About The Ka`u Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, July 1, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Friday, July 1, 2016

The Nature Conservancy divers assess coral bleaching in West Hawai`i to determine what can be done
to best assure reefs survive in a changing climate. See more below. TNC Photo by David Slater
HAWAI`I COUNTY MAYOR BILLY KENOI joined Gov. David Ige and other county mayors and officials to demonstrate a concerted statewide effort to “Fight the Bite” and keep Hawai`i free of diseases spread by mosquitoes. The public education campaign has been relaunched by the state Department of Health and expanded to include all mosquito-borne diseases that pose a threat to Hawai`i, such as Zika, dengue and chikungunya.
      “Hawai`i is fortunate none of these diseases are endemic or native to our state, and we need to work together to make sure it stays this way,” Ige said. “We are part of a nationwide effort to combat diseases spread by mosquitoes, and with the Department of Health leading the charge to bring partners together to raise awareness about mosquito prevention, I’m confident that communities will come together, as our state and county leadership have done, to ensure the safety of our islands.”
State and county officials, including Mayor Billy Kenoi, support
a statewide effort to "Fight the Bite."
Photo from Office of Gov. Ige
      “Mosquito season in Hawai`i is year-round, but with increased travel and more outdoor activities during the summer months, we need to be on our guard and keep residents and visitors well-informed about mosquito-borne diseases and how to reduce the chances of outbreaks in our state,” Health Department Director Dr. Virginia Pressler said. “Hawai`i has been identified as one of the nation’s higher risk areas for the potential spread of the Zika virus, so we hope people will keep mosquito prevention and control top-of-mind all year long.”
      The revamped “Fight the Bite” campaign has two key components. As a follow-up to the response to 264 cases of dengue fever on Hawai`i Island that likely began as a result of an infected traveler, DOH coordinated with Hawai`i Emergency Management Agency and county emergency management/civil defense agencies to develop a response plan specifically for mosquito-borne diseases. It outlines ongoing preparedness activities to take place when there are no cases, as well as response measures for all imported cases and measures in the event of infected mosquitoes transmitting a disease locally.
      The second component includes a research-based public education campaign that leverages numerous broadcast and social media channels to build awareness about mosquito-borne disease prevention. Starting early this month, Hawai`i residents can expect to hear “Fight the Bite” messages on local radio and television stations statewide and see graphics in malls and shopping centers. The $250,000 media campaign is being funded by the state and will include community engagement activities to spearhead and encourage grassroots efforts to reduce mosquito breeding areas across the state. All resources will be made available to the public at the redesigned campaign website at www.FightTheBiteHawaii.com.
      With support of Hawai`i Tourism Authority and state Department of Transportation, people can also expect to see updated “Fight the Bite” information this year in key points-of-entry, such as airports and harbors. “We are working together with our travel industry partners to educate their workers, guests and customers,” said George D. Szigeti, Hawai`i Tourism Authority President and CEO. “We all need to do our part to protect Hawai`i from mosquito-borne illnesses.”
      Educational outreach to youth is also an important piece of the campaign. “Many educators working at the Department of Education already offer information about mosquito-borne disease prevention to students,” Deputy Superintendent Stephen Schatz said. “DOH and DOE are working to identify new opportunities and to train staff so that they may better educate Hawai`i’s students.”
      For more information about the education campaign, response plan and mosquito-borne diseases and how to prevent them, see www.FightTheBiteHawaii.com.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Man-made threats add more stress to already unhealthy
coral reefs, according to researchers.
TNC Photo by David Slater
CORAL REEFS’ VARIATIONS in response to climate change can help managers develop strategies to keep the reefs alive, according to a new study conducted by The Nature Conservancy of Hawai`i in partnership with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and Marine Applied Research Center.
      Researchers sought to assess the condition of reefs of South Kohala and North Kona and to identify factors that lead to resilience, or the ability of a reef to recover from extreme events such as coral bleaching.
      The study looked at West Hawai`i reefs after a major bleaching event last year caused significant damage. At sites surveyed, rates of partially or fully bleached coral colonies ranged from 38 percent to 92 percent, with more than 90 percent mortality in some sites.
      “Ocean waters are getting hotter and more acidic, and that’s bad news for coral reefs,” said Dr. Eric Conklin, TNC’s director of Marine Science, who presented the study results at the 13th International Coral Reef Symposium. “What we have been doing is not sufficient to protect reefs into the future, so the fundamental question is: What can we do to best assure reefs survive in a changing climate?”
      Researchers determined that three major factors are most important in determining resilience in West Hawai`i: which corals handle increases in water temperature best, which reefs have new corals readily settling on available surfaces, and how much of the reef has already been invaded by algae, which compete with coral.
      According to Conklin, “Rising sea surface temperatures are a threat to corals globally, but man-made threats are adding more stress to reefs in West Hawai`i. To make our reefs more resilient, we need to manage the threats that we can, like reducing fishing pressure on fish that protect reef health by keeping them clean of harmful algae, or reducing runoff of sediments from coastal development and nutrients from outdated wastewater treatment systems.”
      The Conservancy selected the Kona Coast in part because it has been identified by both NOAA and the state as a particularly important coral reef site, and because the area’s community groups are concerned and engaged in managing their reefs. The immediate next step is to present the survey results to government and community partners, so they can begin incorporating resilience into their management actions.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Lava follows several courses on its way down Pulama Pali.
Photo from USGS/HVO
THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW southeast of Pu`u `O`o continued to advance during the past day, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reported this morning. Yesterday afternoon, the flow front was beyond the base of Pulama pali, a steep, lava-mantled fault scarp on Kilauea’s south flank along the western boundary of the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision. The flow is about 4.7 miles long as measured along the tube’s axis.
      Hawai`i County opened a lava viewing area to the public yesterday. From 3 p.m. to 9 p.m., visitors can park near the end of Hwy 130 in Puna and walk three miles on a gravel road to the area.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I COUNTY ECONOMIC Opportunity Council is requesting letters from residents, organizations and community leaders that can support its application for funding from USDA Rural Development to help purchase a mini-bus to serve Ka`u. The mini-bus would enable HCEOC to provide essential transportation services to underserved Ka`u residents. It would have seating for twelve passengers, plus room for two passengers in wheelchairs. If possible, it would be configured at higher safety standards of school buses.
      HCEOC’s free transportation services would provide door-to-door service within a flexible route and schedule that strives to accommodate needs of low-income clients. Service would usually be offered Monday through Friday from 5 a.m. to 6 p.m., adjusted for passenger convenience and scheduling necessities. Instead of clients needing to go to a designated bus stop at certain times, clients could be picked up at and returned to their residence at requested times, subject to road conditions and scheduling needs. Door-to-door convenience would also be provided at destinations, such as doctors’ offices, hospitals, government offices, financial institutions, senior centers, shops, funerals and other locations.
      A public information meeting about the application will be held on Tuesday, July 5 at 1 p.m. at HCEOC’s office in back of Na`alehu Community Center.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

