About The Ka`u Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014

Hula halau from Lana`i come to Ka`u for Ho`okupu Hula No Ka`u Cultural Festival Friday and Saturday. Photo by Malian Lahey
WORK BEGINS FRIDAY ON THE KA`U SIDE of Chain of Craters Road in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park to connect the district with Kalapana in Puna. The emergency route is being built to assist residents of lower Puna, whose access to the rest of the island would be cut off if lava from Kilauea Volcano’s June 27 flow reaches the ocean.
      Hawai`i County crews, overseen by the National Park Service and Federal Highways Administration, will grade the 5.4 miles through the park to the Kalapana boundary.
County workers are rebuilding Chain of Craters Road.
NPS Photo by David Boyle
      The half-mile section of paved road that pedestrians use to access the lava that covered it in 2003 will be closed as of Friday. The popular “Road Closed” sign enrobed in lava will be removed to become part of park history. Other closures include the historic flows and coastal area alongside the construction.
      Holei Sea Arch, the turnaround, bathrooms and concession stand near the turnaround will remain open.
      Motorists can expect traffic delays early tomorrow and Friday mornings as large bulldozers and heavy equipment are transported from the summit of Kilauea down the 19-mile stretch of Chain of Craters Road to the turnaround.
      “We intend to reopen the closed area as soon as it is safe to do so and the bulldozers move closer to Kalapana,” said Park Superintendent Cindy Orlando. “But now is the time to take those last photos of the iconic ‘Road Closed’ sign before it is removed on Friday,” she said.
      Last week, bulldozers from the Kalapana side graded the 2.2-mile portion of Hwy 130 covered in lava to where it meets the park boundary and becomes Chain of Craters Road. Opened in 1965, Chain of Craters Road has been covered and blocked by lava for 37 years of its 49-year existence.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A CIVIL DEFENSE OVERFLIGHT THIS MORNING found that the breakout on the June 27 lava flow in Puna that has been advancing about 90 yards per day along the southeast edge of the flow since early last week has overtaken the former leading edge of the flow. The former flow tip also advanced about 25 yards.
      According to Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, geologists will conduct investigations of the leading edges of the flow on foot today.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

According to Hawai`i DOE, its budget has been flat while the Consumer
Price Index and collectively bargained salaries have increased.
Graph from DOE
SUPERINTENDENT KATHRYN MATAYOSHI HAS PRESENTED the Hawai`i State Department of Education’s 2015-17 Fiscal Biennium budget request, which focuses on investments in strategic reforms and basic school operations. More than 94 percent of the proposed budget request goes directly to fund school-level operations. 
      The proposed budget aims to provide the most benefit to students by preserving school funds for core instruction and enhancing technology. At a presentation before the Hawai`i State Board of Education’s Finance and Infrastructure Committee, Matayoshi reiterated that state funding for education has remained stagnant for the last seven years.
      Since starting reform efforts four years ago, the DOE is in the midst of executing its strategic plan to transform public education system to ensure graduates are prepared for success in college or careers.
      Matayoshi said, “Despite the flat budget, we have managed to increase school-level Weighted Student Formula funding, and our schools have performed extremely well over the last few years.”
Hawai`i Wildlife Fund collected 500 pounds of derelict
fishing net from the Ka`u Coast last month.
Photo from HWF
      Each request falls into one of two major categories: Basic Operations or Strategic Investments. Basic Operations expenditures include health and safety, compliance, facilities, staffing and employee benefits. Strategic Investments enhance the capacity of the public school system to improve student success, staff success and ensure successful systems of support.
      “This annual budget reflects input from the schools and complex area personnel from the field on the needs and priorities of the Department of Education, and we fully support the schools and the effort to improve student achievement consistent with our strategic plan,” said BOE Finance Committee Chair Brian De Lima.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I WILDLIFE FUND SENDS MAHALOS to the 43 people who helped remove over 1,858 pounds of marine debris from along the coastline at Ka`u’s Kamilo Point during last month’s cleanup event. 
      This debris consisted of approximately 1,750 pounds of miscellaneous debris collected in 83 large bags, plus 100 pounds of derelict fishing nets. In addition, three participants picked up another 580 pounds of debris (180 pounds in 10 bags, plus 400 pounds of nets) of extra debris the following week. Of the 32,204 items removed and tallied by volunteers, over 91 percent were plastic, and the remainder were cloth/fabric, glass, rubber or glass/metal.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

