About The Ka`u Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, April 20, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Sunday, April 20, 2014


Earth Matters Farm on South Point Road hosts an Earth Day tour for the public Tuesday. See below for more information.
Photo from Earth Matters Farm
HAWAI`I FARMERS UNION UNITED drew enough commitments last night during its organizing meeting to secure a Ka`u Chapter. Leaders of the statewide organization came to Pahala Community Center to explain the purpose of the national organization. 
     Local chapter organizer Malian Lahey, who has a farm in Wood Valley, said she approached the Farmers Union United after learning that Ka`u Coffee is being sold for blending. “It hurts my business,” and it damages the Ka`u Coffee farmers’ reputation, said the coffee broker, noting that the Hawai`i Farmers Union United has sponsored legislation to require labeling that would declare all origins used in blended coffee.
Rep. Richard Creagan came to Pahala last night for the organization of the
Ka`u Chapter of Hawai`i Farmers Union United. Photo by Julia Neal
      Most of the blended Ka`u Coffee is sold under the name Alan Wong, who has championed Ka`u Coffee at his restaurants for years and earlier encouraged farmers to keep the coffee pure. The labeling says 10 percent Ka`u Coffee without naming the origin of the rest of the coffee used in the blend. It sells at a fraction of the price of pure Ka`u Coffee, which a number of the farmers sell under their own brand names.
     Vince Mina, president of Hawai`i Farmers Union United, reminded attendees that the organization is not a labor union. It represents family farms and focuses on the health of the soil and sustainable agricultural practices, he said. Mina said the national organization was created by farmers over a century ago to help farmers. He contended that the Farm Bureau was formed ten years later by corporate interests. “The Farm Bureau was organized to keep farmers from being organized.”
Steve Sakala, President of Kona Farmers Union United,
attended the Pahala meeting yesterday.
     Mina and other directors of Hawai`i Farmers Union United said that they have gained traction in building awareness in government regarding “soil health.” They talked about the difference between mining and farming, with mining using up the nutrients and soil conditions needed for crops, while farming in a sustainable way builds soil health. Several of the group's leaders talked about the direction of agriculture in Hawai`i. “Are you killing the life of the land or regenerating the soil?” was one of the mantras.
     Another involved breaking down the word agriculture. “Agri-Culture. Cultures are living,” said Mina. He said that farmers and governments need to give more support to the “culture.” Government has traditionally given the most support to agribusiness, he said.
     Those attending also talked about education and possibly helping to revive agricultural programs at Ka`u High School and also education for adults who may want to learn to farm.
     Several of the farmers who attended are involved in politics. Steve Sakala, who is President of Kona Farmers Union United, chairs District Five of the Democratic Party. Richard Creagan, of Ka`u, who is a physician and farmer, is west Ka`u’s member to the state House of Representative. Lahey is President of Precinct Seven, District Three of the Democratic Party.
      Mina said it is important to be involved in the political process because, “If you are not part of the process, you’re part of the menu.”
      He also said that growers of food can look forward to more people being concerned about the fresh food they are consuming and paying for it. “One day there will be an app when we can take our produce to market and you get paid for the nutrient density.” He predicted that farmers who “aloha `aina the soils will be rewarded.”
      Farmers represented at the meeting have grown, coffee, mac nuts, taro, flowers, pigs, rabbits, sheep, goats, cattle, pumpkins, lettuce and other truck crops, as well as fruits, from banana to dragon fruit.
      Anyone interested in joining the Ka`u Chapter of Hawai`i Farmers Union United can call Lahey at 503-575-9098. The next planned meeting is Saturday, May 17 at Pahala Community Center.
      Information about the organization is available at hawaiifarmersunionunited.org.  
      See more on the Hawai`i Farmers Union United meeting in tomorrow’s Ka`u News Briefs.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A bill at the state Legislature would help Ka`u Coffee growers purchase pesticides
to battle the coffee berry borer.
A BILL TACKLING COFFEE BERRY BORERS is on tomorrow’s conference committee agenda as the state Legislature begins its final full week in session. HB1514 would appropriate funds for mitigation of, and education relating to, the pest, whose “infestation threatens the viability of Hawai`i’s entire coffee industry,” the bill states.
      The bill would establish a pesticide subsidy program until June 30, 2019, to help coffee growers purchase pesticides containing Beauveria bassiana to combat the coffee berry borer. If passed, it would become effective on July 1. Both the Hawai`i Farm Bureau and Hawai`i Farmers Union United have lobbied for the money to fight the borer.
      Progress of this and other bills at the state Legislature can be tracked at capitol.hawaii.gov.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

