About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, July 15, 2020

Police officers on this island carried the torch for the virtual Special Olympics events which started
last Saturday and will go statewide in August. See more below. Photo from Special Olympics
See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar directory for farms, ranches, takeout.

VOLCANO SCHOOL OF THE ARTS & SCIENCES will open for in-person education beginning Tuesday, Aug. 4. To allow for smaller class sizes and physical distancing, approximately half the students will attend each Monday, alternating Wednesdays, and each Thursday. The other group will attend each Tuesday, alternating Wednesdays, and each Friday. On days away from campus, the students will study a home. See volcanoschool.net or call 808-985-9800. Registration is closed.
     Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary starts classes on Tuesday, Aug. 4. Nāʻālehu Elementary starts classes Wednesday, Aug. 5. See their plans for smaller classes and distance learning on the July 13 Kaʻū News Briefs.

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THREE KONA COMMUNITY HOSPITAL STAFF TESTED POSITIVE FOR COVID-19, two today, one on Monday. The hospital, located on Haukapila Street in Kealakekua, made the announcement today, saying the three employees are quarantined at home and that the entire staff will be tested on Thursday. Kona Community Hospital is managed through the West Hawaiʻi Region of Hawaiʻi Health Systems Corp. Kaʻū Hospital & Rural Health Clinic is managed by the East Hawaiʻi Region of HHSC.

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Onset of COVID-19 cases in the last 28 days, by zip code. White 
is zero cases. Yellow is one to five cases. Light orange is six 
to ten cases. Dark orange (not pictured) is 11 to 20 
cases. Red (not pictured) is 21 to 50 cases.
Hawaiʻi Department of Health map
TWENTY-NINE NEW COVID-19 CASES IN THE STATE are reported today. Hawaiʻi Island reports two new cases, with one hospitalization. All active cases on-island are monitored by Department of Health. Oʻahu reported 27 new cases today while its overall case count dropped by one due to new information. The state's case count has risen by 193 in the last seven days.
     Volcano, 96785 zip code, has one active case. In Kaʻū, since the pandemic began, there was one case reported in Ocean View and one in Nāʻālehu, but none in the last 28 days. Since the pandemic began, Hawaiʻi Island reported 107 cases, with 96 victims recovered. No one died of COVID-19 here. Of the five hospitalized, four have been released.
     Since the pandemic began, Oʻahu reported 986 cases, Kauaʻi 43, and Maui County 135. Twenty-one victims are residents diagnosed while visiting other places. As of July 14 at 4:30 p.m., there were 31 people hospitalized for COVID-19 in the state. Twenty-two people in the state died from COVID-19. The state has reported 1,292 cases since the pandemic began. DOH reports almost 100,000 people have been tested for the virus in the state.
     In his daily message, Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Director Talmadge Magno said, "The majority of states continue to see an increase of people being infected by the Coronavirus. Hawaiʻi State remains in a good place, but know how important it is for everyone to continue to follow the preventive measures of face coverings, distancing, gatherings, and cleanliness. As a reminder, wearing of face coverings is mandatory on Hawaiʻi Island. Thank you for listening and be safe. This is your Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Agency."
     In the United States, more than 3,491,936 cases have been confirmed -- an increase of over 62,000 in about 24 hours. The death toll is over 137,235.
     The worldwide COVID-19 case count is more than 13.5 million. The death toll is more than 582,596.

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NO COVID-19 TESTS ARE REQUIRED BUT STUDENTS MUST BE VACCINATED for other diseases to attend school and go to childcare centers. In effect as of July 1, immunizations are required for students entering childcare, preschool, kindergarten, 7th grade, post-secondary schools, and private schools. All new students entering school in Hawaiʻi for the first time, regardless of age must also receive the immunizaitons, says a statement from Hawaiʻi Department of Health.
     The updated immunization requirements "conform with current national recommendations and reflect what occurs in healthcare provider offices and clinics in Hawaiʻi as standard medical practice," says the DOH announcement.
     Hawai‘i State Law requires all students to meet physical examination, immunization, and tuberculosis clearance requirements before they may attend a childcare facility, preschool, public school, or private school.
     Physical Examination must be performed by a U.S. licensed physician, Advanced Practice Registered Nurse, or Physician's Assistance within one year before first date of attendance at a childcare facility, preschool, or school in Hawai‘i and first date of attendance in the seventh grade.
     Required immunizations depend on the age of the child or grade of the student. All immunizations must meet minimum age and interval requirements between vaccine doses. Only medical or religious waivers are accepted.
     Information regarding Tuberculosis clearance requirements for school attendance should be obtained from the child's healthcare provider, by calling DOH Tuberculosis Control Branch at (808) 832-5731, or visiting health.hawaii.gov/tb.

