About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Sunday, September 30, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Sunday, September 30, 2018

Moonset over Mauna Loa and Kīlauea Caldera, the sulfur banks illuminated by moonlight. Tina Neal tells
Kaʻū News Briefs of her excitement at the reopening of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park
last weekend. See story, below. NPS/Janice Wei photo
HURRICANE WALAKA, THE FIRST CYCLONE TO DEVELOP IN THE CENTRAL PACIFIC since Hurricane Pali and Tropical Storm Ulika in 2016, is threatening Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument. Walaka - the Hawaiian spelling of Walter, which means "ruler of the army" - was moving west northwest, located southwest of the Islands, at 5 p.m. today, with winds of 75 mph.
Path of Walaka shows it heading north through
Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument,
possibly as a major hurricane.
Image from Central Pacific Hurricane Center
     The Central Pacific Hurricane Center predicts that Walaka will become a major hurricane on Monday and remain strong for two to three days, turning to the north by Tuesday and passing over or near Johnston Atoll, where a hurricane warning is in effect.
     "Walaka remains within ideal conditions for strengthening, with high sea surface temperatures, low shear, high ocean heat content, and plenty of deep moisture," reports the Hurricane Center, which also predicts  rapid intensification, exceeding 90 percent, and winds possibly reaching 140 mph. At 5 p.m., Wakala was 860 miles southwest of Honolulu and 630 miles southeast of Johnston Atol.
     One impact on the Hawaiian Islands could be cutting off the tradewinds. Another is a possible track that would cut through Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, as a major hurricane, when Wakala turns north. Central Pacific Hurricane Center warns: "Interests in the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument should monitor the progress of Walaka."
     For more on the national monument, see papahanaumokuakea.gov, or visit the interactive Mokupāpapa Discovery Center for Hawaiʻi’s Remote Coral Reefs in downtown Hilo.

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USGS HVO Scientist-in-Charge Tina Neal speaks to a visitor on reopening
day, Sept. 22. Photo by Ann Bosted
TINA NEAL, SCIENTIST-IN-CHARGE OF THE USGS HAWAIIAN VOLCANOES OBSERVATORY, was on hand last weekend to welcome the public back to Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and answer questions.
     Neal was thrilled to volunteer alongside HVNP staff, she told Kaʻū News Briefs. She based herself at the view site at the end of the former Crater Rim Drive, which was closed in early 2008 when strong degassing and explosions heralded a lava lake in Halemaʻumaʻu. At that time, gas was venting directly below the Crater Overlook.
     On March 19, there was a huge explosive eruption and blocks of rock up to a foot in size were thrown onto the overlook area. Pieces up to an inch in length were found on the Crater Rim Drive. That event, together with sulfur dioxide gas emissions and a high concentration of the dangerous gas on Crater Rim Drive, prompted closing to the public of the drive, the overlook, and the parking lot, a decade ago. A short section of the drive remained open to hikers and cyclists.
A visitor scopes out Halemaʻumaʻu on reopening day.
NPS photo
     The May 2018 eruption of fountaining lava from about 24 fissures in Leilani Estates coincided with a long series of tremors, explosive eruptions and collapses of portions of the Kīlauea caldera floor, as well as collapse of the Puʻu ʻŌʻō crater. It was these tremors and near-daily collapse explosions - many of which produced an earthquake of equivalent magnitude 5 or more - that caused the park to be closed from May 10 to September 22. In that time, the depth of Halemaʻumaʻu quadrupled and its diameter has more than doubled.
     When hundreds of visitors flocked to the reopening of the park last Saturday, the former
view site of choice, Jaggar Museum, was still closed. Many hiked or biked along the former Crater Rim Drive to Keanakākoʻi Crater to view the transformed Kīlauea Caldera from the south.
     Scars of the months of shaking and subsidence were evident on the paved drive. Some fissures in the road were so large that the Park had installed large metal plates for visitors to use as a foot bridge across the chasms.
Part of Crater Rim Drive, collapsed into Halemaʻumaʻu.
NPS photo
     From the view site, visitors were able to take in the vast changes caused by the movement of magma from beneath Halemaʻumaʻu to the Lower East Rift Zone. To the west, a collapsed section of the Crater Rim Drive, with its center stripe still plainly visible, could be spotted lying hundreds of feet below the edge of the enlarged crater. A visitor set up a telescope trained on the fragment of road, and encouraged other visitors to take a peek.
     Clad in a bright orange USGS shirt, Neal was a magnet for questions and comments. She told The Kaʻū Calendar that she was "thrilled" to be back in the Park, and "excited" to be a small part of the reopening day.
     Neal was well-supplied with charts and photos to explain the science behind the breath-
taking transformation of Halemaʻumaʻu and the surrounding caldera floor. In response to a visitor's question about the volume of magma that was drained from the summit and the volume of lava that was erupted in Puna, Neal was able to consult her fist-full of printed materials to show that, based on initial analysis, the volumes were roughly equal.
Visitors peer out over Steaming Bluffs in the reopened Park.
NPS/Janice Wei photo
     She described the early May tremors at the HVO facility as "very frightening." Over the
course of three months of shaking, the floor and ceiling of her office at HVO was badly damaged - part of the floor dropped several inches. She and other HVO staff had to rapidly pack up their offices and move out. They also boxed the invaluable items accumulated from decades of scientific research that were stored in their huge basement warehouse. These irreplaceable treasures are now mostly stored temporarily in the Federal Building in Hilo. No decision has yet been made as to whether the HVO building will be repaired or where HVO will be housed for the long term.
     Asked about scientific monitoring instrumentation in the field, Neal explained that her team wanted to leave them in place for as long as possible as they were giving valuable data, but in a few cases "we left them out a bit too long" and they were lost in the collapses. One loss proved serendipitous. A GPS that toppled into the crater was able to continue sending radio signals until the line of sight was lost. This helped scientists monitor how fast the floor of the crater was subsiding and how deep the crater was becoming. On average, the floor fell tens of feet during each of the 60 collapse explosions.
     Learn more at volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo.