NET ENERGY METERING is a topic Henry Curtis, director of Life of the Land, discusses on his blog at ililanimedia.blogspot.com. With NEM, utility customers, including those who have photovoltaic systems, lower their electricity bills by sending surplus energy back to the utility company. About eleven percent of all Hawaiian Electric Co. customers, including those on Hawai`i Island, have rooftop solar.
      Curtis says that, in such a system, the transmission grid acts as a battery. “The customer transfers electricity to the grid during the afternoon and pulls electricity out of the grid during other parts of the day,” he says. “They only pay for the net amount of energy used.
      “If one month the customer provides more electricity to the grid than the customer pulls out, then the customer has a credit which they can tap into the following month.”
Life of the Land Director Henry Curtis
      A problem, Curtis says, is that at the end of each year, customers’ accounts are zeroed out, and excess credits are given to the utility. “In essence, the utility has been given ‘free electricity,’” Curtis contends. He says that federal laws, rules and regulations call for utilities to zero out accounts each year and do not permit utilities to pay for excess electricity when accounts are zeroed out.
      Curtis explains an alternative power exchange system called a Power Purchase Agreement. As opposed to Net Energy Metering, in a Power Purchase Agreement scheme, customers sell (export) electricity to the grid at the wholesale price and buy (import) electricity at the retail rate.
      “Some Independent Power Producers, such as wind generation facilities, only exist to export electricity to the grid,” Curtis says. “At other IPPs, most notably sugar plantations, co-generation petroleum refineries and commercial rooftop solar facilities produced electricity for themselves and for export to the grid and occasionally also bought electricity from the grid. These customers have two meters, one for export and one for import. Smaller systems use the Feed-In Tariff (FiT) mechanism. 
      “Thus, under a Power Purchase Agreement, Hawai`i Electric Light Co. might buy solar energy at 20 cents per kilowatt-hour and sell electricity at 45 cents per kilowatt-hour. Clearly this would not be profitable for owners of small residential rooftop solar facilities,” Curtis says. “Rooftop solar owners also don’t like to be net importers of electricity from the grid. Instead, people with rooftop solar overbuild their solar system and wind up giving the utility free electricity rather than the alternative of buying electricity from the grid. 
      “The utility opines that Net Energy Metering customers are a burden on the 89 percent who are non-Net Energy Metering customers. The utility argues that Net Energy Metering customers get free use of the grid without paying for it. The utility asserts that they must maintain the grid but only non-Net Energy Metering customers wind up paying for it.”
Dr. John Dvorak discusses earthquake storms
Tuesday at After Dark in the Park.
      According to Curtis, the utility does not track free electricity. “Rather, to keep their analysis simple, the utility distorts reality by assuming that there is no free electricity. All of the utility price analyses assume there is no free electricity.”
      Curtis suggests another approach – the utility could track free electricity. “At the end of the year, the utility could note how many kilowatt-hours were given to the utility for free by each customer,” he says. “Customers could make a tax-deductible charitable donation of that free electricity to a nonprofit, which would allocate that credit to those that are economically challenged.
      “Thus, the benefits of renewable energy would not only go to economically secure people but would be spread across the economic spectrum,” Curtis concludes.

FREE ENTRY CONTINUES TODAY at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park to kick off National Park Week.

