About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, June 23, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Friday, June 23, 2017



A color-shaded bathymetry map of Lō‘ihi, a submarine volcano 24 miles southeast of Pahala. 
The summit is marked by pit craters formed in connection with an eruption and earthquake 
swarm in July–August 1996.  Right: Earthquakes in the vicinity of Lō‘ihi (same area as 
bathymetry map) located by USGS during a 30-day period ending June 22. Locations shown 
with dots; size indicates magnitude. The blue dot east of Lō‘ihi was a magnitude-2.3 
earthquake that on June 22. See story below. Images from USGS

COMMERCIAL LAVA TOUR BOAT RIDES FROM PUNALU`U BOAT RAMP would require written permission from owners of the ramp, and possibly government permits for using the shoreline area, according to state and county zoning and boating regulations. Punalu`u Boat Ramp is is shown on the state Department of Land & Natural Resources harbor and boat ramp map as the only private boat ramp on the island. It is owned by the hui associated with Roberts of Hawai`i, which also owns land zoned Open adjacent to the boat ramp, nearby land zoned for resort and also the Punalu`u Golf Course.
With no more permits allowed at the goverment controlled boat ramp at
Po`oiki, some tour boat operators are eyeing the privately owned
ramp at Punalu`u for launching lava boat tours.
Photo from Kohala Tours 
     At state and county boat ramps, government agencies manage the number of permits for commercial boaters using them. However, the state boating division has no control over boats using private ramps. 
     The question of tour boats launching from Punalu`u to run along the shore of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park to the lava flowing into the ocean, has come up among fishermen and users of Punalu`u Beach. They said they have seen preparations at the Punalu`u Boat Ramp and adjacent land and have met people who talk about starting lava boat tours there.
Punalu`u Boat Ramp is the only private ramp listed
by the state on its map of harbors and ramps on the
Big Island. Map from DLNR. Red dots are county,
blue are state and yellow is private.
Map from DLNR
      Since the land adjacent to the boat ramp is zoned Open, not commercial, and is within the Special Management Area along the coast, it requires additional permitting when operating businesses. Permits for repairing and enlarging the ramp would also be required.
     Community concerns include a commercial boat using Punalu`u Bay where families swim, dive, fish and surf, and the amount of tour boating traffic that could be generated in the small Punalu`u Bay, with the only family friendly swimming area and beach park within Ka`u.
     The number of tour boat permits is capped at Po`oiki ramp in Puna for taking people 25 minutes on the water to the lava entry to the ocean. The time it would take to conduct a lava tour by boat from Punalu`u could be an hour and a half one way on an unusually calm day, according to local boaters who make the run while fishing.

