About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, December 8, 2016

Kaʻū News Briefs , Thursday, December 8, 2016


Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at Kīlauea Volcano is helping to drive the draw of visitors to Hawaiʻi Island.
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is the most visited destination in the Islands.
See video of lava upwelling and moving at hvo.wr.usgs.gov.
Image and video from USGS

TOURISM IN HAWAIʻI is continuing its five-year growth, according to figures recently released by the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority. October 2016 proved to be one for the tourist record books – visitor spending in Hawaiʻi increased for fifth consecutive month and more visitors arrived in the state than in any other October on record.
     In October 2016, visitor arrivals to Hawaiʻi Island increased by 5.4 per cent year-over-year, with the most visited place in all of the state being in Kaʻū and Puna – Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park.
     A shorter length of stay on this island resulted in no growth in visitor days. However, visitor spending on Hawaiʻi Island rose by a significant 11.7 per cent to $152.5 million, driven by the increase in average daily spending of 11.2 per cent to $176 per person compared to October last year. However, spending per visitor per day is still the lowest in the state. On Oʻahu it is $206, on Maui $201, and on Kauaʻi it is $193 per day.
Punaluʻu Black Sand Beach, a popular visitor destination. Photo by Julia Neal
     Visitors to the islands spent a total of $1.2 billion in October 2016, a 6.8 per cent increase compared to last October and the fifth consecutive month of year-over-year growth, according to preliminary statistics released by HTA.
     Statewide, total visitor arrivals increased 4.3 percent to set a new record of 717,486 visitors for the month of October.
    This means that Hawaiian Islands have had five years of steady, continual growth in tourism for the first time since the eighties, according to HTA.
    A total of 20,673 visitors arrived by cruise ship, an increase of nearly 17 per cent, while 696,812 arrived by air, a more modest 4 percent increase for October 2016 over October 2015. In October, ten out-of-state cruise ships brought 20,673 visitors to Hawai‘i compared to the eight ships that came in October 2015 with 17,701 visitors. Total cruise visitors (arrivals by cruise ships and by air to board the Hawai‘i home-ported cruise ship) increased by 10.4 percent (compared to October 2015) and numbered 31,937.
     The total number of seats available on flights to the islands during October 2016 was about equal to the number available in October 2015 – just 931,243, indicating that the planes to the state generally flew more full this year.
      HTA statistics on visitor accommodations indicate that the vast majority of visitors to the state stay in hotels, condos or timeshares. However, there was a six per cent increase among those who stayed with friends or relatives, an eight per cent drop in staying at Bed & Breakfasts, and a small increase in those who rent houses. HTA does not have statistics for the number of people who stayed in private homes in October 2015, but lists over 10,000 visitors using them, statewide, in October 2016. This indicates that HTA is now tracking visitors who book accommodations through on-line vacation rental companies, like Airbnb and VRBO.

