About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Kaʻū News Briefs Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016

‘Ōpūkaha‘ia likely fished, swam and played at this black sand Nīnole beach at Koloa Bay.
The view is from the Kaʻieʻie fishing heiau. See story below.
Photo by Chris Cook


FILIPINO WWII VETERANS WILL BE ELIGIBLE FOR CONGRESSIONAL GOLD MEDALS with the unanimous passage of a bill today by the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill was co-introduced by Kaʻū’s Senator Mazie Hirono and Kaʻū’s House member Tulsi Gabbard. It passed the Senate unanimously in July.
Filipino WWII heroes to receive Congressional Medal
of Honor after unanimous passage of legislation today.
Photo from Filipino Veterans Recognition and Education Project
www.filvetrep.org
     The legislation acknowledges the more than 200,000 Filipino and Filipino-American soldiers who responded to President Roosevelt’s call-to-duty and fought under the American flag against the Imperial Forces of Japan during World War II.
     Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba (Ret), chairman of the Filipino Veterans Recognition and Education Project, said: “Today is truly a great day, a significant seminal period in American history – second only to the liberation of the Philippines and surrender of the Japanese Imperial Forces on August 15, 1945. Now we can tell our veterans with pride in our hearts that this grateful nation has, at last, granted them recognition for the selfless sacrifice they endured in war, and restored their dignity and honor in service to their nation.”
       Hirono said, “These veterans were instrumental to our victory in the Pacific, but had to fight for decades to receive the benefits they earned. The unanimous support this bill earned in the Senate and the overwhelming backing it has in the House honors the sacrifice so many of these veterans made for our country.”
       Gabbard called it an “historic vote to honor our Filipino World War II veterans with the Congressional Gold Medal – our highest civilian honor. These loyal and courageous soldiers suffered, fought, and gave up their lives alongside their American counterparts throughout the war, and have waited decades for their service to be recognized. They cannot afford to wait any longer. It has been an honor to personally get to know some of these veterans and their families, and to hear them humbly tell their courageous stories of service. I urge my colleagues to join me in voting to pass this timely legislation, and to honor our veterans with this long-overdue recognition.” 
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

MICRO UNITS OF HOUSING for the homeless is a new outreach by the County of Hawaiʻi. Twenty-three were dedicated yesterday, after completion by Kona-Kaʻū Construction and several subcontractors in nine months at a cost of $2.5 million. The County handled the design and engineering. The housing addresses a critical need within the chronically homeless community.
     According to a statement from Mayor Billy Kenoi, the number of homeless on this island increased ten percent in one year, totaling about 1,400 in January. About 500 were unsheltered and living on the west side of the island. “Our families who are homeless need a sense that they have a chance. They can believe that because they can sleep in a clean, safe place,” said Kenoi. “We’re creating a puʻuhonua, a safe haven, a place of refuge where people can walk around with dignity and respect.” 
Hale Kikaha, 23 micro units to house the homeless, was constructed by
Kona Kaʻū Construction in nine months. Photo from County of Hawaiʻi
     This first micro-housing cluster is now open in Kailua-Kona on Pawai Place in the industrial area. The name is Kikaha, which means to soar. According to the mayor’s statement, “Hale Kikaha represents the County's hope and  commitment to the residents that will call the project home.” 
     Nearby is the county’s 31-bed emergency shelter built in 2010, along with “wraparound” services. The statement says the County has adopted the best practice Housing First model for dealing with the homeless problem.
     The County has also partnered in constructing affordable homes to be rented and others to be owned by low-to-moderate income families. In addition, it administers programs to assist tenants renting existing housing. More than 2,000 families receive over $14 million in assistance every year through Tenant-Based Rental Assistance and the Housing Choice Voucher programs on this island. 
    “We are measured not by what we do for those who have the most, we are measured by what we do for those who have the least,” said the mayor.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