TO COMMEMORATE EARTH DAY, Greg Smith, of Earth Matters Farm, invites the public to taste organic greens and grilled vegetables Tuesday from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. The farm is two miles down South Point Road to the right of Kama`oa Road. For more information, call 939-7510.

EARTHQUAKE STORMS: THE PAST & PRESENT of the San Andreas Fault, is the topic at After Dark in the Park Tuesday at 7 p.m. at Kilauea Visitor Center in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Dr. John Dvorak explains the San Andreas Fault: what it is, where it is and how it works. His new book, Earthquake Storms: The Fascinating History and Volatile Future of the San Andreas Fault will be available for sale. The book explains how the recent seismic lull in could result in an “earthquake storm” of large earthquakes. Dvorak studied volcanoes and earthquakes for the U.S. Geological Survey, taught at the University of Hawai`i and has written numerous cover articles for scientific publications. Free; park entrance fees apply. $2 donations support After Dark programs. 

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, April 19, 2014

The new state Division of Aquatic Resources chief wants more public input on West Hawai`i Fisheries Management Area, which covers 35 percent of the western coast of the Big Island from South Point to `Upolu Point in Kohala. Photo from state Department of Land & Natural Resources

KA`U RESIDENTS AND OTHER Hawai`i Island residents will have more say in management of West Hawai`i Regional Fishery, the new chief at the state Division of Aquatic Resources is pledging. West Hawai`i Today reports Frazer McGilvray saying, “I’m in favor of community-based management. I think it’s important to engage the people whose livelihoods depend on the resource.”
New state DAR chief Frazer McGilvray
      According to reporter Bret Yager, Mcgilvray said social science is as important as biological science when decisions are made about how to manage a resource.
      Yager says McGilvray also considers it important to gather information from as many sources as possible regarding health of the fisheries. “We have no idea — only anecdotal figures — about how many fish are coming out of the water,” McGilvray said. “How can we manage our fisheries without this information? We just can’t. We know the government has to play a part. We know the community has to play a part. We’re still trying to find that sweet spot. It has to be what the community wants.”
      McGilvray also wants to increase collaboration between divisions in the Department of Land & Natural Resources. “When it rains up-country, it all runs down,” he said. “So if you have problems with the forest, it all runs down to the reef. These agencies have to work together. One department can’t solve all these issues.
      “Change has to come to link land and water.”
      West Hawai`i Regional Fishery Management Area runs from Ka Lae to `Upolu Point in North Kohala and from the highwater mark on shore seaward to the limit of the state's management authority.
      SCUBA spearfishing was banned in the Management Area last year by the Board of Land and Natural resources. West Hawai`i is the only area in the state to ban the practice. Other areas where it is also banned include Australia and Palau.
      Other prohibitions in the Management Area include:
  • To take, kill, possess, sell, or offer for sale, any specimen of Hawaiian stingray, broad stingray, pelagic stingray, spotted eagle ray, blacktip reef shark, gray reef shark, whitetip reef shark, tiger shark, whale shark, horned helmet, and Triton's trumpet; 
  • To possess more than five yellow tang larger than 4.5 inches total length, or more than five yellow tang smaller than two inches total length;
 
  • To possess aquarium collecting gear, or take or possess any specimen of aquatic life for aquarium purposes between sunset and sunrise, without a valid aquarium permit or in violation of its conditions, or while on a vessel that does not conform to registration requirements; and
 