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SPECIAL OLYMPICS GOES VIRTUAL IN AUGUST AND HAWAIʻI COUNTY POLICE CARRIED THE TORCH in preparation. Due to COVID-19, Special Olympics Hawaiʻi is unable to hold its statewide Aukake Classic. In lieu, it is hosting the Aukake Fitness Classic, a virtual competition with fitness events for individual athletes and Unified teams of one athlete and one partner. Events are for athletes of all abilities. Specific events are for athletes that use wheelchairs. The statewide virtual competition will take place on Saturday, Aug. 8. The preliminaries were held on Hawaiʻi Island on Saturday, July 11. See more at Hawaiʻi Special Olympics Facebook.

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MIKE RUGGLES is running for Mayor of Hawaiʻi County with a focus on "trickle-up economics." Born in Las Vegas, Ruggles moved to Hawaiʻi Island in the 70s. He is a fourth-generation mason, from a family of police officers. His youth was focused on athletics, and he was a boxing champion and wrestling champion.
     During his athletics, he sustained several chronic injuries and "discovered the healing benefits of cannabis personally." Ruggles started a support group for medical cannabis patients, Alternative Pain Management Puʻuhonua Collective, and became a medical cannabis advocate. "In following the state's medical cannabis program in 2000," his campaign information says, "I became aware of the many flaws of the inner workings of our legislative and judicial branches of government, and how they systematically persecute medical cannabis patients."
Mike Ruggles, Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate.
     Ruggles' campaign information says he advocates for food security and native rights. "We walk the talk on our small family farm in Mountain View. Working as a mason, I married and raised my family… in Fern Acres, Mt.View. I raised four great kids who, I feel, have been a positive influence on the community and I'm deeply appreciative of the Big Island and how it not only gave me a fulfilling life, but my children as well. I want to give back to the Big Island and help fix some of the serious problems that we're facing, like homelessness, drug abuse, corruption, and an inefficient government, to name a few. I want the judicial system to stop abusing the mentally ill and most vulnerable. And I want the government to use our tax money more effectively and efficiently. As a small business owner, I have always supported a strong vibrant economy and the business owners that work tirelessly to make our island economy thrive."
     Ruggles told The Kaʻū Calendar, "Now that we are entering a depression, my platform is that it is important to distance ourselves from trickle-down economics and instead use trickle-up." He says his plan is to create food hubs in each district that work like grocery stores, but only help local farmers, ranchers, and fisherman.
     Another concern of Ruggles' is affordable housing, "and we can fix that with a housing boom. Right now the mayor won't let you put an air conditioner into a window without a building permit. And that is why we have a housing shortage. Until we construct the 27,500 houses we are short on the Big Island, we need to streamline the permits."
     If elected, he says he wants to start community farms that will employ "the homeless and non-victim criminals to relieve overcrowding at the jails and reduce crime. I want to give economic incentives to small businesses by providing labor for the unemployed, which will stimulate the economy and also reduce crime."
     Ruggles also has plans for waste: "We can't continue to pile up garbage for our children to deal with. We need to stop paying $200 a ton to truck it to Kona and start separating, sorting, recycling, and upcycling."
Mike Ruggles, Hawaiʻi County mayoral candidate, and family.
     He is concerned with pesticide spraying on roads and under new slabs, criminal justice reform, administrative forfeiture, overcrowding in jails, police reform, and going back to "the original rule of engagement, which is you can only return deadly fire, not shoot because you are scared."
     Ruggles added, "Let's not add insult to injury by doing the Thirty Meter Telescope. Let's not let greed hurt the island so no Puna Geothermal Venture and possibly no 5G [cell service]. I also believe that it is the mayor's responsibility to require all departments under him to be fiscally responsible, transparent, and accountable. The fixes are easy but it is going to take someone who actually believes in it to do it."
     His website says, "You are the reason we will bring sustainable health, water, food, and energy to Hawaiʻi Island. From Kapaʻau to Kaʻū, we will bring trust and cooperation back into our communities. Now is the time for island thinking. Let's refocus on what our communities need as though our lives depended on living together sustainably."
     See mayormikeruggles.com.
     Watch the June 25 mayoral candidate debates at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GXE9Jby7yZA&feature=emb_logo for candidates Paul Bryant, Yumi Kawano, Lahi Verschuur, Mike Ruggles, Mikey Glendon, Ted Shaneyfelt, Robert Greenwell, and Wendell Ka‘ehu‘ae‘a, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqTWWn_kPZM&feature=emb_logo for candidates Stacy Higa, Neil Azevedo, Harry Kim, Ikaika Marzo, Tante Urban, Bob Fitzgerald, and Mitch Roth.