HAWAI`I WILDFIRE MANAGEMENT ORGANIZATION will hold community input meetings next week to update Hawai`i County Community Wildfire Protection Plans for Volcano and Ka`u.
      “Community input is critical to the CWPP process to determine priority wildfire concerns, needs and action steps to better prepare and protect fire-prone areas from wildfires,” said HWMO representative Ilene Grossman. “Your input is vital to the plan being well rounded and informed.”
Fuel reduction workdays are part of some communities' Wildfire Protection Plans.
Photo from HWMO
      Meetings will be held Tuesday, Oct. 28 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Cooper Center in Volcano and from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Na`alehu School. Another meeting takes place Wednesday, Oct. 29 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.   

HONOLULU STAR-ADVERTISER HAS ENDORSED SEN. DAVID IGE in the race for governor. The endorsement mentions Ige’s action plan, Engineering Hawai`i’s Future and highlights his approach to balancing the state budget, supporting business growth through targeted tax credits and improving education by getting resources directly to each school’s leaders.
      The paper’s editorial board also described Ige as “a conciliator, one who has deep working relationships with lawmakers who can bring plans to fruition,” a reference to Ige’s 29-year history at the state Legislature.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

WALK-IN VOTING IN ADVANCE OF THE NOV. 4 General Election is available at Pahala Community Center weekdays through Friday, Oct. 31. Hours are 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

TODAY’S MEETING OF THE KA`U CHAPTER of Hawai`i Farmers Union United has been rescheduled for Thursday, Oct. 30 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Na`alehu Community Center. 
      For more information, call 503-575-9098.

LANA`I COMES TO KA`U TO PARTICIPATE in Ho`okupu Hula No Ka`u Cultural Festival in Pahala. As a cultural exchange, practitioners will be coming from Lana`i to share their talents with Ka`u and Hawai`i Island.
      Kumu hula Debbie Ryder created the festival when she lived on Lana`i, and Pahala members of her Hula Halau O Leionalani traveled to Lana`i to participate. Ryder recently moved to Pahala and brought the festival with her.
      The festival takes place on the grounds of the Plantation Manager’s House in the afternoons and evenings this Friday and Saturday.
      All entertainment is open to the public with no fees.
Diane Ferlatte
      Workshops, some with minimal fees, are scheduled Saturday morning.
      For more, see www.hookupukau.com.
      See more on the festival in this week’s Ka`u News Briefs and in this month’s issue of The Ka`u Calendar.

DIANE FERLATTE, AN INTERNATIONALLY ACCLAIMED and award-winning storyteller, will share ghostly tales, just in time for Halloween, at Pahala Public & School Library a week from today on Wednesday, Oct. 29 at 3 p.m. In Haunted Bayou: Ghostly Tales, Spirits Have Souls, Too, Ferlatte uses expression, gesture and intense emotion to create multiple characters for each story. Through stories, songs, American Sign Language and humor, she brings her tales to life.
      Ferlatte is a native of New Orleans and has visited almost every state in the U.S., including Hawai`i and Alaska, to perform at libraries, major festivals, theaters, conferences and schools. Nominated for a Grammy Award in 2008, Ferlatte said she especially loves performing in public libraries, as she believes that they are one of the places where the tradition of storytelling is to be nurtured and lessons of the stories most need to be heard.
      This 45-minute program is suitable for ages 5 and older. Young children must be accompanied by a parent or caregiver.
      For more information, call 928-2015.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.




See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.









Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014

Guitarist Wailau Ryder, of Washington State, will be coming to Ka`u to participate in Ho`okupu Ka`u Cultural Festival. He is seen here performing with Hula Halau O Leionalani member Jamie Kailiawa at April's Specialty Coffee Association of America convention in Seattle. Photo by Julia Neal
KA`U HIGH & PAHALA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL is one of five Big Island schools and one of 55 statewide that have received Excellence in Wellness Awards. The state Departments of Health recognized the schools for achieving scores of 90 percent or more on the second annual Safety & Wellness Survey for the 2012-2013 school year. The Pahala campus' score was 90.9 percent.
Ka`u High & Pahala Elementary School has received an Excellence in Wellness Award.
      Wellness Guidelines are a set of standards for foods and beverages provided to students that include goals for school-based wellness committees, health and physical education and other practices that support student health. All 255 Hawai`i public non-charter schools have been required to meet the Wellness Guidelines since 2011. SAWS is administered annually to school principals.
      “Healthy and physically active students are more likely to be academically motivated, alert and successful,” said Health Director Dr. Linda Rosen. “Schools that follow the Wellness Guidelines provide a healthy foundation for their students to thrive in school and life.”
      “The importance of health and nutrition standards in our schools cannot be overstated,” said Superintendent Kathryn Matayoshi. “Our Wellness Guidelines help students stay healthy and ready to learn.”
      SAWS data for 2013-14 school year is currently being collected. The Wellness Guidelines, SAWS and public reporting of SAWS data fulfills requirements of the Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 and the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010.
      The report is available at http://www.hawaiipublicschools.org/DOE%20Forms/Health%20and%20Nutrition/SAWS2012-13.pdf.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

The third Mars simulation has begun on Mauna Loa. Photo from HI-SEAS
MAUNA LOA IS MARS AGAIN, as Hawai`i Space Exploration Analog and Simulation's six crew members began their eight-month simulated stay on Mars last Wednesday. This is the third and longest mission on Mauna Loa in a quarry at an elevation of 8,000 feet.
      The HI-SEAS Three mission, funded by NASA, will study team cohesion, with researchers gathering data on cognitive, social and emotional factors that may impact team performance.
      Mission commander is Martha Lenio. Additional crew members are Allen Mirkadyrov, Jocelyn Dunn, Zak Wilson and University of Hawai`i-Hilo graduates Neil Scheibelhut and Sophie Milam.
      See hi-seas.org.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

AFTER FINDING MINIMAL DAMAGE TO FACILITIES, the state Department of Land and Natural Resources is reopening all state parks, state small boat harbors and managed forest areas on all islands today. These state lands were closed on Friday for public safety due to anticipated heavy rains, flooding, high surf and surge related to Hurricane Ana.
      Issuance of all state forest camping and state park camping permits has been restored via the Wiki permit online reservations website at https://camping.ehawaii.gov/camping/welcome.html.
A collapse of Halema`uma`u's wall has widen the crater. Photo from USGS/HVO
      Any persons holding valid permits for state camping areas over the weekend should contact DLNR for refunds.

      The department reminds all swimmers and surfers to avoid murky waters due to potential for shark bite.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HALEMA`UMA`U CRATER IS NOW LARGER, following a collapse of rock from the wall that occurred Sunday around 1:15 a.m. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported that rocks impacting the lava lake triggered an explosion of spatter that fell around Halema`uma`u Overlook, which is within an area closed to the public due to such hazards.
      The scar left by this collapse is visible as the light-colored area marked in the photo.
      See hvo.wr.usgs.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I COUNTY CIVIL DEFENSE reports that lava has once again begun to advance toward Pahoa. The flow front has advanced approximately 30 yards since yesterday and remains approximately 0.6 miles from the Apa`a Street area near Pahoa Transfer Station. A very narrow finger along the east edge of the front has advanced approximately 125 yards and currently remains behind or in back of the flow front and is moving in a northeast direction.