DR. RHONDA LOH LEADS an easy, 1.2-mile hike through Kipukapuaulu in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. The park’s inaugural Special Ecological Area is a hot spot of biological diversity, with more native tree species per acre than any other forest in the park.
      Free; park entrance fees apply.
      See nps.gov/havo.

NA`ALEHU INDEPENDENCE DAY parade and celebration is tomorrow. The parade begins at 11 a.m., with activities, food and senior Bingo following at Na`alehu Park.

THE FOURTH OF JULY RODEO in Na`alehu is tomorrow, Saturday, July 2 and Sunday July 3 with gold buckles for the winners of such traditional paniolo, Hawaiian cowboy events as Po`o Wai U.  Youth barrels, dummy roping, and goat undecorating are on tap for keiki. For adults the contests include bull riding, tied down roping,  wahine breakaway, wahine mugging, double mugging, open dally, team 90s and kane-waihine mugging. Ticket prices are $8 at the gate. Slack roping starts at 8 a.m. with the rodeo at noon both days. It is sponsored by Ka`u Roping & Riding Association.
Ka`u Roping & Riding Association hosts its annual Fourth of July Rodeo on Saturday and Sunday.
Photo by Julia Neal
LIVE & LOCAL COMEDY for all ages comes to Pahala Community Center Sunday at 7 p.m., featuring Augie T, Frank De Lima and Mel Cabang. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door.
      Call 990-0474, or see AugieT.com.

THE LEGACY OF MARY KAWENA PUKUI, of Her Beloved Ka`u is the topic a week from today, 
on Friday, July 8 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Na`alehu Community Center. Pukui’s grandson La`akea Suganuma, president of Mary Kawena Pukui Cultural Preservation Society, presents the program along with Pukui’s great grandchildren and great-great grandchildren.
      Sponsored by Uhane Pohaku Na Moku O Hawai`i, Inc., along with Debbie & Kawehi Ryder.
      Refreshments will be served.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_July_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.



Thursday, June 30, 2016

Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Thursday, June 30, 2016

Keiki enjoy Pahala Community Center's new playground after yesterday's ribbon-cutting ceremony.
See more below. Photos by Ron Johnson
WITH THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW from Pu`u `O`o making its way over Pulama Pali along the western boundary of the former Royal Gardens Subdivision in lower Puna, Hawai`i County opens the area to lava viewing today.
Lava reaches a mango tree in a kipuka
on its way toward the Puna Coast.
Photo from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
      Lava viewing along the three-mile stretch of the county’s portion of an emergency road that leads to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is permitted between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily. The emergency road was built when lava threatened to cut off lower Puna in 2014. If lava had covered Hwy 130 near Pahoa, residents’ and emergency vehicles would have exited lower Puna by driving on the emergency road that hooks up with the national park road that climbs up the pali to Hwy 11 in Volcano. 
      For lava viewing, viewers will walk. No vehicles will be allowed.
      Security guards will be posted on the emergency road or Hwy 130 before the entrance to Kalapana Gardens to provide lava viewing information and to direct parking. As in previous lava viewing events, visitors will be asked to park in marked areas near the end of the paved portion of Hwy 130.
      Visitors are reminded that the emergency road is a gravel road that traverses over older lava flows and ends at the National Park Service boundary. Visitors are also reminded to prepare for the trek with proper footwear, sunscreen, warm clothing and water.