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IMPROVING CHILDREN'S MENTAL HEALTH in Hawaiʻi is the aim of a newly awarded $11.8 million grant from the federal government to the state Department of Health's Child & Adolescent Mental Health Division. The money comes from the Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration.
       The four-years of funding services programs that begin in August to focus  statewide on approximately 2,400 youth, ages three to 21, per year, who have "serious emotional disturbance."
     CAMHD Acting Administrator, Dr. Scott Shimabukuro, said, "Now more than ever, it is important for us to work collaboratively with our child-serving partners to protect and improve children’s mental health. We know that the COVID-19 pandemic and other societal stressors will have lasting impacts on the wellness of our children and families. These funds offer the opportunity to use cutting-edge strategies to address this growing crisis in our state."
     For more information on CAMHD, visit health.hawaii.gov/camhd.

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HAWAIʻI HAS THE LOWEST CONSUMPTION OF ELECTRICITY WITH THE HIGHEST PRICE per consumer in the country, according to a recent WalletHub report. Hawaiʻi resident's monthly consumption averages 495 kilowatt hours per consumer, paying $0.3247 per kWh. In 2018, WalletHub reported an average of 481 kWh per consumer, paying $0.2747 per kWh. Hawaiʻi ranks 5th in monthly electricity costs, averaging $161 per consumer per month. In 2018, Hawaiʻi averaged $132 per consumer per month.
     In contrast, Louisiana, with the highest usage, averages 1,540 kWh per consumer, paying $0.0959 per kWh. The average cost per month is $148 per consumer. In 2018, Louisiana averaged 1,475 kWh per consumer, paying $0.0934 per kWh at average cost per month of $138 per consumer.
     For motor fuel, Hawaiʻi still has the highest price, as in 2018, at $3.18 per gallon average. The Aloha state ranks 45th in usage in consumption per number of drivers. The average vehicle fuel bill per month is $121, third highest in the nation.
     Natural gas is rarely used in Hawaiʻi, which ranks 50th in national usage. Average cost is $43.48 per 1,000 cubic feet -- the highest price -- at an average cost of $5 per month per consumer, the lowest average monthly cost, with an average of 0.11 cubic feet used per month.
     Overall, Hawaiʻi ranks 15th in total energy costs. Read the report at wallethub.com/edu/energy-costs-by-state/4833.

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FIND GRANTS AND LOANS OFFERED TO FARMERS AND RANCHERS at oahuaca.org urges Keith Ranney, Communications Director for Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Ranney says the site is a relevant source because it is updated frequently. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher.
     To search for statewide grants, hover over "Grants & Loans" and select "For Farmers & Ranchers." Set the Grant/Loan Filter to "Grant" and the Region Filter to "Statewide." Ranney notes that narrowing the search to County will display opportunities specific to that county. "Selecting Nationwide or Statewide will display other opportunities you may be eligible for and/or be aware of for future reference." Rannay says the website is also updated for mobile and tablet use. "Thank you to Oʻahu Agriculture and Conservation Association for providing this user-friendly tool to Hawaiʻi Agriculturalists," says Ranney.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

NATIVE HAWAIIAN FARMERS AND RANCHERS encouraged to use U.S. Department of Agriculture On-Farm Market Directory. The U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs has launched a project to help develop a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

directory for farms, ranches, takeout. Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is 
free, with 7,500 distributed on stands and to all postal addresses throughout 
Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano throughout the district. Read online at 
kaucalendar.com and facebook.com/kaucalendar. To advertise your 
business or your social cause, contact kaucalendarads@gmail.com.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our Fresh Food on The Kaʻū Calendar and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Daily, weekly, and monthly recurring Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, Meditation, and more are listed at kaucalendar.com.

EVENTS
Attend Miloliʻi Lawaiʻa ʻOhana Camp In-Person or Virtually. The tenth annual event runs through Monday, July 20, feature in-person classes for a limited number of students, and offering classes via Zoom. Receive the knowledge of kūpuna. Sponsors include Kalanihale, Paʻa Pono Miloliʻi, Kua O Ka Lā, Conservation International, Alu Like Inc, Hawaiʻi Community Foundation, and Hawaiʻi Marine Education and Research Center. See facebook.com/kalanihaleMilolii for more. Register for virtual classes here. Register for in-person attendance here. Contact organizer Kaimi Kaupiko at 937-1310 or kkaupiko@gmail.com with questions.

Free Virtual Storytime Sessions with Jeff Gere, Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday for three weeks, 9:30 a.m. to 10:10 a.m., through July 23. Partnered with UH-Mānoa's Outreach College Statewide Cultural Extension Program. To attend each show, email jeffgere1031@gmail.com and csinfo@hawaii.edu, with the subject SCEP : Jeff Gere. In the body of the email, copy & paste in the programs wanted to watch from the list below. An email confirming the reservation will confirm receipt. About 30 minutes before each show starts at 9:30 a.m.csinfo@hawaii.edu will email the Zoom link to the email provided.
     Tuesdays: Participation Tales. July 21, Teaching Tales. Wednesdays: Folktales. July 22, several Adventurous Tales. Thursdays: "Spooky Hawaiʻi" Tales. July 16Old Mililani GraveyardSensativeJuly 23Pele Tales, true stories of meeting Pele.
     During performances, leave microphones off so everyone can enjoy the show. Share sign-up information with "as many listeners as you like" and watch "as many shows as you like." Tech questions should be directed to summer aides. All attendees will be asked to answer a host and technology questionnaire after each show. Zoom's WEBINAR format does not allow a view of the audience. "We won't be able to see your children. It is not an issue."

Free ZOOM Talk on Finding Solutions, Growing Peace, noon to 1 p.m., Thursday, July 16. Non-profit Ku‘ikahi Mediation Center hosts its Brown Bag Lunch Series on the third Thursday of the month. July's speaker, Ilana Stout, M.S., will speak on From Anxiety to Action: Emotional Literacy to Deepen Education. In this talk, attendees can "learn how to support mental and emotional wellness that can serve as a foundation for community action," says the announcement. Register online at freebrownbagtalk.eventbrite.com. For more information, contact Ku‘ikahi Program Coordinator Majidah Lebarre at 935-7844 x 3 or majidah@hawaiimediation.org. Or visit hawaiimediation.org.

Grow Food From Wood: Mushroom Cultivation with Zach Mermel, separate workshops on Saturday, July 18 and Sunday, July 19 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Villagevolcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Strategies to Jump-Start Your Writing by Jacquolyn McMurray and Kristin Wolfgang, a virtual workshop via Zoom, will be held Saturday, July 25 from 9 a.m. to noon. "How long has writing been on your bucket list? Are you ready to make 2020 the year you finally get started or restarted? This class is perfect for all writers seeking new inspiration and strategies." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Start, Expand, or Improve Rural Cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses in rural America. USDA will make $5.8 million in grants available under the Rural Cooperative Development Grant program. USDA encourages applications that will help improve life in rural America. Key strategies include: Achieving e-Connectivity for Rural America, Developing the Rural Economy, Harnessing Technological Innovation, Supporting a Rural Workforce, and Improving Quality of Life. Nonprofit corporations and institutions of higher education are eligible to apply, to provide technical assistance to individuals and rural businesses. Fiscal year 2019 award recipients who received a grant period extension due to a loss of operations as a result of the coronavirus pandemic are eligible to apply for fiscal year 2020 funding. Electronic applications must be submitted to grants.gov by 6 p.m. HST Aug. 3. Additional information is available on page 39870 of the July 2 Federal Register.