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THE DASHBOARD FOR THE STATE OF HAWAIʻI – which tracks and provides public overview to more than $450 million in spending on more than 600 projects in 16 departments, with timelines, status and financial breakdowns – won an international award, announced today. Hawaiʻi Department Dashboard went live in January.
      The prize is the Chaucer Digital Innovation Award is for cutting-edge projects. "The State of Hawaiʻi is our first North American winner for their digital strategic roadmap initiative, which was developed to improve the state's IT governance process and promote organizational change using a strategic plan by means of data visualization," said Chris Laslett, CEO of Chaucer. 
     Gov. David Ige praised the state Office of Enterprise Technology Service "for earning this tremendous recognition after implementing this initiative in the beginning of the year. I thank the ETS team and the executive departments for working collaboratively on the Hawaiʻi Department Dashboard."
      Todd Nacapuy, chief information officer for the state, said, "The Hawaiʻi Department Dashboard also provides transparency in government IT spends and makes the data accessible to the public."

Kaʻū Trojans football team. Photo from Kaʻū High Athletics
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KAʻŪ TROJANS FOOTBALL WIN yesterday, 58-28 over Pāhoa, gives the team the #1 seed in the BIIF 8-man Championship. It will be held Saturday, Oct. 20, at 1 p.m., at Pāhala Ball Park.
     "Haʻaheo Kākou ʻO Kaʻū," says the Kaʻū High School Athletics Twitter feed.
     Hosting Pāhoa at Kaʻū, the Trojans were down 6 during the first quarter, which ended with a score of 14-20. The Trojans came back, preventing the Daggars from gaining any points in the second quarter, which finished with Kaʻū 44 and Pāhoa 20. Third quarter ended with Kaʻū 58, Pāhoa 20. While Pāhoa gained 8 points in the fourth, and Kaʻū was scoreless, Kaʻū finished the game with more than twice the points of Pāhoa, final score 58-28.
     The Trojans have one more game, hosting Kohala, before the BIIF semi-finals. See the Fall schedule, below.

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Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
KAʻŪ TROJANS FALL SPORTS SCHEDULE
Football:
   Sat, Oct 6, 12pm, host Kohala
   Sat, Oct 13, BIIF Semi-Finals at Kamehameha
   Sat, Oct 20, BIIF Finals - Higher
Girls Volleyball:
   Mon., Oct. 1, 6pm, host HAAS
   Tues, Oct 2, 6pm, @ Kealakehe
   Fri, Oct 5, 6pm, host Keaʻau
   Wed, Oct 10, 6pm, @ Parker
   Fri, Oct 12, 6pm, host St. Joseph
   Mon, Oct 15, BIIF DII Qtr - Higher
   Wed, Oct 17, BIIF DII Semi-Finals @ Kona
   Thu, Oct 18, BIIF DII Finals @ Kona
Cross Country:
   Mon., Oct. 1, 6pm, host HAAS
   Sat, Oct 6, 2pm, @ Kealakehe
   Sat, Oct 13, BYE
   Sat, Oct 20, 9am, BIIF @ HPA
   Sat, Oct 27, 8:30am, HHSAA

NEW and UPCOMING
HULA KAHIKO FEATURING KUMU HULA LIANA LEI‘ILIMA AVEIRO WITH HĀLAU MALANAI is performed Saturday, Oct. 13, from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. The event takes place in a one-of-a-kind outdoor setting at the kahua hula (hula platform) near Volcano Arts Center Gallery. The performance is part of a year-round series sponsored by Volcano Art Center that was temporarily moved during the recent park closure.
     Hālau Malanai, under the direction of Kumu Hula Liana Leiʻilima Aveiro, is an offshoot of Hālau Hula Ka Noʻeau. Aveiro studied under Kumu Hula Michael Pili Pang for more than 20 years, graduating as a Kumu Hula through traditional uniki ceremony and passage. Their hula genealogy comes from master Kumu Hula Auntie Miki Aiu Lake.
Hālau Malanai perform Hula Kahiko on Saturday, Oct. 13, within
Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Photo from volcanoartcenter.org
     The Hālau is located at Konoho Kuahiwi in the uplands of Waimea, with haumana from age 4 to adult women. Hālau Malanai's name was given by Pang and "takes us to one of our core Hula auwana 'Waika.' Located in this area, our Hālau Malanai carries the name of the distinct Breeze that is clean, cool, and refreshing. A breeze that promotes love on many different levels," states the event description on volcanoartcenter.org.
     Hula Kahiko is presented authentically in an outdoor setting, rain or shine, without electronic amplification. Audience members are encouraged to bring sun/rain gear and sitting mats. Free; park entrance fees apply. See volcanoartcenter.org.

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MONDAY, OCTOBER 1
Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Meeting, Mon., Oct. 1, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue./Wed., Oct. 2 (Committees)/3 (Council), Hilo, Tue./Wed., Oct. 16 (Committees)/17 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue., Oct. 2, 4-6pm, Oct. 16, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue., Oct. 2, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

Family Yoga Class, Tue., Oct. 2, 9:30-10:30am, PARENTS, Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Wonderful way to embody connection. 3-12 years old and caregivers. All levels welcome. Wear comfortable clothes, bring a mat, if can, as supplies are limited. Free. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
Open Mic Night, Wed., Oct. 3, 6-10pm, Kīlauea Military Camp inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Call 967-8365 after 4pm to sign-up and for more details. For patrons 21+. Park entrance fees may apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu., Oct. 4, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
Annual Oktoberfest Dinner, Fri., Oct. 5, 5pm, St. Jude's Episcopal Church. Tickets: Singles $8, doubles $15, family $20. stjudeshawaii.org, 939-7000

