About The Ka`u Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Monday, May 25, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Monday, May 25, 2015

Residents and groups have one more week to sign up to participate in Na`alehu's Fourth of July parade. Photo by Julia Neal
UNITED STATES AND HAWAI`I STATE FLAGS were flown at half-staff from sunrise to 12 p.m. today by order of Gov. David Ige in memory of the brave Americans who sacrificed their lives for the freedom and security of our nation. 
      “We pause on this Memorial Day to remember and honor those who answered the call to serve our country and paid the ultimate price to preserve and protect our freedom,” Ige said. “I encourage everyone in Hawai`i to take some time this holiday weekend to show your appreciation and gratitude to those who have fought and who continue to fight for our freedom.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Today, the country honors those who died in America's wars.
THE FIRST NATIONAL CELEBRATION of Memorial Day on May 30, 1868 to commemorate the sacrifices of Civil War soldiers.
      “We do not know one promise these men made, one pledge they gave, one word they spoke; but we do know they summed up and perfected, by one supreme act, the highest virtues of men and citizens,” said former Union General and sitting Ohio Congressman James Garfield at Arlington National Cemetery on that date. “For love of country they accepted death, and thus resolved all doubts and made immortal their patriotism and their virtue.”
      After Garfield’s speech, 5,000 participants helped decorate graves of the more than 20,000 Union and Confederate soldiers buried there.
      The event was inspired by local observances of the day that had taken place in several towns throughout America in the three years after the Civil War. In 1873, New York was the first state to designate Memorial Day as a legal holiday. By the late 1800s, many more cities and communities observed Memorial Day, and several states had declared it a legal holiday. After World War I, it became an occasion for honoring those who died in all of America’s wars and was then more widely established as a national holiday throughout the United States.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Pres. Obama at Arlington National Cemetery today.
Photo from Office of the President
PRES. BARACK OBAMA SPENT the first Memorial Day since the end of the war in Afghanistan at Arlington National Cemetery, remembering the more than 2,200 American patriots who gave their lives in that conflict, as well as all of America’s fallen soldiers. The President asked that all Americans spend the day honoring the memory and sacrifice of those heroes and “remain committed to the cause of freedom and the country for which they fought.” 
      “This weekend is Memorial Day – a time to pay tribute to all our men and women in uniform who’ve ever given their lives so that we can live in freedom and security,” Pres. Obama said in his weekly address. “These Americans gave everything they had – not for glory, not even for gratitude, but for something greater than themselves.”
      In closing his remarks at Arlington, Pres. Obama said, “The Americans who rest beneath these beautiful hills, and in sacred ground across our country and around the world, they are why our nation endures. Each simple stone marker, arranged in perfect military precision, signifies the cost of our blessings. It is a debt we can never fully repay, but it is a debt we will never stop trying to fully repay. By remaining a nation worthy of their sacrifice. By living our own lives the way the fallen lived theirs – a testament that ‘Greater love has no other than this, than to lay down your life for your friends.’
      “We are so grateful for them. We are so grateful for the families of our fallen. May God bless our fallen heroes and their families, and all who serve. And may He continue to bless the United States of America.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard honors her fallen comrades.
Photo from Office of the Representative
“MEMORIAL DAY IS A TIME TO REFLECT and honor our fallen heroes,” U.S. Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said. “When I came home from my deployment to Iraq, I stepped off the plane and into the warm embrace of my family. I felt an indescribable joy, but at the same time I felt a sad and deep sense of loss for my brothers and sisters in uniform who would never have the chance to come home. Today, we remember these great Americans and show our gratitude for their sacrifice and service.” 
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