Exhibition Mixed Flock: Prints by Margaret Barnaby and Pottery by Emily Herb has been held over through Aug. 8. Also available to view online, view the exhibition in person the Gallery in the Park during normal gallery hours, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Wednesday through Sunday. Free. The exhibition features two prominent female artists from Volcano Village "who find deep inspiration in Hawaiʻi's natural environment and specifically the native bird populations found within it." volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Apply for Grants to Help Socially Disadvantaged Groups develop business and strategic plans in rural areas through USDA Rural Development through 6 p.m. HST on Aug. 10 at grants.gov. Eligible applicants include cooperatives, groups of cooperatives, and cooperative development centers. USDA defines a socially disadvantaged group as one "whose members have been subjected to racial, ethnic or gender prejudice because of their identity as members of a group without regard to their individual qualities."
     Applicants are encouraged to consider projects that provide measurable results in helping rural communities build robust and sustainable economies through strategic investments in infrastructure, partnerships, and innovation. Key strategies include e-connectivity for rural America, developing rural economies, harnessing technological innovation, supporting a rural workforce, and improving quality of life.

ONGOING
Free Breakfast and Lunch for Anyone Eighteen and Under is available at Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary and at Nāʻālehu Elementary on weekdays (no holidays) through Friday, July 17. Each youth must be present to receive a meal. Service is drive-up or walk-up, and social distancing rules (at least six feet away) are observed. Breakfast is served from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11:30 a.m. to noon. Food is being delivered on Wednesdays to students in Green Sands, Discovery Harbour, and Ocean View.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Soup Kitchen is open, with a modified menu and increased health & safety standards, every Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Hot showers, the computer lab, and in-person services and bible studies are suspended. Services and worship are posted online on Sundays at stjudeshawaii.org. Join the Aloha Hour via Zoom at 11 a.m. on Sundays,
us02web.zoom.us/j/6843449828?pwd=YW94djVvU0szOGNKaFZ1V0pUL1owUT09, Meeting ID: 684 344 9828, Password: Aloha.

The Food Basket provides food to those in need. See hawaiifoodbasket.org to verify dates and times. Go to Volcano's Cooper Center at 19-4030 Wright Road on Wednesday, July 22, 10 a.m. until pau. Ocean View residents can go to The Food Basket's pantry at St. Jude's the last Tuesday of the month, July 28.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Cooper Center 19-4030 Wright Rd. Served by Friends Feeding Friends Thursday, July 30 – the last Thursday of the month. Call 985-7140 to verify.

On-Call Emergency Box Food Pantry is open at Cooper Center weekdays from 8 a.m. to noon. Eligible one time every three months. Call Kehau, 443-4130.

Pāhala and Nāʻālehu Public Libraries are Open for Pick-Up Services Only. Nāʻālehu is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Pāhala is open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to noon and 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Library patrons schedule Library Take Out appointment times to pick up their hold item(s) at their favorite libraries by going to HSPLS Library Catalog and placing a hold on any item(s) they want to borrow, or they may call their favorite library branch to place a hold with the library staff. After receiving a notice that item(s) are ready for pick up, patrons schedule a Library Take Out time at picktime.com/hspls. For patrons who placed holds during the closure, their item(s) are ready for pickup after the patron schedules a Library Take Out appointment. For more information, visit librarieshawaii.org.

Free Book Exchanges at the laundromats in Ocean View and Nāʻālehu are provided by Friends of the Kaʻū Libraries. Everyone is invited to take books they want to read. They may keep the books, pass them on to other readers, or return them to the Book Exchange to make them available to others in the community. The selection of books is replenished weekly at both sites.

