About The Ka`u Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, November 27, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, Nov. 27, 2014


College student Tiare Lee Shibuya and her partner Bradley Llanes are two supporters of Ka`u Learning Academy
among those who perform weekends at Gilligan's Cafe, which hosts an anniversary celebration Saturday, Dec. 13 and rolls
out applications for the 2015 school year. Photo by Julia Neal
KA`U LEARNING ACADEMY, a tuition-free, public charter school, has announced that it will accept applications beginning in December for open enrollment lottery for school year 2015-2016, which begins in August for grades 3 to 6. Classes will be held at the old Discovery Harbour Golf Course Clubhouse, now operated as Gilligan’s Café to benefit the school.
     Unlike traditional public schools, KLA will provide an individual education plan for every student, allowing each to work at their own ability level, said Kathryn Tydlacka, founder and executive director, who has nearly 20 years of experience in public and private education and holds a Master’s Degree in Education Administration. “KLA holds high academic expectations and also offers electives such as theatre arts, agriculture, computer, art and music,” she said.
     Transportation and lunch will be provided to KLA students. Enrollment meetings will be held throughout the district starting in January. “We want to thank a number of local residents and private foundations that have made significant monetary contributions to the charter school. It is a testament to KLA’s strong academic plan that it was the only charter school applicant approved for 2015 under Hawai‘i’s tough new charter school law,” Tydlacka said. For more information and to enroll a child, see www.kaulearning. com or call 213-1097.
Aaron DeLos Santos supports Ka`u Learning Academy as a regulae host at
Gilligan's Cafe. He is seen here at Science Camps of America this summer.
Photo from Science Camps of America
       Tydlacka also said that Ka‘u Learning Academy thanks patrons of Gilligan’s Café for continued support every Friday and Saturday night. Founders of KLA opened Gilligan’s in December of 2013 as a nonprofit business to help fund the school.
     The one-year anniversary celebration will be Saturday, Dec. 13 from 11a.m. to 9 p.m. Enjoy food and live music all day, along with craft and info booths, a silent auction, giveaways and other surprises. Musicians include Solomn & Tiger, Lucky Lizardz, `Ukulele Boyz and Mark Chopot.
    KLA enrollment applications and information will be featured. For Gilligan’s menu, music line-up and location, see www.bigislandgilligans.com
To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A FEDERAL MAGISTRATE RULED AGAINST HAWAI`I COUNTY’S NEW GMO LAW yesterday. U.S. Magistrate Judge Barry Kurren stated that county law is preempted by state law, a decision similar to the one he handed down, preventing Kaua`i County from regulating pesticides and Genetically Modified Organisms. Pro GMO companies and citizens groups are also challenging a GMO moratorium that passed in a Maui referendum on Nov. 4.
   An analysis by Civil Beat stated yesterday that the decision deals “another blow to Hawai`i’s growing movement against genetically modified organisms. Judge Barry Kurren ruled Wednesday that Ordinance 13-121 is invalid because it is fully preempted by state law and partially preempted by federal law.
   “The lawsuit, filed in June by several Big Island farmers and flower growers, along with a national trade organization representing the biotech industry, challenged the Hawai`i County ordinance that banned genetically engineered farming with the exception of existing crops.
     “The lawsuit is one of several filed over the past year challenging county regulations of the state’s $243 million seed industry. Less than two weeks ago, Monsanto and Dow AgroSciences filed a lawsuit to overturn Maui County’s new moratorium on GMO farming.”
    Civil Beat pointed out that “In Wednesday’s decision, Kurren argued that although the state does not specifically regulate genetically modified crops, Ordinance 13-121 still conflicts with the work of state agencies.
     “He said the state Department of Agriculture and state Board of Agriculture comprise a ‘comprehensive statewide framework’ governing plants that may ‘injure or harm agriculture, the environment or public health.’
     ‘Clearly, the state legislature intended this network of the HDOA, the HBOA, and the advisory committee to have extensive and broad responsibilities over agricultural problems spanning the various counties to form a coherent and comprehensive statewide agricultural policy,’ he wrote. 
 
