives. They show that taxpayers earning $75,000 or less would pay more taxes than currently. Those earning $75,000 to $100,000 would pay about the same and those earning more than $100,000 would pay less taxes. The biggest savings would be for those paying taxes on $1million and more in income each year.
     Schatz tweeted that if the bill passes and it is not retracted, "this thing blows up the debt by several trillion dollars."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HAWAIIAN OCEAN VIEW ESTATES DEEP WELL REMAINS DOWN and is restricted to use for drinking water only. The county Department of Water Supply calls it a mechanical failure and issued a statement saying, "troubleshooting is being done to further analyze the problem, determine the needed repairs and develop and estimated repair timeline."
    The water department is leaving spigots open for community access, stating, "users are asked to limit their consumption to potable water needs only. Your cooperation extends current water availability in the reservoir."
     The county shut down the standpipe facility for water hauling and will reopen it when repairs are made and the well becomes operable. Haulers are allowed to use the standpipe at Nāʻālehu. "The Department requests your cooperation, patience, and understanding during this emergency," says the statement. For additional information, contact 961-8790.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

EACH OF SIX GOALS of the Nā Hopena A‘o: HĀ framework policy, adopted by the Hawai‘i Department of Education, was represented by an activity and booth at Nā‘āleha Elementary School's Friendraiser on Saturday. The first letter of the words representing the goals - Belonging, Responsibility, Excellence, Aloha, Total Well-Being, and Hawai'i - can be combined to spell the English word BREATH, which can be translated to the Hawaiian word HĀ. Event attendees were encouraged to visit six key booths to gain a free raffle/game ticket or one pint of plain/chocolate milk. The booth that represented Excellence, for example, highlighted that Nā'ālehu Elementary is a Challenge Five School in which students are encouraged to miss no more than five days of school each year.
Kupuna Ke taught the Hawaiian games kōnane and hū.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
    During the Friendraiser, each Nā'ālehu Elementary School student was encouraged to take home a window planter box, along with a bag of potting soil and four to five garden starts. The project is called He keiki aloha na mea kanu, beloved children are the plants, after the saying of Hawaiian language expert and historian of Ka‘ū, Mary Kawena Pukui.
    The window boxes were sponsored by Island Insurance Foundation Excellence in School Leadership Award by Masayuki Tokioka. A letter distributed with each window box says:
      "It is said of farmers that their plants are like beloved children, receiving much attention and care. Families, please use this planter box and potting soil as a family to teach your children to love and to nurture, or to care for, what is important to each of us. This is also an opportunity to teach our children to grow healthy vegetables for our family meals. If you don't already have a family garden, this is first step.
University of Hawai‘i Native Hawaiian Student Center
reached out to Ka‘ū students and families.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
    "Planting in this garden box is a symbol of the diversity of the land of Ka‘ū. We have areas of rich soil and areas of rugged lava. Regardless of our circumstances we can develop and grow with attention and care."
    When working a child on a window box garden, families are invited to post pictures at Facebook - NaalehuElementary GardenProjects. Those without a Facbook account may email pictures (one or two at a time) to GardenProjects@naalehu.org to be posted. The goal is for families to take care of about 400 window box gardens across the community. "We would love to share how we grow and bloom!" says the letter.
    Hui Mālama Ola Nā 'Oiwi asked attendees to register with them as they took height and weight measurements of keiki. Keiki received fans, stickers, information, crayons and a coloring book in return. The booth also represented Total Well-Being.
    Tūtū & Me staff offered coloring books and information about their traveling preschool program and home visitor program. Some children also received a stuffed toy eel character Noa the Puhi from their parent program, Partners In Development.
Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Jami Beck and The Nature Conservancy 
booth representative John Replogle. 
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
     Blue Zones Project by Healthways offered information on the Power 9, claiming that by applying nine principles to everyday life, one can live longer. Power 9 principles are: Down Shift -  reverse disease by finding a stress relieving strategy that works for you; Purpose - wake up with purpose each day to add up to seven years; Plant Slant- put less meat and more plants on your plate; Social Hour, - schedule social time with friends while enjoying healthy drinks and snacks; Family First - invest time with family to add up to six years; 80 Percent Rule, eat mindfully and stop when 80 percent full; Move Naturally - find ways to move more ti burn calories without thinking about it; Right Tribe - surround yourself with people who support positive behaviors; and Belong - belong to a faith-based community and attend services four times a month to add four to 14 years. 
     The Blue Zones - areas in which the principles are taken from those who have lived longest - are: Ikaria, Greece; Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; Okinawa, Japan; and Loma Linda, California. To help demonstrate moving naturally, representatives encouraged keiki to take turns blending healthy smoothies with a blender powered by a pedal bike.
     Hawai‘i Island Hawksbill Turtle Recovery Project offered information about turtles found in Hawai‘i and handed out illustrated brochures that educated attendees about how to identify weather a turtle was a Hawksbill or Green sea turtle. Kupuna Ke also offered lessons with Kōnane boards and Hū (kuikui nut spinner top).
     ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou offered shave ice for $3 each, with profits donated back to the school.
Exercise received a big push at the Fundraiser on Saturday.
Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
   Queen Lili‘uokalani Children's Center offered information about Queen Lili‘uokalani and shared values believed to create strong families. Lili‘uolkalani Trust also promoted two programs:
     Lili‘uokalani Trust is hosting a free Makana Financial Literacy program at Nā‘ālehu Community Center on Wednesdays, Nov. 22 and 29, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. The program offers responsible money management advice from Bank of Hawai‘i; fraud and identity theft information from C.U. Hawai‘i, home owners tips from Hawai‘i Community Assets; and energy saving tips from HELCO. Food for the participating families will be available as well as activities for keiki in attendance ages five and older. The program is open to the public. Space is limited and there are currently four of 15 seats left. The Trust also offers free Kamalama Parenting Classes in Hilo.
    Call Ken or Lourdes at 935-9381 for more details on either program and to assure space is available.
     A representative from the Kīpuka: Native Hawaiian Student Center of UH Hilo was there. She encouraged signing up for scholarships and assistance programs to help freshman register early for classes and acclimate to the university environment before the majority of other students arrive. She said current and prospective students seeking financial aid for university should apply now while the funds are available. Her contact info: kipuka.hawaii.edu, 932-7418.
The ball toss was popular with keiki. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
   Officer Dane Shibuya and Reserve Officer Bill Doar were in attendance as well as 2017 Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Queen Jami Beck.
    Other organizations present included Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, The Nature Conservancy, and United Healthcare Community Plan.
     Keiki enjoyed a bounce house, dozens of fair themed games and highly successful splash booths. Food, baked goods, beverages and popcorn were sold to help raise funds for Nā‘ālehu Elementary School.
       Raffle tickets were selected throughout the day for numerous prizes.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