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Meeting, Fri., Oct. 5, 6:30pm, Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sat., Oct. 6, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Discover Hawaiian goddesses and the natural phenomena they represent on this free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Kāwā Community Workday, Sat., Oct. 6, Meet 9:30am, Northern Gate, Kāwā. Sign-up w/James Akau, Nā Mamo o Kāwā, namamookawa@gmail.com, jakau@nmok.org, 561-9111. nmok.org

The Art Express, Sat., Oct. 6, 10-3pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Classes held once monthly. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran, 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.com, discoveryharbour.net/art-express

Keiki Science Class, Sat., Oct. 6, 11-noon, Ace Hardware Stores Islandwide, including Nā‘ālehu, 929-9030, and Ocean View, 929-7315. Free. First Sat every month. acehardware.com

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 7
Hawai‘i Wildlife Fund Kamilo Point Clean-Up with Hilo Bay Café, Sun., Oct. 7, contact in advance for meet up time at Wai‘ōhinu Park. BYO-4WD vehicle only. Free; donations appreciated. kahakai.cleanups@gmail.com, mattie.hwf@gmail.com, wildhawaii.org

Pu‘u o Lokuana, Sun., Oct. 7, 9:30-11 a.m., Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Short, moderately difficult, 0.4-mile hike to the top of the grassy cinder cone. Learn about the formation and various uses of this hill over time. Enjoy breathtaking view of lower Ka‘ū. Free. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Volcano Village Health and Safety Fair at the Cooper Center, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 7. Healthy food demonstrations and free food tastings, how to make a "go bucket," info on advance directives, free flu vaccinations (conditions apply), free testing for HepC and HIV, and more. Free event, open to the public. Sponsored by the Volcano Community Association.Contact Sher Glass at 967-8553, vcainfo@yahoo.com.

Ham Radio Potluck Picnic, Sun., Oct. 7, noon-2pm, Manukā State Park. Anyone interested in learning about ham radio is welcome to attend. Sponsored by South Point Amateur Radio Club and Amateur Radio Emergency Service. View sites.google.com/site/southpointarc or sites.google.com/view/southhawaiiares/home. Rick Ward, 938-3058

ONGOING
CU Hawaiʻi Federal Credit Union's Nāʻālehu Branch is taking applications for a Member Service Representative. Job description: Serve as a liaison between the member and the Credit Union. Provide a variety of financial services to members including savings, share drafts, and loan transactions, as well as sales of merchandise items: money orders, traveler's checks, postage stamps, etc., in accordance with Credit Union procedures and policies. CU Hawaiʻi offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Mail, hand-deliver, or fax application to: CU Hawaii Federal Credit Union, Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street, Hilo, HI 96720, Fax (808) 935-7793. Applications can be downloaded online at cuhawaii.com/about-cu/career-opportunities.html

One Lucid Dream: A Retrospective of Art Works by Ken Charon. Exhibit open Mon.-Sat., through Oct. 6, 10-3pm, Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus, Volcano Village. Original paintings, drawings, and other objects. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Volunteers Needed by St. Jude's Episcopal Church for community outreach, especially soup cooks and shower organizers, towel laundry, alter guild, and for the computer lab. Volunteers do not have to be members of the church. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's. Contact Dave Breskin, 319-8333.

Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool's Temporary Nāʻālehu Location is Kauahaʻao Church in Waiʻōhinu. Meeting days and times remain the same: Mondays and Wednesdays, from 8:45 to 10:45 a.m. Pāhala site program meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., at Pāhala Community Center.
     Tūtū and Me also offers home visits to those with keiki zero to five years old, to aid with parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate, listening ear. Free. Visits last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, total of 12 visits. Snacks are provided.
     To enroll in either program, fill out enrollment forms found at pidf.org/programs/tutu_and_me/enrollment_forms, or call Linda Bong at 464-9634. Questions: Clark at 929-8571 or eclark@pidfountation.org.

Open Enrollment for Harmony Educational Services through Oct. 15. Partnered with four local public charter schools, offers benefits of homeschooling with resources available to public schools. Interested families can contact Ranya Williams, rwilliams@harmonyed.com or 430-9798. harmonyed.com/hawaii

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Saturday, September 29, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Saturday, September 29, 2018

Jaclanne Pagala, left, and Riley Viernes, right, practice their skills using classmate Dalyn Kupukaa as a subject,
during an EMT course which has been added to curriculum at both the Hilo and Kona college campuses.
See story, below. Photo from Hawaiʻi CC
A CALL FOR A PUBLIC HEARING ON THE HU HONUA BIOENERGY PLANT, which plans for eucalyptus harvested from Kaʻū tree farms and elsewhere to produce electricity, has been issued by the Democratic Party of Hawaiʻi County. A statement from the party on Saturday describes Hu Honua Bioenergy (also known as Honua Ola), as an "incinerator-style power plant that is one of the most environmentally harmful projects now underway in the State of Hawaiʻi, set to open soon on our island."
     Hawaiʻi County Democrats and the statewide Party recently passed two resolutions, urging public officials to withdraw support from Hu Honua Bioenergy. The Democrats also announced that the 30-day comment period for testimonies on Hu Honua's applications for two National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permits closes Oct. 6.
     Testimonies already submitted include those from Anne Frederick, Executive Director of Hawaiʻi Alliance for Progressive Action; Lianna Murillo of The Surfrider Foundation; and Rob Culbertson, an environmentalist.
     The statement from the Democratic Party summarizes their testimonies, saying that Hu Honua plans to release storm water drainage off a cliff and also to disposed wastewater into injection wells 80 feet from cliff line over the ocean. "This means that chemically and thermally dominated wastewater will percolate down to coastal waters and aquifer, threatening the nearshore marine environment, our drinking water and also causing more instability in the landslide-prone sea cliffs."
     The statement also contends that "Other dire consequences of this project will be the unnecessary release of 300,000 tons per year of greenhouse-gas emissions, as well as the drawing of 21.6 million gallons of water per day from the Hakalau aquifer. This water will be mixed with about two dozen hazardous chemicals, and then used to cool the turbines of the electrical generator. The contaminated water is planned to be disposed of through the injection wells, which are 400 feet deep. Once it hits coastal waters, it will still be too hot for marine life to survive."
     The Democratic Party states that "Hu Honua Bioenergy is being called 'renewable energy' by state officials, but this is a false narrative. Officials are ignoring the fact that it takes between 20-100 years for replanted trees to capture an amount of carbon equal to that which would be released."
     Read Hu Honua's description of its project at huhonua.com where it states: "Hū Honua Bioenergy is one of the keys to Hawai‘i's energy independence. Once operational, Hū Honua can produce up to 30-megawatts (MW) of firm, renewable power fueled by homegrown biomass. Hū Honua can help the state meet its bold clean energy vision, while creating a new forestry industry, providing jobs to local families, and ensuring a secure, sustainable energy future for Hawai‘i Island."
     Testimony can be sent to the CleanWaterBranch@doh.hawaii.gov; norris.uehara@doh.hawaii.gov; darryl.lum@doh.hawaii.gov; shane.sumida@doh.hawaii.gov; kozelka.peter@epa.gov.
     The Democrats also posted a petition at actionnetwork.org/petitions/permits-and-public-hearings-for-hu-honua.

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HAWAIʻI WILDLIFE FUND RECENTLY LOADED 20,820 POUNDS OF DERELICT FISHING AND CARGO NETS AND LINE into a 40-foot container. Volunteers loaded up ten tons of the debris, collected during the last six months from Hawai‘i Island's coastlines, last Sunday, Sept. 23. Matson will send the container to Oʻahu, where the debris will be burned for electricity.
     Of these massive net and line bundles, five truckloads were collected from Kona and Hilo state Division of Aquatic Resources storage. The truckloads were collected by community volunteers, dive shops, local fishermen, and the Department of Land and Natural Resources staff. The container includes nets from both Pohoʻiki and Wai‘ōpae, in areas that were subsequently covered in lava.
Over ten tons of derelict fishing and cargo nets and line were collected on Hawaiʻi Island in six months. Photo from HWF 
     This is the second container filled and shipped to O‘ahu by HWF this year, "the 11th since 2005 via the Ka Ipu ‘Āina program, thanks to Matson," says a release from HWF. "This entire effort is a part of the NOAA Nets-to-Energy partnership. Since HWF began contributing nets to this program 13 years ago, 63 tons of nets have been diverted from the Hawai‘i Island landfills." Nets sent for incineration were primarily collected by HWF staff and volunteers, but also include efforts by County of Hawai‘i lifeguards, DLNR staff, and community members around the island.
     HWF's Education Coordinator Stacey Breining said, "We love that the community looks to HWF to report and remove large net bundles. Net bundles can potentially entangle or smother our precious marine life and animals have been known to ingest it as well. That's why we relentlessly strive to clean it up. Folks can bring any nets or lines they have collected to our net collection bins outside both the Hilo (Wailoa Fisheries Station) and Kona (Honokōhau Harbor) DLNR DAR offices."
     To report any large or potentially dangerous debris items, call HWF's marine debris hotline (808-769-7629) and DLNR (808-587-0405).

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THE OPPORTUNITY TO BECOME AN EMT WILL BE CLOSER AT HAND for those in Kaʻū who wish to drive to school to either Kona or Hilo. An Emergency Medical Technician course will be added to the Hawaiʻi Community College Fire Science Program at both campuses.
     Assistant Professor of Fire Science Jack Minassian said that by "earning their national registry EMT certification along with their Associate of Science degree, students will greatly enhance their employment opportunities with fire service agencies. It's one more added benefit when they apply for a job, and it's a big one." Fire service agencies on the island include those at Hawaiʻi County Fire Department, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Parks, and the airports.
Kainalu Burley, left, and Woody Keahi Nelson, right, 
practice their skills using classmate Dustin Figueira as 
a subject. Photo from Hawaiʻi CC
     The EMT courses, taught by instructors David Mendonsa and Daina Leslie Dietz, are in collaboration with Kapiolani Community College on Oʻahu. Established in 2005, the Fire Science program has become one of the most popular academic programs at Hawaiʻi CC in Hilo where 98 students are enrolled in the program.
     In 2017, Hawaiʻi CC began offering the Fire Science program at the Hawaiʻi CC – Pālamanui campus in Kona. A new cohort of students is admitted every two years.
     Students can begin the application process now to enroll for Fall 2019 at the Pālamanui campus and at the Manono campus in Hilo.
     For students interested in a bachelor's degree, Hawaiʻi CC has a transfer agreement with Colorado State University that allows Hawaiʻi CC Fire Science graduates to easily enter CSU's online Bachelor of Science in Fire and Emergency Services Administration program. Students can complete the online Bachelor of Science program while living on Hawaiʻi Island.
     For more information about the Fire Science program, contact Minassian at jackm@hawaii.edu or (808) 934-2617. Those interested in learning more about the enrollment process can contact the Welcome Center at (808) 934-2800.
     In five semesters, students can earn an Associate of Science degree. Hawaiʻi CC Fire Science graduates have found employment with federal, state, and local fire service agencies.