  • To possess or use any net or container underwater to capture or hold aquatic life alive for aquarium purposes, which is not labeled with the commercial marine license number(s) of the person(s) owning, possessing, or using the equipment. 
      For more on the Management Area, see state.hi.us/dlnr/dar.
      See westhawaiitoday.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U’S NEW COUNCIL MEMBER to be elected this year would make more money than its current Council member, Brenda Ford, under a plan being considered by the county Salary Commission to give raises to county officials. Ford is ineligible to run again due to having reached her term limit.
      According to a story in Hawai`i Tribune-Herald, the 8.3 percent raise would bring Council members’ salaries to $52,000 per year.
      Reporter Nancy Cook Lauer said Council chair would get an 11.5 percent increase, to $58,000 per year.
Na`alehu native Amanda Dahlstedt Ciulla is a finalist for
EMT of the Year at Acadian Ambulance in Texas.
      Cook Lauer also reported other raises being considered: Mayor, 19.8 percent to $130,818; Managing Director, 6.1 percent to $110,244; Deputy Managing Director, 5.8 percent to $104,736; and department heads who didn’t get raises last year, unspecified amounts.
      Before voting on its plan, the commission holds a meeting on Monday, April 28 at 10 a.m. in County Council chambers in Hilo, when it will accept public comment.
      See westhawaiitoday.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

NA`ALEHU NATIVE AMANDA DAHLSTEDT CIULLA was recently honored as finalist for EMT of the Year by her fellow medics at Acadian Ambulance. The company, which provides emergency and non-emergency medical transportation in Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi, recognizes exceptional medics for their tireless work ethic and dedication to their jobs.
      Finalists are known as outstanding medics who display exemplary attitudes and provide excellent patient care. Ciulla was nominated by her fellow medics to represent Acadian’s Houston operations, which include Harris, Montgomery, Fort Bend, Brazoria, Walker, Galveston and Liberty counties.
      Ciulla grew up in Na`alehu and now lives in Conroe, Texas. She began working in health care as a medical assistant before joining the Acadian team in December 2012 as an EMT-Basic. She has since received her EMT-Intermediate certification and is working on her paramedic certification.
      “I am extremely honored and happy to be chosen by my peers as an EMT of the Year finalist,” Ciulla said. “It means so much to me to know that I have made a positive impression on my fellow co-workers.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE CURRENT ISSUE OF VOLCANO WATCH discusses a portable instrument package was developed at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to quickly and easily deploy Webcams for recording activity at new eruptive vents and tracking the location and advancement of lava flows in real time.
This portable platform can be used for several types of monitoring instruments.
Photo from USGS/HVO
      While the units can be slung by helicopter to remote sites, they require scientists on the ground to set up the cameras, install and align the radio antennas and connect the final wiring. “The new platforms greatly reduce the time and effort needed to deploy Webcams and other monitoring stations,” HVO reports.
      The core of HVO’s portable unit is an aluminum framework strong enough to be slung by helicopter while also supporting the power system (solar panels and batteries), camera tripod and electronics needed to acquire, store and transmit data to the observatory.
      “With the help of a long-term volunteer, Frank Box, HVO now has several of these units ready for deployment when the eruption of Kilauea changes or activity ramps up at one of the other active volcanoes in Hawai`i. The pre-fabrication will save many days of preparation time and reduce the number of sling loads needed to quickly install several new, temporary monitoring stations with minimal impact to a site,” HVO states.
      The issue also discusses portable units designed and built by Cascades Volcano Observatory scientists in their efforts to monitor Mt. St. Helens.
      See hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

FREE ENTRY TO HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK today and tomorrow kicks off National Park Week. Next week, the park has many events scheduled around the theme of Go Wild for Culture and celebrating Merrie Monarch Festival. See nps.gov/havo and future Ka`u News Briefs.

KA`U RESIDENTS INTERESTED IN THE WORK of Hawai`i Farmers Union United can attend a meeting today at 5 p.m. at Pahala Community Center. Speakers include Vincent Mina and Bob Shaffer. This meeting of is a potluck; farmers are encouraged to use their local ingredients. 
      For more information, contact Malian Lahey at 503-575-9098 or malian@kauspecialtycoffee.com.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S LAVA LOUNGE in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park holds a Jungle Party today at 7 p.m. Participants dress in jungle attire and dance to the tunes of DJ Tiki. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.
      Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. for more information.

