About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Ka‘ū News Briefs,Thursday, January 23, 2020

Mauna Loa's last eruption was in 1984 and the USGS is asking people to always be prepared for the next one.
See more below. USGS Photo
ADOPTION OF THE INTERNATIONAL ENERGY CONSERVATION CODE at Tuesday's Hawaiʻi County Council meeting, given Mayor Harry Kim's signature, means the beginning of tougher construction codes. The county Department of Public Works issued a statement today to explain that state law requires Hawaiʻi County to undertake a "phased overhaul of energy, building, electrical, plumbing, and outdoor lighting codes to meet modern construction standards."
     Bill 126, approved Tuesday, was one of many steps. It adopts amendments that apply to Hawaiʻi Island to the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code into Chapter 5 of  Hawaiʻi County Code. The bill next goes to the Mayor for approval.
     "Using the lessons learned from the adoption of the IECC, there will be a series of bills introduced over the next six months to completely overhaul the building review process," said a statement from Public Works Director David Yamamoto and County Council member Sue Lee Loy.
     Soon after Bill 126 becomes law, its amendments will be restructured into a new bill (internally called the "Administration Code bill") that will allow the consolidation of the other Public Works codes under a new Chapter 5. The existing Chapter 5 (Building Code), Chapter 9, (Electrical Code), and Chapter 17 (Plumbing Code), will all be repealed and its provisions will be placed in the new Chapter 5, so that future updates to the codes will be consistent with each other, using the same definitions, and will be easier to update. This bill is expected to reach the Public Works and Mass Transit Committee in the first half of 2020, depending on the timing of future public engagements and adjustments in response to those meetings.
Modernize building codes move forward with adoption of Hawaiʻi County's version of the International
Energy Conservation Code at Tuesday's County Council meeting. Photo from Hawaiʻi Energy Office
     New sub-chapters will be created to hold administrative provisions, commercial building codes, residential building codes, existing building codes, electrical codes, energy conservation codes, plumbing codes, and possibly also outdoor lighting codes.
     Once that bill is in place, additional bills coming later in 2020 will fill in or update those codes, with additional County amendments.
     State codes are based on the fire code, the Uniform Plumbing Code, the International Building Code, the International Residential Code, the International Energy Conservation Code, and the National Electrical Code.
Hawaiʻi County Public Works Director David Yamamoto said there will
be more opportunity for public input into revamping the electric
plumbing, building and residential codes.
Photo from Big Island Video News
     Public Works pointed out that "This year, the County faces deadlines, imposed by state law, of August 21, 2020, in adopting the 2017 National Electrical Code (the Hawaiʻi State Electrical Code) and the 2012 Uniform Plumbing Code (the Hawaiʻi State Plumbing Code). The County also faces deadlines of November 13, 2020, to adopt the 2012 International Building Code (the Hawaiʻi State Building Code) and the 2012 International Residential Code (the Hawaiʻi State Residential Code).
     According to Public Works, "Additional rounds of public engagement are anticipated, as was done prior to the introduction of Bill 126, but unlike that bill, these new codes will come with additional restrictions. The Department is cautioning that it will not accept compromised building standards that jeopardize the public's health and safety."
     Acting Building Division Chief Robyn Matsumoto said, "We remain steadfast on sharing this with the community and using the topic-focused briefings to alert all stakeholders and helping the design professionals adjust to these series of code revisions and adoption timelines."
     Lee Loy said, "This comprehensive policy overhaul will complement the framework needed to moving us toward a one-permit system. This legislative package pours the foundation for providing efficient services to the entire construction industry and strengthening our island's pathway to economic opportunities."

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ATTEND THE RESCHEDULED SOLID WASTE MEETING on Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Community Center. The Jan. 14 meeting was cancelled due to storm activity. Hawaiʻi County's Public Information Meeting by the Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division will include discussion on improvements and changes at the county's transfer and recycling stations where people take their trash.
     Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.

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One keiki attendee of the Ocean View skatepark meeting drew this colorful concept art of of a future skate park for
Ocean View. Photo by Travis Aucoin
A SKATEPARK FOR OCEAN VIEW is in the works. In a meeting Dec. 28 sponsored by the community organization Kalani Hale, members, advocates, and kids supported building a park for skate boarding, skating, scooters, and more.
     Travis Aucoin, a driving force behind the project, told The Kaʻū Calendar that many ideas came out of the meeting. "Kids made cool drawings of skateparks." Aucoin said he is on a roll to meet with county Parks & Recreation on design, location, and size. He said that Evergreen Skateparks is willing to work on design with the group, which also seeks a licensed contractor.
     Aucoin said more community workshops are planned to hone down the design. One idea is a Flow Park, "with lots of room and area for the Advanced Tech Skaters, and more experienced Park Users." He noted that skateboarding is an Olympic sport. "Lots of skateboarders travel to compete in professional contests." During the public meeting, "We watched videos of all kinds of skateparks and took notes on lots of different size ramps, a Pump Track Street Course, and a nice Bowl that beginners could learn to ride."
     The group also viewed videos of skateboarding contests, one with a Hawaiian skateboarder taking first at an X Games in China.
     Aucoin said the he plans to meet with Hawaiʻi Department of Parks & Recreation on Monday, Feb. 3.
     Interested in supporting the skateboard park? Contact Aucoin at 808-345-2588.