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RENEWED SEISMIC ACTIVITY at Lō‘ihi seamount, the underwater volcano 24 miles southeast of Pahala and northeast of Kalae, is registering on Hawaiian Volcano Observatory equipment. The island chain's youngest and still submarine volcano has registered more than 50 quakes in June.
     Lō‘ihi is a new feature on Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's new website. The website change was part of an overall update to how the U.S. Geological Survey’s Volcano Hazards Program (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov) provides information to both the scientific community and the general public. The new HVO website (https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/) provides a portal to a wide range of information about the two ongoing Kīlauea eruptions and current unrest on Mauna Loa and Lō‘ihi, reports this week's Volcano Watch, written by HVO scientists:
      Somewhat coincident with the debut of HVO’s updated website, eagle-eyed web surfers have noticed recent increases in earthquake activity at Lō‘ihi. Although there are no seismic stations near Lō‘ihi,  HVO has been tracking earthquake activity there from land-based seismic stations for over 50 years.
     Since the end of February, HVO seismic analysts have noted a slight uptick in the numbers of earthquakes near Lō‘ihi. From January 2015 through February 2017, there was, on average, one located Lō‘ihi earthquake per month. Since then, the rate of earthquakes has gradually increased. As of June 22 there were 51 located earthquakes in the Lō‘ihi region in this month alone.
      Without permanent seismic stations at Lō‘ihi—because the highest point of the volcano is still a kilometer (0.6 mi) under water—it is not possible to locate earthquakes there as accurately as at Kīlauea or Mauna Loa. However, HVO can state that the June 2017 earthquakes appear to be clustered roughly 10–12 km (6–7 mi) below sea level and extend from beneath the summit region of Lō‘ihi to the south.
      Interestingly, the roughly 170 earthquakes located in the area of Lō‘ihi between 2010 and 2016 occurred away from the summit region. They were primarily beneath the northern flanks of Lō‘ihi, and extended to significantly greater depths below the volcano. The significance of this difference is unclear.
      As early as 1952, HVO scientists interpreted occasional earthquake swarms in the Lō‘ihi region as reflecting active volcanism there. In fact, the earthquakes were key to recognizing that the seamount is actually an active volcano. 
      Earthquake activity alone does not conclusively indicate that Lō‘ihi is erupting. But the locations of recent earthquakes directly beneath the volcano’s summit region plausibly suggest magmatic or volcanic origin, such as adjustments within the magma reservoir or volcanic edifice. We would, however, expect to see many more earthquakes associated with an eruption.
     The most recent confirmed eruption of Lō‘ihi occurred in 1996. That year, an energetic earthquake swarm began in July and quickly intensified, motivating a scientific expedition to Lō‘ihi to seize an unprecedented opportunity to possibly observe a submarine eruption. Thousands of earthquakes, including over a dozen with magnitudes greater than 4.5, were recorded from beneath the summit and south flank of the volcano between July and September 1996.
Pillow lava from an eruption at Lo`ihi. Photo from University of Hawai`i
      Subsequent viewing and mapping of the Lō‘ihi summit region showed that, consistent with magma movement from beneath the summit area, a significant portion of it had collapsed. Fresh pillow lavas and glassy fragments collected during submersible dives also confirmed the occurrence of an eruption.
     Because Lō‘ihi is still so deep beneath the ocean’s surface, the USGS regards Lō‘ihi as a low- to very low-threat volcano. There are no immediate plans for additional monitoring instruments and our views of Lō‘ihi for the foreseeable future will be strictly seismological.

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AN EXTREME HIGH TIDE MESSAGE has been issued for the weekend by Hawai`i County Civil Defense Agency. The National Weather Service reports unusually high tides, also known as King Tides, may cause dangerous flooding conditions along all shores of Hawai`i Island through Sunday before gradually subsiding next week.
     "Due to the King Tides, be aware that coastal areas, beaches, low-lying roads, boat ramps, and harbors may be dangerously impacted during the afternoon and evening hours. A below advisory level south swell will enhance impacts to exposed shores. These high tides and swell will cause higher beach run up, flooding and erosion."
King Tides are expected to send seawater running up onto the shores
through this weekend. Image from University of Hawai`i
     Because of these dangerous conditions, the following precautions should be taken, warns Civil Defense:  "Ocean front residents, beach-goers, and boat owners are advised to be on the alert for high surf, strong currents, and coastal flooding. As a precaution, consider postponing ocean activities until these hazards are over.  As always, precautionary measures should be taken before night fall.
Special caution to the coastal areas in and around Kapoho during the high tide periods.
     There are no closures of roads or beaches. "However, be aware closures may occur without notice.
Radio stations and this public notification will be updated and you will be informed of any conditions that may affect your safety," reports Civil Defense.

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MONEY FOR HEAT ABATEMENT IN PUBLIC SCHOOL CLASSROOMS will be borrowed, interest free, now that Gov. David Ige has signed state House Bill 957 (Act 57) – The Department of Education will borrow money from the Hawai‘i Green Infrastructure Loan Program, the Gov. said when signing the legislation on Thursday.
     The effort is to expedite cooling of classrooms across the state while decreasing energy usage and electricity costs.
    “I ordered the cooling of 1,000 public school classrooms about a year and a half ago. The state and the DOE have worked very hard to achieve this goal. Although the process hasn’t always been easy and it has taken more time than we would have liked, I am happy to say that we expect to have 1,000 classrooms cooled off by the end of August,” said Ige.
Ka`u High & Elementary has high ceilings and large windows but may
qualify in the future for air conditioning through new funding
from the state. Photo by Julia Neal
   The governor's statement says that the DOE is expecting significant decreases in energy use and electricity costs. The use of LED indoor lighting in public school classrooms is expected to result in a $4 million drop in energy costs annually. Such reductions in energy consumption and the lowering of the kilowatt load may enable the installation of AC units in classrooms without expensive and time consuming electrical upgrades.
    The governor’s Cool the Schools initiative and the DOE’s Heat Abatement program have resulted in: The installation of 456 classroom air conditioning units and201 photovoltaic AC units; distribution of 402 portable AC units to the hottest classrooms across the state and the ordering of 1,062 AC units
   In addition, 461 portable classrooms have been covered with heat reflective material; trees have been planted to shade buildings and minimize heat; awnings have been installed on at least four buildings; ceiling fans have been installed in 139 classrooms; and large diameter fans are being installed in cafeteria dining rooms.
    “A big mahalo to our state legislators for their support of our efforts to cool the schools. Thank you also to the DOE for its hard work and for helping us to achieve our goal of creating a learning environment in which our students and teachers can thrive,” Ige said.

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Stained Glass II: Panel Lamp, Sat – Sun, June 24 – July 8, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Claudia McCall teaches students how to create their own stained glass table lamp. $150/$135 VAC members; $15 supply fee. 967-8222

Nature & Culture: An Unseverable Relationship (He Pilina Wehena ‘Ole), Sat, June 24, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change & subsequent restoration can be observed. Free. nps.gov/havo

Thursday, June 22, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, June 22, 2017

Ship and submarine repairing and building for the military could become a much bigger industry in Hawai`i,
if plans to increase the U.S. military fleet from 305 to 355 go through, says Sen. Mazie Hirono, who
advises to balance military and domestic needs.  See story below.
Photo from Ship Repair Association of Hawai`i

THE MUSIC PROGRAM AT THE VOLCANO SCHOOL OF ARTS & SCIENCES has received an outpouring of aloha and generous support of Volcano community members and businesses, following the theft of instruments and sound equipment in May.
     In addition to many donations of instruments, community members gave nearly $6,000 to the music program. The Volcano Winery, in partnership with Grand to Grand Ultra, gifted the school with a check for $1,500 for the purchase of new instruments and sound equipment. The Volcano Art Center also donated $1,000 for the school’s music program.
Nearly $6,000 has been raised to support the music program at
Volcano School of Arts & Sciences following theft of
music instruments. Photo from Volcano School
     Music and the arts are not just extra-curricular at Volcano School. They "are an important part of the learning process through arts integration and creative expression," said a statement from the school.
     "Students and staff are deeply appreciative of the tremendous generosity of The Volcano Winery, Grand to Grand Ultra, the Volcano Art Center, and the many individuals who donated instruments, equipment, and money to support the music program. Students and staff express our heartfelt thanks for the incredible community support that provided a very happy outcome to an unfortunate incident."
      Volcano School is a PreK-8 public charter school. Call 808-985-9800 to inquire about enrollment for the 2017-2018 school-year. Visit www.volcanoschool.net to learn more about the school. Save the date.
     The Volcano Winery will sponsor the Harvest Festival fundraiser for Volcano School again on Sept. 10. Tickets go on sale soon.

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THE U.S. SENATE HEALTH CARE proposal, released on Thursday, drew quick response from Senators Mazie Hirono and Brian Schatz. Among Hirono's tweets:
     "#Trumpcare would hurt Americans living with illnesses like #kidneycancer. As @POTUS says, that's mean. #kidneycancerday. Breakthroughs in research wouldn't be able to exist w/out an + in funding. We must ensure programs get backing to get off the ground."
     Hirono also tweeted, "In Hawai`i, we have a word for what Senate Republicans are doing with #Trumpcare. It's shibai- or as it's more widely known, B.S. #Trumpcare guts Medicaid and eliminates Medicaid expansion, depriving millions of Americans access to this critical program. Millions of people in this country are very concerned about what this bill does." #msactivist @maziehirono."
     Another Hirono tweet, "To Americans living with serious and chronic diseases, #Trumpcare sends a simple message: you're on your own."
      Schatz said he read the bill right after it came out Thursday morning and went on CNN. He said that the Senate health bill isn't "less mean" than the House bill, which Trump called "Mean." Schaz said that the Senate bill drafted by a few Republican senators behind closed doors, "actually went totally in the opposite direction. They cut Medicaid really deeply. They basically change the nature of the Medicaid  program and make massive cuts....specifically for the purpose of giving a tax cut of about $800 billion dollars to the wealthiest Americans. There is no reason to make a wealth transfer from regular people to rich people but this is what they are are doing in this bill." 
     Schatz told CNN's Wolf Blitzer that Democrats are willing to work in a bipartisan process to improve the existing Affordable Care Act.
     Schatz tweeted: "Forgot to mention that the tax on tanning salons is repealed in the Senate bill. Sigh;" and "Hey Republicans don't listen to me. But ignore AARP at your peril." He referred to the AARP, which Thursday, called on the Senate to reject the health bill. Also calling for rejection was the American Hospital Association, American Medical Association and many other health professional organizations.

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An AARP image for citizens standing for health care.
Image from AARP
AARP RESPONDED TO THE HEALTH CARE BILL released Thursday by the U.S. Senate.
     Wrote AARP: "This new Senate bill was crafted in secrecy behind closed doors without a single hearing or open debate—and it shows. The Senate bill would hit millions of Americans with higher costs and result in less coverage for them. AARP is adamantly opposed to the Age Tax, which would allow insurance companies to charge older Americans five times more for coverage than everyone else while reducing tax credits that help make insurance more affordable.
     “AARP is also deeply concerned that the Senate bill cuts Medicaid funding that would strip health coverage from millions of low-income and vulnerable Americans who depend on the coverage, including 17 million poor seniors and children and adults with disabilities. The proposed Medicaid cuts would leave millions, including our most vulnerable seniors, at risk of losing the care they need and erode seniors’ ability to live in their homes and communities.
     “The Senate bill also cuts funding for Medicare which weakens the programs ability to pay benefits and leaves the door wide open to benefit cuts and Medicare vouchers. AARP has long opposed proposals that cut benefits or weaken Medicare.
     “As we did with all 435 Members of the House of Representatives, AARP will also hold all 100 Senators accountable for their votes on this harmful health care bill. Our members care deeply about their health care and have told us repeatedly that they want to know where their elected officials stand. We strongly urge the Senate to reject this bill.”

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SEN. MAZIE HIRONO WILL UNDERGO SURGERY next week and announced Thursday that her Stage Four cancer for which one of her kidney's was recently removed,  is less aggressive than originally thought, enabling surgeons to remove part of her seventh rib which also has a tumor. "The Senator expects a full recovery," said a statement from her office.
Sen. Mazie Hirono points to Pres. Donald Trump calling the Republican
 health care proposals "Mean."  Photo from Office of Mazie Hirono
     In an interview with KITV newswoman Paula Akana, the broadcaster asked Hirono, "The cancer was found during a routine physical in preparation for eye surgery. It showed up on an x-ray. This with a 69-year-old woman who was last hospitalized when she was 17. Did you, when you look back now, have any kind of symptoms?"
     Hirono replied, "Yes, I did, but I ignored them. I have a tumor on my seventh rib, and for a while I felt this weird kind of a tightness sensation, a bit of pain. I just thought it was a muscle spasm or something and I ignored it. I’m just glad that my cancer was caught early enough because if it weren't for that exam that I mentioned to you I’d still be walking around thinking everything was fine when everything wasn't fine."
     Akana commented on Hirono's energy and work ethic. "Don't expect it to slow her down. It was hard to keep up with the Senator as she walked the capitol going from conference calls to chambers to news conferences. The Energizer Bunny clearly loves what she does. And she isn’t retiring anytime soon."
     Said Hirono: "There's work to do. I’ve been privileged to do what I do for over 30 years and I believe that there is justice. So it keeps me going and I have work to do."
    Akana reported that top on Hirono's list is immigration reform and health care. "Hirono says her experience has now made health care a personal battle."
     Said Hirono: "I just thought that major health issues happen to other people but this really taught me one thing: it can happen to any one of us. All of us- one diagnosis from a major illness. So as we sit here debating health care, it’s even more important that people have the health care that they need."
     The surgery is scheduled for next Tuesday at Georgetown University Hospital. Hirono will be hospitalized for a day or two, and said will be back at work as soon as possible.

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Pearl Harbor Shipyard and other repair and maintenance facilities would
become more important and expand to handle an increase from 308 to 355
military ships proposed by the new federal administration.
BALANCING MILITARY INVESTMENT WITH  DOMESTIC PROGRAMS is important, said Sen. Mazie  Hirono,  Ranking Member of the Senate Armed Services Seapower Subcommittee. She said on Wednesday that she has heard from Navy leadership on the Navy’s shipbuilding plan and operational needs, including the goal of increasing submarines and major surface combatant force levels from the previously projected need of 308 ships to 355. "While investments in our national security are essential, Senator Hirono reminded her colleagues of the need to balance military investments with critical domestic programs," said a statement from her office.
      “We all learned a lesson in 2013 when sequester was allowed to take effect—in fact, some in our industrial base are still working through the aftermath of that fiasco,” said Hirono. “Yet here we are, six years later, living under the caps, and in fear of sequestration. Funding for critical programs, both defense and non-defense, is not an either or proposition. We cannot enact the priorities and programs discussed today until we lift the caps and eliminate the fear of sequester.”
Hawai`i shipyards are strategically placed to build and make repairs
for the Pacific Fleet.
      Under current policy, the Navy plans to base 60 percent of its ships in the Asia-Pacific region. The new total of 355 ships would equate to an estimated increase of about 28 ships in the region. These additional ships would require increases in the number of sailors, infrastructure, and the capacity of shipyards. Meeting these needs would require new job-creating investments in Hawai`i, including to support Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, which continues to play a vital role in keeping the Pacific fleet ready for action, said the Hirono statement.
       As part of Hirono’s concern about protecting Hawai`i, Alaska and the continental U.S. from long-range missiles, she also asked questions about the ship radar tested Air and Missile Defense Radar. This radar has been tested at the Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai.
      This hearing was one of a series of committee hearings to consider the Fiscal Year 2018 defense budget request and drafting of the National Defense Authorization Act, legislation that sets Department of Defense funding levels and policy each year.

Weave a Small Decorative Fish, Fri, June 23, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Participants use nui (coconut fronds). Free.

Stained Glass II: Panel Lamp, Sat – Sun, June 24 – July 8, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Claudia McCall teaches students how to create their own stained glass table lamp. $150/$135 VAC members; $15 supply fee. 967-8222

Nature & Culture: An Unseverable Relationship (He Pilina Wehena ‘Ole), Sat, June 24, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change & subsequent restoration can be observed. Free. nps.gov/havo
http://kaucalendar.com/TheDirectory_2017



Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, June 21, 2017

Office of Hawaiian Affairs has released a major study on the health of Hawaiian men. See story below. Image from OHA
A 4.5 EARTHQUAKE SHOOK KA`U TODAY.  The epicenter was northeast of South Point, 23 miles beneath the sea between Loihi Seamount and Ka Lae, southwest of Pahala. The quake was a fit and start, sending some people scurrying to safe places as it started small, stopped for a second and started again, which sometimes means the bigger one is arriving. However, there were few aftershocks and no damage reported.

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THE LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND, which has helped conserve tens of thousands of acres across the U.S. since 1964, some of it locally, would receive an 84 percent cut in the Trump Administration budget, as proposed by the new U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. The Land and Water Conservation Fund, in place since 1964, receives $900 million annually from energy companies drilling on the Outer Continental Shelf of the U.S. The purpose is to support National Parks and other federal, state and local conservation efforts with the non-taxpayer funding.
       Such funding has helped double the size of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park through the purchase of the Kahuku Unit. It has also funded Ala Kahakai Trail purchases and requests gave been made to dedicate part of the funding toward acquisitions of thousands of acres around the Great Crack, Pohue Bay and Waikapuna in Ka`u.
      At Tuesday's Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee hearing, Sen. Mazie Hirono questioned the Secretary of the Interior, reminding Zinke:
      “You said a number of times in response to our questions that this budget is what a balanced budget looks like. Does this budget balance resource extraction with conservation?”
The Kahuku Unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park was added with
funding from the Land and Water Conservation Fund, which faces an
83 percent cut in the proposed federal budget. Janice Wei/NPS Photo
       Her line of questioning set the stage to bring up the Land and Water Conservation Fund, created over 50 years ago to balance natural resource extraction with conservation of the nation’s land and water resources. In recent years, LWCF has provided critical land acquisition funding for Hawai`i’s Island Forests at Risk proposal. However, the Trump Administration’s fiscal year 2018 budget zeros out all funding for land acquisitions from the LWCF.
      “When you were here for confirmation hearings you were a big supporter…of the Land and Water Conservation Fund. That fund is supposed to be a conservation program that is funded by oil drilling revenues and yet this fund is cut by 84 percent,” said Hirono. 
     “The reason that I’m particularly interested in the strength of the Land and Water Conservation Fund is that it is a very bipartisan-supported fund. Hawai`i has submitted a proposal that obtains funding from the LWCF and our proposal is called Island Forests at Risk. It protects water resources, improves ecosystems, etc. So has your commitment to the LWCF changed? Because this fund is cut by 84 percent in the President’s budget, which you support.”       
      Since her service began in the U.S. House of Representatives, Hirono has been working to secure federal support for land acquisitions in Hawai`i and has been a strong supporter of federal resources for conservation.
     For the first time in FY 2016 the Obama Administration’s budget ranked Island Forests at Risk high enough for the National Park Service and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to acquire lands that protect native forests and watersheds that are essential to the recovery of threatened and endangered species and cultural resource protection. Additional funding for purchasing these parcels was provided in FY 2017. "However, zeroing out funding for land acquisitions in the FY 2018 budget proposal could halt these important conservation efforts," said Hirono.
This non-tax payer funding from oil and gas companies to support conservation
would be cut by 83 percent in the new Trump budget.
Image from Land & Water Conservation Fund Coalition
      The Trump Administration’s FY 2018 proposed budget for the Department of the Interior is $11.8 billion, a 12 percent overall cut below funding provided in FY 2017, and the LWCF is not the only conservation program that will take a major hit if the FY 2018 funding levels are approved by Congress. The budget also includes a 13 percent reduction in National Park Service’s budget, a 15 percent reduction in the U.S. Geological Survey’s budget, a 14 percent reduction in U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service’s budget, and a 22 percent reduction in the Office of Insular Affairs’ budget from FY 2017 levels.
     The National Park Service and USGS are important employers in Ka`u.
     
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`O KA`U KAKOU SCHOLARSHIPS total $4,000 this year, provided to students in higher education. The  local volunteer organization has awarded scholarships based on academic achievement, community service, honors and awards and a written essay.
     The following are the recipients: Emmett Enriques, who will be attending California Baptist University; Tiare-Lee Shibuya, attending the University of Hawai`i; Evan Enriques, attending Stanford University; Rochelle Koi, attending the University of Hawai`i; Addison Enriques, attending Concordia University Irvine; Kamrie Koi, attending the University of Hawaii; Avery Enriques, attending Grand Canyon University; and Chloe Gan, attending California State Polytechnic University.

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A 137-FOOT TALL STEEL LATTICE RADIO TOWER WITH A MICROWAVE DISH and two, two-way radio antennas and related structures, are proposed for 2,178 square feet of land in Ocean View, also the location of the fire station. The address is 92-6091 Orchid Circle Mauka at  the intersection with Ocean View Parkway. The County's  Department of Public Works is asking for the permit from the Windward Planning Commission. The request is on the agenda for 9 a.m. at the commission meeting on Thursday, July 6 at the Aupuni Center Conference room on Pauahi Street in Hilo. Testimony can be given and the meeting accessed locally from the interactive video communication site at the Old Na`alehu Courthouse.

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The well-being of Hawaiian kāne is a new 45-page report. See http://www.oha.org/kanehealth.
TRANSFORMING THE HEALTH OF NATIVE HAWAIIAN MEN - Kānehōʻālani is a new publication by the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The 45-page report on the well-being of Hawaiian kāne builds upon the E Ola Mau study, developed by a group of scholars in the mid-1980s, which led to the passage of the federal Native Hawaiian Health Act.
     Kānehōʻālani is grounded in data gleaned from various state departments, federal survey systems, among other sources. However, what sets Kānehōʻālani’s apart from previous research is its wide-ranging scope and cultural emphasis. The report tracks health across an individual’s lifespan from, keiki to kupuna, while also examining how many different factors impact health, such as education, occupation, incarceration and housing – collectively referred to as the social determinants of health. The report also underscores the important role of males in traditional Hawaiian customs, which may
offer a cultural road map to improve health outcomes. OHA is developing a similar report on the health of Native Hawaiian women, slated for release in May 2018, which coincides with Women’s Health Month.
          To view Kānehōʻālani: Transforming the Health of Native Hawaiian Men, visit http://www.oha.org/kanehealth.

Of the 1,360,301 State population, 289,970 (21.3%) were Native Hawaiians, with nearly one-fifth, 18.9% lived in
Hawai‘i County,Of the 289,970 Native Hawaiians in Hawai‘i, 145,849 or 50.3% were kāne, with a median age 26.3 years. The median age for the 681,243 State males was 37.2 years. ∫ In 2010, there were 527,077 Native Hawaiians in the United
States: 45% living in the Continental U.S. and 55% in Hawai‘i. 
     Kamana‘opono Crabbe, OHA Ka Pouhana/Chief Executive Officer, said that "The Kanehoalani Native Hawaiian Men’s Health Report is the first ever focus on Hawaiian men’s health that looks at compiling medical, health, chronic diseases, behavioral health, some of the more socio-economic challenges, but also taking a look from a cultural lens to paint a clearer picture of Native Hawaiian men’s health issues among our kāne."

Kamana`opono Crab, OHA Ka Pouhana/Chief Executive Officer.
Photo from OHA
He said that "OHA’s role was really to accumulate the data from Department of Health. They release the results to the public but they don’t disaggregate it, they don’t break it down by ethnic group or gender so we had to do that. It was a multiyear process to get that information and once we were able to obtain the data files we were able to distill it down into our own analysis. So the reason why that’s important is so we can provide it back to the community for those who want to pursue grants, projects or programs focusing on Native Hawaiian men’s health."
      Michael Broderick, former family court judge and current President and Chief Executive Officer of YMCA of Honolulu said, "I think there are a lot of people in Hawaiʻi who are in denial about the numbers, and about the data, and about the disproportionate impact that the justice system has on Native Hawaiians. This report verifies what a number of people thought for many years, but now we know for sure, for example, that Native Hawaiians are disproportionately represented in prison.
The study analyzes state Department of Health statistics about
the health of Hawaiian Men. Graph from OHA
"I think from a judge perspective… Judges, I think, often have unconscious biases. And it’s unconscious so that means they’re not aware of it, which I think contributes to the disproportionate number of Hawaiians in prison and I think a report like this will get the attention of the criminal justice system so they can then be introspective about changes they might make personally and systematically to address the issue."

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Weave a Small Decorative Fish, Fri, June 23, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Participants use nui (coconut fronds). Free.

Stained Glass II: Panel Lamp, Sat – Sun, June 24 – July 8, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Claudia McCall teaches students how to create their own stained glass table lamp. $150/$135 VAC members; $15 supply fee. 967-8222

Nature & Culture: An Unseverable Relationship (He Pilina Wehena ‘Ole), Sat, June 24, 9:30 – 11:30 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Palm Trail hikers visit a place where catastrophic change & subsequent restoration can be observed. Free. nps.gov/havo
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