      The county has established lava flow viewing areas along Hwy 130 as far back as 2001 and most recently in Pahoa in 2014.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I COUNTY OFFICIALS JOINED Ka`u keiki, kupuna and other residents to celebrate two new playgrounds yesterday. Playgrounds at Na`alehu Park and Pahala Community Center feature a variety of slides, climbing walls and ropes and twirling bars, along with park benches. Artificial turf covers the grounds’ padded surfaces. 
Junior Miss Ka`u Coffee Karlee Fukunaga-Camba, First Junior Miss
Princess Calaysa Koi, Third Junior Miss Princess Helena Nihipali-Sesson
and Second Miss Peaberry Khloe Moses helped Mayor Billy Kenoi to
celebrate opening of the playgrounds.
      Leading the blessing was Mayor Billy Kenoi. He said his vision is to provide playgrounds as a way to bring communities together. He said that such facilities can help reduce the need for more police because they create safe places for children and families to enjoy activities together.
      Also attending were Hawai`i County Council members Maile David, Greggor Ilagan and Karen Eoff.
      David, Ka`u's council member, said the day was such an uplifting experience, being able to see keiki enjoy new experiences the playgrounds offer. She said the county pushed to have the Na`alehu playground ready in time for the Fourth of July celebration there this Saturday.
      Deputy County Parks Director James Komata, Pahala Park manager Nona Makuakane and Na`alehu Park manager Richard Karasuda were also on hand.
      Junior Miss Ka`u Coffee Karlee Fukunaga-Camba, First Junior Miss Princess Caylasa Koi, Third Junior Miss Princess Helena Nihipali-Sesson and Second Miss Ka`u Coffee Peaberry Klohe Moses joined the celebration, representing the Ka`u Coffee industry.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I ISLAND POLICE INFORM the public that operating a farm vehicle, such as a tractor, on county roadways or state highways is prohibited and in violation of numerous equipment and regulatory offenses.
Keiki can climb rock walls and ropes, twirl on bars and try
a variety of slides at the playgrounds.
      In addition, those vehicles are unable to maintain the minimum posted speed limit, which impedes traffic and is a danger for pedestrians and bicyclists using roadway shoulders.
      Exceptions are for construction and/or maintenance tractors used at construction or cleaning sites.
      The proper method of transporting farm vehicles on public roadways is with use of a properly inspected and registered vehicle and trailer.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TOTAL VISITOR ARRIVALS TO HAWAI`I rose 1.3 percent in May, and visitor expenditures declined 2.4 percent, Hawai`i Tourism Authority reported.
      “Visitor arrivals and expenditures year-to-date show that Hawai`i is still ahead of last year’s record-setting pace, with total arrivals up 3.1 percent and spending up one percent,” said George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of HTA. “Visitors from our two largest markets, the U.S. West and East, led arrivals in May and continues its positive course of year-over-year growth, despite a slight drop in arrivals last month due to travel around Easter holiday falling in March instead of April this year.
Ka`u residents greet Mayor Billy Kenoi and Hawai`i County
Council member Maile David.
      “On the international side, arrivals from Korea were strong in May, seeing a double-digit increase year-over-year. However, declines in arrivals and expenditures from the Japan and Canada markets can be attributed to a weaker exchange rate and the fact that Golden Week in Japan shifted travel to late April this year versus the first week of May in 2015.
      “We are also closely monitoring the situation in Europe and how that may affect travel. It’s too early to know precisely how the situation there will affect the global economy, including tourism related impacts. In 2015, 143,434 visitors from Europe came to Hawai`i, with 50,469 of that total coming from the United Kingdom. This represents less than two percent of the 8.6 million visitors who came to Hawaii last year.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

