About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Friday, June 14, 2019

Kaʻū News Briefs, Friday, June 14, 2019

Runit Island along the Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands is subject of a study approved in the 2020 House
version of the National Defense Authorization Act. The concrete dome is a nuclear storage facility. Photo from NPR
REQUIRING AN UNCLASSIFIED PUBLIC REPORT ON THE STATE OF NUCLEAR WASTE on the Marshall Island of Runit is included in the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act, through the initiative of Rep. Tulsi Gabbard. The Runit Dome nuclear waste storage site is located on one of 40 islands of Enewetak Atoll of the Marshalls. The Defense Act passed the House Armed Services Committee and the report would involve the Department of Energy, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Department of Defense.
The Okenos Foundation sailing canoe carried a Marshall Arts
Project team in 2018 to map the island and the nuclear waste site.
 Photo from Marshallese Arts Project
     Runit Dome, called The Tomb by the Marshallese, contains 111,000 cubic yards of radioactive nuclear waste created by U.S. nuclear testing in the 1940's and 1950's. Gabbard said, "The Marshallese people are gravely concerned about environmental threats to the integrity of the storage site and the impact on their country. The U.S. government is responsible for this storage site and must ensure the protection of the people and our environment from the toxic waste stored there."
     The report would assess the current condition of the dome's outer construct, it's environmental impacts, and safety of food sources, and people residing in the vicinity of Runit Dome.
     In 2018, the Marshall Arts Project group mapped the island using drones, after sailing to Runit on a modern walao style Pacific canoe, operated by the non-profit Okeanos Foundation. The boat uses wind, solar, and coconut biofuel to operate.
     In addition to the Runit Dome study, Gabbard cosponsored H.R. 1377, the Mark Takai Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act, which would provide treatment of veterans who participated in the cleanup of Enewetak Atoll and were likely exposed to radiation that led to disabilities acknowledged by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs. Current law only covers service members who participated in active nuclear tests, not those who participated in the cleanup. Gabbard serves on the House Armed Services and Financial Services Committees. She is in her fourth term in the House and is one of more than 20 candidates for President.
Marshallese group on top of the nuclear waste storage Runit Dome. Photo from the Marshall Arts Project
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE TULSI GABBARD will take the stage for the nationally televised Democratic debate on the first night, Wednesday, June 26. According to the Democratic National Committee's announcement today, Gabbard will be on stage with presidential candidates Cory Booker, Julian Castro, Bill de Blasio, John Delaney, Jay Inslee, Amy Klobuchar, Beto O'Rourke , Tim Ryan, and Elizabeth Warren. The second night, Thursday, June 27, candidates debating will be Michael Bennet, Joe Biden, Jr. Pete Buttigieg, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, John Hickenlooper, Bernie Sanders, Eric Swalwell, Marianne Williamson, and Andrew Yang.
     See yesterday's Kaʻū News Briefs for the qualifying rules and a statement from Gabbard's campaign, saying she will make the risk of nuclear war a major point in her statement. The debates, staged in Miami, will be shown in Hawaiʻi from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on MSNBC and NBC.