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KAʻŪ TROJANS GIRLS VOLLEYBALL had disappointing games last night. Challenging Kona in a home game, JV lost both sets, and Varsity lost all three sets.
     Come cheer the girls on, on Monday, Oct.1, at 6 p.m., as they host HAAS. See the Fall schedule, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
KAʻŪ TROJANS FALL SPORTS SCHEDULE
Football:
   Sat, Oct 6, 12pm, host Kohala
   Sat, Oct 13, BIIF Semi-Finals at Kamehameha
   Sat, Oct 20, BIIF Finals - Higher
Girls Volleyball:
   Fri., Sept. 28, 6pm, host Kona
   Mon., Oct. 1, 6pm, host HAAS
   Tues, Oct 2, 6pm, @ Kealakehe
   Fri, Oct 5, 6pm, host Keaʻau
   Wed, Oct 10, 6pm, @ Parker
   Fri, Oct 12, 6pm, host St. Joseph
   Mon, Oct 15, BIIF DII Qtr - Higher
   Wed, Oct 17, BIIF DII Semi-Finals @ Kona
   Thu, Oct 18, BIIF DII Finals @ Kona
Cross Country:
   Fri., Sept. 28, 6pm, host Kona
   Mon., Oct. 1, 6pm, host HAAS
   Sat, Oct 6, 2pm, @ Kealakehe
   Sat, Oct 13, BYE
   Sat, Oct 20, 9am, BIIF @ HPA
   Sat, Oct 27, 8:30am, HHSAA

NEW and UPCOMING
VOLCANO VILLAGE HEALTH AND SAFETY FAIR is held at the Cooper Center, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., on Sunday, Oct. 7.
     The fair offers healthy food demonstrations and free food tastings, how to make a "go bucket," info on advance directives, free flu vaccinations (to those over 18 years of age, with a valid picture I.D. and insurance card - Kaiser and V.A. not covered), free testing for HepC and HIV, and more. The free event, open to the public, is sponsored by the Volcano Community Association.
     Participants include: Blue Zones Hawai‘i - HMSA, KTA Pharmacy (flu vaccines), Hawai‘i Island HIV/AIDS Foundation, Fight the Bite - Hawai‘i, State Dept. of Health, Community Emergency Response Team, Volcano Emergency Response Team, Lava Paws - pet safety, Bay Clinic Mobile Health Unit, Sweet Cane Cafe, Café Ono, Volcano School of Arts and Sciences, and more. For more, contact Sher Glass at 967-8553 or email vcainfo@yahoo.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1
Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Meeting, Mon., Oct. 1, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue./Wed., Oct. 2 (Committees)/3 (Council), Hilo, Tue./Wed., Oct. 16 (Committees)/17 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue., Oct. 2, 4-6pm, Oct. 16, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue., Oct. 2, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

Family Yoga Class, Tue., Oct. 2, 9:30-10:30am, PARENTS, Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Wonderful way to embody connection. 3-12 years old and caregivers. All levels welcome. Wear comfortable clothes, bring a mat, if can, as supplies are limited. Free. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
Open Mic Night, Wed., Oct. 3, 6-10pm, Kīlauea Military Camp inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Call 967-8365 after 4pm to sign-up and for more details. For patrons 21+. Park entrance fees may apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu., Oct. 4, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
Annual Oktoberfest Dinner, Fri., Oct. 5, 5pm, St. Jude's Episcopal Church. Tickets: Singles $8, doubles $15, family $20. stjudeshawaii.org, 939-7000

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Meeting, Fri., Oct. 5, 6:30pm, Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 6
Hi‘iaka & Pele, Sat., Oct. 6, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Discover Hawaiian goddesses and the natural phenomena they represent on this free, moderate, one-mile walk. nps.gov/hawaiivolcanoes

Kāwā Community Workday, Sat., Oct. 6, Meet 9:30am, Northern Gate, Kāwā. Sign-up w/James Akau, Nā Mamo o Kāwā, namamookawa@gmail.com, jakau@nmok.org, 561-9111. nmok.org

The Art Express, Sat., Oct. 6, 10-3pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. Classes held once monthly. Learn something new or work on a forgotten project. Instructions on oil, acrylic, watercolor, and other mediums. Class size limited to 25. Meliha Corcoran, 319-8989, himeliha@yahoo.com, discoveryharbour.net/art-express

Keiki Science Class, Sat., Oct. 6, 11-noon, Ace Hardware Stores Islandwide, including Nā‘ālehu, 929-9030, and Ocean View, 929-7315. Free. First Sat every month. acehardware.com

ONGOING
CU Hawaiʻi Federal Credit Union's Nāʻālehu Branch is taking applications for a Member Service Representative.
     The job description reads: Serve as a liaison between the member and the Credit Union. Provide a variety of financial services to members including savings, share drafts, and loan transactions, as well as sales of merchandise items: money orders, traveler's checks, postage stamps, etc., in accordance with Credit Union procedures and policies.
     CU Hawaiʻi offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Mail, hand-deliver, or fax application to: CU Hawaii Federal Credit Union, Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street, Hilo, HI 96720, Fax (808) 935-7793. Applications can be downloaded online at cuhawaii.com/about-cu/career-opportunities.html

One Lucid Dream: A Retrospective of Art Works by Ken Charon. Exhibit open Mon.-Sat., through Oct. 6, 10-3pm, Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus, Volcano Village. Original paintings, drawings, and other objects. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Volunteers Needed by St. Jude's Episcopal Church for community outreach, especially soup cooks and shower organizers, towel laundry, alter guild, and for the computer lab. Volunteers do not have to be members of the church. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's. Contact Dave Breskin, 319-8333.

Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool's Temporary Nāʻālehu Location is Kauahaʻao Church in Waiʻōhinu. Meeting days and times remain the same: Mondays and Wednesdays, from 8:45 to 10:45 a.m. Pāhala site program meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., at Pāhala Community Center.
     Tūtū and Me also offers home visits to those with keiki zero to five years old, to aid with parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate, listening ear. Free. Visits last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, total of 12 visits. Snacks are provided.
     To enroll in either program, fill out enrollment forms found at pidf.org/programs/tutu_and_me/enrollment_forms, or call Linda Bong at 464-9634. Questions: Clark at 929-8571 or eclark@pidfountation.org.

