About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, April 20, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Saturday, April 20, 2019

Easter music, Hawaiian style, with Calvin Ponce, Makana Kamahele, and Guy Sesson at the Pāhala Preschool.
See photos and story below. Photo by Julia Neal
KAʻŪ FARMERS AWAIT THE OUTCOME OF THE WATER FIGHT in the Hawaiʻi Legislature.
Gov. David Ige inserted his influence on Friday by sending lawmakers a letter of support for House Bill 1326 HD2, which would give rights to large landowner Alexander & Baldwin to continue diverting water from streams for the next seven years. The bill, which failed in committee, could be pulled to the Senate floor on Monday. The legislation would override Hawaiʻi courts that ordered the return of water to its natural flow, that the era of diverting water to grow sugar cane is over.
Eddie Andrade brought out his many keiki games, including this
wooden machine to launch frogs. Photo by Julia Neal
     The bill supported by Ige would also help Kaʻū farmers and ranchers keep their water sources for now. The Kaʻū agricultural water comes from tunnels in the side of the volcano, not streams supporting Hawaiian agriculture and wildlife.
     An alternative bill, proposed by Sen. Kai Kahele, would have allowed Kaʻū ranchers and farmers and other small users of water to continue with their water sources - separated from the large users like A&B. Opponents contend that A&B was promised $62 more million from the buyer of its Maui land should it be able to guarantee water rights. Water is not a commodity to be sold by private enterprise, contend the opponents who have described the measure supported by Ige as "the water theft bill."
     Ige, however, objected to separating the big and small users, writing, "the law cannot be applied in a discriminatory fashion... all water permittees and applicants must comply with the law and the law cannot be specifically enforced against some permittees and applicants but not others."
Children run for the eggs at Pāhala Elementary
the day before Easter. Photo by Julia Neal
     In response to Ige's letter, Hawaiʻi Sierra Club Executive Director Marti Townsend wrote that the governor "is essentially using his office to influence pending legislation to circumvent a court ruling for the benefit of one major corporation. His administration is failing to take responsibility for their role in this situation. It looks like the state Department of Land & Natural Resources," which is in charge of stewarding Hawaiʻi's water sources, "has done next to nothing on this issue for the last three years, and now as the deadline approaches, and A&B risks losing $62 million, it is a crisis. I do not buy it."

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Keiki spin the wheel for a prize at
Pāhala Preschool. Photo by Julia Neal
EXPANSION OF THE HAWAIʻI NUTRITION EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAM goes to Gov. David Ige for his signature, along with a Hawaiʻi Community College Promise Program to help pay for college education.
     Senate Bill 50 SD2 HD1 would appropriate $910,000 – $455,000 for each of the next two fiscal years – to continue Hawaiʻi Nutrition Employment and Training and hire seven full-time instructional and student support positions. HINET help pay for food, transportation, books, and necessary tools for students who are eligible for SNAP, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits, and are enrolled at least part-time at a University of Hawaiʻi Community College in an approved program. HINET staff also support the students'  needs and goals, matching them with training. HINET began in 2015, and is a partnership between state Department of Human Services and UH.
     SB316 SD2 HD2 provides $1.4 million – $700,000 for each of the next two fiscal years – to continue the Promise Program. It would cover community college tuition for eligible students once all other federal aid and public and private scholarships are exhausted. It requires UH to collect data on how well the Promise Program influences recipients in completing a degree program.
Coloring for all the keiki at Pāhala Preschool
Photo by Julia Neal
     Chair of the Senate Higher Education Committee Sen. Donna Mercado Kim said, "These bills attest to the Legislature's focus on education and the future by not only helping our students with their tuition, but by helping them not have to worry if they are going to be able to feed themselves, if they are going to be able to afford their textbooks, and how they are going to get to campus on time. These two measures work together to bring support the whole student so they can be successful in achieving their educational dreams."
     Chair of the House Lower & Higher Education Committee Rep. Justin Woodson said more than 1,500 community college students have been helped by the Promise Program since it began in 2017, and that 72 percent of the participants returned for their next academic year, compared to 54 percent of all UH community college students. "About 58 percent of the participants are Native Hawaiian," said Woodson. "As of February, the program has served 543 enrollees, with more than 200 University of Hawaiʻi Community College students now receiving assistance. About 140 enrollees completed a two-year program and are employed or transferred to a four-year campus.
Big Mouth accepts the toss at Pāhala
Preschool. Photo by Julia Neal
Easter baskets are almost full at
Pāhala Elementary. Photo by Julia Neal
     "The Legislature wants to ensure that as much of these funds as possible go to students who may not otherwise have attended college, and that the scholarship is effective in helping students complete a degree program. If you want to invest in yourself, then we at the Legislature want to invest in you," said Woodson.