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Lava from Mauna Loa hits the water at Hoʻopula Village, near Miloliʻi in
1929. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory urges people to be prepared
anytime for another Mauna Loa eruption. Photo by Ta Sung
MAUNA LOA ERUPTION PREPAREDNESS is encouraged as January's Volcano Awareness Month wraps up. A presentation on the status of the Volcano where much of Kaʻū District is seated, will be held at Pu‘uhonua o Hōnaunau National Historical Park in the amphitheater on Wednesday, Jan. 29 from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m.
     U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Frank Trusdell will present the current status of Mauna Loa, discuss potential volcanic hazards based on past eruptions, and describe how HVO is preparing for the next eruption of Earth's largest active volcano.
     A statement from USGS asks, "What will you do when Earth's largest active volcano erupts? In 2019, the Volcano Alert Level for Mauna Loa was elevated from NORMAL to ADVISORY due to increased seismicity and deformation at the volcano. This alert level does not mean an eruption is imminent, but it is a fact that Mauna Loa, which has erupted 33 times since 1843 (most recently in 1984), will erupt again. What will you do when it does?"
     The 1929 Mauna Loa eruption wiped out the village of Hoʻopuloa near Miloliʻi.
     Mauna Loa is not erupting, but the update about the volcano from HVO today states that seismometers recorded 99 small magnitude earthquakes beneath the upper elevations of the volcano during the past week. The strongest was a 3.1 magnitude earthquake on Tuesday, Jan. 21. Most earthquakes occurred at shallow depths of less than 5 km (~3 miles) beneath the volcano's surface.
     Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements show continued slow summit inflation, consistent with magma supply to the volcano's shallow storage system. Gas concentrations at the Sulphur Cone monitoring site on the Southwest Rift Zone remain stable. Fumarole temperatures as measured at both Sulphur Cone and the summit have not changed significantly.
     For more information on current monitoring of Mauna Loa Volcano, see: volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes/mauna_loa/monitoring_summary.html.

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ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU'S 12TH ANNUAL FISHING TOURNAMENT AND CANNED FOOD DRIVE will be held Saturday, Feb. 22. Registration is open through Wednesday, Feb. 19 at noon. Tournament check-in is 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. Welcome and rules announcement is 9 a.m. Poles, gear, and bait are handed out at 9:30 a.m. Fishing time runs from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Free lunch is provided for all attendees, no matter the age, from noon to 12:30 p.m. Awards and prizes are handed out at 1 p.m.; keiki must be present to win. Each child receives a prize, chosen during registration, in the order they register; register early. Special prizes are awarded to the top three largest catch in each of five categories: Largest Kupipi, Largest Po‘opa‘a, Largest Hinalea, Largest Āholehole, and Most Caught.
     The free tournament, held each year at Punaluʻu Black Sand Beach Park Pavillions, is a huge draw for Kaʻū residents. Whole families make a day of it. Keiki as young as one year old up to age 14 can register online at okaukakou.org, or pick up a registration form at Nāʻālehu Elementary School, Nāʻālehu Ace Hardware, Pāhala Elementary School, Mizuno Superette in Pāhala, Wiki Wiki Mart in Nāʻālehu, Kahuku Country Market in Ocean View, and Ocean View Auto Parts. For more information, contact Guy Enriques at 808-217-2253 or Wayne Kawachi at 808-937-4773.
     All attendees are encouraged to bring canned or non-perishable food to the event. "One can, if can. If no can, no can."
     Fishing guidelines are: a parent or legal guardian must accompany keiki at all times; handpole fishing with barbless hooks only; personally owned hand poles are allowed; hand poles, gear, and bait are provided; no chumming or using palu (bread, mackerel, etc.) allowed; all fishing is catch and release.
     Last year's tournament had over 275 keiki entrants, and the shores held almost 1,000 participants and volunteers. Those fishing in the ocean catch, measure, and release their catches.
     Other sponsors of the event include Department of Land and Natural Resources Enforcement Division, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Barbless Circle Hook Project, Marine Wildlife Program, County of Hawaiʻi, S. Tokunaga Store in Hilo, and Suisan Company, Ltd.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
Girls Basketball
Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Boys Basketball
Mon., Jan. 27 @Kamehameha
Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Soccer
Sat., Jan. 25 Girls BIIF
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