Open Enrollment for Harmony Educational Services through Oct. 15. Partnered with four local public charter schools, offers benefits of homeschooling with resources available to public schools. Interested families can contact Ranya Williams, rwilliams@harmonyed.com or 430-9798. harmonyed.com/hawaii

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Friday, September 28, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Friday, September 28, 2018

Sen. Mazie Hirono joined Sen. Richard Blumenthal in walking out of the vote to send the nomination of Brett
Kavanaugh to the Senate floor for confirmation to become a U.S. Supreme Court Justice.
Photo from Sen. Blumenthal
THE VOTE BY THE U.S. SENATE on confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court is delayed for a week. Pres. Donald Trump today ordered an FBI investigation for no more than a week into allegations that Kavanaugh committed sexual assault.
     Some Republicans joined Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee in calling for the investigation. Those Republicans voted today to send Kavanaugh's nomination to the full Senate with this condition: If the investigation is not carried out, they would vote against Kavanaugh on the Senate floor. The 11-10 vote today moved the issue to the full Senate and was followed by this statement from the Committee:
Sen. Mazie Hirono, center, Sen. Kamala Harris, right, and protesters against
the election of Kavanaugh to a lifetime appointment on the Supreme Court.
Photo from Hirono's Twitter 
     "The Senate Judiciary Committee will request that the administration instruct the FBI to conduct a supplemental FBI background investigation with respect to the nomination of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to be an Associate Justice on the Supreme Court.
     "The supplemental FBI background investigation would be limited to current credible allegations against the nominee and must be completed no later than one week from today." Trump followed up and ordered the investigation.
     In protest of the Committee voting to move the nomination to the full Senate, Hawaiʻi Sen. Mazie Hirono walked out of the Committee meeting. She was joined by Senators Richard Blumenthal, Kamala Harris, and Sheldon Whitehouse. They returned and voted "no." They also joined protesters who oppose Kavanaugh and spoke at a podium with a sign saying "Kava Nope."
     Hirono Tweeted: "This morning Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) and I walked out of the Senate Judiciary Committee markup on Brett Kavanaugh. This Committee and the Republicans have tossed out all rules and norms to push Brett Kavanaugh onto the Supreme Court. We will not be part of this sham."
     Hirono shared a post from Harris on her Twitter: "Right now, many survivors of sexual assault are reliving trauma. If you're a survivor, know that you are not alone. If you need to talk, you can call 800-656-HOPE to reach a national, confidential helpline 24/7. There is also an online hotline" at hotline.rainn.org/online."

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.
View of Halemaʻumaʻu from the HVO observation tower, today. USGS photo
TILTMETERS MEASURE TINY CHANGES that can have big consequences, states this week's Volcano Watch, written by U.S. Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists and affiliates. This week's article was written by HVO geophysicist Ingrid Johanson.
     The USGS HVO uses a diverse set of instruments to monitor active volcanoes in Hawaiʻi. These include seismometers, gas sensors, Global Positioning System stations, and webcams. Each provides a unique type of data critical to understanding volcanic systems.
     However, electronic tiltmeters are the instruments that are often the first to alert us to changes in a volcano that could lead to an eruption. This is because they are exceptionally sensitive, capable of measuring very small ground deformations that suggest the movement of magma into shallow parts of volcanoes.
On the right, a tiltmeter is ready for installation in a shallow borehole. On the 
left, the tiltmeter is located at the bottom of a 3 to 4 m (10 to 15 ft) borehole 
lined with a metal casing. The tiltmeter is surrounded by sand to secure it 
within the borehole so that it does not touch the casing. USGS photos
     While tiltmeters respond to many subsurface processes, they are particularly effective for tracking inflation and deflation of subsurface magma reservoirs, like the shallow Halemaʻumaʻu source at Kīlauea's summit. As magma moves into a subsurface reservoir, the reservoir expands to accommodate additional magma. This causes the ground above the reservoir to bulge, depending on how shallow it is.
     As it bulges upward, the slope of the ground surface changes in certain places and in a specific pattern. This change in slope is what a tiltmeter measures, much like a carpenter's level.
     Tiltmeters commanded the spotlight at Kīlauea during the events of May–August 2018. Large changes in tilt just ahead of the collapse of Puʻu ʻŌʻō on April 30, 2018, first heralded the major events about to happen. Tiltmeters and seismometers located along the volcano's East Rift Zone were key for tracking magma intruding into the lower ERZ beneath Leilani Estates. At Kīlauea's summit, sudden changes in the direction of surface tilting were primary indicators that repeated collapse events, and not just earthquakes, had occurred.
     The unit used when measuring tilt at a volcano is usually the microradian. This is an angular unit, just like "degrees." A full circle is 360 degrees, equivalent to 6.28 radians. One microradian is about 50 millionths of a degree – a very small change in ground slope. If you put a tiltmeter on a rigid plank that is one mile long, and then put a quarter under one end of the plank, the measured change would be about one microradian of tilt.
Electronic Tilt at Kīlauea East Rift Zone for the past two days. Graph from USGS
     The tiltmeters that HVO use can resolve even smaller tilt changes – as small 5 nanoradians. However, this great sensitivity comes at a cost. That's because the tiltmeter records all changes in the ground tilt, whether they are due to changes in the volcano or another reason.
     One non-volcanic source of tilt is the heating of the ground that happens on sunny days. Most of HVO's tiltmeters are installed in boreholes about 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft) below the ground and are surrounded by rock. This rock expands as it warms up during the day, and any unevenness in its expansion will produce an easily measurable ground tilt. This is diurnal noise, which can be easily identified because it happens regularly during the day.
     Rainfall can also cause small amounts of tilt. Rock contains small air pockets, called pore spaces, which can become filled with water during a storm, causing the rock to swell up like a sponge. Small differences in pore spaces on either side of a tiltmeter will cause a measurable change in ground tilt. Remember, these are tilts that are much smaller than can be discerned by simply looking at a patch of ground with your eyes.
The blue line shows the radial tilt at Summer Camp station on the eastern rim of Kīlauea's caldera. The green line is radial tilt at Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, on the north flank of Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō cone. Positive changes often indicate inflation of the magma storage areas beneath the caldera or Pu‘u ‘Ō‘ō, but may also result from heavy rainfall or, occasionally, instrumental malfunctions. USGS graph
     Another important source of noise at a tiltmeter is settling of the instrument in its borehole. This can last months, if not years, in some cases. It is a major contributor to tiltmeter "drift," and, on a tilt record, can look like a long-term tilt change or trend.
     Because of tiltmeter drift, we mainly trust tiltmeters for short time-scale changes. For changes over several months or years, we must look to other instruments, such as GPS, for deformation data. It also means that the usefulness of a tilt record is how the tilt changes within a week or a month, and not necessarily the absolute value of tilt produced by the instrument.
     Despite these effects, electronic tiltmeters offer one of our best views into subsurface changes at Kīlauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes, and are an important part of our monitoring toolbox. See current tilt data from HVO's network on our website. Go to
volcanoes.usgs.gov/observatories/hvo, then click on "Deformation."
Volcano Activity Updates
     At Kīlauea's lower East Rift Zone, the most recent significant incandescence visible within the fissure 8 cone was on September 15. At the summit of the volcano, seismicity and ground deformation remain low. Hazardous conditions still exist at both the LERZ and summit. Residents in the lower Puna District and Kīlauea summit areas on the Island of Hawaiʻi should stay informed and heed Hawai‘i County Civil Defense closures, warnings, and messages hawaiicounty.gov/active-alerts. No collapses at Puʻu ʻŌʻō have been observed during the past two weeks. The combined sulfur dioxide emission rates at Kīlauea’s summit, Puʻu ʻŌʻō, and lower East Rift Zone remain at less than 1,000 tonnes per day – lower than at any time since late 2007.
GPS readings at Puʻu ʻŌʻō over the last year. Graph from USGS
     A magnitude-3.7 earthquake with three or more felt reports occurred 18 km (11 mi) southeast of Volcano at 6 km (4 mi) depth on September 21 at 1:56 a.m. Small aftershocks from the May 4, 2018, magnitude-6.9 earthquake are still being generated on faults located on Kīlauea's south flank.
     Visit volcanoes.usgs.gov/hvo for past Volcano Watch articles, Kīlauea and Mauna Kea updates, volcano photos, maps, recent earthquake info, and more. Call 808-967-8862 for a Kīlauea summary update. Email questions to askHVO@usgs.gov.