IN THE LIFE OF KAʻŪ BORN HENRY ʻŌPŪKAHAʻIA, new key historical detail has come to light, with oral history identifying his probable place of birth at Punaluʻu-Nīnole. Author Chris Cook recently updated his 2015 edition of The Providential Life and Heritage of Henry Obookiah, a biography of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia. The more specific location of the childhood home comes from history handed down to the Rev. Henry Boshard Ph.D., who served as pastor at Mokuaikaua Church on the Kailua-Kona waterfront from 1964-2006. Boshard told Cook that his family believes the ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia homesite is located below the Hokuloa - Henry ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia Chapel near Punalu‘u Beach Park. 
      ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia grew up along the black sand beach and lava rock coastline along the strand at Nīnole and Punalu‘u. Referring to the scant published documentation on the early years of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia, it was earlier assumed that the beach at Koloa Bay in the ahupuaʻa of Nīnole was the location of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia’s home, said the author.
        Kahu Boshard also grew up in Punalu‘u and his wife Iris Boshard has ties to Ka‘ū through her paniolo father from the Kanaka‘ole family with heritage at Kapapala Ranch. Boshard said his grandmother, Adeline Nihokula Akiu, related to her family that the location of a beachfront parcel makai of the Hokuloa Chapel at Punalu‘u as the birthplace and childhood home of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia.
     The Hokuloa Chapel was dedicated by the Women’s Board of Missions of the United Church of Christ in Hawai‘i in 1957 in honor of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia. The walk up the unpaved drive takes visitors to the chapel mauka of Punalu‘u black sand beach park. From the rock wall gate at the chapel, one can look down upon ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia’s beachfront parcel homesite, writes Cook.
     ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia and his family departed Ka‘ū in 1796. His father Keʻau was recruited as a minuteman-type soldier in a Ka‘ū army marching under orders of the district ali‘i nui, Namakeha. The Kaʻū chief hoped to reconquer lands taken earlier by Kamehameha, taking advantage of the king being distracted while completing his conquest of O‘ahu following the Battle of Nuʻuanu.
    The fate of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia’s family resulted in their never returning to their kuleana at Punalu‘u. ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia’s father, mother Kamohoʻula (a cousin of Kamehameha) and infant brother were slaughtered following the Battle of Kaipalaoa fought near the Wailuku River in Hilo in the summer of 1796. ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia, about age 10, was spared – as too young to cause trouble, but old enough to take care of himself, and to able to provide useful labor for his captors. ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia was taken to North Kohala by a warrior who killed his family. His maternal uncle Pahua, a kahuna at the Hikiau Heiau at Napoʻopoʻo along the shore of Kealakekua Bay, adopted ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia into his priestly family and began training him as a kahuna. In 1808 ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia chose to sail away aboard the New Haven sealing ship Triumph.
Cynthia Lehua Nani Hoʻomanawanui-Akiu, left, and cousin Deborah
Liʻikapeka Lee at ʻŌpūkahaʻia Memorial Chapel during a history tour.
Photo by Chris Cook
   “The decision of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia, then about 21 years old, to venture outside Hawai‘i as a sailor, would result in great changes to Hawaiʻi in later years,” writes Cook. “‘Ōpūkaha‘ia became well known in New England churches in the mid-1810s, a ‘heathen’ converted to Christianity who translated the Book of Genesis directly from Hebrew to the Hawaiian language, preached in English, and was being groomed to lead a Protestant mission to Hawaiʻi.
   ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia died of typhus fever at Cornwall, Ct. in February 1818. Following his death, the 100-page, hand-sized book Memoirs of Henry Obookiah spread his story. The widespread reading of the little book drew strong public support for sending the pioneer company of the Sandwich Islands Mission to Hawaiʻi, out of Boston in October 1819.
     In 1993 Deborah Lee of Hilo, supported by her ʻohana, successfully undertook the return of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia’s remains from Cornwall to a raised stone gravesite at the Kahikolu (Trinity) Church at Napoʻopoʻo. 
     She has also been involved in putting together a Hana Hou History Tour, which  is returning to Hokuloa Chapel in mid-February to focus on the life of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia at Punaluʻu-Nīnole. The tour draws visitors from the mainland and Hawaiʻi interested in the Christian history of Hawaiʻi Island. The tour will also visit Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park where a native Hawaiian guide will relate the story of Chiefess Kapiʻolani challenging the goddess Pele at Kīlauea Volcano in the mid-1820s. For more information: hanahou.info
      Author Cook said he seeks comments on his account of ‘Ōpūkaha‘ia, especially information from Kaʻū about the notable native Hawaiian’s childhood in Punaluʻu and Nīnole.  This account is based on a post at his blog www.obookiah.com. Interested persons can contact Cook at obookiah@gmail.com
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see facebook.com/kaucalendar.

WINTER CRAFTS FOR KEIKI will be offered today, Nov. 30 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m at Pāhala Community Center, for grades K-8. 928-3102.
Keiki gets a lift at the new Kaʻū
District Gym. Photo by Ron Johnson

REGISTER FOR UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I VULCAN VOLLEYBALL CLINIC to be held tomorrow, Thursday, Dec. 1, at the new Kaʻū District Gym. The clinic, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. is for youth five to 14 years of age. The clinic is expected to feature Vulcan and Trojan volleyball star Marley Strand-Nicholaisen and other Vulcan players who just finished their season. All participants must have a parent sign the Dept. of Parks & Recreation release of claims form and the HI-PAL permission Release Form. Court shoes or rubber sole shoes are required. To register, call Pāhala Community Center at 928-3102 or 854-7316. Community police Officer Blaine Morishita is also helping through the Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League and can be reached at 936-7192.

DEADLINE FOR THE ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM is this Friday, Dec. 2. The tournament will be held at the new Kaʻū District Gym, Dec. 9-11 with opportunities for adults and youth of all ages. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. Cost is $10 per person with five players maximum per team. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To sign up or donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858.