Wrestling
Sat., Jan. 25 @Kamehameha
Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

Swimming
Sat., Jan. 25 @Kona Community Aquatic Center
Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

UPCOMING
THURSDAY, JAN. 23
PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, Jan. 23 and 24, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24
Old Style Pau Hana Mele & Hula ‘Auana, Friday, Jan. 24 – fourth Friday, monthly – 4-5:30p.m.Volcano Art Center. Held outdoors, weather permitting. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

SATURDAY, JAN. 25
Palm Trail, Saturday, Jan. 25, 9:30-12:30p.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, relatively difficult, 2.6-mile, hike. Bring snack and water. nps.gov/havo

Sounds at the SummitHilo Jazz Orchestra Frank Zappa Tribute, Saturday, Jan. 25, 5:30-7:30p.m. Hawaiʻi Island musician and composer Trever Veilleux, director. Annual concert tends to sell out. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Blue Tattoo Band, Saturday, Jan. 25, 7-10p.m.Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge, in HVNP. $5 cover charge, free to in-house guests. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

MONDAY, JAN. 27
Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ʻĀina, the fabric of Hawaiʻi with Puakea Forester, Monday, Jan. 27 – fourth Monday, monthly – 2:30-4:30p.m.Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

TUESDAY, JAN. 28
After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo

H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 11:30a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333

Public Information Mtg. by County of Hawai‘i Department of Environmental Management's Solid Waste Division, Wednesday, Jan. 29 at Nā‘ālehu Clubhouse, 95-5635 Māmalahoa Hwy, from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend and give input. The Solid Waste Division will be discussing the facilities' operating days and the possibility of modifying the current schedule for transfer stations. Visit hawaiizerowaste.org or call the Solid Waste Division Office at 961-8270 for more.
Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.

THURSDAY, JAN. 30
Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 11a.m.-noonPāhala Community Center. 928-3102

The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, 6p.m.Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 4-6p.m., Cooper Center, Volcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

FRIDAY, JAN. 31
Kahuku Coffee Talk – Makahiki: A Celebrated Season, Friday, Jan. 31 – last Friday, monthly – 9:30-11a.m., Kahuku Unit Visitor Contact Station. Free. nps.gov/havo

ONGOING
Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in WashingtonD.C. to meet with NPS managers.
     The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 
     The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

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Wednesday, January 22, 2020

Ka‘ū News Briefs, Wednesday, January 22, 2020


The State of the State, presented in the Hawaiʻi Capitol on Tuesday. See story below and in
Tuesday's Kaʻū News BriefsPhoto from Hawaiʻi House of Representatives
A FLU VACCINATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THIS YEAR with the threat of the novel coronavirus (2019nCOV), according to the state Department of Health. DOH issued a statement today, advising physicians statewide to be alert for patients who traveled from Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. DOH provided a detailed medical advisory to healthcare providers on reporting, testing, specimen collection, and interim healthcare infection control recommendations. DOH advised providers to notify DOH Disease Outbreak Control Division immediately if a patient meets the case criteria.
Coronavirus advisory was issued today by the state Department
of Health. Photo from WebMd
     DOH advises everyone (six months and older), especially those who travel, to receive a flu vaccination. Dr. Sarah Park, state epidemiologist, said, “With the current flu activity, there will likely be crossover in clinical presentation so the more people vaccinated against flu, the more helpful that will be.”
    DOH promised to closely monitor the outbreak of 2019-nCoV in China and to regularly coordinate with Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition to issuing the Medical Advisory, DOH is coordinating with Emergency Medical Service personnel/first responders, the Department of Transportation, and infection control partners in medical facilities throughout the state. DOH is also monitoring its respiratory surveillance network which reviews flu activity in the state. Online resources for the 2019-nCoV are posted at health.hawaii.gov/prepare/cdc-issues-warning-about-pneumonia-cases-in-wuhan-china-caused-by-novel-coronavirus/.
     The outbreak of a 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China has been developing since December 2019. At lease 300 confirmed infections and several deaths in China are confirmed along with cases in Thailand, Japan, the Republic of Korea, and U.S. with one case in Washington state. While human-to-human transmission appears limited, the situation
New Conovirus spread from China to Thailand, Korea, Japan,
and U.S. State Department of Health recommends the flu shot.
Map from Center for Disease Control
continues to evolve. Nearly all travelers from China enter the state from other U.S. or international ports of entry that are being monitored, stated the DOH statement.
     DOH recommends for anyone who traveled to Wuhan and feels sick: Seek medical care right away. Before going to a doctor’s office or emergency room, call ahead and report recent travel and symptoms. Stay home. Except for seeking medical care, avoid contact with others. Do not travel while sick. Cover your mouth and nose with tissue or sleeve (not hands) when coughing or sneezing.
Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
     For more information, including information for clinicians and public health professionals, please go to the following CDC and WHO webpages:
wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/notices/watch/novel-coronavirus-china
www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/novel-coronavirus-2019.html
www.who.int/csr/don/05-january-2020-pneumonia-of-unkown-cause-china/en/