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THE 21st CENTURY CURES ACT, a comprehensive bill to accelerate medical research, passed the U.S. Senate yesterday. Sen. Mazie Hirono said she gave it her support. “This bill directs additional resources to Hawaiʻi researchers on the cutting edge of uncovering new cancer treatments and strengthens seniors’ access to essential durable medical equipment under Medicare’s new reimbursement system.”
      Dr. Randall Holcombe, Director of University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Centers, said, “I am grateful for Senator Hirono’s support. This legislation will accelerate the pace of cancer research at the University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center and provide direct benefit for the people of Hawaiʻi.”
University of Hawaiʻi’s School of Medicine and Hawaiʻi Cancer Center
        George Greene, Healthcare Association of Hawaiʻi President and CEO, said, “We are grateful that Congress included relief for Hawaiʻi residents living in rural areas in this important legislation.We also reiterate our thanks to Senator Hirono for her tireless work on this issue. This legislation will open the door to further actions that could address the access issues our providers have faced since cuts started almost four years ago. We look forward to continuing our work with Senator Hirono and our government officials in making sure that Hawaiʻi’s seniors have access to the medical equipment and supplies they need.”
     The bill includes $4.8 billion in funding for the National Institutes of Health for research, including nearly $2 billion for Vice President Joe Biden’s moonshot initiative to accelerate finding cures for cancer. As one of only 69 National Cancer Center-designated centers in the nation, the University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center is eligible for funding to advance research on the genetic diversity of tumors and the mechanisms of cancer development. The 21st Century CURES Act also includes language Hirono fought for to help Hawaiʻi seniors access essential medical equipment. Because of changes in Medicare reimbursement rates, Hirono said, Hawaiʻi Medicare beneficiaries have been at a disadvantage in procuring medical equipment such as oxygen tanks and wheelchairs. The legislation passed yesterday eases these cuts, as well as calling for the long-term evaluation of the detrimental effects the rate changes have on rural communities like those in Hawaiʻi.
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NASA’s Juno Spacecraft. Image from NASA
JUPITER, JUNO AND THE NASA INFRARED TELESCOPE are the focus on Friday, Dec. 16 at 7 p.m. at ʻImiloa Astronomy Center in Hilo.  The stream of recent exoplanet discoveries – planets circling other stars will be discussed. Dr. John Rayner, Director of the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility on Mauna Kea, will explain the extensive research and development that is underway in order to better understand how these planets are formed, as well as discovering the formation of planets within the Earth’s solar system.
     Rayner will also discuss how the NASA IRTF provides supporting observations for NASA’s own Juno spacecraft, which is orbiting Jupiter with the goal of measuring the planet’s overall structure and composition and increasing understanding of how it was formed. Jupiter is by far the largest planet in the solar system, and knowledge of its properties is key to understanding the formation of the solar system and possibly other planetary systems.
     Rayner will describe the Juno mission and the role of this spacecraft in this epic quest for knowledge.
     Rayner obtained his education in the United Kingdom with a degree in Physics from Kings College, University of London, and a PhD in astronomical instrumentation from the University of Edinburgh. He has been building infrared instruments at IRTF for the past 27 years and is commissioning a high-resolution infrared spectrograph, optimized for observing star and planet-forming disks, planetary atmospheres and comets.
Dr. John Rayner
    Hosted by Planetarium Technician Emily Peavy, ‘Imiloa’s monthly Mauna Kea Skies program includes observational highlights of the current night sky over Hawai‘i, with the audience able to view prominent constellations and stars visible during this time of year. Mauna Kea Skies planetarium presentations are held on the third Friday of each month. General admission tickets are $10, $8 for members (member level discounts apply). Pre-purchase tickets at ‘Imiloa’s front desk or by phone at 932-8901.
 To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM tournament will be held starting tomorrow through Sunday at the new Kaʻū District Gym. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858.

 To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

THE LIVING MYSTERY SYMPOSIUM is this Saturday, Dec. 10,  from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. at Kīlauea Theater,  with workshops on Sunday, Dec. 11, form 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Koa Conference Room. (Sun). Leading the events with the idea “Is the Supernatural the Super Natural?” will be New York Times best-selling author of Communion, Whitley Strieber. Also speaking is former Chair of the Department  of Religious Studies at Rice University,  Jeffrey Kripal, legendary ethnobotonist Terrence McKenna and author/talk show host Jeremy Vaeni. They will give talks about the nature of the supernatural. Kama‘aina pricing. Free park entrance upon emailed request. 

INSPIRATION HIKE, Saturday, Dec. 10, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Artists are invited to be inspired on a hike at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Artists learn how nature can inspire them to connect with their own creativity on this free, moderately easy, 1.5-mile hike. Register by Dec 6. nps.gov/havo

Rudolph meets one of the Pāhala Christmas Parade's sponsors,
Ed Olson and Sami Stanbro. Photo by Julia Neal
PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE IS THIS SUNDAY, Dec. 11. The parade is in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters. Participants begin gathering at the Pāhala Armory at 11:30 a.m. 

DEADLINE FOR THE DIRECTORY, to sign up for listings and advertising for businesses, community groups, churches and agencies is Dec. 15. The annual business and community resource guide is sponsored by Kaʻū Chamber of Commerce and produced by The Kaʻū Calendar. It includes photography and art by Kaʻū residents, a calendar of events, listings and feature stories including winners of the recent Beauty of Kaʻū art show, sponsored by the Chamber.
     The Directory raises scholarship money for students from Kaʻū throughout their higher education in trades, college and university studies. Printed each January, 7,500 copies of The Directory are distributed throughout Kaʻū and Volcano. To sign up, contact geneveve.fyvie@gmail.com .

FRIEND-RAISER IS NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S Winter Fest theme for Saturday. Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Make New Friends,” declares the poster, which also reports on opportunities to enjoy shave ice, drinks, hot dogs – all for $1. Games are 50 cents. Also featured is a bounce house, raffle, bake sale, splash booth, jail, face painting and information vendors. Winter Fest is sponsored by the Nāʻālehu School Council. Anyone wishing to donate prize items or make a monetary donation should contact Nāʻālehu Elementary vice-principal Christina Juan or student council adviser Amberly Keohuloa at 323-4000.

REP. RICHARD CREAGAN’S OCEAN VIEW FORUM we will be at Ocean View Community Center on Monday, Dec. 19 at 6 p.m. Creagan represents District 5 in the Hawaiʻi House of Representatives and chairs the Committee on Agriculture. District 5 includes Honuʻapo to  Nāʻālehu, to Ocean View, to Capt. Cook, Kealakekua and part of Kailua-Kona. A statement from his offices says

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY features lei, art, festivities at Volcano Art Center though Jan. 2. Free; park entrance fees apply.

BASKETBALL CAMP for children, first through eighth grades, is planned by Ocean View Baptist Church for February. Location is the Kahuku County Park, Feb. 20 - 24 from 3:30 p.m to 4:30 p.m. Organizers are looking for advance registration. Campers will learn skills of basketball and important fundamentals in an atmosphere that is fun and enjoyable. Space is limited. Call 333-0212.

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Wednesday, December 7, 2016

Kaʻū News Briefs Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016

Mounted on the after deck of the Japanese mother submarine, mini-sub HA-19 is boarded by its crew, Kazuo
Sakamaki and Kyoshi Inagi in the pre-dawn hours of Dec. 7, 1941. See Story below.
Painting by Tom W. Freeman

PEARL HARBOR holds special meaning for thousands of Hawai‘i residents and other Americans, especially today, Dec. 7, the 75th anniversary of the attack by the Japanese. The memory is particularly dear to Gov. David Ige and first lady Dawn Amano-Ige, both of whose Japanese American fathers fought in WWII to defend the freedoms of U.S. citizens. At the time of the Pearl Harbor, 40 percent of the people living in Hawaiʻi were of Japanese descent, most of them brought here or descended from those who came here to work in the sugar industry. Many of these Japanese Americans signed up for the U.S. Military when the war began.
Gov. Ige and first lady Dawn Amano-Ige with 
WWII veteran Walter Hughes in Hilo.
     “We welcome this opportunity to honor the members of the ‘Greatest Generation,’” said the governor. “In the past 75 years, we have worked together to usher in the Pacific Era. With this commemoration, we can ‘honor the past and inspire the future to change the world for the better.’”
    “As we know,” said Ige, “the attack on Pearl Harbor changed Hawaiʻi and the world forever. Like others, our fathers decided it was important to prove their loyalty to America through their service and defend our freedoms – even if it meant risking their lives.”
    Gov. and Mrs. Ige have been joining government officials,
 military personnel, celebrities, and grassroots citizens at events since Dec. 1, honoring those who lost their lives on Dec. 7, 1941 in the attack on Pearl Harbor and those who fought in the ensuing years of WWII. The events ranged from musical performances to ceremonies and other events honoring Pearl Harbor survivors and all veterans, active duty military and their families.
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The bow of a Japanese mini sub when it was
discovered in 2002.
Photo from University of Hawaiʻi
A LIVE DIVE to reach two sunken Japanese mini-submarines that were part of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor was witnessed by the public this morning through live streaming on the Internet. A team from NOAA is using a remotely operated vehicle from NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer to revisit the historic wreckage of the WWII mini-subs and document their condition. On the NOAA team are: James Delgado, director of maritime heritage; Brian Kennedy, expedition coordinator; Frank Cantelas, marine archaeologist and Hans Van Tiburg, marine archaeologist and historian.
     On the morning of Dec. 7, 1941, U.S. naval vessels and aircraft on patrol outside Pearl Harbor spotted a partially submerged submarine trying to enter the harbor, but alerts were not immediately sent. Ninety minutes before Pearl Harbor was bombed by air, the sub fired on the destroyer USS Ward which then fired back, sinking it. The event marks the first U.S. shots fired and the country’s entry into WWII in the Pacific.
     The second submarine explored during this morning's dive disappeared Dec. 7, 1941 before the attack. It was discovered in shallow waters in 1951, raised by the U.S. Navy, and taken out to sea to be dumped in deeper water. In 1992, the University of Hawaiʻi’s Undersea Research Laboratory rediscovered it. It has been periodically visited by the university’s submersibles, the last time in 2013.
     The attack on Pearl Harbor by the subs and hundreds of Japanese warplanes, which flew from aircraft carriers,  sank or damaged eight U.S. battleships, three light cruisers, three destroyers and four additional naval vessels. More than 2,400 Americans were killed.


KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP - ONCE A DETAINMENT CENTER - THE TALK is the topic on Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 7 p.m. at the Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Park archaeologist Dr. Jadelyn Moniz-Nakamura discusses the experience of Japanese-Americans of the Issei (first generation) and Nisei (second generation) arrested and detained at KMC during World War II following the Dec 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. Free, park entrance fees apply.                                                            

 KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP - ONCE A DETAINMENT CENTER - THE HIKE focuses on Japanese-American detainees at Kīlauea Military Camp. The Centennial Hike is at Kīlauea Military Camp, on Saturday, Dec 17, 10:30 a.m. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park staff lead a revealing walk through the KMC with a look at how KMC was used as a Japanese detainment camp during World War II. Free, park entrance fees apply.


RATE HIKES AND THE EFFICIENT OPERATION OF HELCO come up at public hearings before the Hawaiʻi Public Utilities Commission in Hilo on Tuesday, Dec. 13 and Kona on Wednesday, Dec. 14. Ililani Media, which covers regulation of utilities in Hawaiʻi, has written a summary for those who might be interested in submitting testimony in person, electronically or by postal service;
    “The PUC wants to know if Big Island residents are happy with the amount they are spending on their electric bills, and whether residents are willing to pay 6.5 percent more. 
    “The Public Utilities Commission and the State Consumer Advocate will be examining every aspect of the operations of the utility. 
    “Is HELCO efficient, or are they wasting ratepayer funds?
    “Should HELCO work closer with Parker Ranch and/or Hawaiʻi Island Energy Cooperative?  Are their costs justified, or is the utility trying to ram through bad ideas and making residents pay for those bad ideas?
Windmills have been providing wind power to HELCO for generations. Photo by Peter Anderson
     “Should the utility receive a greater share of its revenue from performance incentives, and if so, what incentives are reasonable?
      “Is the utility open to hearing what consumers want, or are they single-minded in their approach to ram unpopular projects through the regulatory process?
     “Is HELCO heading in the right, or wrong direction?
      Ililani Media points out that HELCO wrote last week: “Over the last seven years, the growth and spread of Albizia on these circuits has increased, hence requiring more resources to manage this issue.” Is HELCO doing a great job, a reasonable job, or a poor job?
      “Should HELCO buy the Hamakua Energy Partners naphtha-burning power plant in Honokaʻa, or work to develop micro-grids?
     “Should ratepayers fund efforts to increase geothermal, Liquefied Natural Gas, Pumped Hydro, and/or grid upgrades to allow greater amounts of rooftop solar?
Should ratepayers fund grid upgrades to allow more rooftop solar?
Photo by Julia Neal
   “Is the HELCO medical plan (for its employees) reasonable?
    “Yes, the Public Utilities Commission and the State Consumer Advocate will be examining every single cost that HELCO incurs.
     “Is HELCO reasonable tightening their belt, or are they living high off the backs of ratepayers?” asks Ililani Media.
     Encouraging the public to weigh in at the public hearings or in writing, Ililani Media states,   “Those who think the utility is doing a great job, a reasonable job, or a poor job, have the opportunity to let the regulators know.
    “With the exception of any entity that intervenes in the proceeding, this will be the last opportunity for the public to influence the outcome of this rate hike proposal.
    “Those who submit written testimony, or who show up at the hearings, should be aware that the purpose of the hearings is to influence state regulators.
     “The bulk of ratepayers are not engineers, accountants, or lawyers. All views need to be expressed to get a balanced picture of how residents view the utility request for a rate hike. What are HELCO strengths, weaknesses, and opportunities? Does HELCO need more ratepayer money to accomplish their plans?” asks Ililiani.
     The addresses of the public hearings locations on this island are, Tuesday, Dec. 13 at 5:30 p.m. at Hilo High School Cafeteria, 556 Waianuenue Avenue and Wednesday, Dec. 14 at 5:30 p.m. at West Hawaii Civic Center, County Council Chambers, 74-5044 Ane Keohokalole Hwy Kailua-Kona.
Hydroelectric is a possibility at the Keiaiwa Reservoir
above Wood Valley Road.
Photo by Julia Neal
     The Commission will accept testimony in-person, or written testimony by snail mail, or by electronic mail. Written comments should reference Docket No. 2015-0170, and include the author's name and the entity or organization that the author represents. Postal mail can be sent to Public Utilities Commission, 465 South King Street #103, Honolulu, HI 96813.
Electroninc mail can be sent to: puc.comments@hawaii.gov. For more on utilities and public input see www.ililani.media.
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KAPA MAKING, Today, Dec. 7, 10 a.m. -12 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Joni Mae Makuakāne-Jarrell demonstrates the making of the traditional kapa (paper mulberry bark) cloth used by native Hawaiians for clothing. Free, park entrance fees apply.

RED CROSS VOLUNTEER meeting, Thursday, Dec. 8, 7 p.m., HOVE Road Maintenance Corp. office. Help prepare Ocean View for community emergencies. Volunteers and those interested in becoming volunteers. Hannah Uribes, 929-9953 




ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM tournament will be held this weekend at the new Kaʻū District Gym, Dec. 9-11. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858.

 To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter


THE LIVING MYSTERY SYMPOSIUM is this Saturday, Dec. 10,  from 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. at Kīlauea Theater,  with workshops on Sunday, Dec. 11, form 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Koa Conference Room. (Sun). Leading the events with the idea “Is the Supernatural the Super Natural?” will be New York Times best-selling author of Communion, Whitley Strieber. Also speaking is former Chair of the Department  of Religious Studies at Rice University,  Jeffrey Kripal, legendary ethnobotonist Terrence McKenna and author/talk show host Jeremy Vaeni. They will give talks about the nature of the supernatural. Kama‘aina pricing. Free park entrance upon emailed request. 

INSPIRATION HIKE, Saturday, Dec. 10, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m., Artists are invited to be inspired on a hike at the Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Artists learn how nature can inspire them to connect with their own creativity on this free, moderately easy, 1.5-mile hike. Register by Dec 6. nps.gov/havo

Santa and many other characters at Pāhala
Christmas Parade this Sunday.
Photo from Big Island Video News
PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE IS THIS SUNDAY, Dec. 11. The parade is in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters. Participants begin gathering

DEADLINE FOR THE DIRECTORY, to sign up for listings and advertising for businesses, community groups, churches and agencies is Dec. 15. The annual business and community resource guide is sponsored by Kaʻū Chamber of Commerce and produced by The Kaʻū Calendar. It includes photography and art by Kaʻū residents, a calendar of events, listings and feature stories including winners of the recent Beauty of Kaʻū art show, sponsored by the Chamber.
     The Directory raises scholarship money for students from Kaʻū throughout their higher education in trades, college and university studies. Printed each January, 7,500 copies of The Directory ar distributed throughout Kaʻū and Volcano. To sign up, contact geneveve.fyvie@gmail.com.

FRIEND-RAISER IS NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S Winter Fest theme for Saturday. Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Make New Friends,” declares the poster, which also reports on opportunities to enjoy shave ice, drinks, hot dogs – all for $1. Games are 50 cents. Also featured is a bounce house, raffle, bake sale, splash booth, jail, face painting and information vendors. Winter Fest is sponsored by the Nāʻālehu School Council. Anyone wishing to donate prize items or make a monetary donation should contact Nāʻālehu Elementary vice-principal Christina Juan or student council adviser Amberly Keohuloa at 323-4000.

REP. RICHARD CREAGAN’S OCEAN VIEW FORUM we will be at Ocean View Community Center on Monday, Dec. 19 at 6 p.m. Creagan represents District 5 in the Hawaiʻi House of Representatives and chairs the Committee on Agriculture. District 5 includes Honuʻapo to  Naalehu, to Ocean View, to Capt. Cook, Kealakekua and part of Kailua-Kona. A statement from his offices says that in his new chairmanship, he “is excited to help the Big Island and all of Hawaiʻi increase agriculture for all farmers across the State.”

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY holiday exhibit daily through Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Featured at Christmas in the Country is the 17th Annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit, with prizes awarded for the best wreaths. To participate, contact Emily Weiss at 967-8222 or gallery@volcanoartcenter.org . Free; park entrance fees apply.

BASKETBALL CAMP for children, first through eighth grades, is planned by Ocean View Baptist Church for February. Location is the Kahuku County Park, Feb. 20 - 24 from 3:30 p.m to 4:30 p.m. Organizers are looking for advance registration. Campers will learn skills of basketball and important fundamentals in an atmosphere that is fun and enjoyable. Space is limited. Call 333-0212.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL


See www.kaucalendar.com

Tuesday, December 6, 2016

Kaʻū News Briefs Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2016

Swearing in ceremonies for Mayor Harry Kim, County Council member Maile David, Prosecutor Mitch Roth
and others drew hula for the celebration. Photo by Ann Bosted
Mayor Harry Kim begins his third term, after sitting out for two.
Photo by Ann Bosted
KAʻŪ’S ELECTED COUNTY REPRESENTATIVES ARE SWORN IN. They began their new terms yesterday in Hilo, with hula, speeches and Judge Ronald Ibarra administering the oaths.
     County Council member Maile David said after the ceremonies, “I am very, very happy and optimistic with the makeup of this new council. The feeling is that everyone is striving for the same thing, to help their communities and make this island better.” She described the council members as “diverse. With our backgrounds we  will bring a lot of creativity and problem solving.” She applauded incoming Mayor Harry Kim who talked about the diversity of the population of Hawaiʻi Island. “He said that we should be an example for the world in demonstrating what aloha is, and how we treat others. The reason we have aloha is because our whole state is a cosmopolitan state and we have learned how to work together and live together.”
     The mayor, beginning his third term after sitting out for two terms, talked about Mauna Kea, saying that he was saddened about the court case regarding the location of the Thirty Meter Telescope on the mountain. Kim said those involved should have talked about their problems “with their hearts.” While the audience sat spellbound, he said he believed the whole mountain could become a park for education. When interviewed after the ceremony, Kim stated that he would be in favor of the construction of the TMT, provided all Hawaiians can learn and benefit from it.
County Council member Maile David began her second
term yesterday, congratulated by Pāhala’s Phoebe and
Bobby Gomes and family. Photo by Ann Bosted
     County Prosecutor Mitch Roth began his address by introducing a dog he brought to the stage named Faith that helps out at the county prosecutor’s office. He said he had faith in the dog and named her so. He described the many obstacles he had to overcome in order for Faith to be accepted there. Problems included working with those allergic to dogs, those afraid of dogs, and then getting around rules that prohibit dogs in courtrooms and other places that Faith needs to go to do her job.
     Roth mentioned Cold Cases his department has reopened so that victims and families can have closure. He also said that he encourages his staff to treat both victims and defendants with respect, as though they are family.
     Musical entertainment kept the ceremony light and interesting for hundreds of people who attended. The vibrant Hawaiʻi County Band played the prelude and an opening processional and concluded the ceremony with a recessional. Alexandra Roth led the audience in singing The Star-Spangled Banner. She also led Hawaiian anthem Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī.
     Hula dancers from Waiakea High School entertained the audience with two numbers accompanied by Hawaiian chanting and drumming. After the ceremony, a spread of food was offered to attendees for lunch, as the newly inaugurated Mayor, Prosecuting Attorney and County Council members wandered through the exuberant crowd, posing for photos, accepting mountains of leis, countless hugs and endless congratulations.
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AN ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT for the entire Dakota Access Pipeline would be required and approval granted before further construction at Standing Rock, North Dakota, according to Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard. She praised the Department of the Army and its Army Corps of Engineers for denying an easement for the pipeline route, at least until more studies are completed. While visiting the Standing Rock camp over the weekend, Gabbard said that only an Environmental Assessment has been conducted, “which is not anywhere near as comprehensive as the EIS.” Gabbard credited the chair of the Sioux tribe for pressing the Army for the EIS.
Congressswoman Tulsi Gabbard visited Standing Rock and praised
the denial of the right of way for the Dakota Access Pipeline.
Photo from Tulsi Gabbard
      Gabbard said the Sioux tribe, along with thousands of veterans and other supporters who traveled to Standing Rock, “are celebrating. They are joyful that their stance for water, as water protectors, has been successful.”
     The Guardian carried a story yesterday with a headline stating “Standing Rock is a modern-day Indian war. This time Indians are Winning.”  The subhead: “A historic growing movement for Indigenous rights is a key to protecting land and water and preventing climate chaos.” Reporter Martin Lukacs wrote that the Obama administration’s decision to refuse the Dakota Access Pipeline permission to complete its construction has shaken up an old story. ”Its old version was that Indigenous people have always been in the way of progress, their interests a nuisance or threat, their treaties a discardable artifact. The American heroes forged on these high plains of the west were never the Indians: they were the gold-diggers or gamblers, the cowboys or calvary.
     “But over the past months, it became impossible to watch peaceful Indigenous people and supporters attacked by snarling dogs, maced, and shot with rubber bullets and water cannons in freezing conditions, and still see in them a threat. It was impossible to look upon these young Indigenous men and women, in jungle dresses or on horseback, and not observe the courage that America desperately needs. It was impossible to listen to the cry of their slogan and not hear a rallying vision for all of us: Water is Life.” The writer further describes the Standing Rock drama: “This is not high-minded romanticism. It is hard-bitten reality.” See The Guardian To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

GOV. DAVID IGE RESPONDED TO QUESTIONS ABOUT DIVISIVENESS that emerged during and after the recent presidential campaign. Regarding what it means for Hawaiʻi, he released a statement yesterday, saying, “This is Hawai‘i’s opportunity to lead by example. We celebrate diversity better than any other state because we encourage people to be proud of who they are and where they came from and to share that with others. With our Native Hawaiian gift of aloha, this is our chance to show how a multi-cultural community can work.” To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Rep. Richard Creagan hosts forum on Dec. 19.
REP. RICHARD CREAGAN HAS ANNOUNCED AN OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY FORUM for Monday, Dec. 19 at Ocean View Community Center at 6 p.m. Creagan represents District 5 in the Hawaiʻi House of Representatives and chairs the Committee on Agriculture. District 5 includes Honuʻapo to Nāʻālehu, to Ocean View, to Miloliʻi to Capt. Cook, Kealakekua and parts of Kailua-Kona. A statement from his office says that in his new chairmanship, Creagan “is excited to help the Big Island and all of Hawaiʻi increase agriculture for all farmers across the State.” The forum is designed for discussion on all issues related to Ocean View and Kaʻū in preparation for the 2017 Hawaiʻi Legislature which convenes in January.   To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.
AFTER DARK IN THE PARK: Virunga National Park is the topic tonight, Tuesday, Dec. 6 at 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Travel writer and Virunga advocate Kimberly Krusel offers a virtual visit to what has been called the most biologically significant park in Africa. The park located in the Congo was created in 1925 as the first national park on the continent of Africa. It was founded primarily to protect mountain gorillas living in the forests of the Virunga Mountains. Today Virunga is a UNESCO-designated World Heritage Site. Free; park entrance fees apply.

KAPA MAKING, Wednesday, Dec. 7, 10 a.m. -Noon, Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Joni Mae Makuakāne-Jarrell demonstrates the making of the traditional kapa (paper mulberry bark) cloth used by native Hawaiians for clothing. Free, park entrance fees apply.

RED CROSS VOLUNTEER meeting, Thursday, Dec. 8, 7 p.m., HOVE Road Maintenance Corp. office. Help prepare Ocean View for community emergencies. Volunteers and those interested in becoming volunteers. Hannah Uribes, 929-9953

ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM tournament will be held at the new Kaʻū District Gym, this Friday Dec. 9-11. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858.

PANCAKE BREAKFAST, Saturday, Dec. 10, 8-11 a.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033

Dominic Yagong joined Pahala Preschool 
in the 2011 parade. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE IS THIS SUNDAY. The parade is in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters. Participants begin gathering at the old Pāhala Armory at noon and the parade starts at 1 p.m. The parade ends at the Catholic Church on Pikake Street for refreshments. Organizer for almost four decades is Eddie Andrade. For more information, call Andrade at 928-0808.

FRIEND-RAISER IS NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S Winter Fest theme for Saturday. Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Make New Friends,” declares the poster, which also reports on opportunities to enjoy shave ice, drinks, hot dogs – all for $1. Games are 50 cents. Also featured is a bounce house, raffle, bake sale, splash booth, jail, face painting and information vendors. Winter Fest is sponsored by the Nāʻālehu School Council. Anyone wishing to donate prize items or make a monetary donation should contact Nāʻālehu Elementary vice-principal Christina Juan or student council adviser Amberly Keohuloa at 323-4000.

DEADLINE FOR THE DIRECTORY, to sign up for listings and advertising for businesses, community groups, churches and agencies is Dec. 15. The annual business and community resource guide is sponsored by Kaʻū Chamber of Commerce and produced by The Kaʻū Calendar. It includes photography and art by Kaʻū residents, a calendar of events, listings and feature stories including winners of the recent Beauty of Kaʻū art show, sponsored by the Chamber.
     The Directory raises scholarship money for students from Kaʻū throughout their higher education in trades, college and university studies. Printed each January, 7,500 copies of The Directory are distributed throughout Kaʻū and Volcano. To sign up, contact geneveve.fyvie@gmail.com.

Christmas in the Country at Volcano Art Center daily.
CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY holiday exhibit daily through Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Featured at Christmas in the Country is the 17th Annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit, with prizes awarded for the best wreaths. To participate, contact Emily Weiss at 967-8222gallery@volcanoartcenter.org . Free; park entrance fees apply.

BASKETBALL CAMP for children, first through eighth grades, is planned by Ocean View Baptist Church for February. Location is the Kahuku County Park, Feb. 20 - 24 from 3:30 p.m to 4:30 p.m. Organizers are looking for advance registration. Campers will learn skills of basketball and important fundamentals in an atmosphere that is fun and enjoyable. Space is limited. Call 333-0212.

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SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL


See www.kaucalendar.com