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HAWAIʻI COUNTY ASKS THE PUBLIC TO REPORT BROKEN STREET LAMPS to ensure safe trick-or-treating, and to provide adequate lighting to prevent accidents and to illuminate the roadway, sidewalk, and shoulders for safe pedestrian and motorist use, in a release.
Example of a street lamp number.
Photos from Hawaiʻi County
     The Traffic Division of the County of Hawai‘i Department of Public Works, the release says, manages over 10,165 street lights and is asking for the community's assistance in identifying and reporting any broken streetlights in their neighborhood area. Bulbs can burn out, and the light will not activate at dusk. The sensor can malfunction, and the light can remain on all day.
     If a street light is lit all day, or is not lit at night, call the Traffic Division, weekdays from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., at 961-8341, with the street light pole number: easily spotted from a car, it is a large silver number located six to seven feet up on the street light pole. Please also provide the street or highway name, if available – a well-known landmark is also helpful.
Another example of
a street lamp number.
     The average timeline from reporting a malfunctioning street light to its repair is between three and seven days, says the release. "The Department of Public Works thanks the community for their assistance and partnership in ensuring a safe Holiday Season for our Big Island ‘Ohana."

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A JOB FAIR AND JOB READINESS WORKSHOP, sponsored by the American Job Center Hawaiʻi, happen in Hilo in October, and are free and open to the public, says an announcement from the Mayor's office.
     The Job Readiness Workshop happens Tuesday, Oct. 16, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Aunty Sally's Luau Hale. The Workshop "assists participants to prepare for the job fair by offering guidance on resume writing, interviewing skills, properly completing an application and instruction on dressing for success," says the announcement.
     The Job Fair happens Thursday, October 25, 201810:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Edith Kanakaʻole Tennis Stadium. Island-wide businesses looking for employees to fill vacancies will gather at the Fair. Participants should come prepared with resumes and in professional attire, as interviews may be done on site.
     For more, call Office of Housing and Community Development at 961-8379.

Kaʻū Trojans Girls Volleyball fought hard against HPA
on Tuesday. Photo from Kaʻū Trojans Twitter
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KAʻŪ TROJANS GIRLS VOLLEYBALL had a rough Tuesday night. At an away game at HPA, both sets the JV team played ended in defeat, with Kaʻū scoring 9 and 19 to HPA's 25 and 25. Varsity fared a little better, scoring 25, 19, 18, and 21, but HPA won the game with 23, 25, 25, and 25.
     The next game happens tonight, and Kaʻū News Briefs will report on the scores tomorrow. See the schedule, below.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

Print edition of The Kaʻū Calendar is free to 5,500 mailboxes 
throughout Kaʻū, from Miloliʻi through Volcano, and free on 
stands throughout the district. Read online at kaucalendar.com
KAʻŪ TROJANS FALL SPORTS SCHEDULE
Football:
   Sat., Sept. 29, 11am, host Pāhoa
   Sat, Oct 6, 12pm, host Kohala
   Sat, Oct 13, BIIF Semi-Finals at Kamehameha
   Sat, Oct 20, BIIF Finals - Higher
Girls Volleyball:
   Mon., Oct. 1, 6pm, host HAAS
   Tues, Oct 2, 6pm, @ Kealakehe
   Fri, Oct 5, 6pm, host Keaʻau
   Wed, Oct 10, 6pm, @ Parker
   Fri, Oct 12, 6pm, host St. Joseph
   Mon, Oct 15, BIIF DII Qtr - Higher
   Wed, Oct 17, BIIF DII Semi-Finals @ Kona
   Thu, Oct 18, BIIF DII Finals @ Kona
Cross Country:
   Sat, Sept 29, 10am, @ Waiakea
   Mon., Oct. 1, 6pm, host HAAS
   Sat, Oct 6, 2pm, @ Kealakehe
   Sat, Oct 13, BYE
   Sat, Oct 20, 9am, BIIF @ HPA
   Sat, Oct 27, 8:30am, HHSAA