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PĀHALA PRESCHOOL AND PĀHALA ELEMENTARY DREW DROVES OF KEIKI for two Easter Egg Hunts today. At Pāhala Preschool, Eddie Andrade - well known for his role as Santa during 40 years of Christmas Parades - brought out his many wooden games for children. The Easter celebration featured songs from musicians Calvin Ponce, Makana Kamahele, and Guy Sesson, with food and games for all. At nearby Pāhala Elementary and Kaʻū High School, the Easter Egg Hunt was tied to a health fair. See more on the health fair in tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs.

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Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said, "Unlike President Trump, I will
not turn our great country into the prostitute of Saudi Arabia."
Photo from tulsi2020.com
REP. TULSI GABBARD CALLED OUT PRES. DONALD TRUMP on his veto of the War Powers Act that recently won approval by both Republicans and Democrats in Congress. In a recent email, Gabbard said the resolution would have seen the U.S. "finally end its support of Saudi Arabia's genocidal war against the people of Yemen." She said the veto "again proves that he is the servant of Saudi Arabia — the theocratic dictatorship which spends billions of dollars every year spreading the most extreme and intolerant form of Islam around the world, the very ideology that motivates al-Qaeda and other jihadists."
     Gabbard also said Trump's veto "is further, a betrayal of his campaign promise to end 'stupid wars.' Trump is caving to the neocons around him who are fomenting regime change war in Venezuela and Iran, and escalating the new Cold War and nuclear arms race. These wars have and will continue to waste trillions of dollars and thousands of American lives, undermine our national security by strengthening terrorist groups like ISIS and al-Qaeda, and cause untold suffering and devastation for the people in the countries where we wage these wars.
     "We are complicit in the genocide that Saudi Arabia is carrying out in Yemen, that has killed tens of thousands of innocent children and civilians as well as the deaths of millions more from disease and starvation. We must do the right thing and stop assisting Saudi Arabia as they carry out this genocide.
     "We already know Trump is more interested in pleasing the Saudis than doing what's right, but we don't have to accept that. I will put the interests and the values of the American people first, not the interests of the theocratic dictatorship of Saudi Arabia."
After another bombing in Yemen. Photo from tulsi2020.com
     She urged the public to watch this video, "where I explain how, because of the actions of President Trump, the U.S is complicit in the genocide that the theocratic dictatorship of Saudi Arabia is waging on the people of Yemen. And then share it with your friends to get the word out about what this veto really means. She also asked the public to become a citizen co-sponsor of the bipartisan resolution she will be reintroducing, "that ensures the decision to go to war lies with Congress — not the president — as is specified in our constitution. No President should be able to start a war without the explicit consent of Congress."
     Said Gabbard, "As a veteran, this is personal. The direct and indirect costs of these unnecessary, costly interventionist wars take a heavy toll on our troops and veterans, and on the American people. Our communities face crumbling infrastructure, failing public schools, skyrocketing costs of healthcare and housing, and so much more while we spend trillions of dollars on regime change wars and nation-building.
Pres. Trump meeting with Saudi Arabian representatives.
Photo from tulsi2020.com
     "This must stop. We must stand up to President Trump and the continued abuse of our Constitution by ending presidential wars once and for all. I'm making a promise to you right now: As President, I will put the needs and values of the American people — your needs — first. I will restore War Powers to Congress and you will have a say in the decision to send our troops into harm's way.
     "Unlike President Trump, I will not turn our great country into the prostitute of Saudi Arabia."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

USING THE PLATFORM OF 4/20, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard today sent out a message to supporters about legalizing marijuana: "I'm passionate about legalizing marijuana because to me, it's a basic question of fairness and freedom of choice for the American people. And since 60 percent of voters support legalizing pot, it's clear that the American people agree. It appalls me that marijuana is considered a Schedule 1 drug, alongside heroin, and that our country arrested 600,000 people just for possession in 2017 alone.
     "Meanwhile, Big Pharma gets off scot free for pushing highly addictive opioids on to patients who don't need them. Justice means expunging the records of those with marijuana possession charges and fully prosecuting Big Pharma for fueling an opioid epidemic that has killed thousands." 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