Pāhala Christmas Parade is Sunday, Dec. 11
with floats, marchers, and Christmas music.
Photo by Julia Neal
PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE welcomes community groups, churches, sports teams coffee farmers, classic vehicle drivers and more to travel through the village on Sunday, Dec. 11. The parade, in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters. Participants begin gathering at the old Pāhala Armory at noon and the parade starts at 1 p.m. The parade ends at the Catholic Church on Pikake Street for refreshments. Organizer for almost four decades is Eddie Andrade. For more information, call Andrade at 928-0808.
Beauty of Kaʻū art show artists and supporters of The Directory,
with a Dec. 15 deadline to sign up. Photo by Ron Johnson
                     
DEADLINE FOR THE DIRECTORY, to sign up for listings and advertising for businesses, The Kaʻū Calendar. It includes photography and art by Kaʻū residents, a calendar of events, listings and feature stories including winners of the recent Beauty of Kaʻū art show, sponsored by the Chamber. Deadline to sign up by businesses, community groups, churches and agencies is Dec. 15. The annual business and community resource guide is sponsored by Kaʻū Chamber of Commerce and produced by The Kaʻū Calendar.
A mamaki wreath by Lanaya Delly at
Christmas in the Country at
Volcano Art Center
     The Directory raises scholarship money for students from Kaʻū throughout their higher education in trades, college and university studies. Printed each January, 7,500 copies of The Directory are distributed throughout Kaʻū and Volcano. To sign up, contact geneveve.fyvie@gmail.com.

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY holiday exhibit daily through Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Featured at Christmas in the Country is the 17th Annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit, with prizes awarded for the best wreaths. To participate, contact Emily Weiss at 967-8222 or gallery@volcanoartcenter.org . Free; park entrance fees apply.

DONATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FRIEND-RAISER, NĀʻĀLEHU Elementary School's Winter Fest. It takes place on Saturday, Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Make New Friends,” declares the poster, which also reports on opportunities to enjoy shave ice, drinks, hot dogs – all for $1. Games are 50 cents. Also featured is a bounce house, raffle, bake sale, splash booth, jail, face painting and information vendors. Winter Fest is sponsored by the Nāʻālehu School Council. Anyone wishing to donate prize items or make a monetary donation should contact Nāʻālehu Elementary vice-principal Christina Juan or student council adviser Amberly Keohuloa at 323-4000.
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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

The Kaʻū Calendar News Briefs, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016

Jami Beck, a graduate of Kaʻū High School and Youth Ranger, teaches keiki about the rainforest at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes
National Park. The scholar athlete is also a candidate for Miss Teen Hawaiʻi in Honolulu on Dec. 17. An on-line
vote for for Miss Photogenic takes place through Dec. 12. See story below.
CONGRESSWOMAN TULSI GABBARD is planning to join hundreds to thousands of veterans, many of them Native Americans, this Sunday, Dec. 4 at Standing Rock, North Dakota to protect clean water and historic sites from the Dakota Access Pipeline. The 1,172 mile-long pipeline would transport about half the fracked oil produced at Bakken, North Dakota, taking it past Sioux tribal lands and their freshwater sources, under the Missouri River into South Dakota and Missouri to Illinois, hooking up with other pipelines to refineries.
     Gabbard is scheduled to join the water protectors on the day before the deadline that Army Corp of Engineers set for everyone to leave the pipeline construction area. Calling themselves “Native Water Protectors” rather than protesters, the large group that is camped near the Missouri River grew from about three dozen in April to 5,000 on Labor Day. Comprised of some 300 tribes, including Native Hawaiians, the protectors and their supporters have held their ground for more than six months in hot to frigid weather. Some have been arrested. Their slogan in the Sioux language is “Mni Waconi.” In English, it is “Water is Life.”
      Once completed, the pipeline would carry daily as much as 570,000 barrels of fracked crude oil  past the Sioux lands. Standing Rock Sioux tribal leaders contend that they could lose clean water security, saying the pipeline operator is known for many oil spills. They also claim that construction of the pipeline desecrates sacred burial sites.
     A statement from Gabbard's staff says, “Next weekend, the congresswoman will be joining thousands of veterans from across the country to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux in North Dakota who are protesting the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline through their tribal lands, with grave concerns about the contamination of their major water source.”
     A GoFundMe has raised more than $500,000 to support the cost of veterans traveling to Standing Rock.
Sone 300 tribes, including Native Hawaiian groups,
have supported the Standing Rock Sioux.
Photo by Tony Webster
     In an online petition soliciting names to oppose the pipeline, Gabbard writes, “We cannot remain silent while so many of our brothers and sisters continue to stand up against a greedy oil company and an Army Corp of Engineers that have failed to properly follow the law or actually address the important issues of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and neighboring communities.”
     In September, Gabbard and 18 Democrats in the Native American Caucus of the U.S House of Representatives wrote to Pres. Barack Obama saying “The federal government has a moral and legal trust responsibility to ensure that federally permitted projects do not threaten historically or culturally significant tribal places, the trust lands of tribal nations, or the waters that run through them. We stand with tribal leaders in asking you to uphold our federal trust responsibility and protect tribal interests in this and future permitting decisions by the United States Army Corps of Engineers.”
A segment of the Dakota Access Pipeline already constructed in
North Dakota. Photo by Tony Webster
     The lawmakers also wrote. “In the instance of the Dakota Access Pipeline, despite its location within a mile of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation, the United States Army Corps of Engineers failed in its responsibility to engage in meaningful consultation and collaboration with potentially impacted tribal nations. The lack of proper consultation on the Dakota Access Pipeline has been detrimental to the interests of all stakeholders in this issue, from the tribal governments whose heritage and lands are at risk to the workers hired to construct this pipeline who now face uncertain conditions.”
     On its website the pipeline company states the following: “The pipeline will translate into millions in state and local revenues during the construction phase and an estimated $156 million in sales and income taxes. The Dakota Access Pipeline Project is a $3.7 billion investment into the United States directly impacting the local and national labor force by creating 8,000–12,000 construction jobs and up to 40 permanent operating jobs. The committed volume rates of the pipeline project have already created historically high shipment ratios, with the pipeline projected to carry half of the Bakken’s current daily crude oil production. The pipeline will meet or exceed state and federal safety requirements and at a minimum will be designed in accordance with 49 Code of Federal Regulations Part 195.”
     President-elect Donald Trump is reportedly an investor in the stock of the pipeline company Energy Transfer Partners and was provided with campaign funding by its CEO Kelcy Warren. See more from the company at www.dakotaaccessfacts.com
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