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AGRICULTURE AND SELF SUFFICIENCY were addressed by Gov. David Ige in Tuesday's State of the State. He gave special recognition to Kaʻū's members of the state House of Representatives - Rep. Richard Creagan, who chairs the House Agriculture Committee, and Rep. Richard Onishi, who serves on it.
     Ige said, "Perhaps the longest transition we have experienced recently has been the transformation of our agricultural industry from large-scale farming to more diversified farms. But there is one important difference in today's efforts from yesterday's, and that's technology. As in other fields, we have seen the rise of technology change the face of everything in society. In agriculture, it too has been a game changer. It has enabled farmers to produce higher yields in the field and more precise targeting strategies in the marketplace. Consequently, we are seeing a greater willingness to invest in local agricultural endeavors."
Rep. Richard Onishi serves east
Kaʻū and on the Agriculture
Committee. Photo from Onishi
     The governor pointed to recent agricultural start-ups. "Mahi Pono, which bought 41,000 acres of former sugar cane land, is raising potatoes in central Maui. And they want to plant another 120 acres of citrus trees and 20 acres of non-GMO papayas. Their plans also include growing avocados, bell peppers, guava, lilikoi, oranges, lemons and limes.
     "Sensei Farms is transforming agriculture on Lanaʻi by using a mix of proven and innovative technology to power its hydroponic greenhouses on former pineapple fields. This mix of traditional farming and new technology is the wave of the future for agriculture throughout the state." En Young of Sensei Farms attended the State of the State with recognition from Ige.
     Ige contended that "More than at any other time in our history, local farmers have it within their grasp to make a difference in our drive toward self-sufficiency."
     Sustaining the economy and lifestyle was another topic in the governor's address: "You know, we can initiate a host of activities to encourage local food production, stimulate our economy, and protect our environment. But the key has always been whether we are able to keep those initiatives going. And so sustainability has been an integral part of our efforts.
    "How do we sustain our economy, our lifestyle and our natural environment? We do it first by developing clean energy sources. With a flurry of commercial solar projects in the pipeline and local homeowners' enthusiasm for residential solar power, we will meet our 2020 energy goal of attaining 30 percent of our energy needs from renewable sources."
Dr. Richard Creagan serves
West Kaʻū, leads Committee
on Agriculture.
     The governor insisted that "The significance of this initial pivot to clean and renewable energy cannot be overstated. We have become a leader in this effort, and our actions have inspired other states to follow. Since we set a goal to become carbon negative by 2045, four other states have followed our lead. So far, we have successfully reduced our greenhouse gas emissions and will meet our goal for 2020. And our utilities are meeting our clean electricity goals faster and at record low prices.
     He gave some examples: "Today, 37 percent of Oʻahu's single-family residences have rooftop solar. On certain days, Kauaʻi is already achieving 100 percent of electricity from clean energy sources, decades ahead of when we thought this would be possible.
     "We will continue to aggressively engage in actions that will continue to de-carbonize our economy and make our environment whole.
     "Sustaining our economy has replaced the old mantra of growing the economy," proclaimed the governor.  He pointed to a "shift in focus in our biggest industry. In 2019, the Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority shifted its priorities from increasing visitor arrivals to improving the visitor experience, while supporting the quality of life for residents. Through HTA's Aloha ʻĀina program, 28 nonprofit and government agencies were given funding for programs to help protect Hawaiʻi's natural resources.
     "For example, the authority is working to repair and improve hiking trails like those at Mānoa Falls. Through its Kūkula Ola program, the authority has funded 28 programs this year and committed to fund 43 more programs in 2020 that perpetuate Hawaiian culture. The beneficiaries are programs and groups like the Lānaʻi Culture & Heritage Center, Hula Hālau O Molokai, Hana Arts, the Edith K. Kanakaʻole Foundation, the Kalihi-Palama Culture & Arts Society, and so many more."
The governor said that small diverse farming is more likely now than
ever and praised Mahi Pono, which delivered 30,000 pounds of
potatoes grown in Hawaiʻi to the Food Bank this month.
Photo from Food Bank
     The governor also gave his latest view on Maunakea. "While we are on the subject of Native Hawaiian culture, let me digress for just a moment and speak on the Thirty Meter Telescope and Mauna Kea. Emotions have run high on both sides. The arguments are strong on both sides, and that's what makes the situation so difficult. There is no easy answer or quick solution. We will have to work hard if we want to resolve this conflict. But I truly believe it can be resolved, if we put our heads and our hearts together.
     "There are some who have encouraged me to take strong measures against those who are protesting on Mauna Kea. That would have been the easier course. But it is not just the authority of the law that is at stake. It is much more than that.
     "What is also at risk is the glue that has always bound us together: our sense of aloha. It is the thing that underpins our laws and gives them meaning and an ethical foundation. That trust in each other is also sacred. And I will not break that bond, no matter how convenient or easy.
     "At the heart of our dilemma is both the history of wayfinding and discovery and the future of wayfinding and discovery. If we have lost our way, we must find our way back."
     "To do this, we must be open hearted, as well as open minded. We must listen, as well as speak with conviction, and we must have aloha for each other, in spite of our differences. I am of that mind, and I ask all to join me in continuing to look for a way forward. I stand ready to work with any and everyone who refuses to let this issue divide us. Let us together find a way forward," said the governor in concluding his speech.