GOV. DAVID IGE HAS APPOINTED attorney Thomas Gorak to the state Public Utilities Commission. Since 2013, Gorak has worked closely with the PUC as its chief counsel, serving as chief legal and regulatory advisor.
      Gorak has practiced law since 1977, specializing in public utility regulation at both the federal and state levels for the past 37 years. He previously worked on utility regulatory matters in Maryland and practiced law in Washington, D.C., where he provided client services that included analyzing and addressing their positions in public utility matters.
Thomas Gorak Photo from Gov. Ige's office
      Gorak opened his solo practice in 1995 and moved his firm to Hawai`i in 2003, where he continued to represent clients in utility matters, both on the mainland and before the PUC.
      “Tom has years of national and international experience in utility regulatory matters,” Ige said. “He has been closely engaged with the PUC as its chief counsel for the past three years and will be able to step in immediately to participate in discussions and decision making on all matters pending before the commission. There will be no delay in addressing the many issues that must be resolved to meet our renewable energy goals.”
      “I very much appreciate the governor’s faith in me as the state moves forward on the path to a 100 percent renewable energy future,” Gorak said. “I believe my experience and background, along with the support of the superb staff of the Public Utilities Commission, will allow me to contribute to the commission’s efforts in meeting the challenges associated with achieving this goal.”
      Gorak replaces Michael Champley, whose term expires today. Gorak begins his term on tomorrow. His appointment is subject to Senate approval.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

JOIN STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Volunteers cut invasive Himalayan ginger on Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park trails. Loppers and gloves are provided. Participants are encouraged to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and closed-toe shoes. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      See nps.gov/havo.