Jami Beck is up for public voting for
Miss Photogenic Teen Hawaiʻi 
KAʻŪ FOOD PANTRY will be open to distribute food today, Tuesday, Nov. 29 at St. Jude’s Church in Ocean View from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

DONATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED FOR THE FRIEND-RAISER, Nāʻālehu School’s Winter Fest on Saturday. Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.  Anyone wishing to donate prize items or make a monetary donation should contact Nāʻālehu Elementary vice-principal Christina Juan or student council adviser Amberly Keohuloa at 323-4000.
   “Make New Friends,” declares the poster, which also reports on opportunities to enjoy shave ice, drinks, hot dogs – all for $1. Games are 50 cents. Also featured is a bounce house, raffle, bake sale, splash booth, jail, face painting and information vendors. Winter Fest is sponsored by the Nāʻālehu School Council. 

WINTER CRAFTS FOR KEIKI will be offered this Wednesday, Nov. 30 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m at Pāhala Community Center, for grades K-8. 928-3102.

JAMI BECK, MISS TEEN KAʻŪ 2017, is in the running for the state Miss Teen Hawaiʻi title at the pageant on Sunday, Dec. 17 in Honolulu at the Neil Blasdell Center’s Pikake Room at 5 p.m. In the meantime, anyone can vote for Jami Beck for Miss Photogenic through Dec. 12 with online voting.
   Beck, a graduate of  Kaʻū High School, won the swimsuit competition and tied for first in talent in the 2016 Miss Kaʻū Coffee pageant. Vote at Facebook.com.

UPCOMING MEETINGS, EVENTS, COMMENT DEADLINES:

ULUPOLU INITIATIVE invites community members, including food producers, to listening sessions in Kamuela on Friday, Dec. 2 from 10 a.m. to noon at Kohala Center, and in Hilo at the Hawaiʻi Innovation Center, at 117 Keawe St., on Tuesday, Dec. 13 from 3 to 5 p.m. Ulupono Initiative will host the gatherings at agricultural “hot spots” within each county “to listen, learn and brainstorm solutions to Hawaiʻi’s many challenging food issues.”
Formerly grazed land is replenished by silvaculture,
growing koa on proposed Safe Harbor lands.
Photo from Kamehameha Schools

DEADLINE IS DEC. 22 FOR SAFE HARBOR PROGRAM FOR KEAUHOU AND KĪLAEUA LAND GIVEN BY PRINCESS RUTH KEʻELIKŌLANI to Kamehameha Schools in 1883. The endangered species protection plan was presented at a state Department of Land & Natural Resources public hearing in Volcano in November. The 32,800 acres near Volcano border Kapapala Forest Reserve, Hawaʻi Volcanoes National Park, Puʻu Makaʻala Nautral Area Reserve, Mauna Loa Forest Reserve and Kipuka Ainahou Nene Sanctuary. The land would become the largest Safe Harbor for endangered species in the United States, if approved by DLNR and the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which would help Kamehameha Schools with the conservation management.
See more of the plan at hawaii.gov. Comments can be sent to katherine.cullison@hawaii.gov by Dec. 22.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter

Marley Strand-Nicholaisan
at her last Vulcan game.
She will be at the
Kaʻū Gym Thursday.
REGISTER FOR UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I VULCAN VOLLEYBALL CLINIC to be held this Thursday, Dec. 1 at the new Kaʻū District Gym. The clinic, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. is for youth five to 14 years of age. The clinic is expected to feature Vulcan and Trojan volleyball star Marley Strand-Nicholaisen and other Vulcan players who just finished their season. All participants must have a parent sign the Dept. of Parks & Recreation release of claims form and the HI-PAL permission Release Form. Court shoes or rubber sole shoes are required. To register, call Pāhala Community Center at 928-3102 or 854-7316. Community police Officer Blaine Morishita is also helping through the Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League and can be reached at 936-7192.