Margaret Masunaga
HAWAI`I STATE SENATE WILL CONVENE tomorrow at 11 a.m. to open a special session to consider judicial appointments of Margaret K. Masunaga to Hawai`i Island’s District Court of the Third Circuit as well as Jeffrey P. Crabtree and Christine E. Kuriyama to O`ahu’s Circuit Court of the First Circuit. 
      Following the official opening of the special session, the Senate Judiciary and Labor Committee will hold decision making on the confirmation and consideration of the appointees at 11:30 a.m. in Room 016 of the Hawai`i State Capitol. Lawmakers today heard from the appointees and those who supported or opposed their appointments.
      On Thursday at 11 a.m., the full Senate will reconvene to vote on the recommendations made by the Judiciary and Labor Committee. Information related to the special session, including testimony and committee reports, can be found online at http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/splsession.aspx?year=2014a.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

HAWAI`I GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES discussed the status of Hawai`i Health Systems Corp. during a forum in Hilo earlier this month. HHSC, which runs the state-owned hospital system, is currently under-funded by the Legislature and has sought emergency appropriations.
Ka`u Hospital is an HHSC facility. Photo by Julia Neal
      Independent candidate Mufi Hannemann said he wants to create public-private partnerships. “The model exists, and it exists very well,” he said. He gave an example of the partnership between North Hawai`i Hospital and Queen’s Medical Center.
      Hannemann also said he would be able to work with hospital workers’ unions, some of whose members he said think hospital administrators wages are too high. “We have to look into that,” he said. “We need a governor who can sit at the table, work with the unions.”
      Republican Duke Aiona agreed with Hannemann that HHSC’s situation is a top priority. He said he would “convene a meeting that would result in a solution.” The meeting would include administrators, unions, employees and legislators.
      “Whether it’s a public-private partnership with a local company or a privatization of the system, or whatever it takes so that we can finally put this to rest, that’s what will be done,” Aiona said.
      State Sen. David Ige also focused on union contracts, saying, “I know that a challenge in the hospital system is that under the state process, civil service, one contract applies to all employees, whether they work in a hospital, which is a 24/7 operation, or they work in a standard office.
      “I know that hospitals need a different kind of contract and employees that work in hospitals need to have contracts that are suited to 24/7 operations. I am running for governor because I understand that the governor has to be actively involved in talking with partners, in negotiating with the unions.”
      See bigislandvideonews.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Joshua Kalima Photo from NPS
WALK-IN VOTING FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION begins today at Pahala Community Center and continues weekdays through Friday, Oct. 31. Hours are 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

JOSHUA KALIMA SHARES HIS KNOWLEDGE and love of creating lei tomorrow from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center lanai in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. 
      Free; park entrance fees apply. 

KAMUELA FARMER ANNA PEACH presents The Pumpkin Primer, a program about sustainable farming methods, today at 2:30 p.m. at Na`alehu Public Library and tomorrow at 10:30 a.m. at Pahala Public & School Library. 
      See squashandawe.com.

TODAY’S AFTER DARK IN THE PARK program features Ka`u Learning Academy co-founder Joe Iacuzzo with a talk entitled Thomas Jefferson to Johnson Space Center: America’s Fossil History.
      The free program begins at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.
      Park entrance fees apply. $2 donations support park programs.

THE PUBLIC IS INVITED TO TOMORROW’S meeting of Ka`u Chapter of Hawai`i Farmers Union United at Na`alehu Community Center at 5:30 p.m. Guest speaker Tane Datta, of Adaptations, Inc., discusses how to bring produce to market.
      Farmers and backyard growers are invited to bring food to share.
      To join the Farmers Union, call 503-575-9098.

HO`OKUPU HULA NO KA`U CULTURAL FESTIVAL takes place in Pahala on the grounds of the Old Plantation Manager’s House this Friday and Saturday. All entertainment is open to the public with no fees.
      Wailau Ryder, who entertained coffee enthusiasts at Specialty Coffee Association of America’s April convention in Seattle, will be flying in from Washington State for the event.
      For more, see www.hookupukau.com.
      See more on the festival in this week’s Ka`u News Briefs and in this month’s issue of The Ka`u Calendar.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.




See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.