NEXTERA ENERGY AND HAWAIIAN ELECTRIC INDUSTRIES are questioning the motives of several of the 29 intervenors in Hawai`i Public Utilities Commission’s examination of the proposed merger of the two utilities.
      The utilities are concerned about sharing vital information with organizations that may be considering alternatives to the merger.
      “This restricted information will be only authorized to those parties for which applicants have reasonable assurance that they are not engaged in and do not plan to engage in a competing acquisition of HEI or of a controlling interest in one or more of the Hawaiian Electric companies,” NextEra and HECO told the PUC in its filing. “Applicants have and will be designating various due diligence, projections and other commercially sensitive and competitive information as ‘restricted information.’”
      Entities questioned by the companies are KULOLO, AES Hawai`i Inc., The Gas Co., Hawai`i PV Coalition, Hawai`i Renewable Energy Alliance, Hina Power Corp., Kaua`i Island Utility Cooperative, Paniolo Power Co., Renewable Energy Action Coalition of Hawai`i Inc., SunEdison and SunPower Corp.
      Robert Harris, of KULOLO, or Keep our Utilities Locally Owned and Locally Operated, told Honolulu Star-Advertiser that the organization was created to raise awareness about a public acquisition of Hawaiian Electric Light Co. “It’s not designed to buy HECO,” he said.
      See staradvertiser.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Lava continues to change the landscape in Kahauale`a Natural Area Reserve.
Photos from USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory
KAHAUALE`A NATURAL AREA RESERVE remains closed following Friday’s decision by the state Board of Land & Natural Resources to keep the area off limits for another two years. The area has been closed since July 2007 due to volcanic activity. 
      Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists reported that Pu`u Kahauale`a, which has been buried slowly by the Pu`u `O`o eruption over the years, is now nearly covered by the June 27th lava flow. The image on the left shows Pu`u Kahauale`a on June 30, 2014, a few days after the June 27th flow started (the `a`a flow just behind the cone is from the early stages of that flow); the image on the right shows Pu`u Kahauale`a on May 21 from nearly the same perspective. Only the highest parts of Pu`u Kahauale`a’s twin craters remain.
      According to Tom Callis, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald, Hawai`i Fire Department has responded to 22 incidents involving lost hikers in the area since May 2008.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IS THE TOPIC of a Ka`u Community Development Plan focused discussion tomorrow at 5:30 p.m. at Na`alehu Community Center. Participants’ questions, comments and suggestions will be documented. As appropriate, the CDP Planning Team will use outputs of the discussion to do additional analysis, refine the CDP rationale and/or recommend CDP revisions.
Hawaiian implements by Rick Lamontagne are on display Wednesday.
Photo from NPS
      Public input on the draft Ka`u CDP is due a week from today on Monday, June 1. The CDP is available at local libraries and community centers and online at kaucdp.info.

PARK VOLUNTEER RICK LAMONTAGNE displays Hawaiian implements that he has replicated Wednesday from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center lanai in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Part of the `Ike Hana No`eau: Experience the Skillful Work program. Free; park entrance fees apply.
ONE WEEK FROM TODAY is the deadline to sign up to participate in this year’s annual Fourth of July parade in Na`alehu. Contact Debra McIntosh at 929-9872 to register floats or parade walkers.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.



See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_May2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.




Sunday, May 24, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Sunday, May 24, 2015

Ka`u Roping & Riding Association has announced plans for its 38th annual Fourth of July weekend rodeo. Photo by Julia Neal

EARTH MATTERS FARM HOSTED more than 50 people yesterday at the monthly meeting of the Ka`u chapter of Hawai`i Farmers Union United. The farm, owned by Greg Smith, president of the Ka`u chapter, is near the corner of South Point and Kama`oa Roads and produces organic vegetables for a community-assisted agriculture program.
The Kohala Center encourages Ka`u farmers to participate in the Farm
to School movement.
      Anna Lisa Okoye, of The Kohala Center, talked about building relationships between farms and schools and how farmers can sell to distributors to place their produce in the state Department of Education schools. Charter schools have more flexibility in buying directly from farmers. Some charter schools choose to buy as local as they can. She gave the example of a school on the Hamakua Coast that attempts to buy the most food it can from producers located within 40 miles of the school itself.
      Okoye encouraged farmers to be a part of the Farm to School movement that teaches youth where food comes from and how to eat a healthy diet. She said that part of the problem is that menus in public schools can be dictated for the entire state school system, limiting the opportunity to include food grown near or on the campus.
      A Farm to School connection event will be held on Tuesday, June 30 from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Hawai`i Academy of Arts and Science at 15-1397 Homestead Road in Pahoa. Farmers can bring samples of produce or locally produced value-added products and meet school food buyers who want to buy for school food programs, including the USDA Fresh Fruit & Vegetable Program. Those without crops ready for harvest can bring photos of produce and farms.
      Farmers can reserve tables to exhibit produce and information about farms and businesses. Registration deadline is June 25 at koha.la/f2smixer or by calling 887-6411.
      Gabriel Howearth talked about the importance of keeping a local seed bank for food crops that grow well here.
      Bob Shaffer, a soil consultant, talked about soil kept healthy with cover crops, microorganisms, compost and mulch, along with tillage and mineral management.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Ledward Ka`apana
LEDWARD KA`APANA’S JUS’ CRUZIN’ won in the Instrumental Album category at last night’s Na Hoku Hanohano awards. The Big Island native and master of `ukulele and slack key guitar has taught visitors and local students during past Hawaiian Music & Lifestyle workshops in Pahala sponsored by the Center for Hawaiian Music Studies. 
      Other nominations in the same category included more Pahala workshop teachers, Bolo, with his ‘ekahi, and Jeff Peterson with Island Breeze.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HAWAI`I’S U.S. SENATORS OPPOSE trade promotion authority legislation, also known as “fast track” authority, which was passed by the U.S. Senate 62-37.
      Fast track bills give the President authority to negotiate trade deals on the condition that Congress will vote to accept or reject the deal without making changes, as long as the deal meets the objectives set by Congress.
      “That’s a lot of authority to grant without knowing what a final agreement will look like,” said Sen. Mazie Hirono. “For example, the Administration has been negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would represent 40 percent of the world’s economy, and very few people, including members of Congress and the public, know what is in the agreement. Past fast track bills have not put strong enough standards in place and we’ve seen whole communities and industries hurt as a result.
      “Trade deals should help, not hurt, middle class families and workers. I voted against this bill because it does not go far enough to ensure future trade deals will include fair wages, a decent standard of living and a clean environment for all.”
      Sen. Brian Schatz said, “I oppose the procedures contained in this bill, and I am seriously concerned about using fast-track to pass trade agreements that do not reflect the best interests of the American people and undermine the prerogatives of the Congress. Corporate interests should not be the driving force for public policy decisions on public health, consumer safety and the environment.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