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Group shot of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park volunteers and supervisors taken Jan. 22. NPS photo/Janice Wei
VOLUNTEERS ARE ESSENTIAL TO THE MISSION OF HAWAIʻI VOLCANOES NATIONAL PARK; the Park would have a tough time fulfilling its mission without its corps of dedicated volunteers, says a statement released today.
     Last year, 651 park volunteers contributed 27,568 hours of their time helping the Park. They worked in museum collections and archives, led hikes and answered countless visitor questions, monitored the backcountry, restored native forest, maintained trails, helped save native animals like honu‘ea (hawksbill turtles) and other endangered species, and so much more. Their invaluable effort is equal to 13.25 full-time equivalent employees working 40 hours a week, or $701,000, according to Park estimates.
Kupono McDaniel
Photo by Julia Neal
     On Wednesday, the park and its non-profit partners, the Friends of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park and Hawai‘i Pacific Parks Association, hosted a lunch and appreciation party for the volunteers. Volunteer coordinator Kūpono McDaniel told volunteers that the park could not fulfill its mission without their invaluable efforts. 
     McDaniel said, "On behalf of the entire park, we are deeply humbled by all that you do. When more than 600 people are willing to do my job for free, I am reminded how powerful and far-reaching our work really is. Volunteers are the true philanthropists, the people who give their most valuable commodity, their time, to ensure our parks are here for the next generation."
     The mission of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park is to protect, conserve, and study the volcanic landscapes, and associated natural and cultural resources and processes, and to facilitate safe public access to active volcanism, diverse geographic settings, and wilderness for public education and enjoyment.  
     Anyone interested in volunteering at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park can visit volunteer.gov/gov, or contact Kūpono McDaniel at (808) 985-6015 or kupono_mcdaniel@nps.gov. 

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

TROJANS TASTED VICTORY on Monday during both Junior Varsity and Varsity games. The Boys Basketball teams traveled to Honokaʻa, where JV scored 68 points over the Dragons' 35. In the Varsity game, the Trojans scored just once more point over Honokaʻa, ending the game 56 to 55.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule
Girls Basketball
Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Boys Basketball
Mon., Jan. 27 @Kamehameha
Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Soccer
Sat., Jan. 25 Girls BIIF
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

Wrestling
Sat., Jan. 25 @Kamehameha
Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

Swimming
Sat., Jan. 25 @Kona Community Aquatic Center
Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

UPCOMING
THURSDAY, JAN. 23
PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, Jan. 23 and 24, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, Jan. 23, 3-4 p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for community members. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584 or domingoc1975@yahoo.com.

Ka‘ū Farmers United meeting at Pahala Plantation House, 4 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 23.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24
Old Style Pau Hana Mele & Hula ‘Auana, Friday, Jan. 24 – fourth Friday, monthly – 4-5:30p.m.Volcano Art Center. Held outdoors, weather permitting. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

SATURDAY, JAN. 25
Palm Trail, Saturday, Jan. 25, 9:30-12:30p.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, relatively difficult, 2.6-mile, hike. Bring snack and water. nps.gov/havo

Sounds at the SummitHilo Jazz Orchestra Frank Zappa Tribute, Saturday, Jan. 25, 5:30-7:30p.m. Hawaiʻi Island musician and composer Trever Veilleux, director. Annual concert tends to sell out. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Blue Tattoo Band, Saturday, Jan. 25, 7-10p.m.Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge, in HVNP. $5 cover charge, free to in-house guests. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

MONDAY, JAN. 27
Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ʻĀina, the fabric of Hawaiʻi with Puakea Forester, Monday, Jan. 27 – fourth Monday, monthly – 2:30-4:30p.m.Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

TUESDAY, JAN. 28
After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo

H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 11:30a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333

Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.