Nursery, Greenhouse, and Cut-Flower Growers are invited to participate in COVID-19 impact survey by Cornell Cooperative Extension. The survey may help them qualify for USDA CFAP financial assistance. Complete the survey online.

Avocado Growers Survey Open: Help identify opportunities for expanding the local avocado industry, to assist local farmers, buyers, and agencies develop strategies to bolster Hawaiʻi's avocado industry, says Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United. Farmers and farm names will be kept anonymous. Results will be shared publicly. Survey completion gives option to register to win a $200 gift certificate to Home Depot. For a hard copy of the survey, email: info@growfruithawaii.com. Take the survey: surveymonkey.com/r/Hawaiiavosurvey2020.
Receive Help Over the Phone with Critical Financial Issues through Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund Financial Navigators from County of Hawaiʻi, in partnership with Hawaiʻi First Federal Credit Union. Access these remote services by completing the web form at hawaiifirstfcu.com/community-resource-center or by calling 808-933-6600 to sign up. The Financial Navigator will then send a short service agreement and call the client to begin their personal session. Organizations across the County can also refer clients directly to a Financial Navigator. For more information, contact Sharon Hirota at 808-961-8019.

Find Resources for LGBTQ+, Loved Ones, and Allies at Sexual and Gender Minority online resource hub. Hawaiʻi Department of Health's first website dedicated to LGBTQ+ resources. Developed by the Sexual and Gender Minoroty Workgroup in partnership with the DOH Harm Reduction Services Branch. Resources: Understanding the Pacific's alternative genders; Pronoun guide; Book lists for children and teens; ʻOhana support; and DOH data. For more information on joining the SGM Workgroup, email Thaddeus Pham at thaddeus.pham@doh.hawaii.gov. See health.hawaii.gov/harmreduction/sexual-gender-minority/sexual-and-gender-minorities-sgm-in-hawaii/.


Learn About Hawaiʻi's History & Culture through the Papakilo Database, a resource developed by The Office of Hawaiian Affairs. The Kahalo Center says database consists of "collections of data pertaining to historically and culturally significant places, events, and documents in Hawaiʻi's history. The purpose of this educational online repository is to increase the community's ability to preserve and perpetuate cultural and historical information and practices." See papakilodatabase.com.

Native Hawaiian Farmers and Ranchers Urged to Use U.S. Dept. of Ag On-Farm Market Directory. U.S. Office for American Indian, Alaskan Native, and Native Hawaiian Programs is developing a list of Native Hawaiian farmers willing to sell direct to consumers through the On-Farm Market Directory. On-farm markets are managed by a single farm operator that sells products on their farm, or on a property next to their farm. Some on-farm markets may also deliver or ship their goods directly to consumers. Visit the program website for more information and to register.

Receive Free Marketing Assistance for Small Businesses affected by COVID-19 can receive free marketing assistance from Univeristy of Hawaiʻi-Hilo faculty and their senior class. Helen Tien, College of Business and Economics, and her senior retail and distribution management course is offering 1-hour sessions dedicated to helping small business marketing needs. They offer help with moving a business online, finding out more about the businesses' customers, analyzing marketing effectiveness, and providing customer service or website feedback. Visit https://bit.ly/2YvFxsl.

Find Grants and Loans Offered to Farmers and Ranchers at oahuaca.org. The website has a new search feature to help find information that applies to the searcher. To search for statewide grants, hover over "Grants & Loans" and select "For Farmers & Ranchers." Set the Grant/Loan Filter to "Grant" and the Region Filter to "Statewide." Ranney notes that narrowing the search to County will display opportunities specific to that county. Selecting Nationwide or Statewide will display other opportunities searchers may be eligible for and/or want to be aware of for future reference.

Begin Learning Basics of Organic Farming from two free modules of a virtual training program. Accessible online, additional modules will be added. The course is presented by the Organic Farming Research Foundation, the University of California Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education Program, and California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo.

Apply for Internships with Sen. Brian Schatz's office. Internships for undergrad, graduate, and law students are offered in the Honolulu and Washington D.C. offices. Applications are considered on a rolling basis year-round.
     Non-office internships are open for high school students to advocate in their communities. Applications due Sunday, Sept. 13.
     Schatz may also nominate exceptional students for appointment to the U.S. Service Academies. Applications due Friday, Oct. 23.