HI`ILEI ALOHA LLC, A NONPROFIT SUBSIDIARY of Office of Hawaiian Affairs, holds a grant-writing workshop and leadership development on Wednesday, June 10 from 9 a.m. to noon at Ka`u Rural Health Community Center in Pahala. This free workshop will help nonprofit organizations, leaders and individuals interested in improving their communities by teaching them how to write a grant application. 
      Participants will learn basic techniques and strategies of grant writing and become familiar with key parts of grant applications and terms such as needs assessment, budgets and work plans. The class will also teach the difference between government, foundation and corporate grants. Participants will also continue to receive notification of upcoming grant opportunities.
      The class will also be held in Hilo on Wednesday, July 15 and in Kona on Friday, July 17.
      To register or for information, contact Jennifer at 596-8990 ext.1013 or jenniferc@hiilei.org.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Paniolo wrangles a cow during a KRRA rodeo at Na`alehu Arena.
Photo by Julia Neal
THE PANIOLO TRADITION OF RANCHERS and other rodeo riders gathering together with families will fill the Na`alehu Arena grounds over the July 4 weekend with events designed for keiki, wahine and kane. The 38th Annual Fourth of July Rodeo is sponsored by Ka`u Roping & Riding Association on Saturday, July 4 and Sunday, July 5. 
      Slack Roping begins Saturday at 8 a.m. Cowboy Church is on Sunday at 10 a.m. with Thy Word Ministries-Ka`u Pastor Bob Tominaga. Rodeo Shows start at 12 p.m. both days.
      Rodeo Queen contestants are Ku`ukamali`i Bishop of Na`alehu, Arena Jospeh of Kea`au and Chrissy Perez of Honoka`a. Residents can support the young ladies by buying rodeo tickets for $6. Tickets are $7 at the gate.
      All spectators, guests and contestants can buy $1 raffle tickets and win prizes. Prizes will be advertised at the rodeo. All proceeds from the raffle drawing will be donated to American Cancer Society’s Hilo Relay for Life by KRRA.
      Special guests are Miss Rodeo Hawai`i 2015 and Nebraska Queen, who will be signing autographs.
      Events scheduled at the rodeo include Open Team Roping, Kane/Wahine Dally Team Roping, Team 90s, Double Mugging, Kane/Wahine Ribbon Mugging, Wahine Mugging, Tie Down Roping, Wahine Break Away, Po‘o Wai U and Bull Riding.
      Dummy Roping, Goat Undecorating, Calf Riding and Youth Barrel Racing events are set for youngsters.
      For more information, call Tammy Kaapana at 929-8079.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S Memorial Day Ceremony is tomorrow at 3 p.m. on KMC’s Front Lawn in Hawai‘`i Volcanoes National Park. Keynote speaker is Rod Sueoka, of the Office of Veterans’ Services.
      Memorial Day Buffet follows the ceremony from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at KMC’s Crater Rim Café. Menu includes Hawaiian kalua pork sandwich, local-style fried chicken, chili con carne, biscuits and honey, buttered corn, steamed rice, dessert and a beverage. Adult $18; child $9.
Economic development is the topic of a Ka`u CDP discussion Tuesday.
      Call 967-8356 for more information. KMC is open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. Call 967-8371 for additional information.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IS THE TOPIC of a Ka`u Community Development Plan focused discussion Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Na`alehu Community Center. Participants’ questions, comments and suggestions will be documented. As appropriate, the CDP Planning Team will use outputs of the discussion to do additional analysis, refine the CDP rationale and/or recommend CDP revisions.
      Public input on the draft Ka`u CDP is due a week from tomorrow on Monday, June 1. The CDP is available at local libraries and community centers and online at kaucdp.info.