THURSDAY, JAN. 30
Ka‘ū Food Basket, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 11a.m.-noonPāhala Community Center. 928-3102

The Next Mauna Loa Eruption and the 2018 Kīlauea Eruption talk, Thursday, Jan. 30, 6p.m.Ocean View Community Center, 92-8924 Leilani Circle. To close out 11th annual Volcano Awareness month, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal and Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense Administrator Talmadge Magno will talk about the current status of Mauna Loa, hazards of future eruptions, experiences from Kīlauea 2018 eruption, preparing for next Mauna Loa eruption, and how communities can stay informed. The meeting is free and open to public. More info at "HVO News" at volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo/, (808) 967-8844, or askHVO@usgs.gov.

Volcano Friends Feeding Friends, Thursday, Jan. 30 – last Thursday, monthly – 4-6p.m.Cooper CenterVolcano Village. Free community dinner for all. Additional packaged goods to take home for those in need. Donations and volunteers encouraged. 967-7800, thecoopercenter.org

ONGOING
Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in Washington,  D.C. to meet with NPS managers.
     The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 
     The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

   

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Ka‘ū News Briefs,Tuesday, January 21, 2020

KUPU, which has offered numerous youth training and stewardship programs involving Kaʻū, received
special recognition in Gov. David Ige's State of the State address today. Photo from KUPU
"A NEW URGENCY FOR THE ʻĀINA" was proclaimed today by Gov. David Ige in his State of the State address. "Like our host culture, we sustain our environment by protecting it," said the governor, speaking at the state Capitol. More from his speech:
     "Stewardship of the ʻāina has always been a central part of public policy here in Hawaiʻi. It is embedded in our state motto and in the awareness of our children from an early age. The life of our lands has always depended on right thinking and a love of this place we call home.
     "But there is a new danger threatening the ʻāina, and it comes from climate change. No one need tell us how global warming is directly impacting our lives or the lives of: Families who live along the North Shore of Oʻahu, or those who suffered from recent historic storms on Kauaʻi, or the people of West Maui, who were affected by unprecedented high tides, or those affected by devastating wildfires on The Valley Isle."
     Ige pointed out that "recently, Time Magazine named Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg its Person of the Year for 2019. She is a passionate and compelling youngster who believes we all have a part to play in preventing climate change. She sets an example for all of us. "
     Ige challenged "our own young students to think about Greta's message to us. The adults in this room often talk about sustainability and the future. But for those under 21, it is more about your future than ours. It is never too early to take ownership of it.
     "Because it's as much about everyday activities as it is about large or sweeping public policy. We can work with the Legislature to permanently set aside 10,000 acres in conservation under the State's Legacy Land program, as we have over the last year and a half. We can mandate 100-percent clean energy usage by 2045. But without your involvement, public policy is just that: a policy written on a piece of paper. It is your support and daily participation that transforms those policies into meaningful actions.
The state's Legacy Land Conservation Program, which has helped to conserve many thousands of acres in Kaʻū,
 was mentioned by Gov. David Ige today as he declared, "A New Urgency for the ʻĀina."
Image from Legacy Land Conservation Program
     The governor gave the example of KUPU, the nonprofit youth organization "dedicated to making a difference in their communities," which has participated in many land and ocean stewardship projects in Kaʻū. He thanked John Leong, Director of KUPU, and asked a group from KUPU to
"stand and be recognized for their contributions to making a difference in Hawaiʻi."
     He said the KUPU volunteers "are only a few years older than those of you who are still in school. The future will be here faster than you think. But you don't have to wait for that day to come. These young folks have shown how you can make a difference right now."
     The governor began his speech by reminding everyone that on Jan. 1, "We welcomed the dawn of not only a new year, but a new decade. For those under 30, that may not seem like a big deal. But for those who grew up without the internet — when The Lord of the Rings was a book you read and not a movie you watched — time has a way of sneaking up on us.
     "Could any of us have imagined the changes and discoveries that have already taken place in this century? Smart phones, 3-D printers, Facebook, and self-driving cars. And it seems that each year, change happens faster and faster.
The transition from sugar to small farms in Hawaiʻi received mention in the State of the State
address today. This Kaʻū Coffee Farm was started by local coffee pioneers Francis and
Trinidad Marques. Photo by Julia Neal
     "How do you keep up with it all? If we are honest with ourselves, we must admit, we can't. We go along with the flow and hang on for dear life.
     "But the issues that concern our families haven't changed for as long as I can remember: Finding a job that pays the bills, dealing with Hawaiʻi's high cost of living, and taking care of our family."
     The governor praised ALICE, the study sponsored by the Aloha United Way, which reported that a family of four in Hawaiʻi needs a combined annual income of $77,000 "just to survive... to pay for food, housing, health care, childcare, and taxes.
     "If you asked working families in Hawaiʻi whether they make $77,000 a year, many would answer, 'no.' If you asked families who made $77,000 whether that was enough, I suspect the answer would still be, 'no,'" said Ige.
     The governor detailed the 2020 Hawaiʻi Legislature package of bills that is based on the ALICE Report. See yesterday's Kaʻū News Briefs for the story.
     The governor cautioned, however, that "Great things do not happen overnight. To paraphrase Robert Kennedy, they begin with a vision to see things, not as they are, but as they might be."
     He talked about transformation of agriculture in Hawaiʻi, saying that "large plantations that exported sugar and pineapple to smaller more diversified farms that grow food for local consumption is such a vision. But it has taken a while.
     "The transition of our visitor industry from a sector that focuses on growth to one that embraces sustainability is just beginning. It, too, will take time. In fact, the shift to sustainability in many of the things we pursue—including energy, economic development, and the environment—will continue long after we are gone. That is why we cannot lose sight of those broader goals, no matter the obstacles, changes in administration, or how long the process."
     See more on the State of the State in tomorrow's Kaʻū News Briefs.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
Veteran farmers marketer Millie Akau, who sells at the Ace Hardware site until the end of January.
Photo by Julia Neal
ʻO KAʻŪ KĀKOU WILL HOST A FARMERS MARKET on Wednesdays in Nāʻālehu, beginning Feb. 5,  on its open land on the mauka side of Hwy 11 that formerly hosted Nāʻālehu Fruit Stand. The operation will be managed by Sue Barnett. The purpose of the farmers market, according to OKK, is to provide a large space for the community to sell and buy produce and to help raise money for the planned senior housing at the location. The start-up of the new farmers market will follow the closure of the market at the Ace Hardware location in Nāʻālehu at the end of January.
     Contact Barnett at kaufarmer@aol.com of 808-845-9374.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
See monthly and weekly Kaʻū and Volcano Events, Meetings, Entertainment, Exercise, and Meditation at kaucalendar.com.