DATES FOR THE ANNUAL DECORATED COTTAGES HOLIDAY CHALLENGE at Kīlauea Military Camp within Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park have been announced. The public is invited to view the cottages and vote for a favorite from Friday, Nov. 24, through Friday, Jan. 1. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8371 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

See public Ka‘ū events for November including monthly meetings at 
kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/novemberevents.html
See Ka‘ū exercise, meditation, daily and weekly community events at 
kaucalendar.com/octnovdec/novembercommunity.html.
Pick up the November print edition of The Ka‘ū Calendar, 
free to 5,500 mailboxes throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i 
through Volcano. Also available on stands throughout
the district. See it online now at kaucalendar.com
PEOPLE AND LAND OF KAHUKU, a free guided, 2.5 miles, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain is scheduled for Sunday, Nov. 19, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., at Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The guide will focus on the area’s human history. For more details, visit nps.gov/HAVO.

REGISTRATION FOR THE FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY AT PUNALU‘U remains open through Monday, Nov. 20. The annual event to honor past, present and future generations will be on Saturday, Nov. 25, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Punalu‘u Black Sand Beach Park, Medicine Pond.
      Taiko Drummers will join the celebration, as will hula dancers, local musicians and Gi Gong practitioners. Floating lanterns for inscribing messages will be provided to the first 50 registrants. Donations are tax deductible and will be used toward college scholarships through the events sponsor Ka‘ū Rural Health Community Association. Call 928-0101 to register.

A VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPARTMENT MEETING is scheduled for Monday, Nov. 20, at 4 p.m. in the Ocean View Community Center. For more, call 939-7033.

REGISTER KEIKI OF ALL AGES FOR AN ANNUAL RUBBERBAND TURKEY art class at Pāhala Community Center that takes place on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. For more, call 928-3102 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

REGISTER KEIKI AGES 6 TO 12 TO MAKE A THANKSGIVING NATURE WREATH at Kahuku Park on Wednesday, Nov. 22,  from 2:45 p.m. to 3:45 p.m. For more, call 929-9113 or visit hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation.

CREATE A SMALL KĀHILI PA‘A LIMA, a hand-held kāhili, on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 10 a.m. to noon, on the lānai of Kīlauea Visitor Center in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Kāhili are a form of Hawaiian leatherwork that traditionally acknowledged a person’s status and genealogy, and offered spiritual protection. Free, park entrance fees apply. For more, see nps.gov/HAVO.

A FREE COMMUNITY THANKSGIVING DINNER is hosted at the Ocean View Community Center on Thursday, Nov. 23, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the main hall. The dinner is open to all and boasts a full turkey dinner with "all the fixings." For more details, call 939-7033 or email ovcahawaii@gmail.com.

DENNIS AND CHRISTY SOARES PERFORM Thursday, Nov. 23, from 3 p.m. to 7 p.m., at Kīlauea Military Camp’s Lava Lounge in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. No cover charge. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

A THANKSGIVING BUFFET takes place Thursday, Nov. 23, from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at KMC’s Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The menu features Roast Turkey, Pineapple Honey Glazed Ham and all the fixings. $21.95/adult, $11.85/child (ages 6-11). Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. For more, call 967-8356 or visit kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI'S 31ST ART STUDIO TOUR & SALE is Friday, Nov. 24, through Sunday, Nov. 26, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., six artists studios in Volcano Village. Meet artists, view and purchase wide variety of artwork from local artists. Special drawing held at sales end. For more call 987-3472. Find a map of the six participating artists studios at VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORP. meet Friday, Nov. 24, at 5 p.m., in Hawaiian Ranchos' office.

CU HAWAI‘I FEDERAL CREDIT UNION IS OFFERING EMPLOYMENT as a Member Service Representative in Nā‘ālehu. CU Hawai‘i seeks energetic individuals for full time positions who enjoy working with people and can provide professional, courteous and efficient service to valued members.
     The ideal candidate must be service oriented and possess good communication and computer skills. Cash handling and customer service experience is preferred. Must be able to work Saturdays. CU Hawai‘i offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Email, mail or fax application to: Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street Hilo, HI 96720, Fax: (808) 935-7793. Applications can be found online at cuhawaii.com/careers.html.








kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory_2017