Volcano Art Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., closed Saturday and Sunday. The Gallery in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park is open Wednesday through Sunday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., closed Monday and Tuesday. Virtual Shopping Appointments are offered at Volcano Art Center locations. Via Skype or FaceTime, a VAC associate helps customers browse the selection of artwork up close, and gives personalized tips and recommendations to help customers "find that perfect piece of locally made artwork, wherever you are in the world!" Book an appointment online for $5 and VAC staff will help schedule a date and time at volcanoartcenter.org/shop. Shop the online gallery 24/7. Orders are shipped as regularly scheduled. Free local pickup is available.VAC now offers a Virtual Classroom, which features over 90 videos. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more.

Guided Nature Walks through Nature Trail & Sculpture Garden, Mondays, 9:30 a.m. at VolcanoArt Center Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. No reservations for five or fewer – limited to ten people. Free; donations appreciated. Email programs@volcanoartcenter.org. Garden is open to walk through at one's own pace, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays. Free. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Yoga with Emily Catey Weiss, Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Volcano ArtCenter Niʻaulani Campus in Volcano Village. Advanced registration required; $5 per class. volcanoartcenter.org/events, 967-8222

Volcano Farmers Market at Cooper Center on Wright Road, off of Old Volcano Highway, is open on Sundays from 6 a.m. to 10 a.m., with much local produce, island beef, and prepared foods. Call 808-967-7800.

Ocean View Swap Meet is open at Ocean View makai shopping center, near Mālama Market. Hours for patrons are 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Vendor set-up time is 5 a.m. Masks are required for all vendors and patrons.

ʻO Kaʻū Kākou Market in Nāʻālehu is open three days per week – Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday – replacing Friday with Saturday, from 8 a.m. to noon. The goal is no more than 50 customers on the grounds at a time. Vendor booths per day are limited to 25, with 30 feet of space between vendors. Masks and hand sanitizing are required to attend the market. Social distancing will be enforced.
     More food vendors are added on Mondays, including Bella's Mexican takeaway hot foods. 
     Lau Lau Man and Flyin' Hawaiian Coffee return to the Market on Wednesdays.
     Saturday will host vendors who have not been able to get space at the Wednesday market. The Saturday Market will feature familiar faces and plenty of new sellers. 
     OKK's Nāʻālehu Market offers a wide selection of fresh vegetables and fruits, prepared take away foods, assorted added value foods, breads and baked goods, honey, cheese, grass-fed beef, fish, vegetable plants, masks, handmade soaps, coffee, and more, on various days. Contact Sue Barnett, OKK Market Manager, at 808-345-9374 (voice or text) or kaufarmer@aol.com for more and to apply to vend. See facebook.com/OKauKakouMarket.

Enroll in Kua O Ka Lā's Hīpuʻu Virtual Academy for school year 2020-2021, grades four through eight. The Hawaiian Focused Charter School teaches with an emphasis on Hawaiian language and culture. The blended curriculum is offered through online instruction and community-based projects, with opportunities for face-to-face gatherings (with precautions), in an "Education with Aloha" environment.
     Kua O Ka Lā offers a specialized program that provides students with core curriculum, content area, and electives in-keeping with State of Hawaiʻi requirements. Combined with Native Hawaiian values, culture, and a place-based approach to education, from the early morning wehena – ceremonial school opening – Kua O Ka Lā students are encouraged to walk Ke Ala Pono – the right and balanced path.
     The school's website says Kua O Ka Lā has adopted Ke Ala Pono "to describe our goal of nurturing and developing our youth. We believe that every individual has a unique potential and that it is our responsibility to help our students learn to work together within the local community to create a future that is pono – right." The school aims to provide students with "the knowledge and skills, through Hawaiian values and place-based educational opportunities, that prepare receptive, responsive, and self-sustaining individuals that live 'ke ala pono.'"
     See kuaokala.org to apply and to learn more about the school. Call 808-981-5866 or 808-825-8811, or email info@kuaokala.org for more.

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