Kaʻū Winter Sports Schedule

Girls Basketball
Wed., Jan. 22 @HPA
Tue. and Wed., Jan. 28 and 29 BIIF @Civic
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Boys Basketball
Mon., Jan. 27 @Kamehameha
Tue. and Wed., Feb. 4 and 5 BIIF @ Kealakehe
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 HHSAA on Oʻahu

Soccer
Wed., Jan. 22 and Sat., Jan. 25 Girls BIIF
Wed. thru Sat., Feb. 5-8 Girls HHSAA on Oʻahu
Sat., Feb. 1 and 8 Boys BIIF
Thu. thru Sat., Feb. 13-15 Boys HHSAA on Oʻahu

Wrestling
Sat., Jan. 25 @Kamehameha
Sat., Feb. 1 @Hilo
Sat., Feb. 8 BIIF @Konawaena
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 21 and 22 HHSAA

Swimming
Sat., Jan. 25 @Kona Community Aquatic Center
Fri., Jan. 31 and Sat., Feb. 1 BIIF @Kamehameha
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 14 and 15 on Maui

UPCOMING
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22
Kuʻi Kalo: Pound Poi, Wednesday, Jan. 22, 10a.m.-noonKīlauea Visitor Center lanai, HVNP. Make poi, the staple food of the Hawaiian diet. The root of the kalo plant is cooked and ku‘i (pounded) to create this classic Hawaiian dish. Join Ranger Keoni Kaholo‘a‘a as he shares his knowledge of kalo. Part of Hawai‘i Volcanoes’ ‘Ike Hana No‘eau, Experience the Skillful Work, workshops. Free; Park entrance fess apply. 985-6011, nps.gov/havo

THURSDAY, JAN. 23
PETFIX Spay and Neuter Free Clinic for Cats and Dogs, Thursday and Friday, Jan. 23 and 24, Ocean View Ranchos. Registration: contact Bridget at (808)990-3548 or petfixbigisland@gmail.com.