NEW and UPCOMING
OPEN MIC NIGHT RETURNS TO KĪLAUEA MILITARY CAMP'S LAVA LOUNGE on Wednesday, Oct. 3, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. The event features singers, bands, comedians, etc., and welcomes patrons over the age of 21 years old to attend or perform.
     To sign-up or for more details, call 967-8365 after 4 p.m. Kīlauea Military Camp is located inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park; park entrance fees may apply. See kilaueamilitarycamp.com.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 29
Volunteer Day, The Nature Conservancy, Sat., Sept. 29, 8-3pm, either Kona Hema or Kaʻū Preserve, contact for confirmation. Tools, gloves, and stories provided. Space is limited. Reserve a space in a 4wd TNC truck in advance. Sponsored in part by Hawaiʻi Tourism Authority. Contact Mel Johansen at or Shalan Crysdale at scrysdale@tnc.org. tnc.org

Paths and Trails, Sat., Sept. 29, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park. Moderately-difficult, 2-mile, hike with some of the most spectacular overlooks in Kahuku. Discover the ways people, animals, and plants got to Kahuku and the paths they follow. Free. nps.gov/HAVO
Story Time with Lindsey Miller from PARENTS, Inc., Mon., Oct. 1, 2:30-3:15pm, Nā‘ālehu Public Library. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

MONDAY, OCTOBER 1
Ocean View Volunteer Fire Department Meeting, Mon., Oct. 1, 4-6pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 2
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue./Wed., Oct. 2 (Committees)/3 (Council), Hilo, Tue./Wed., Oct. 16 (Committees)/17 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov.

Discovery Harbour Volunteer Fire Dept. Meeting, Tue., Oct. 2, 4-6pm, Oct. 16, 4:30-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net

Ka‘ū Coffee Growers Meeting, Tue., Oct. 2, 6-8pm, Pāhala Community Center.

Family Yoga Class, Tue., Oct. 2, 9:30-10:30am, PARENTS, Inc., Nā‘ālehu. Wonderful way to embody connection. 3-12 years old and caregivers. All levels welcome. Wear comfortable clothes, bring a mat, if can, as supplies are limited. Free. 333-3460, lindsey@hawaiiparents.org

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 3
Open Mic Night, Wed., Oct. 3, 6-10pm, Kīlauea Military Camp inside Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Call 967-8365 after 4pm to sign-up and for more details. For patrons 21+. Park entrance fees may apply. kilaueamilitarycamp.com

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4
Ocean View Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Thu., Oct. 4, 6-7pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 5
Annual Oktoberfest Dinner, Fri., Oct. 5, 5pm, St. Jude's Episcopal Church. Tickets: Singles $8, doubles $15, family $20. stjudeshawaii.org, 939-7000

‘O Ka‘ū Kākou Meeting, Fri., Oct. 5, 6:30pm, Aspen Center. okaukakou.org

ONGOING
CU Hawaiʻi Federal Credit Union's Nāʻālehu Branch is taking applications for a Member Service Representative.
     The job description reads: Serve as a liaison between the member and the Credit Union. Provide a variety of financial services to members including savings, share drafts, and loan transactions, as well as sales of merchandise items: money orders, traveler's checks, postage stamps, etc., in accordance with Credit Union procedures and policies.
     CU Hawaiʻi offers medical, drug, dental, vision and retirement benefits.
     Mail, hand-deliver, or fax application to: CU Hawaii Federal Credit Union, Attn: Human Resources, 476 Hinano Street, Hilo, HI 96720, Fax (808) 935-7793. Applications can be downloaded online at cuhawaii.com/about-cu/career-opportunities.html

Disaster Recovery Center Closes Tomorrow, Saturday, Sept. 29. Open weekdays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Saturdays from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Pāhoa Neighborhood Center at 15-3022 Kauhale St. Survivors who have left the area, call 800-621-3362.

One Lucid Dream: A Retrospective of Art Works by Ken Charon. Exhibit open Mon.-Sat., through Oct. 6, 10-3pm, Volcano Art Center's Ni‘aulani Campus, Volcano Village. Original paintings, drawings, and other objects. 967-8222, volcanoartcenter.org

Volunteers Needed by St. Jude's Episcopal Church for community outreach, especially soup cooks and shower organizers, towel laundry, alter guild, and for the computer lab. Volunteers do not have to be members of the church. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's. Contact Dave Breskin, 319-8333.

Tūtū and Me Traveling Preschool's Temporary Nāʻālehu Location is Kauahaʻao Church in Waiʻōhinu. Meeting days and times remain the same: Mondays and Wednesdays, from 8:45 to 10:45 a.m. Pāhala site program meets Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m., at Pāhala Community Center.
     Tūtū and Me also offers home visits to those with keiki zero to five years old, to aid with parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate, listening ear. Free. Visits last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, total of 12 visits. Snacks are provided.
     To enroll in either program, fill out enrollment forms found at pidf.org/programs/tutu_and_me/enrollment_forms, or call Linda Bong at 464-9634. Questions: Clark at 929-8571 or eclark@pidfountation.org.

Open Enrollment for Harmony Educational Services through Oct. 15. Partnered with four local public charter schools, offers benefits of homeschooling with resources available to public schools. Interested families can contact Ranya Williams, rwilliams@harmonyed.com or 430-9798. harmonyed.com/hawaii

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.