Pa`u riders return to Na`alehu's Fourth of July Parade this Saturday.
Photo by Peter Anderson
NA`ALEHU INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE and celebration is Saturday. The parade begins at 11 a.m. at Na`alehu School and travels up Hwy 11 to Na`alehu Hongwanji. Pa`u riders will again grace the highway, along with school groups, nonprofits, motorcyclists, classic-car owners, businesses, politicians and more. 
      `O Ka`u Kakou sponsors the parade and activities at Na`alehu Park, including keiki treats, bounce houses and senior Bingo and lunch.
      Call 929-9872 for more information.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.


Ka`u Calendar News Briefs Thursday, June 30, 2016

Keiki enjoy Pahala Community Center's new playground after yesterday's ribbon-cutting ceremony.
See more below. Photos by Ron Johnson
WITH THE ACTIVE LAVA FLOW from Pu`u `O`o making its way over Pulama Pali along the western boundary of the former Royal Gardens Subdivision in lower Puna, Hawai`i County opens the area to lava viewing today.
Lava reaches a mango tree in a kipuka
on its way toward the Puna Coast.
Photo from Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
      Lava viewing along the three-mile stretch of the county’s portion of an emergency road that leads to Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park is permitted between 3 p.m. and 9 p.m. daily. The emergency road was built when lava threatened to cut off lower Puna in 2014. If lava had covered Hwy 130 near Pahoa, residents’ and emergency vehicles would have exited lower Puna by driving on the emergency road that hooks up with the national park road that climbs up the pali to Hwy 11 in Volcano. 
      For lava viewing, viewers will walk. No vehicles will be allowed.
      Security guards will be posted on the emergency road or Hwy 130 before the entrance to Kalapana Gardens to provide lava viewing information and to direct parking. As in previous lava viewing events, visitors will be asked to park in marked areas near the end of the paved portion of Hwy 130.
      Visitors are reminded that the emergency road is a gravel road that traverses over older lava flows and ends at the National Park Service boundary. Visitors are also reminded to prepare for the trek with proper footwear, sunscreen, warm clothing and water.
      The county has established lava flow viewing areas along Hwy 130 as far back as 2001 and most recently in Pahoa in 2014.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I COUNTY OFFICIALS JOINED Ka`u keiki, kupuna and other residents to celebrate two new playgrounds yesterday. Playgrounds at Na`alehu Park and Pahala Community Center feature a variety of slides, climbing walls and ropes and twirling bars, along with park benches. Artificial turf covers the grounds’ padded surfaces. 
Miss Ka`u Coffee princesses joined Mayor Billy Kenoi to open
Ka`u's new playgrounds yesterday.
      Leading the blessing was Mayor Billy Kenoi. He said his vision is to provide playgrounds as a way to bring communities together. He said that such facilities can help reduce the need for more police because they create safe places for children and families to enjoy activities together.
      Also attending were Hawai`i County Council members Maile David, Greggor Ilagan and Karen Eoff.
      David, Ka`u's council member, said the day was such an uplifting experience, being able to see keiki enjoy new experiences the playgrounds offer. She said the county pushed to have the Na`alehu playground ready in time for the Fourth of July celebration there this Saturday.
      Deputy County Parks Director James Komata, Pahala Park manager Nona Makuakane and Na`alehu Park manager Richard Karasuda were also on hand.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

HAWAI`I ISLAND POLICE INFORM the public that operating a farm vehicle, such as a tractor, on county roadways or state highways is prohibited and in violation of numerous equipment and regulatory offenses.
Keiki can climb rock walls and ropes, twirl on bars and try
a variety of slides at the playgrounds.
      In addition, those vehicles are unable to maintain the minimum posted speed limit, which impedes traffic and is a danger for pedestrians and bicyclists using roadway shoulders.
      Exceptions are for construction and/or maintenance tractors used at construction or cleaning sites.
      The proper method of transporting farm vehicles on public roadways is with use of a properly inspected and registered vehicle and trailer.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

TOTAL VISITOR ARRIVALS TO HAWAI`I rose 1.3 percent in May, and visitor expenditures declined 2.4 percent, Hawai`i Tourism Authority reported.
      “Visitor arrivals and expenditures year-to-date show that Hawai`i is still ahead of last year’s record-setting pace, with total arrivals up 3.1 percent and spending up one percent,” said George D. Szigeti, president and CEO of HTA. “Visitors from our two largest markets, the U.S. West and East, led arrivals in May and continues its positive course of year-over-year growth, despite a slight drop in arrivals last month due to travel around Easter holiday falling in March instead of April this year.
Ka`u residents greet Mayor Billy Kenoi and Hawai`i County
Council member Maile David.
      “On the international side, arrivals from Korea were strong in May, seeing a double-digit increase year-over-year. However, declines in arrivals and expenditures from the Japan and Canada markets can be attributed to a weaker exchange rate and the fact that Golden Week in Japan shifted travel to late April this year versus the first week of May in 2015.
      “We are also closely monitoring the situation in Europe and how that may affect travel. It’s too early to know precisely how the situation there will affect the global economy, including tourism related impacts. In 2015, 143,434 visitors from Europe came to Hawai`i, with 50,469 of that total coming from the United Kingdom. This represents less than two percent of the 8.6 million visitors who came to Hawaii last year.”
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

GOV. DAVID IGE HAS APPOINTED attorney Thomas Gorak to the state Public Utilities Commission. Since 2013, Gorak has worked closely with the PUC as its chief counsel, serving as chief legal and regulatory advisor.
      Gorak has practiced law since 1977, specializing in public utility regulation at both the federal and state levels for the past 37 years. He previously worked on utility regulatory matters in Maryland and practiced law in Washington, D.C., where he provided client services that included analyzing and addressing their positions in public utility matters.
Thomas Gorak Photo from Gov. Ige's office
      Gorak opened his solo practice in 1995 and moved his firm to Hawai`i in 2003, where he continued to represent clients in utility matters, both on the mainland and before the PUC.
      “Tom has years of national and international experience in utility regulatory matters,” Ige said. “He has been closely engaged with the PUC as its chief counsel for the past three years and will be able to step in immediately to participate in discussions and decision making on all matters pending before the commission. There will be no delay in addressing the many issues that must be resolved to meet our renewable energy goals.”
      “I very much appreciate the governor’s faith in me as the state moves forward on the path to a 100 percent renewable energy future,” Gorak said. “I believe my experience and background, along with the support of the superb staff of the Public Utilities Commission, will allow me to contribute to the commission’s efforts in meeting the challenges associated with achieving this goal.”
      Gorak replaces Michael Champley, whose term expires today. Gorak begins his term on tomorrow. His appointment is subject to Senate approval.
      To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

JOIN STEWARDSHIP AT THE SUMMIT tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Volunteers cut invasive Himalayan ginger on Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park trails. Loppers and gloves are provided. Participants are encouraged to wear long-sleeved shirts, long pants and closed-toe shoes. Meet at Kilauea Visitor Center.
      See nps.gov/havo.

Pa`u riders return to Na`alehu's Fourth of July Parade this Saturday.
Photo by Peter Anderson
NA`ALEHU INDEPENDENCE DAY PARADE and celebration is Saturday. The parade begins at 11 a.m. at Na`alehu School and travels up Hwy 11 to Na`alehu Hongwanji. Pa`u riders will again grace the highway, along with school groups, nonprofits, motorcyclists, classic-car owners, businesses, politicians and more. 
      `O Ka`u Kakou sponsors the parade and activities at Na`alehu Park, including keiki treats, bounce houses and senior Bingo and lunch.
      Call 929-9872 for more information.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_June_2016.pdf.

See kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.html
and kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory2016.pdf.