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Location of planned Pāhala wastewater treatment plant. County map
A TEN MILLION DOLLAR BUDGET IS APPROVED TO START THE PĀHALA AND NĀʻĀLEHU WASTEWATER TREATMENT PROJECTS. The money is included in the County of Hawaiʻi Budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1. The County Council approved the budget last week.
     The county budget allows the county to sign on for a $10 million loan for the Pāhala and Nāʻālehu wastewater treatment systems during the coming fiscal year. The money is coming from a state revolving fund. The fund offers a lower interest rate than money that would be garnered if the county issued a bond. With the revolving fund, the county would pay interest as the money is used.
     Kaʻū's County Council member Maile David said the $10 million commitment will provide initial funding for such work as conducting environmental assessments for both treatment plants. The goal is to shut down old gang cesspools that are now illegal under federal law, and to replace them with sewage treatment plants and distribution lines. The sites for the facilities are still to be finalized, following Environmental Assessment to determine if the sites are environmentally acceptable, she said.
     Approvals to borrow additional money for both projects are included in two bills, unanimously passed by the County Council Finance Committee last week and sent to the full County Council for final approval.
     Bill 75 for Nāʻālehu includes $7 million for a Wastewater Treatment and Disposal System and Drainage Modifications; $2 million for a Wastewater Collection System; and $1 million for a Sewage Pump Station and Force Main.
     The Pāhala Bill 76 includes $15 million for Wastewater Collection System and $22 million for Large Capacity Cesspool Conversion.
Red lines indicate where sewer lines are planned in Nāʻālehu. County map
     Several community members in Pāhala have objected to the proposed site above Highway 11 next to the Norfolk Pine lane coming into the village. Several have also opposed the Nāʻālehu location, which has been moved away from the Makahiki Grounds and Nāʻālehu Elementary School.
     County Council member Karen Eoff emphasized that interest the county will pay on money borrowed for both projects will be low. Deanna Sako, county Director of Finance, said interest is about .5 percent and that no payments or interest are due until money is withdrawn. 
     She said the county committed to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ruling deeming Large Capacity Cesspools illegal more than ten years ago. She said an environmental assessment will be completed on the project once funding has been secured, and that a draft EA is expected in October.
     Dora Beck, Wastewater Division Chief, said the the now-defunct sugar company that provided housing for employees asked the county to help change the sewer system since the company was going through dissolution. She said options were septic tanks or a sewer system, and that a community vote approved a county owned sewer and treatment system. She said the county agreed to take over the Large Capacity Cesspools by 2010 and to work toward replacing and closing them.
     "Since then, we've been trying to move the LCC closures along," said Beck, noting that the process has taken longer than expected, mostly due to site concerns. She said the EPA "understands the problems we have been having."
     Beck said there is a $1.8 million federal grant for the Pāhala project, which was issued in the early 2000s. Testimony at the meeting came from several island residents.
Wastewater treatment engineer Michelle Sorensen goes over the plan with a Nāʻālehu property owner
during an earlier community meeting. Photo by Julia Neal
     John Olson from Pāhoa testified that the small population of Pāhala "will need some help paying for this… This is not socially going to have a very good outcome."
     Jerry Warren from Nāʻālehu testified the Nāʻālehu Senior Center was converted from LCC to septic, a project that "came in under budget," and that the "same solution can be applied to Pāhala's" and Nāʻālehu's LCCs. He contended that the cost of the planned lagoon treatment project for the two towns is too high, that there is a lawsuit against the Nāʻālehu Project, and that the Finance Committee should not consider letting this "boondoggle" progress.
     Shelly Mahi testified that a methane conversion plant could benefit everyone by making the wastewater an energy source, that there are more ways to dispose of waste, and that those alternatives should be looked into.
     Sandra Demoruelle testified that no environmental assessments on either project have been published for public comment in "over 12 years." She said EAs are required to be completed early in the project process, "before decisions like bills 75 and 76 are made by you, the county council."

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HIGH SURF ADVISORY for all south-facing shores from Kona to Puna is in effect through Saturday, reports the National Weather Service and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense. Surf will be higher than normal, and shore break and rip currents could cause injury or death, and make swimming difficult and dangerous. Beach-goers, swimmers, and surfers should heed all advice given by ocean safety officials and exercise caution. Beaches may be closed without notice but there are no beach closures at this time.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

HILINAʻI INITIATIVE COMMUNITY MEETING happens Wednesday, June 19, 6 p.m., at Volcano School of Arts & Sciences Keakealani campus, second floor at 19-4024 Haunani Rd., in Volcano Village. Facilitated by Bob Agres and Keiko Mercado County of Hawaiʻi Kīlauea Recovery Initiative Community Engagement Team, the goal is to move toward a "comprehensive community resilience plan for upper Puna and Kaʻū."
     Hilinaʻi Kaʻū, kālele iā Puna; Hilinaʻi Puna, kālele iā Kaʻū: Kaʻū is independent, supported by Puna; Puna is independent, supported by Kaʻū, is the slogan on the announcement.
     Dinner is provided, and attendees are welcome to bring a local, healthy dish to share, if can. To get involved, email resilience@volcanoschol.net.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
UPCOMING
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
Ocean View C.E.R.T. Mtg., Saturday, June 15, 10a.m.-1p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Community Emergency Response Team monthly meeting and training. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Hula Kahiko - Kumu Hula Lorna Lim w/Hālau Kawehileimamoikawekiu‘okohala, Saturday, June 15, 10:30-11:30a.m., hula platform near Volcano Art Center Gallery. Hula performance. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Nā Mea Hula w/Kumu Moses Kaho‘okele Crabbe, Saturday, June 15, 11a.m.-1p.m., Volcano Art Center Gallery porch. Hands-on cultural demonstration. Free; park entrance fees apply. 967-8222, volcanohula@gmail.com, volcanoartcenter.org