Monday, October 20, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Monday, Oct. 20, 2014

Sunlight at dawn yesterday creates a backdrop of Hurricane Ana's clouds as birds fly in the skies near South Point.
Photo by Richard Taylor
HAWAI`I GUBERNATORIAL CANDIDATES shared their views with Big Island residents during a forum in Hilo earlier this month. Duke Aiona, Mufi Hannemann and Sen. David Ige told attendees why they are running for the state’s highest elected office.
Duke Aiona Photos from
Big Island Video News
      Republic Duke Aiona said, “The reason I’m running is I want to take you in a new direction. I don’t want you to have the same system. … It’s really about going in a new direction in regards to businesses, taxes and fees and everything else we face in this island state of ours.
      “But the real reason is I believe my calling is for my grandchildren and my children. I’m at that stage in life right now where I believe I have that one last season of life, and just this past couple of years my wife and I were blessed with a granddaughter Riley and a grandson. … For those of you who are brand-new grandparents, you understand my feeling and my emotion toward my grandchildren. In looking at them, and also looking at my children, you know it was upon me, upon a challenge from my wife. This is what I really wanted to do, which was to walk away from all this. Really, I had really thought about this and prayed about this, and if I would be able to look myself in the mirror and say I did everything I could to make things better for my grandchildren and my children.
      “And obviously the calling was simple. So, I’m here to give you an option taking you in a new direction so that you don’t have to just change out the players and have the same system in place.”
Mufi Hannemann
      Independent candidate Hannemann said, “I want you to think of yourself as an employer. You’re looking to hire the next leader for the state of Hawai`i, and when you do that, you look at their experience; you look at their qualifications; you look at their previous track record.
      “This is a job for someone who has executive experience. This is a big job – 52,000 employees, billions of dollars in an operating budget. You have to be clear that that person can hit the ground running from day one. 
      “It’s also a job that requires a governor to go to Washington, D.C. We’ve lost our perennial powerhouse back there in Sen. Daniel Inouye, and so now more than ever, with a very young delegation, that governor has to go there and ask for federal assistance. I have a proven track record of doing work in Washington, D.C., having worked with our delegation to save Pearl Harbor Shipyard from closing.
      “It also has to be a governor that has an international breadth of experience in dealing in the Pacific Asian region. I was … talking to students at University of Hawai`i-Hilo. I told them our future is in the Pacific Asia Region and what better way than to have a governor who has traveled extensively in that part of the world, has relationships and can build upon those relationships to build a better place.”
Sen. David Ige
      Sen. David Ige said, “I have had the privilege of working with your representatives in the State Capitol for 29 years, three decades, and there have been so many projects that I am proud of to be associated with the Big Island. I still remember the first time I met with Larry Kimura and he just expressed his concern that we would be losing native speakers, that we are down to the last 50 native speakers, and when we lose the language, we lose the culture. I am so proud to have been a part of that groundbreaking up at UH-Hilo to open the Hawaiian College, committed to perpetuation of the Hawaiian language, because I understand that the language is the culture, and our host culture is so important to the state of Hawai`i. …
      “I am running for governor because this election really is about the future of Hawai`i. It’s about the future that you and I want to leave to our children and our children’s children. There are so many issues. As I traveled across the state, and I’ve listened and heard the concern from many of you that government has become disconnected with the people; that it is no longer serving. I’m running for governor because I believe and I’ve heard that you want a change in leadership style. You want a leader that can bring our communities together rather than divide them; a leader who can find common ground and, most importantly, find solutions that move our communities forward.”
      See more at bigislandvideonews.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Hurricane Ana churned the waters at South Point Saturday. Photo by Peter Anderson
WALK-IN VOTING FOR THE GENERAL ELECTION begins tomorrow at Pahala Community Center and continues weekdays through Friday, Oct. 31. Hours are 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Name These Waterfalls. Here are two of several waterfalls
that appeared on the slopes above Wood Valley during
Hurricane Ana. Photo by Julia Neal 
MANY KA`U RESIDENTS HAVE COMMENTED ON FACEBOOK that they have never seen so much water fall from the mountain slopes as they saw Saturday during Hurricane Iselle, when Ka`u got drenched with upwards of 7.5 inches of rain. The Ka`u Calendar continues to seek native Hawaiian names for waterfalls along Hwy 11 and in Wood Valley.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

DOWNED POWER LINES ALONG HWY 11 resulted in a loss of electricity this morning in Pahala, Punalu`u and Wood Valley, according to Hawai`i Electric Light Co. The outage occurred at 4:44 a.m., and power was restored at 8:15 a.m. A HELCO representative did not know what brought the lines down.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES ARE VERY HIGHLY favored by Hawai`i residents, according to a report by the University of Hawai`i. A representative survey of 1,214 Hawai`i residents conducted to assess public attitudes about different technologies for generating electricity showed that 97 percent of the public support increased development of at least some forms of RE in the state.
      “This support for RE was motivated by concerns for environmental protection, sustainability, and energy independence and by frustration with local energy prices,” the report states. Solar and wind power were the most widely accepted forms of RE (with 92 percent and 86 percent favorable opinion, respectively), followed by hydroelectric (76 percent) and geothermal power (75 percent). Municipal waste (58 percent) and biomass combustion (53 percent) were less widely endorsed but were still acceptable to the majority of residents. Only a small segment of the public endorsed conventional sources of energy generation — nuclear (22 percent), oil (13 percent) and coal (12 percent). There were modest differences in attitudes as a function of age, gender, and education, but no differences across counties.
      See http://uhfamily.hawaii.edu.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KAMUELA FARMER ANNA PEACH presents The Pumpkin Primer, a program about her sustainable farming methods, at Ka`u public libraries this week. Programs are at Na`alehu Public Library tomorrow at 2:30 p.m. and Pahala Public & School Library Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
      See squashandawe.com.

TOMORROW’S AFTER DARK IN THE PARK program features Ka`u Learning Academy co-founder Joe Iacuzzo with a talk entitled Thomas Jefferson to Johnson Space Center: America’s Fossil History
      The free program begins at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park.
      Park entrance fees apply. $2 donations support park programs.

KA`U CHAPTER OF HAWAI`I FARMERS UNION UNITED meets at Na`alehu Community Center Wednesday at 5:30 p.m. Guest speaker Tane Datta, of Adaptations, Inc., discusses how to bring produce to market.
      The public is invited to all Ka`u Farmers Union United meetings. Farmers and backyard growers are invited to bring food to share.
      To join the Farmers Union, call 503-575-9098.

HO`OKUPU HULA NO KA`U CULTURAL FESTIVAL takes place in Pahala on the grounds of the Old Plantation Managers House this Friday and Saturday. All entertainment is open to the public with no fees. Friday and Saturday night will feature emcee Skylark and chanter Na`auao Vivas.
      On Saturday evening at 4 p.m. will be an opening pule performed by dancers who attend the morning hula workshop, along with an introduction of Kumu Hula. At 4:30 p.m. will be Hands of Time. At 5 p.m. will be Halau Hula O Kawaimaluhia with Kumu Hula Keoni Jennings. At 5:45 p.m. will be Hula Halau Kahoku Kauhiahionalani with Kumu Hula Sammy Fo. At 6 p.m. will be the Gomes `Ohana. At 6:30 p.m. a Kukui Ceremony; at 6:45 p.m. Keaiwa, featuring Demetrius Oliveira and Halau Hula O Leonalani, with Kumu Hula Debbie Ryder and Haumana from Japan, Okinawa, O`ahu and Pahala. At 7:30 p.m. will be Ka `Imia Na`auao Kahiko from Ka`u School of the Arts and Kumu Hula Marsha Bolosan. At 8 p.m. is Victor Chock & Friends, with the evening ending at 9 p.m. with Hawai`i Aloha.
      For more, see www.hookupukau.com.
      See more on the festival in this week’s Ka`u News Briefs and in this month’s issue of The Ka`u Calendar

VOLCANO ART CENTER’S ANNUAL MEETING, which was postponed due to Hurricane Ana, has been rescheduled for this Sunday, Oct. 26 at 3 p.m. at the Niaulani Campus in Volcano Village.
      There will be live entertainment while ballots are being counted, with current board member, vocalist Desiree Cruz, joined by Loren Wilken on keyboard for a set of Jazz music.
      For more information, call 967-8222.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.