Maile Medeiros David (center) will be sworn into the County Council seat for Ka`u
on Monday. She attended Ka`u Plantation Days this Fall and plans to
meet farmers, business owners and other constituents in December.
Photo by Julia Neal
 ‘In light of the comprehensive statutes and the network designed to address statewide agriculture problems, the Court concludes that the legislative intent for an exclusive, uniform and comprehensive state statutory scheme on the precise subject matter addressed by Ordinance 13-121 preempts the County’s ban on genetically engineered organisms.”’  See more at civilbeat.com. 
To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

COUNTY COUNCIL MEMBER ELECT MAILE MEDEIROS DAVID will be sworn into office to serve Ka`u, Volcano and South Kona on Monday, Dec. 1 at noon in Hilo. The ceremonies for all nine council members for Hawai`i County who are each elected for two-year terms will be held at the Ah Fook Chinen Civic Auditorium and the public is invited.    
       Master of Cermonies will be Sherry Bracken, of Hawai`i Public Radio. The Honorable Judge Ronald Ibarra will administer the Oath of Office and Mayor Billy Kenoi will deliver the keynote speech. The event is free to the public.
     David said she will visit with community groups, farmers, small business owners and other constituents throughout her County Council District 6 during December.  She replaces County Council member Brenda Ford who was unable to run again due to term limits.  To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.
Pahoa Village Road reopened yesterday along the half mile that was closed during
the lava threat, now providing easier access to local businesses. Photo by Julia Neal
THE HALF- MILE SECTION OF PAHOA VILLAGE  ROAD, which had been closed in expectation of a lava flow, reopened at noon yesterday. Lava, which flowed down to the edge of the village, taking out one house, part of a cemetery and part of the county trash transfer station, reached as close as 430 feet from the road on Oct. 30. 
     The lava flow, which started June 27 upslope at Pu`u O`o, has since slowed, hardened and became inactive near the town. Some Pahoa businesses closed in fear they would be destroyed, but others remained open despite some visitors and residents keeping away from them.  
To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

A FREE THANKSGIVING DINNER IS TODAY AT OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER at 1 p.m. It is open to all Ka`u residents. To offer help during the event, call 939-7033.

VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI hosts its annual Studio Tour & Sale tomorrow, Saturday and Sunday, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artwork on sale represents a wide variety of media Maps are available at village businesses and at volcanovillageartistshui.com.

FRIENDS OF HAWAI`I VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK hosts a holiday fundraiser Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1943 Pukeawe Circle, Volcano Golf Course, off Pi`i Mauna Drive. Featured are baked goodies and poinsettias.
KA`U FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY is Saturday at Punalu`u Beach Park from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Registration is available through Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, Inc. at 928-0101.

A CRECHE FESTIVAL with more than 100 nativity scenes from around the world, is open to the public from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Na`alehu Church of Jesus Christ of Later-Day Saints. The Ka`u Ward hosts the second annual islandwide event. The address is 95-5682 Mamalahoa Highway. Along with the crèche display, the event features live music performed by local musicians and choir and activities for children. Visitors are welcome to the free holiday festival. For more information, call ‪‪808-895-0491‬‬.

THE KA`U CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ANNUAL MEETING & DINNER is next Thursday, Dec. 4 at Gilligan’s Restaurant in Discovery Harbour at 6 p.m. Dinner is $15 a person for pizza or spaghetti, salad and dessert. Beverages include beer, wine or soda. Money will be collected at the door. The public is invited to learn more abut The Chamber, which publishes The Directory for Ka‘u, provides scholarships for students from Ka‘u, hosts the annual art contest and selection for The Directory cover at CU Hawai`i Federal Credit Union in Na‘alehu, and assists in funding Ka‘u Food Pantry. Memberships with a listing in The Directory are $35 and will be accepted at the meeting. 

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.








Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014

Friday is the deadline for public comments on proposed regulatory changes geared toward helping food producers overcome barriers to business growth and expansion. Photo by Jolene Koi
KA`U COFFEE FARMERS ARE PREDICTING a banner year despite the coffee berry borer pest taking a bite out of the crop. Ka`u Coffee Mill predicts it will harvest some 200,000 pounds from its young orchards, compared to 100,000 pounds last year, said mill manager Lou Daniele.
Gloria Camba, here with Bong Aquino, reports coffee farmers
receiving good prices. Photo by Julia Neal
      Ka`u Coffee Growers Cooperative President Gloria Camba said farmers are receiving good prices from many independent buyers and brands developed by farmers and brokers who need to supplement their own production and buying contracts.
      Finding enough coffee pickers has been a challenge, with coffee growers looking for housing for picking crews coming in from Kona.
      Another worry for the farmers is the lack of land security. After nearly two decades of working the Cloud Rest and Pear Tree farms, farmers find that the land is for sale and being marketed with the coffee lands as the major value. The coffee acreage was set up with the county planning director for subdivision and sale before the developers who bought it from C. Brewer were foreclosed on by Lehman Brothers Holdings, from whom they borrowed $40 million.
      Former Naniloa Hotel operator and Volcano House operator Ken Fujiyama said he has been doing some due diligence talking with farmers on behalf of new investors interested in buying the coffee farms that are part of 5,800 acres being sold.
      Many of the Ka`u Coffee farmers’ leases expired during the past year. A number have arranged to farm on some of the land off Wood Valley Road owned by Olson Trust.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Existing cesspools that will not need to be upgraded upon sale
of property are in green, and existing cesspools that will need
to be upgraded are in red. Map from DOH
THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH HAS REVISED its draft cesspool rules in response to public comment. 
      On Sept. 1, DOH proposed revisions to its Wastewater Systems Rules to update the regulation of cesspools. DOH extended the public comment period by 15 extra days and conducted five public hearings on the Neighbor Islands and the agency received and reviewed over 230 public comments.
      The rules will require only cesspools that most affect human health and water quality to be upgraded upon sale of a property. Only cesspools that are near a public drinking water well and those within 750 feet of the shoreline, a stream or a wetland will be affected. This rule would govern 19,793 cesspools out of a statewide total of about 88,000, or 22 percent of all cesspools in Hawai`i. This reduces the properties covered by the upgrade requirement by 78 percent compared to the original rule draft.
      To assist homeowners with the expense of upgrading old cesspools to modern septic systems, DOH will offer grants to eligible homeowners to install modern treatment systems near public drinking water wells and zero-interest loans to lower income homeowners for cesspools near streams or the ocean. Higher income households will be eligible for two percent interest loans to upgrade their cesspools.
      If a property cannot accommodate a new septic tank and leach field system, DOH will allow exemptions from the upgrade requirement.
      DOH will extend the period for completing the cesspool upgrade to within one year from sale, rather than the originally proposed six months.
      In addition, DOH is clarifying that cesspool upgrades will not apply to property transfers such as times when no money is exchanged during property conveyances between family members.
      DOH is also now proposing to allow individual septic systems in new residential subdivisions with single family homes on lots of an acre or larger.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE EXCITING ENERGY FUTURE is the title of a blog entry by Henry Curtis, director of Life of the Land. 
      “It is an exciting time to be alive,” Curtis writes. “So much is happening. There are so many possibilities. The world is changing before our eyes. We can be part of the change.
      “The first great transition occurred when nomadic people settled down and developed agrarian societies… .
      “The second great transition involved the use of largely stationary sources of fossil fuel. Whale sperm oil, coal and kerosene could be collected in one place and used in another place. Coal was used in ships and trains, but it was bulky and required manpower. This was the First Industrial Revolution (c. 1750).
      “During the 1800s Europe and North America became urbanized. Cities served as industrial hubs. They were crowded and noisy. Suburbs developed, followed by congested roads and over-crowded public transport systems.
Henry Curtis
      “The third great transition relied on mobile forms of fossil fuel. Electricity could travel great distances in electric grids. Gasoline could power internal combustion engines which enabled long-distance travel. This was the Second Industrial Revolution (c. 1870).
      “The modern economic society was enabled by movable forms of fossil fuel. Cities and urban communities exist as a direct result of movable forms of fossil fuel… .
      “We are in the middle of several additional transitions: the computer age, the information (Internet) age, the global warming awareness age, the renewable energy age and the nanotechnology age.
      “The threat of climate change is forcing society to switch from fossil fuel to renewable energy. That is compounding the threat to the electric grid.
      “Amory and Hunter Lovins wrote Brittle Power for the military some 35 years ago. The book pointed out how the largest machine in the world – the electric grid – was inherently vulnerable to collapse.
      “The use of intermittent wind and solar – needed to fight global warming – has added instability to the grid.
      “Three major sets of paths have developed.
      “The first is sort of the status quo, business-as-usual approach. Giant electric utilities which have not changed in a hundred years will suddenly reinvent themselves, will build and control giant Smart Grids relying on new telecommunication systems, vast computer systems, big data, complex algorithmic programs and dynamic policies.
      “The second is the giant monolithic dinosaurs with archaic dumb grids will provide backup to sophisticated smart micro-grids and smart building-level nano-grids built and operated by a new wave of cutting edge entrepreneurs.
      “The third approach asserts that solar and battery prices are falling, energy efficiency is growing, nanotechnology is changing industry and that buildings will be able to reliably generate and consume all of their power needs on their own.
      “Which system is more reliable, more cost-effective and more resilient? Which will be so in five years, 10 years and 20 years?
      “The dominant paradigm states that the first approach will win. Meanwhile, traditional utilities are losing customers each year to the second and third paths.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