DEADLINE FOR THE ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM is this Friday, Dec. 2. The tournament will be held at the new Kaʻū District Gym, Dec. 9-11 with opportunities for adults and youth of all ages. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. Cost is $10 per person with five players maximum per team. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To sign up or donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858.

Holy Rosary Church sponsors a float and welcomes parade goers
at the end of the annual Pahala Christmas Parade on Sunday, Dec. 11.
Photo by Julia Neal
THE 38TH ANNUAL PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE invites community groups, churches, sports teams coffee farmers, classic vehicle drivers and more to travel through the village on Sunday, Dec. 11. The parade, in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters. Participants begin gathering at the old Pāhala Armory at noon and the parade starts at 1 p.m. The parade ends at the Catholic Church on Pikake Street for refreshments. Organizer for almost four decades is Eddie Andrade. For more information, call Andrade at 928-0808.

The Key to the World is the
name of this art to be included
in The Directory 2017
Caren Loebel-Fried’s
Kīlauea Lighthouse
at Christmas in the Country,
Volcano Art Center
DEADLINE FOR THE DIRECTORY, to sign up for listings and advertising for businesses, community groups, churches and agencies is Dec. 15. The annual business and community resource guide is sponsored by Kaʻū Chamber of Commerce and produced by The Kaʻū Calendar. It includes photography and art by Kaʻū residents, a calendar of events, listings and feature stories including winners of the recent Beauty of Kaʻū art show, sponsored by the Chamber.
     The Directory raises scholarship money for students from Kaʻū throughout their higher education in trades, college and university studies. Printed each January, 7,500 copies of The Directory are distributed throughout Kaʻū and Volcano. To sign up, contact geneveve.fyvie@gmail.com.

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY holiday exhibit daily through Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Featured at Christmas in the Country is the 17th Annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit, with prizes awarded for the best wreaths. To participate, contact Emily Weiss at 967-8222 or gallery@volcanoartcenter.org. Free; park entrance fees apply.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL

Monday, November 28, 2016

Kaʻū News Briefs Monday, Nov. 28, 2016

U.H. Hilo and NASA researchers recently wrapped up a Mars simulation deployment at Mauna Ula. Photo from U.H. Hilo
NASA’S AMES RESEARCH CENTER AND UNIVERSITY OF HAWAIʻI-HILO  have completed an 18-day field deployment using terrain in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park that is similar to terrain on the planet Mars. The goal is to prepare for human and robot exploration of Mars in the future. The terrain for the simulation is located around Mauna Ulu.
    A youtube video on the exercise poses the question, “Can astronauts test drive a mission to Mars here on Earth?” See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OM-SWMmrOsk
Using terrain in Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park to simulate Mars,
a University of Hawaiʻi-Hilo and NASA crew set up communications.
 Photo from NASA’s Ames Research Center
     The mission group, called Biologic Analog Science Association with Lava Terrains - BASALT, included a science team set up at Kīlauea Military Camp and an extra-vehicular field crew at Mauna Ula. The groups interacted via simulated Mars mission communication delays that ranged from five to 15 minutes in length one-way. The effort was to help identify operational concepts and capabilities that enable science and discovery when humans explore Mars – the red planet nearest Earth. This was the second BASALT exercise for this program.
     U.H. Hilo participants included geology students Kyla Defore, Colin Milosoroff, Ashley Garnett and Michael Baily; physics and astronomy students Niki Thomas and Felicity Cross; and marine science and physics student Brittany Fuemmeler. U.H. Hilo geology alumni Sarah Benner and Brendan McQuillan also participated along with U.H. physics and astronomy instructors John Hamilton and Marc Roberts.
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Prepping for Mars exploration around Moaʻula,
with U.H. Hilo and NASA team.
Photo from NASA’s Ames Research Center
CLIMATE CHANGE IS TAKEN SERIOUSLY by Hawaiʻi state and county government, according to two state and one county official who spoke at a recent forum held by the county Department of Research & Development.
     Bruce Anderson, head of the state Department of Land & Natural Resources Aquatic Resources Division, weighed in. He reported on climate change evidence in the rising temperature of ocean waters, saying sealife is heavily impacted. He reported that approximately half the corals in West Hawaiʻi died in the year 2014-2015. Statewide, 90 percent of corals bleached in 2015 – the  worst recorded Hawaiʻi coral bleaching ever.
    The bleaching phenomenon has been widely reported by the international press, as not only a threat to ocean life but a threat to Hawaiʻi Island tourism which depends on beautiful corals and sealife for snorkeling visitors. The Guardian reported on the bleaching, quoting the Director of the Hawaiʻi Institute on Marine Biology “comparing dead coral reef to a city reduced to ruble.”
   West Hawaiʻi Today, reported that the recent county forum drew the state Aquatic Resources chief to say, “We really can’t do a whole lot about world temperature changes. Let’s face it, we’re on a trajectory that will probably continue as it is for at least a decade or two, even if we can start dramatically reducing emissions.”
Coral bleaching documentation along the west coast of Hawaiʻi Island.
Photo form The Nature Conservancy
      Reporter Max Dible wrote that Anderson talked about helping corals through allowing marine life to flourish. “Anderson said creating marine reserves, limiting take on certain species and addressing sedimentation concerns will be key to sustaining corals at what may prove a historical tipping point for marine ecosystems.”
     Dible also quoted Scott Glenn, director of the state Office of Environmental Quality Control. Dible reported that Glenn “said the consensus approach has been to bite off little pieces of the complex problem one at a time, starting with what is already known.” According to the West Hawaiʻi Today story, Glenn talked about state long-term planning, given existing building codes and emergency preparation for such expected disasters as hurricanes. Glenn said, “The idea is applying a climate lens. We look at what we have now, what’s existing, and say if we looked at this from a climate change point of view, does it work? And if it doesn’t, why not? And what can we tweak about it to help make it work? And then, by doing that, we’ll also figure out what do we not have any legislative cover for?”
Ocean water temperatures can be seen daily at a NOAA website
http://coralreefwatch.noaa.gov/satellite/bleaching5km/images_current/cur_b05kmnn_sst_wnw.gif
    According to the Gible story, “Glenn said the approach to combating climate change is two-pronged: Mitigation to reduce and eventually eliminate carbon emissions is first, followed by adaption, or figuring out how to live in a world reformed by human-induced climate change.” Glenn referred to the state's Act 234 aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions and Act 283, setting climate change adaptation priority guidelines to be meshed with overall state planning.
    The West Hawaiʻi Today story also quoted John DeFries, who heads the county Department of Research & Development. DeFries said the Hawaiian Islands must unite with the roughly 175,000 other islands and 600 million islanders around the world to create a coalition and thereby an international voice on the subject of climate change. “If islands are going to have a voice at the international policy level, we’re going to have to unite,” he said. “Islands contribute the least amount to climate change and will be the first to be impacted. Our motivation is very different than those on the continent.”
See more at westhawaiitoday.com.
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Family members and friends remembered over Thanksgiving weekend
 with a Floating Lanterns Ceremony at Punaluʻu Medicine Pond, sponsored
by Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association. Photo by Dr. Dexter Hayes
THE MEDICINE POND AT PUNALUʻU was the site of the sixth annual Floating Lanterns ceremony over Thanksgiving weekend. Sponsored by Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association, it featured a gathering of people to honor their loved ones who have died. They launched rafts with lights into the pond with decorated sails with drawings and written messages. They enjoyed a potluck together, Taiko drumming, hula, a digital presentation about loved ones and past lantern ceremonies, and tunes from  local musicians. The annual event is held each Saturday after Thanksgiving.
     For Kaʻū Rural Health Community Association activities and education all year long, see https://krhcai.com/
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Taiko Drumming honored loved ones at the
Floating Lantern Ceremony.
Photo by Dr. Dexter Hayes
KAʻŪ FOOD PANTRY will be open to distribute food this Tuesday, Nov. 29 at St. Jude’s Church in Ocean View from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. 

WINTER CRAFTS FOR KEIKI will be offered this Wednesday, Nov. 30 from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m at Pāhala Community Center, for grades K-8. 928-3102.

REGISTER FOR UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I VULCAN VOLLEYBALL CLINIC to be held this Thursday, Dec. 1 at the new Kaʻū District Gym. The clinic, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. is for youth five to 14 years of age. The clinic is expected to feature Vulcan and Trojan volleyball star Marley Strand-Nicholaisen and other Vulcan players who just finished their season. All participants must have a parent sign the Dept. of Parks & Recreation release of claims form and the HI-PAL permission Release Form. Court shoes or rubber sole shoes are required. To register, call Pāhala Community Center at 928-3102 or 854-7316. Community police Officer Blaine Morishita is also helping through the Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League and can be reached at 936-7192.

DEADLINE FOR THE ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM is this Friday, Dec. 2. The tournament will be held at the new Kaʻū District Gym, Dec. 9-11 with opportunities for adults and youth of all ages. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. Cost is $10 per person with five players maximum per team. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To sign up or donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858.

Pāhala's Christmas parade is Sunday, Dec. 11.
Photo by Julia Neal
PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE welcomes community groups, churches, sports teams coffee farmers, classic vehicle drivers and more to travel through the village on Sunday, Dec. 11. The parade, in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters. Participants begin gathering at the old Pāhala Armory at noon and the parade starts at 1 p.m. The parade ends at the Catholic Church on Pikake Street for refreshments. Organizer for almost four decades is Eddie Andrade. For more information, call Andrade at 928-0808.