PESTICIDE SAFETY TRAINING FOR GROWERS happens at Pāhala Community Center Tuesday, April 30 from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Presented by AgSafe, this hands-on, interactive pesticide safety training for growers is approved for three Continuing Education Credits by Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture. The training will deliver information on pesticide safety and compliance, worker protection standard training, employer responsibilities, and employee rights. Participants will receive a grower compliance kit with teaching aids and training tools to use with employees. Educational materials are available in multiple languages. There is no cost to attend. Contact Amy Wolfe to RSVP at 209-499-4091 or amy@agsafe.org.

ALL HAWAIʻi ISLAND KTA SUPER STORES AND EXPRESS OFFER DA BUX Double Up Food Bucks, the Food Basket's healthy food incentive program. Primarily funded by the USDA Food Insecurity Nutrition Incentive grant, DA BUX doubles low-income Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cardholders' purchasing power for fruits and vegetables while supporting Hawaiʻi Island farmers. Read the press release or contact Chelsea Takahashi at 808-933-6030 to learn more.

FOOD SAFETY REIMBURSEMENT APPLICATION DEADLINE IS EXTENDED to Tuesday, April 30, for farmers and ranchers. Refer to Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture's website for more information and to apply. For assistance preparing an application, contact The Kohala Center's agricultural outreach specialist Maile Woodhall atmwoodhall@kohalacenter.org or 808-887-6411.

THE AG2019 PROPOSAL DEADLINE IS EXTENDED to Friday, April 26. The 2019 Hawaiʻi Agriculture Conference happens October 15 and 16 at the Hawaiʻi Convention Center in Honolulu. The theme is AGdaptation: Hawaiʻi's Growing Opportunity. Complete the application online. Contact agconference@agleaderhi.org with questions.

A FARM TO STATE COORDINATOR position is open for the state Hawaiʻi Department of Agriculture. This full-time position is an employment opportunity in the emerging field of farm to state initiatives. The coordinator will work to increase use of locally produced commodities in Hawaiʻi's educational and institutional markets. Refer to the position description for more information. Contact hdoa.hr@hawaii.gov with questions.

Trojans Athletic Director Kalei Namohala, Deisal Martinez of 
Honokaʻa, Andre Carvalho of Kaʻū, Dustin Dancel of Kaʻū, and 
June Domondon of ‘O Kaʻū Kākou. Photo from Kaʻū Athletics
ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT FOR HAWAIʻI ʻULU COOPERATIVE applications are open. This part-time position is responsible for providing on-site administrative support for all aspects of Hawaiʻi ʻUlu Cooperative operations at the Honalo marshaling yard office in Kona. See the position description for more information. To apply, email resume and cover letter to info@eatbreadfruit.com.

CONSERVATION STEWARDSHIP ENROLLMENT through U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service is open through Friday, May 10. NRCS plans to invest up to $700 million in this program during fiscal year 2019 to help farmers, ranchers, and landowners achieve their conservation and management goals. Refer to the agency's press release for more information.

Track & Field at KS Hawaiʻi, Kaʻū's Luke Watson - Shot
Put. Photo from Kaʻū Athletics
HIGHER LIMITS ON FEDERAL FARM LOANS are available through U.S. Department of Agriculture Farm Service Agency. As a result of 2018 Farm Bill legislation, has increased the lending limits of several programs, including but not limited to the direct operating loan, farm ownership loan, and microloan. Refer to the agency's press release for more information.

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KAʻŪ TROJANS BOYS VOLLEYBALL traveled to Honokaʻa yesterday for a three-set game. The Trojans fiercely battled against the Dragons but succumbed, with Honokaʻa taking each set, 25-15, 25-17, and 28-30.
     Andre Carvalho and Dustin Dancel of Kaʻū, and Deisal Martinez of Honokaʻa, helped raise $750 for Kaʻū Athletics through the ‘O Kaʻū Kākou Serve For Cash at the game.
     The Trojans Track & Feild Team was at Kamehameha Schools Hawaiʻi today. Luke Watson competed in the Shot Put. William Tabios competed in the 300 meter Hurdle.
Track & Field at KS Hawaiʻi, Kaʻū's William Tabios - 300m Hurdle. Photo from Kaʻū Athletics
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
Kaʻū Trojans Spring Sports Schedule
Baseball:
Fri., April 26, BIIF Finals
Sat., April 27, BIIF Finals
Wed.-Sat., May 8-11, HHSAA
Softball:
Wed., May 1-4, HHSAA
Boys Volleyball:
Mon. April 22, BIIF First Round
Wed., April 24, BIIF Semi-Finals
Thu., April 25, BIIF Finals
Thu.-Sat., May 2-4, HHSAA
Track:
Fri., April 26, 2 p.m., BIIF Semi-Finals
Sat., April 27, 3 p.m., BIIF Finals
Fri.-Sat., May 3-4, HHSAA