THE ALOHAHAS PRESENT THEIR SPRING SHOW at Ocean View Community Center today at 7:30 p.m. The improv group presents a series of improvisation games with audience suggestions and participation along with original comedy sketches written and performed by members. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door.
      Call 938-2091 or email thealohahas@gmail.com.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.






Friday, April 18, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Friday, April 18, 2014

Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park waives entry fees this weekend to kick off National Park Week. Photo by Sean King

SITE VISITS TO PLANNED SUBDIVISIONS failed to get approval of Hawai`i County’s Leeward Planning Commission. Ka`u’s County Council Member Brenda Ford introduced Bill 182 calling for site visits in an attempt to prevent the Planning Department from approving projects that violate community development plans. 
      Erin Miller reports in West Hawai`i Today that Deputy Planning Director Bobby Command said, “We feel in concept this has a lot of merit. Practically speaking, it needs a lot of work.”
      Problems brought up at the meeting include a lack of specific factors that would require developers to re-do theirs plans and language that would allow a Planning director to “be capricious,” Planner Keola Childs said.
      Commissioner Thomas Whittemore said the Council could consider the issues and resubmit the bill.
      See westhawaiitoday.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Richard Ha
CHEAPER ELECTRICITY IS “THE SINGLE MOST IMPORTANT need facing Hawai`i today,” Richard Ha says on his blog at hahaha.hamakuasprings.com. “Everything else radiates from it. 
      “We need enough food to eat, and we need to grow it here, instead of relying on it coming to us from somewhere else. Food security – having enough food to eat, right here where we live – is truly the bottom line. We live in the middle of an ocean, we import more than 80 percent of what we eat, and sometimes there are natural or other disasters and shipping disruptions. This makes a lot of us a little nervous.
      “To grow our food here, we need for our farmers to make a decent living: If the farmers make money, the farmers will farm.
      “The price of oil, and of petroleum byproducts like fertilizers and many other farming products, keeps going up, which raises farmers’ costs. They cannot pass on all these higher costs, and they lose money.”
      Ha says farmers in Hawai`i pay four times as much for electricity as do their mainland competition, which puts them at an even bigger competitive disadvantage.
      “Rising electricity costs act like a giant regressive tax: the people on the lowest rungs of the economic ladder get hurt first, and hardest,” Ha says. “If our energy costs are lower – and we can absolutely make that happen – our farmers can keep their prices down, food will be cheaper, and consumers will have more money left over at the end of the month. This is good for our people, and for our economy.” 
      Ha calls for the state Public Utilities Commission to review its directives to and agreements with Hawai`i Electric Light Co. and for HELCO’s primary objective to be “making significant reductions in the real cost of reliable electric power to Hawai`i Island residents.”  
      He encourages residents to join the Big Island Community Coalition, which advocates for local sources of energy, including geothermal. See bigislandcommunitycoalition.com.
      “Remember the bottom line: every one of us needs to call for cheaper electricity, and this will directly and positively impact our food security,” Ha concludes.
      Ha, who owns a farm in Hamakua, was reconfirmed by the state Senate earlier this month for another term on the state Board of Agriculture.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

KA`U’S U.S. REP. TULSI GABBARD is joining congressional leaders on a bipartisan delegation to meet with key leaders in Japan, South Korea and China. The meetings will focus on economic growth and trade, regional security challenges and strengthening alliances in the region. 
      Today, the delegation visits with U.S. Pacific Command leaders in Hawai`i for a roundtable discussion before traveling to Asia.

 “Our economic and strategic partnerships in the Asia-Pacific region are critical to advancing our shared interests in stability and prosperity,” said Gabbard, who serves on the House Armed Services and Foreign Affairs Committees. “In Hawai`i, we deeply appreciate and understand the importance of these regional alliances. Through this delegation’s bilateral meetings with leaders in Japan, China and South Korea, as well as a discussion with USPACOM in Hawai`i, we will strengthen these ties as we work together to maximize the opportunities in the region.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.  

KA`U COFFEE FESTIVAL BEGINS TWO WEEKS from today with a Pa`ina Open House at Pahala Plantation Manager’s House Friday, May 2. The Miss Ka`u Coffee Scholarship fundraiser is sponsored by Pahala Plantation Cottages and Ka`u Chamber of Commerce. The event features music by Bolo and Keoki Kahumoku & his `Ukulele Kids, hula by Halau Hula O Leionalani, refreshments and more.
      For more information, call 928-9811 or see kaucoffeefest.com.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Mark Inman
KA`U COFFEE COLLEGE, the finale of the Ka`u Coffee Festival on Sunday, May 11 at 9 a.m. will feature two leaders in the coffee industry. 
      Mark Inman entered the coffee industry in 1998 based on a passion for remarkable coffee and the belief that business can be environmentally and socially progressive while remaining profitable. For over twenty years, he has been a leading voice in the specialty coffee industry for issues concerning sustainable agriculture, environmental stewardship, green entrepreneurship and social justice.
      Inman’s campaign to improve environmental and social conditions in the coffee industry, as well as voicing his support for the small farmer movement, has taken him from local classrooms in the United States to remote coffee laboratories in the hills of Nicaragua and from Washington D.C. to the floor of the United Nations. His efforts have been covered in local and nationwide publications including TIME Magazine, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal and the San Francisco Chronicle.
      In 2008, Inman served as President of the Specialty Coffee Association of America, where he has also chaired or served on numerous committees and international task forces. From 2010, he served as President of World Coffee Events, which manages seven international coffee competitions, including the World Barista Championship.
Blake Hanacek
      Blake Hanacek is the founder and CEO of A.G.R.O. Roasters and A.G.R.O. Café, Inc. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Global Resource Systems from the Faculty of Agricultural Science at the University of British Columbia. His main focus is sustainable rural development and agribusiness management. He also holds a Master of Watershed Management degree from the Institute for Resources, Environment & Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. Hanacek has studied and worked in Canada, Sweden, Japan, Uganda, Kenya, Costa Rica, Mexico and the United States. He is one of the co-founders of AGRODEV (Agricultural Growers Resource Organization Developing Economic Viability), an international NGO based in Kenya.
      Hanacek has been working in the coffee industry for over twelve years, doing everything from harvesting coffee to making lattés. He has also completed several in-depth research papers and presentations on the current methods of production and consumption of specialty coffee. He is a member of the Specialty Coffee Association of America and the Roaster Guild of America.
      Hanacek has met with coffee growers in over five countries to discuss his Crop to Cup method. He started with one retail cafe and roasting house in 2006 and quickly expanded to three retail locations by 2009. The accredited roaster has over 5,000 hours behind a variety of coffee roasters.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.
       
FREE ENTRY TO HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK tomorrow and Sunday kicks off National Park Week. Next week, the park has many events scheduled around the theme of Go Wild for Culture and celebrating Merrie Monarch Festival. See nps.gov/havo and future Ka`u News Briefs.

HAWAI`I FARMER’S UNION UNITED holds a meeting tomorrow at 5 p.m. at Pahala Community Center for those interested in forming a Ka`u chapter. Speakers include Vincent Mina and Bob Shaffer. This meeting of is a potluck; farmers are encouraged to use their local ingredients. 
      For more information, contact Malian Lahey at 503-575-9098 or malian@kauspecialtycoffee.com.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S LAVA LOUNGE in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park holds a Jungle Party tomorrow at 7 p.m. Participants dress in jungle attire and dance to the tunes of DJ Tiki. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.
      Call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. for more information.

THE ALOHAHAS PRESENT THEIR SPRING SHOW at Ocean View Community Center tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. The improv group presents a series of improvisation games with audience suggestions and participation along with original comedy sketches written and performed by members. Tickets are $10 in advance or $15 at the door.
      Call 938-2091 or email thealohahas@gmail.com.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.