FRIEND-RAISER IS NĀʻĀLEHU ELEMENTARY SCHOOL’S Winter Fest theme for Saturday. Dec. 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. “Make New Friends,” declares the poster, which also reports on opportunities to enjoy shave ice, drinks, hot dogs – all for $1. Games are 50 cents. Also featured is a bounce house, raffle, bake sale, splash booth, jail, face painting and information vendors. Winter Fest is sponsored by the Nāʻālehu School Council. Anyone wishing to donate prize items or make a monetary donation should contact Nāʻālehu Elementary vice-principal Christina Juan or student council adviser Amberly Keohuloa at 323-4000.

Susan Jennings won a first
place ribbon for her art on
a Hawaiian gourd.
DEADLINE FOR THE DIRECTORY, to sign up for listings and advertising for businesses, community groups, churches and agencies is Dec. 15. The annual business and community resource guide is sponsored by Kaʻū Chamber of Commerce and produced by The Kaʻū Calendar. It includes photography and art by Kaʻū residents, a calendar of events, listings and feature stories including winners of the recent Beauty of Kaʻū art show, sponsored by the Chamber.
     The Directory raises scholarship money for students from Kaʻū throughout their higher education in trades, college and university studies. Printed each January, 7,500 copies of The Directory are distributed throughout Kaʻū and Volcano. To sign up, contact geneveve.fyvie@gmail.com.

CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY holiday exhibit daily through Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., at Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Featured at Christmas in the Country is the 17th Annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit, with prizes awarded for the best wreaths. To participate, contact Emily Weiss at 967-8222 or gallery@volcanoartcenter.org. Free; park entrance fees apply.

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Sunday, November 27, 2016

Kaʻū News Briefs Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016

Earth Matters farm at Kama`oa and South Point Roads hosted the chairs of the Agriculture Committees of the state House
 of Representatives and state Senate over Thanksgiving weekend for a Hawai`i Farmers Union United meeting.
  Photo from Earth Matters
TWO TOP AGRICULTURE LEADERS IN THE STATE LEGISLATURE met over the Thanksgiving weekend at Earth Matters Farm on South Point Road to listen to ideas about the future of farming in Hawaiʻi. Sen. Mike Gabbard, Chair of the state Senate Committee on Agriculture, and Rep. Richard Creagan, new Chair of the state House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture, listened to Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United members talk about the state Department of Agriculture's anemic funding.
     While chefs, health and agricultural educators, and numerous policy makers name  growing food locally as an important sustainability and security goal, funding of the state ag department is less than one half of one percent (.0378 percent) of the state budget. More than 100 jobs at the state ag department remain unfilled, including inspectors that help to keep out invasive species and disease from importation. The farmers and legislators called for more funding for the ag department.
      Gabbard and Creagan said they look forward to a good working relationship with Scott Enright, the chair of the state Board of Agriculture and Director of the state Department of Agriculture. They also talked about more direct funding to farmers to help control the coffee berry borer and little fire ants. Farmers talked about making more land and more education available, said Kaʻū President of the Farmers Union, Greg Smith.
       Ken Love, Executive Director of the Hawaiʻi Tropical Fruit Growers, talked about Japanese government providing young farmers some $35,000 a year salary for five years to help establish farms. For greenhouses, the national government puts up 50 percent and the local prefectural governments about 20 percent for new farmers. “It shows the Japanese are really dedicated to their agriculture and to growing food,” said Love.
Sen. Mike Gabbard, Kaʻū Farmers Union President
Greg Smith and Rep. Richard Creagan.
Photo by Steve Sakala
     In Hawaiʻi, as evident at the Farmers Union meeting, said Love, “It is obvious things are starting to coalesce to elevate the level of agriculture in the state.” The three leaders in the legislature and state administration, Gabbard, Creagan and Enright, “are helping usher in a new era of agriculture in Hawaiʻi,” said Love.
      Nancy Redfeather, of the Kohala Center, talked about the farm-to-school movement to allow schools to make more direct purchases of food from local farms. Making agriculture part of the curriculum from elementary school through university is a Kohala Center goal. Redfeather advocated for farmer education through schools, community groups and government.
      John Replogle, a backyard farmer, who works for The Nature Conservancy, discussed the large amount of talk about raising food compared to the small amount of food actually being produced. Replogle, who grew up in Kaʻū and worked in ranching for decades, talked about making more state lands available to small farmers.
    Steve Sakala, President of the Kona Chapter of Hawaiʻi Farmers Union, said keeping out invasive species and pushing them back, once here, remains a major problem. He pointed to the continuing onslaught of coffee berry borers, which likely arrived in bags of imported coffee. He also talked about truth-in-labeling efforts at the legislature to protect regional coffee brands, so buyers understand how much Kona or Kaʻū coffee, for example, is in the bag. Legislation could also require labeling to reveal the origin and amount of imported coffee mixed with the local brand.
       Sakala said land security remains a big issue and pointed out that one of the most successful, largest organic operations on the island, Robb Farm, is moving to Oregon because the farmer  can’t find land security. “We need to retain the great farmers we do have. and train new farmers for the future,” Sakala said
    Hemp was mentioned among the farmers who noted that other states are making great strides in growing it for fiber and other – non-marijuana uses. “We don’t want another year to get hemp permits. We want to grow this Spring,” Sakala told The Kaʻū Calendar.
   Others attending the meeting included Ted Feinstein, new county administrator for College of Tropical Agriculture & Human Resources; Gabriel Howearts, of Seeds of Change; and Bob Schaffer, advocate for re-promoting recycling, mulch and efficient use of green waste. See https://hfuuhi.org.