THE KOHALA CENTER’S RURAL and Cooperative Business Development Services team is seeking public comments on proposed regulatory changes that would impact homemade food operations in Hawai‘i. The proposed recommendations and solutions are geared toward helping Hawai`i’s value-added food producers overcome barriers to business growth and expansion. 
      The Kohala Center encourages interested parties to review the recommendations and provide feedback at https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/cottage-food-survey.
      The deadline to provide public comment is this Friday, Nov. 28.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

PAHALA COMMUNITY CENTER’S annual Rubberband Turkey Shoot takes place today from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event is open to all ages.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER invites Ka`u residents to its annual Thanksgiving Dinner tomorrow at 1 p.m. To offer help during the event, call 939-7033.

`Ohi`a, Chain of Craters Road, by Mary Goodrich, a member
of Volcano Village Artists Hui.
KA`U RESIDENTS CAN VIEW artists’ studios and see artwork in a wide variety of media during Volcano Village Artists Hui’s Studio Tour & Sale Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Maps are available at village businesses and at volcanovillageartistshui.com.

CALLING ALL BAKERS! Friends of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park hold their holiday fundraiser Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 1943 Pukeawe Circle, Volcano Golf Course, off Pi`i Mauna Drive. They will be selling baked goodies and poinsettias, but need more baked goods.
      Bakers are asked to deliver goodies to the pick-up station between Volcano Store and Post Office on Friday between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. Call 808-987-3703 for directions.

KA`U FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY is Saturday at Punalu`u Beach Park from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Registration is available through Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, Inc. at 928-0101.

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS’ Ka`u Ward hosts the second annual islandwide Crèche Festival, featuring more than 100 nativity sets from around the world, from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The address is 95-5682 Mamalahoa Highway in Na`alehu. Along with the crèche display, the event features live music performed by local musicians and choir and activities for children. Visitors are welcome to the free event.
      For more information, call ‪‪808-895-0491‬‬.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.









Add caption
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.

Tuesday, November 25, 2014

Ka`u News Briefs Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014

Kilauea Military Camp invites Ka`u residents to vote for their three favorite decorated cottages beginning Friday.
Photo by Dave Berry
MEGAN LAMSON, MARINE DEBRIS PROJECT COORDINATOR for Hawai`i Wildlife Fund, which holds many Ka`u Coast Cleanups, last week joined a group of delegates from three different countries in Natori City, Japan for a Symposium on Floating Articles and Debris Resulting from the Great East Japan Earthquake. Lamson was the official representative for Hawai`i at the symposium led by the Japan Environmental Action Network, a small nonprofit organization that has been working to clean up Japan’s coast for the past 25 years. Thirteen presenters from Japan’s government agencies and non-government organizations and representatives from Canada, Washington State and Hawai`i shared their experiences with a group of about 60 participants. Azusa Kojima, secretary-general and director with JEAN, said the purpose was to “exchange information regarding marine debris and natural disasters. We are helping to educate people about tsunami/disaster awareness and recovery in similar coastal areas that could face these types of problems.”
Megan Lamson, back row, third from right, and other delegates visit an amamo
(sea/eel grass) restoration site outside Ogatsu, Ischinomaki led by representatives
with Sea Beautification Society. Photo by Kate Le Souef/Vancouver Aquarium
      Lamson said, “If we listen to the stories from our elders and our Pacific neighbors, we may be able to escape such a tragedy here at home. For that reason, we collectively urge you to go home and discuss your emergency plan for hurricanes, tsunamis, fires, etc. with your family, and most importantly, to stick to your plan. In addition, we hope that, by collecting debris from around the Pacific Basin and showing a deep respect for some of the tsunami driftage objects recovered, we will continue to emphasize how connected we all truly are.
      “Marine debris and tsunami driftage items can link lives from around the globe. At this symposium and over the coming months, participants hope to reconfirm their common objectives with their partners across the Pacific Ocean to reduce marine debris inputs into oceans and waterways (and our reliance on single-usage products) and to remember the lives that were lost and share emergency planning strategies with coastal communities.
      “This trip to Japan has been an intense, emotional and inspirational journey that has connected us with our neighbors across the Pacific. Returning home to Hawai`i Island, I am bringing with me an immense feeling of gratitude and respect for all of the memories that may be linked to each of the foreign debris items that we collect along our shoreline.
      “Together with hundreds of volunteers, Hawai`i Wildlife Fund has been removing marine debris items from our shores that originated in Alaska, California, Canada, Korea, Japan, China, Russia and other countries for over a decade. While we will continue to do this in order to protect native wildlife, the debris from Japan will be carefully inspected in the hopes that we may return more objects to their original owners.”
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists say lava could enter a different
path of steepest descent, shown by blue lines.
Map from USGS/HVO
U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY SCIENTISTS at Hawaiian Volcano Observatory express gratitude for the stall of the lava flow near Pahoa in the current issue of Volcano Watch, titled HVO Looks Ahead While There’s a Break(Out) in the Activity
      “Without lava flows posing immediate threats to the community, recent changes have afforded us an opportunity to catch our collective breaths. The changes, however, have also ushered in a new phase of uncertainty about where these renewed surface flows will head.
      “Lava is currently breaking out of the tube at several locations, as well as migrating down the lava tube system. How far the lava will travel through the existing lava tube is not yet known, but based on flow activity in previous years, it is unlikely that lava will reoccupy the tube to the lowest part of the flow near Pahoa.
      “The farthest point at which lava breaks out of the tube and forms a surface flow could become the new flow front in the coming days. On the other hand, any of the existing upslope breakouts, such as the one near Pu`u Kahauale`a, could eventually capture much or all of the lava supply and become the new active front. In either case, the new active flow front will chart its own path downslope, which may or may not follow the route that the earlier part of the June 27th lava flow followed.
      “New breakouts from the tube are often forced to flow along the margin of the existing flow due to that flow’s inflated and elevated surface, thereby widening the overall flow field. In some cases, this can cause the breakout of lava to head in a new direction and enter a different steepest-descent path, commonly shown by blue lines on HVO maps of the flow.
      “The recent upslope breakouts and subsequent interruption in lava supply to the flow front are typical aspects of pahoehoe lava flow behavior, and the sequence is similar to events repeatedly observed for earlier flows from Pu`u `O`o. Major interruptions can happen multiple times during the lifespan of an individual pahoehoe flow.
      “The recent stalling of flows near Pahoa is good news in the short term, but the ongoing breakouts from the June 27th lava tube clearly indicate that the flow is still active and remains a potential hazard to downslope communities. While it is unclear how far lava will be able to reoccupy the tube or where renewed surface flows might head, HVO and HCCD continue to monitor the flow closely with helicopter overflights, field work, satellite imagery and other techniques.”
Hana Dragons and Ka`u Trojan wahine basketball teams spent last weekend
on a food drive and playing in a tournament in Pahala.
Photo by Jennifer Makuakane
      See hvo.wr.usgs.gov for this and other Volcano Watch articles and daily lava flow updates.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