JUST ANNOUNCED
May Day is Lei Day, May 1, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hands on lei making demonstrations, live music and hula. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Arts and Crafts Activity: Boy's Day Craft, Wednesday, May 1, 2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Kahuku Park, H.O.V.E. Register keiki ages 6-12 April 23-30. Free. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Arts and Crafts Activity: Thumbprint Art, Wednesday, May 1, 3:30-5p.m., multi-purpose room, Ka‘ū District Gym. Register keiki grades K-6 April 22-30. Free. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

UPCOMING
SUNDAY, APRIL 21
Easter Brunch, Sunday, April 21, 7 a.m. – noon, Kīlauea Military Camp's Crater Rim Café. Menu includes Honey Glazed Ham, Beef Pot Roast with Gravy, Omelet Station, Waffle Bar with Sauce and Toppings, and more. No reservations required. $17.95/adult, $10.95/ages 6-11. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. 967-8356, kilaueamilitarycamp.com

Easter Egg Hunt, Sunday, April 21, 9 a.m. in the ‘Ōhi‘a Room, Kīlauea Military Camp. Open to keiki 10 years and under; bring Easter basket. Register: 967-8352 before 8:45 a.m. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

Easter Sunday Services, April 21, 9:30 a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. 939-7000

Easter Pancake Breakfast, hosted by Amazing GraceBaptist Church happens Sunday, April 21, 10 a.m., at the Discovery Harbour Community Center, 94-1581 Kaulua Circle, Nāʻālehu. A special Easter service will follow the breakfast; special activities and lessons will be provided for children. Join in for a morning of good food, fellowship, and worship. Pancakes, eggs, breakfast meats, fruit, and Miranda coffee are all on the menu. For more information, contact John Glenn at 970-623-1081.

MONDAY, APRIL 22
Hypertension Management, Monday, April 22, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Kaʻū District Gym, with Hui Mālama Ola Nā ʻŌiwi.

TUESDAY, APRIL 23
Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, April 23 (Committees), Wednesday, April 24 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

HOVE Road Maintenance Board Mtg., Tuesday, April 23, 10 a.m., HOVE Road Maintenance office. hoveroad.com, 929-9910, gm@hoveroad.com

Merrie Monarch Festival Events at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park, Tuesday, April 23 and Wednesday, April 24, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center lānai. Day 1: Weave coconut leaves, make lei. Rupert Tripp Jr. performs. Day 2: Learn/play the Hawaiian board game kōnane, learn about the tools, alter and plants that symbolize hula. Ti "Kawehi" Chun and Pōki‘i Seto perform. Free; park entrance fees apply. nps.gov/havo

Arts and Crafts Activity: Paint a Rainbow, Tuesday, April 23, 2:45 p.m. – 3:30 p.m., Kahuku Park, H.O.V.E. Register keiki ages 6-12 April 15-18. Free. 929-9113, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

Read to Me, Tuesday, April 23, 3:30 p.m. – 5 p.m., multi-purpose room, Ka‘ū District Gym. Open to keiki grades K-6. Free. Register April 15-22. 928-3102, hawaiicounty.gov/pr-recreation

After Dark in the Park: Kīlauea Volcano's 2018 Lower East Rift Zone Eruption, Tuesday, April 23, 7 p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Carolyn Parcheta recounts the progression and shares her experiences monitoring this dramatic eruption. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24
Kōkua Kupuna Project, Wednesday, April 24, 9 a.m. – 11 a.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church, Ocean View. Seniors 60 years and older encouraged to attend, ask questions, and inquire about services offered through Legal Aid Society of Hawai‘i. Referral required: 961-8626 for free legal services. Under 60, call 1-800-499-4302. More info: tahisha.despontes@legalaidhawaii.org, 329-3910 ext. 925. legalaidhawaii.org

THURSDAY, APRIL 25
Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, April 25, 3 p.m. – 4 p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for community members. Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584, domingoc1975@yahoo.com, ccco.k12.hi.us

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, April 25, 4 p.m. – 6 p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, APRIL 26
Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Vendor Application Deadline for Ho‘olaule‘a, Friday, April 26. To become a vendor, contact Brenda Iokepa-Moses at biokepamoses@gmail.com or 731-5409

Coffee Talk at Kahuku - The Price of Paradise: The Story of Sandalwood in Hawai‘i, Friday, April 26, 9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Talk story with John Stallman, biologist and former Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park ranger. Free. nps.gov/havo

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Pā‘ina & Open House, Friday, April 26, 5:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m., Pāhala Plantation House. Free; donations accepted for Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Scholarship Fund. Julia Neal, 928-9811, mahalo@aloha.net. kaucoffeefestival.com

SATURDAY, APRIL 27
Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest Entry Deadline is extended to Saturday, April 27. The all-ages, fee-free contest is Sunday, April 28, 11 a.m. at Kaʻū Coffee Mill. Enter a pūpū, entrée, or dessert, divided into adult and youth categories. The public is invited to enjoy free tastings. Contest entry info at KauCoffeeMill.com or KauCoffeeFest.com, or call 928-0550.

Healing Through Words with Dr. Heather Rivera, Saturday, April 27, 10 a.m. – 11:30 a.m., Volcano Art Center. Creative writing workshop. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Sauerkraut and Kombucha with Jasmine Silverstein, Saturday, April 27, 10 a.m. – 1 p.m., Volcano Art Center. $55/VAC member, $60/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. Register: volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Ka‘ū Coffee Festival: Miss Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant, Saturday, April 27, 6 p.m., doors open 5:30 p.m., Ka‘ū District Gym. Tickets: $10 donation. Ka‘ū Coffee Pageant Director Trinidad Marques, 928-0606, TrinidadMarques@yahoo.com, or Facebook Trinidad Marques. kaucoffeefestival.com

ONGOING
Kaʻū Coffee Fest invites non-profits, clubs, cooperatives, and businesses to sign up for booths at the 11th annual Kaʻū Coffee Fest Hoʻolauleʻa on Saturday, May 4 at Pāhala Community Center. The all-day event comes with music, hula, coffee tasting, and meeting the famous Kaʻū Coffee farmers. See KauCoffeeFestival.com.
     Booth fees are $100 for food vendors; $60 for non-food items and crafts, including coffee and coffee samples; and $35 for pre-approved information displays. No campaign and other political displays. Fifty percent discounts for non-profit organizations and cooperatives selling food, crafts, and coffee. Vendors must also obtain county vendor permits costing $30 each and a Department of Health permit, if serving food. Call Gail Nagata 933-0918. Apply by Friday, April 26. Application at KauCoffeeFestival.com. Email to biokepamoses@gmail.com; mail to Brenda Iokepa-Moses, P.O. Box 208PāhalaHI 96777; or call 808-731-5409.

Kaʻū Coffee Recipe Contest Entry Deadline is extended to Saturday, April 27. The all-ages, fee-free contest is Sunday, April 28, 11 a.m. at Kaʻū Coffee Mill. Enter a pūpū, entrée, or dessert, divided into adult and youth categories. The public is invited to enjoy free tastings. Contest entry info at KauCoffeeMill.com or KauCoffeeFest.com, or call 928-0550.

Hi-Employment Seeks Student Employees to work in a macadamia nut orchard on weekends and holidays. Duties include hand-harvesting macadamia nuts, filling and transporting nut bag and buckets, loading 25-plus pound bags into truck beds, and possible clearing of brush and branches. Applicants must be at least 15 years old, have a work permit, two forms of ID, and transportation to "Panaʻewa Stretch." Call for more details, 238-3741, hi-employment.com.

Exhibit: On Sacred Ground by Dino Morrow is open daily through Sunday, May 5 at Volcano Art Center Gallery. The public is invited to see documentary and protrait photography of Hula Arts at the Kīlauea Program. Visit volcanoartcenter.org for more information.

Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade happens Saturday, June 29 at 11 a.m. The parade route begins at the Nāʻālehu Elementary School and ends at the Nāʻālehu Hongwanji Mission. To participate, call Debra McIntosh, 929-9872.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.