Drawing Mandalas as Meditation w/Lisa Maria Martin, Saturday, June 15, 11a.m.-2p.m., Volcano Art Center. $30/VAC member, $35/non-member, plus $10 supply fee. All supplies provided. Open to all levels. No art or meditation experience needed. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

Ham Radio Mtg., Saturday, June 15, 2-3p.m., Ocean View Community Center. ovcahi.org

Opera Concert w/D'Andrea Pelletier, Saturday, June 15, 5:30p.m., Volcano Art Center. Tickets are $20/VAC member, $25/non-member. volcanoartcenter.org, 967-8222

SUNDAY, JUNE 16
Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Community Clean-Up, Sunday, June 16. Free; donations appreciated. Space available and BYO-4WD ok. RSVP in advance. kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, 769-7629

Father's Day Buffet, Sunday, June 16, 5-8p.m., Crater Rim Café, Kīlauea Military Camp. Main entrees: Prime Rib, Lemon Butter Fish and Vegetable Stir Fry w/Tofu. $29.95/Adults, $14.95/Child (ages 6-11). No reservations required, 967-8356. Open to all authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

MONDAY, JUNE 17
Help Keiki Learn About Alzheimers with Aunty Leona and Aunty Roxane, with Wordsworth Dances the Waltz, Monday, June 17, noon to 1:30 p.m., at Story Time and Activity Hour at Pāhala Public & School Library. Book by Hawaiʻi Island native Frances Kakugawa. Keiki are introduced to the concept that as grandparents age, they may become different, and even forget important things – but "that doesn't mean they aren't still a part of the family nor do they love us any less than they did before." Visit librarieshawaii.org/branch/pahala-public-and-school-library or call 808-928-2015.

TUESDAY, JUNE 18
Hawai‘i County Council Mtgs., Tuesday, June 18 (Committees), Wednesday, June 19, (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

After Dark in the Park - Surviving Against the Odds: The Story of the Hawai‘i ‘Amakihi, Tuesday, June 18, 7p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. Gabrielle Names, UC Davis PhD student, studying the mystery of how this unique little bird appears to be beating avian malaria, a deadly disease, on Hawaiʻi Island. Free; park entrance fees apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

AdvoCATS, Tuesday, June 19, 7a.m.-4:30p.m., Ocean View Community Center. Free spay/neuter for cats. 895-9283, advocatshawaii.org

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19
Ocean View Community Association Board of Directors Mtg., Wednesday, June 19, 12:30-1:30p.m., Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Taiko Drumming Presentation by Endo and his Taiko Ensemble happens Wednesday, June 19, 1:30 p.m. to 2:15 p.m., at Pāhala Public & School Library. This free event is in celebration of the Summer Reading Program. Hear contemporary pieces such as SoaringJugoya (Crystal Clear Moon), Moonwind (a.k.a. Backside of the Moon), and Winds of Change. Free 45-minute program is suitable for all ages. Young children must be accompanied by a parent or adult caregiver. Visit librarieshawaii.org/branch/pahala-public-and-school-library or call 808-928-2015.

Hilinaʻi  Initiavtive Community Meeting happens Wednesday, June 19, 6 p.m., at Volcano School of Arts & Sciences Keakealani campus, second floor at 19-4024 Haunani Rd., in Volcano Village. Facilitated by Bob Agres and Keiko Mercado County of Hawaiʻi Kīlauea Recovery Initiative Community Engagement Team, the goal is to move toward a "comprehensive community resilience plan for upper Puna and Kaʻū." Hilinaʻi Kaʻū, kālele iā Puna; Hilinaʻi Puna, kālele iā Kaʻū: Kaʻū is independent, supported by Puna; Puna is independent, supported by Kaʻū, is the slogan on the announcement.
     Dinner is provided, and attendees are welcome to bring a local, healthy dish to share, if can. To get involved, email resilience@volcanoschol.net.

THURSDAY, JUNE 20
SIGN UP for Nā‘ālehu July 4th Parade, open until Thursday, June 20. Parade and Keiki Fun Day held June 29, 10a.m.-1:30p.m. - see separate event listing. Sponsored by ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Call Debra McIntosh, 929-9872. okaukakou.org

ONGOING
Purchase Tickets for Miss Hawaiʻi Island Teen USA and Miss Hawaiʻi IslandSunday, June 16 at The Grand Naniloa Hotel in Hilo, from Teen USA candidate Kailee "Kamalani" Kuhaulua-Stacy. Tickets are $25; contact Kamalani at 808-315-4252 through Saturday, June 15 to purchase. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., the pageant begins at 6:30 p.m. The evening includes both competition for Miss Hawaiʻi Island Teen USA, for contenders 14 to 18 years of age, and Miss Hawaiʻi Island, for contestants 18 to 28.
     See misshawaiiisland.com.

Seamless Summer Program, open to all people under age 18, no registration required, offers free breakfast at Nāʻālehu Elementary and Kaʻū High & Pāhala Elementary School cafeterias. Meals are available weekdays through July 11; no meals Tuesday, June 11 and Thursday, July 4. Kaʻū High serves breakfast from 7:30 a.m. to 8 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Call (808) 939-2413 for Nāʻālehu Elementary mealtimes.

Exhibit – Hulihia, A Complete Change: The Hawai‘i Nei Invitational Exhibition, runs through Sunday, June 16, daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Volcano Art Center Gallery. Multi-media exhibition of seven artists. Free; National Park entrance fees may apply. 967-7565, volcanoartcenter.org

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou's Annual Nāʻālehu 4th of July Parade and Summer Fun Fest happens Saturday, June 29. The Nā‘ālehu Independence Day Parade begins at 11 a.m. at Nā‘ālehu Elementary School and ends at the Nā‘ālehu Hongwanji Mission. The parade features floats, Paʻu riders, Kaʻū Coffee Court members, and more.
     The Fest, which begins after the parade, features water slides and bounce castles, hot dogs, watermelon, and shave ice, plus Senior Bingo and lunch at the community center for seniors. The free event is open to the public, no registration required.
     To participate in the parade, volunteer, or donate, contact Debra McIntosh at 929-9872 by Thursday, June 20okaukakou.org

Full-Time Teaching Assistant Sought by Tūtū & Me to implement curriculum for caregivers and keiki in Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool in Kaʻū. Competitive salary and benefits package, including medical, dental, drug, and vision; flexible spending plan; 403b retirement plan; vacation, sick days, and 14 paid days off; and more.
     Minimum requirement is a high school diploma. Early Childhood Education, related coursework, and/or experience working children preferred. For more, visit pidf.org/about/careers. Apply by emailing resume and cover letter to hr@pidfoundation.org or fax to 808-440-6619.

Hi-Employment Seeks Student Employees to work in a macadamia nut orchard on weekends and holidays. Duties include hand-harvesting macadamia nuts, filling and transporting nut bags and buckets, loading 25-plus pound bags into truck beds, and possible clearing of brush and branches. Applicants must be at least 15 years old, have a work permit, two forms of ID, and transportation to "Panaʻewa Stretch." Call for more details, 238-3741, hi-employment.com.

Experience Volcano Festival is still looking for vendors. Booths for the event are $25 per day for Saturday, July 27 and Sunday, July 28. The event is coordinated with the new ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash on the 27th. Apply at experiencevolcano.com/vendor-application.
     Experience Volcano is a group of businesses and residents helping to rebuild the economy of Volcano, following last year's volcanic disaster that shut down Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and drastically reduced the visitor county which is now recovering.

ʻŌhiʻa Lehua Half Marathon, 5K, and Keiki Dash happens Saturday, July 27 in Volcano Village, It replaces the Volcano Rain Forest Runs. Register at ohialehuahalf.com.

6th Annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run Registration, webscorer.com/register?raceid=166020. 5K, 10K, 1/2 Marathon races through mac nut and coffee fields along slopes of Ka‘ū starting at 7a.m., Sept. 21, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Sponsored by Ka‘ū Coffee Mill and ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou. Prices increase after July 9. okaukakou.orgkaucoffeemill.com

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.