Ka‘ū Community Children's Council, Thursday, Jan. 23, 3-4 p.m., Classroom 35, Building F, Nā‘ālehu Elementary School. Provides local forum for community members. Light refreshments will be served. RSVP to Chad Domingo, text 808-381-2584 or domingoc1975@yahoo.com.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24
Old Style Pau Hana Mele & Hula ‘Auana, Friday, Jan. 24 – fourth Friday, monthly – 4-5:30p.m.Volcano Art Center. Held outdoors, weather permitting. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

SATURDAY, JAN. 25
Palm Trail, Saturday, Jan. 25, 9:30-12:30p.m., Kahuku Unit, HVNP. Free, relatively difficult, 2.6-mile, hike. Bring snack and water. nps.gov/havo

Sounds at the SummitHilo Jazz Orchestra Frank Zappa Tribute, Saturday, Jan. 25, 5:30-7:30p.m. Hawaiʻi Island musician and composer Trever Veilleux, director. Annual concert tends to sell out. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Blue Tattoo Band, Saturday, Jan. 25, 7-10p.m.Kīlauea Military Camp's Lava Lounge, in HVNP. $5 cover charge, free to in-house guests. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

MONDAY, JAN. 27
Cultural Understanding Through Art & the Environment: Kapa Aloha ʻĀina, the fabric of Hawaiʻi with Puakea Forester, Monday, Jan. 27 – fourth Monday, monthly – 2:30-4:30p.m.Volcano Art Center. Pre-registration required; class size limited. $10 per person supply fee. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

TUESDAY, JAN. 28
After Dark in the Park – Seismicity of the 2018 Kīlauea Volcano Eruption, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 7-8p.m., Kīlauea Visitor Center Auditorium. HVO seismologist Brian Shiro recounts the 2018 earthquake story, including how HVO adapted its techniques to monitor the events, and describes current levels of seismicity and HVO’s ongoing efforts to improve seismic monitoring. Free; Park entrance fees apply. 985-6101, nps.gov/havo

H.O.V.E. Road Maintenance Corp. Board Mtg., Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 10a.m., H.O.V.E. RMC office, 92-8979 Lehua Lane, Ocean View. 929-9910, hoveroad.com

Ka‘ū Food Pantry, Tuesday, Jan. 28 – last Tuesday, monthly – 11:30a.m.-1p.m., St. Jude's Episcopal Church in Ocean View. Volunteers welcome. Dave Breskin, 319-8333

Lava Tubes of Ocean View, Tuesday, Jan. 28, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Presented by Peter and Annie Bosted, it will include presentation of images of the underground in the Ocean View area – especially an extensive system in the Kahuku Unit of the Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, which abuts HOVE – and Hawaiian lava tubes in general. Those who want to know more about what's going on under their feet, and those curious about lava tubes are invited to the free presentation, along with family and friends, said the Bosteds.

ONGOING
Apply for Mosaics of Science by Monday, Feb. 3. Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park's 12-week paid summer internship position is designed to engage university students and recent graduates with on-the-ground work experience in the National Park Service. A $4,800 stipend, and all travel costs are covered, including a week-long career workshop in Washington,  D.C. to meet with NPS managers.
     The internship is open to U.S. citizens and permanent legal residents ages 18-30, and to military veterans up to age 35. Funding is provided under a cooperative agreement for youth conservation activities as part of the Public Lands Corps program, which mandates that these age ranges are followed. 
     The selected intern will assist with the development of education curriculum for Kīpukapuaulu and Pu‘u Loa trails in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park.
     For more information, contact Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park Education Specialist Jody Anastasio by email at jody_anastasio@nps.gov. To apply go to go.nps.gov/mosaics or mosaicsinscience.org.

T-Ball and Coach Pitch Baseball League: Ocean View Team - Mondays and Wednesdays, Kahuku Park. Nā‘ālehu Team - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Nā‘ālehu Park. Pāhala Team (seeking coaches) - attend Nā‘ālehu practice. T-Ball, 3:30-4:30pm, ages 5-6. Coach Pitch, 4:30-6p.m., ages 7-8. Programs take place through April 16. Wear cleats or tennis shoes, bring a glove if possible. Extras gloves available for use. All skills and genders welcome. $35 per teammate. See Ka‘ū Youth Baseball on Facebook. Josh or Elizabeth Crook, 345-0511

Tūtū & Me Home Visiting Program is a free service to Pāhala families with keiki, birth to five years old. This caregiver support program offers those taking care of young keiki "a compassionate listening ear, helpful parenting tips and strategies, fun and exciting activities, and wonderful educational resources" from Tūtū & Me Traveling Preschool. Home visits are one hour in length, two to four times per month, for 12 to 15 visits. Snacks are provided. See pidfoundation.org or call 808-938-1088.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.