MONDAY, JUNE 1 – ONE WEEK from tomorrow – is the deadline to sign up to be in this year’s annual Fourth of July parade in Na`alehu. Contact Debra McIntosh at 929-9872 to register floats or parade walkers.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.



See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_May2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.





Saturday, May 23, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, May 23, 2015

Gov. David Ige has signed a bill creating an annual Sakada Day, Dec. 20. Pahala Filipino Club carries on ethnic traditions in Ka`u.
Photo by Julia Neal
HURRICANE SEASON BEGINS JUNE 1. The Central Pacific Hurricane Center is currently watching activity in the East Pacific, where tropical storms often develop and move toward the Central Pacific.
Central Pacific Hurricane Center is keeping an eye on two
disturbances in the Eastern Pacific. Map from CPHC
      Shower activity associated with an area of low pressure located 
about 1,650 miles southeast of the Big Island has
 become better organized over the past 24 hours. Some additional
 development is possible during the next day or two, and a tropical 
depression could form. After that time,
 development is not expected due to the proximity of a disturbance 
to its northeast and north.
      An area of low pressure may form early next week several hundred
 miles south of the coast of Mexico. Environmental conditions are
 expected to be conducive for subsequent slow development of the 
system.
      Hurricane preparedness information is available on Hawai`i State Civil Defense’s website at scd.hawaii.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

FUNDING IS AVAILABLE TO FARMERS, ranchers and food entrepreneurs to develop new product lines through USDA’s Value-Added Producer Grant program.
      “The Value Added Producers Grant program not only enables farmers and ranchers with opportunities to increase their income from their farming activities, it also increases jobs and expands the food choices for Hawaii’s families” said Chris Kanazawa, state Director for USDA Rural Development. “Hawai`i’s agriculture community has demonstrated a long history of innovation, and the VAPG program provides an excellent resource to perpetuate this tradition.”
      USDA plans to make approximately $30 million in grants available. Applications will be accepted through July 8. More information on how to apply can be found on page 26528 of the May 8 Federal Register (http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2015-05-08/pdf/2015-10440.pdf).
      VAPG grants can be used to develop new product lines from raw agricultural products or additional uses for already developed product lines. Military veteran, socially disadvantaged and beginning farmers and ranchers; operators of small and medium-sized family farms and ranches; farmer and rancher cooperatives; and applicants that propose mid-tier value chain projects are given special priority in applying for VAPGs. Additional priority is given to group applicants who seek funding for projects that “best contribute” to creating or increasing marketing opportunities for these type of operators.
      For more information, contact Business Programs Specialist Lori Nekoba at 933-8312 or lori.nekoba@hi.usda.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