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HAWAI‘I FARMERS UNION UNITED has new grants from the state Department of Agriculture and Kamehameha Schools for trials and demonstrations for sustainable agriculture. President Vince Mina said yesterday that Korean Natural Farming practices will also be supported. Mina reported that the statewide convention, held this year at OK Farms in Hilo, will be held on Oʻahu next year, Oct. 6, 7 and 8. During the convention, the National Farmers Union is expected to deliver a charter for the Hawaiʻi Farmers Union chapter. Mina said it will mark the first new charter for a state in 17 years. The organization in Hawaiʻi has about 700 members and is the fastest growing Farmers Union in the country, he said. Mina said he is hoping for 1,000 members soon. To join see https://hfuuhi.org.
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Elizabeth Miller with her art at Volcano Village Artist Hui
show and sale which wraps up today. Photo by Ron Johnson
30TH ANNUAL VOLCANO VILLAGE ARTISTS HUI SHOW & SALE wraps up  today from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Volcano Village. Gallerygoers are invited to meet the artists in their studios located in Volcano. Artworks will be on display and available for purchase in a variety of media including pottery, raku, hand-blown art glass, sculpture, jewelry, and fiber art as well as photographs, paintings, drawings, metal work, quilts, and block prints. Maps to and galleries. 
     A special drawing for pieces contributed by each of the artists will be held on the final day of the tour.
     For more information, call 987-3472 or 985-7487. Maps to the artists’ studios are available at local businesses and galleries in the Volcano and at: www.VolcanoVillageArtistsHui.com. 987-3472987-3472

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CHRISTMAS IN THE COUNTRY holiday exhibit daily through Jan. 2 from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., at  Volcano Art Center Gallery in Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Featured at Christmas in the Country is the 17th Annual Invitational Wreath Exhibit, with prizes awarded for the best wreaths. To participate, contact Emily Weiss at 967-8222 or gallery@volcanoartcenter.org. Free; park entrance fees apply.  

REGISTRATION IS OPEN FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF HAWAI‘I VULCAN VOLLEYBALL CLINIC to be held this Thursday, Dec. 1 at the new Kaʻū District Gym. The clinic,  from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. is for youth five to 14 years of age. The clinic is expected to feature Vulcan and Trojan volleyball star Marley Strand-Nicholaisen and other Vulcan players who just finished their season.
    All participants must have a parent sign the Dept. of Parks & Recreation release of claims form and the HI-PAL permission Release Form. Court shoes or rubber sold shoes are required. To register, call Pāhala Community Center at 928-3102 or 854-7316. Community police Officer Blaine Morishita is also helping through the Hawaiʻi Isle Police Activities League and can be reached at 936-7192.
Sports clinics and tournaments are open to the public at the
new Kaʻū District Gym. Photo by Ron Johnson
DEADLINE FOR THE ALYSHA & PETE 3-ON-3 BASKETBALL WINTER JAM is this Friday, Dec. 2. The tournament will be held at the new Kaʻū District Gym, Dec. 9-11 with opportunities for adults and youth of all ages. Age groups are ten and under, 12 and under, 14 and under, boys, girls and co-ed. Men and women are also invited to compete. Cost is $10 per person with five players maximum per team. The tournament raises money to help fund Trojan Senior basketball players Pete Dacalio and Alysha Gustafson to travel to the mainland with coach Jen Makuakane to look at colleges who may provide them with sports scholarships. To sign up or donate, call Summer Dacalio at 498-7336, Pete Dacalio at 498-3518 or Alysha Gustafson at 339-0858
To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter.

Everyone is invited to join in the Pahala Christmas Parade
on Sunday, Dec. 11. Photo by Julia Neal
PĀHALA’S CHRISTMAS PARADE welcomes community groups, churches, sports teams coffee farmers, classic vehicle drivers and more to travel through the village on Sunday, Dec. 11. The parade, in its 38th year, travels through the streets of Pāhala, with Santa and his helpers handing out candy to kids. A traditional stop is Kaʻū Hospital where long term patients come outdoors to see the decorated trucks cars and floats, marching groups and costumed characters.
    Participants begin gathering at the old Pāhala Armory at noon and the parade starts at 1 p.m. The parade ends at the Catholic Church on Pikake Street for refreshments. Organizer for almost four decades is Eddie Andrade. For more information, call Andrade at 928-0808.

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