WAHINE TROJANS SCORED BASKETS and brought in food for the needy at their tournament Friday and Saturday. Players met their goal by collecting over 200 pounds of non-perishable food items to donate to the local Food Basket during last weekend’s tournament that drew players from Hana, Maui and Kealakehe in Kona.
      Hosting teams from Hana and Kealakehe on Friday night, Ka`u Varsity scored 39 points to take down Kealakehe Varsity, who made 35 points. Hana Varsity racked up 31 points to beat Ka`u JV, which scored 19 points.
      On Saturday, Kealakehe beat Hana Varsity, Ka`u Varsity beat Hana Varsity, and Kealakehe JV overcame Ka`u JV.
      To comment on or like this story, go to facebook.com/kaucalendar.

PAHALA COMMUNITY CENTER’S annual Rubberband Turkey Shoot takes place tomorrow from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event is open to all ages.

POHAKULOA TRAINING AREA Army officials are opening several training areas from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m. for bird hunting on Thanksgiving Day and bow hunting on Friday.
      On Thanksgiving Day, training areas 1-4, 9-16 and the Keamuku Training Area will be open for shotgun hunting of birds only. Use of shotgun slugs is not permitted.
      The same areas will be open for bow hunting Friday. Hunters are allowed one pig, one goat and one sheep, in keeping with state bag limits. Shooting sheep with blue collars is not permitted.
      For more information, call PTA’s Hunter’s Hotline at 969-3474, see www.garrison.hawaii.army.mil/pta and click on the Hunting tab, or refer to instructions on the hunting pass.

OCEAN VIEW COMMUNITY CENTER invites Ka`u residents to its annual Thanksgiving Dinner Thursday at 1 p.m. Volunteers are still needed to help make the event successful.
      To sign up, call 939-7033.

Family Values by Elizabeth Miller, a member of Volcano Village
Artists Hui.
VOLCANO ARTISTS HUI STUDIO TOUR & SALE is this Friday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors meet Volcano Village Artists Hui members in their studios and see artwork in a wide variety of media. Maps are available at village businesses and at volcanovillageartistshui.com.

THE HOLIDAY CHALLENGE at Kilauea Military Camp in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park begins Friday and continues through Dec. 31. The public can judge cottages decorated in holiday lights by KMC employees and vote for their three favorites. Park entrance fees apply. Call 967-8371 for more information.

KA`U FLOATING LANTERN CEREMONY is Saturday at Punalu`u Beach Park from 3 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. Registration is available through Ka`u Rural Health Community Association, Inc. at 928-0101.

THE SECOND ANNUAL ISLANDWIDE CRÈCHE FESTIVAL, featuring more than 100 nativity sets from around the world, takes place from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints’ Ka`u Ward, 95-5682 Mamalahoa Highway in Na`alehu. Along with the crèche display, the event features live music performed by local musicians and choir and activities for children. Visitors are welcome to the free event.
      For more information, call ‪‪808-895-0491‬‬.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.






See kaucalendar.com/Directory2014.swf.