One of Pahala Filipino Club's many activities is caroling during Christmas.
Photo by Julia Neal
SAKADA DAY IN HAWAI`I IS DEC. 20 of each year. Gov. David Ige yesterday held a signing ceremony for HB604, recognizing the Filipino community’s contribution to the history, economy, culture and heritage of Hawai`i.
      The sakadas, or Filipino plantation workers, were the first Filipinos to arrive in Honolulu aboard the S.S. Doric more than 100 years ago on December 20, 1906, to work as contract laborers in the plantation industry. About 120,000 sakadas arrived in Hawai`i between 1906 and 1934. These sakadas paved the way for the legacy that would be built by the Filipino community in Hawai`i and worldwide. 
      “Like many moments in history, the arrival of the first 15 sakadas in Hawai`i occurred little noticed by most in Hawai`i at the time,” said Rep. John Mizuno. “However, after viewing their struggles and sacrifices, we are honored to recognize the first migration of Filipinos in Hawai`i and the sakadas that followed as we appreciate their historic importance and significance to shaping Hawai`i. Today, Filipinos have achieved significant success worldwide, however, in moving forward it is important to remember the great pioneers who paved the way which allowed for such success to occur. After reviewing the legacy of the sakada we truly begin to understand all that it represents and means to all of us in the state.”
      Today, Filipinos make up the second largest ethnic group in the state, with Filipinos in leadership positions in business, government, community service organizations and the professions.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Sen. Mazie Hirono
U.S. SEN. MAZIE HIRONO, THE FIRST Asian American woman elected to the U.S. Senate, introduced a bipartisan resolution recognizing May as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month. Sen. Brian Schatz is one of several co-sponsors. 
      “Asian Pacific American Heritage Month is a celebration of the contributions and progress made by the Asian American and Pacific Islander community in Hawai`i and across the country. The AAPI community is the fastest growing minority population in the United States and will have an increasing presence and stronger voice in national debates for years to come,” Hirono said. “As an immigrant who came to the United States from Japan with my mother at a young age, it’s an honor to lead a bipartisan group of my colleagues in recognizing and celebrating the culture and stories of AAPI families that have enriched our nation.”
      May is officially designated as Asian Pacific American Heritage Month by section 102 of title 36, United States Code. The observance originally began as Asian Pacific American Heritage Week, which was established through a joint Congressional resolution in 1978. The month of May was chosen due to two important milestones in AAPI history: May 7, 1843, when the first Japanese immigrants arrived in the United States, and May 10, 1869, when the first transcontinental railroad was completed with substantial contributions from Chinese immigrant workers.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Chris Jacobsen, at right teaches non-credit ag classes this summer. Photo from HCC
HAWAI`I COMMUNITY COLLEGE IS OFFERING a series of non-credit agriculture classes this summer that cover topics like sustainable farming practices, pest and disease control, nursery management, irrigation, how to manage a farm business and more. 
      The classes will be held at the Hawai`i CC campus in Hilo, in Captain Cook and at the University of Hawai`i experimental agriculture farm in Pana`ewa. Hawai`i CC Agriculture instructor Chris Jacobsen will teach the courses.
      The following are class subjects, times and fees:
  • Sustainable Production Practices, Thursday, 6-8 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., May 21-June 6. Cost: $59; 
  • Home and Community Food Security, Friday, June 5 and Friday, July 24. Cost for each one-day class is $59; 
  • Farm Management, Thursday, 6-8 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., June 11-27. Cost: $59; 
  • Integrated Pest Management, Tuesday, 6-8 p.m. and Thursday, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., June 30–July 16. Cost: $59; 
  • Irrigation Repair and Theory, Thursday, 6-8 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., July 23-Aug.8. Cost: $59; 
  • Horticultural Operations, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 9 a.m.-2:30 p.m., July 27–Aug. 13. Cost: $67. 
      The classes are part of the C3T-1 program that Hawai`i CC and other University of Hawai`i Community Colleges are participating in.
      C3T Hawai`i is a $24.6 million grant awarded to the University of Hawai`i Community Colleges through the U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration. The grant will fuel the development of education and training curriculum and student academic/career coaching, which targets certificate and degree programs specific to the needs of agriculture, energy and health industries. These industry-focused, employer-driven programs are designed to increase college completion rates and provide job opportunities to the C3T participants.
      The non-credit courses funded by the grant aim to provide training leading to jobs in agriculture for the unemployed, professional improvement for those already employed in agriculture, and instruction for those who want to work in the agriculture field.
      For more information on how to register for these classes and about the course contents, call Linda Burnham Larish, C3T-1 Sustainable Agriculture Coordinator at Hawai`i CC, 934-2687 or email llarish@hawaii.edu.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI & FRIENDS 2010 Potluck Reunion and a concurrent gathering at the old Sasaki Store in Pahala are topics of a video being shown on Na Leo O Hawai`i Community Television. Carese Galiza, formerly of Pahala and now living in Pensacola, FL, produced the video that showcases Ka`u’s talented musicians, including Ernest Kalani’s Back to the Fifties group, Calvin Ponce’s Hands of Time and senior hula dancers from the former Mahealani Halau under the direction of the late Kumu Hula Edna Aguil. The video was dedicated to Aguil for her more than 50 years of community service.
      Air times are today at 6:30 p.m. and Wednesday at 7 p.m.  
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S Memorial Day Ceremony is Monday at 3 p.m. on KMC’s Front Lawn in Hawai‘`i Volcanoes National Park. Keynote speaker is Rod Sueoka, of the Office of Veterans’ Services. 
      KMC is open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. Call 967-8371 for additional information.

MEMORIAL DAY BUFFET IS AVAILABLE from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Kilauea Military Camp’s Crater Rim Café in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Menu includes Hawaiian kalua pork sandwich, local-style fried chicken, chili con carne, biscuits and honey, buttered corn, steamed rice, dessert and a beverage. Adult $18; child $9.
      Call 967-8356 for more information. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.


See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_May2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf and
kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf.