About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Saturday, Oct. 31, 2015

`Ohi`a Lehua is the topic of a free program at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park's Kahuku Unit tomorrow. Photo from NPS
STATE HEALTH OFFICIALS CANNOT REVEAL information about dengue patients or locations on Hawai`i Island “because the investigation into the source of the mosquito-borne disease is ongoing,” according to Colin M. Stewart, of Hawai`i Tribune-Herald. Stewart reported they think that, since the disease is not endemic to the island, dengue was brought here by a traveler.
Hawai`i health officials think a traveler brought dengue fever to Hawai`i Island
from a country where it is endemic, shown in red. Map from Wikipedia
      “Unfortunately, we cannot pinpoint a place. … It’s so hard to know,” state Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park told Stewart. “We’re not trying to hide anything, we’re just not sure at this point. It’s looking like pretty much a good portion of the Big Island is a potential risk. … I do suspect that there is not one particular hot-spot. We’re looking for a few, at least.”
      Park said mosquitoes tend to stay within 200 yards of where they hatched, and the biggest factor in spread of the disease is movement of humans infected with it.
      Aedes aegypti, the species most likely to spread the disease, is found on the Big Island.
      DOH recommends that those infected stay indoors while recovering to prevent being bitten by mosquitoes that could spread the disease.
      See hawaiitribune-herald.com.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY seeks public comment on its proposal to ban chlorpyrifos from use in agricultural fields some 15 years after the agency banned the pesticide from residential use. The announcement came after a recent court of appeals decisions gave EPA a deadline to take meaningful action on a 2007 legal petition to ban the chemical.
      Chlorpyrifos a crystalline organophosphate insecticide. It was introduced in 1965 by Dow Chemical Company and is known by many trade names, including Dursban and Lorsban. It acts on the nervous system of insects.
Earthjustice Attorney Patti Goldman
      According to EPA, based on its current analysis, “there do not appear to be risks from exposure to chlorpyrifos from food, but, when that exposure is combined with estimated exposure from drinking water in certain watersheds, EPA cannot conclude that the risk from the potential aggregate exposure meets … safety standard.”
      EPA stated that issuing a proposed revocation provides an opportunity for public input prior to any final decision.
      “This is what we have been seeking for years,” said Patti Goldman, the Earthjustice attorney handling the case. “EPA’s and other independent findings show that chlorpyrifos causes brain damage to children and poisons workers and bystanders. At long last, the agency is signaling its intention to protect children, workers and their families by banning this hazardous pesticide. It is imperative that EPA move quickly to protect workers and children by finalizing this important rule.”
      “It’s a step forward on the path to environmental justice,” said Virginia Ruiz of Farmworker Justice. “Farmworkers and their families, who are predominantly poor and majority people of color, bear the brunt of poisonings from pesticides and pesticide drift.”
      To submit comments, see regulations.gov following publication next week. Docket is EPA-HQ-OPP-2015-0653.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY researchers return to the June 27th lava flow that threatened Pahoa last year in the current issue of Volcano Watch
      “One year ago, the now infamous June 27th lava flow was headed toward the middle of Pahoa and threatening to cross the main village road and cut off Hwy 130 for thousands of residents,” the article states. “During this time, the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory was forecasting that, if the flow continued, it could also cut Kahakai Boulevard and overrun Keonepoko Elementary School. 
      “Fortunately, at the same time, the supply of lava from the Pu`u `O`o vent on Kilauea Volcano's East Rift Zone was decreasing. Tiltmeters at the summit of Kilauea were recording a deflationary trend, which suggested that less magma from the summit reservoir was getting to Pu`u `O`o and ultimately, that less lava was reaching the flow front in Pahoa.
      “As a result, the tip of the flow stalled about 155 meters (170 yards) from Pahoa Village Road on Oct. 30, 2014. This was because lava was no longer traveling through the tube all the way to the flow front. The delicate balance of lava supply needed to continue growing the lava tube had tipped to the town’s favor.
      “The stalled front and apparent clogging of the lowermost part of the tube instead resulted in upslope breakouts of lava, spawning numerous surface flows that widened the flow field in the following weeks.
Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists' one-on-one interactions
with Pahoa residents provided up-to-date information
about the June 27th lava flow. Photo from USGS
      “Before the June 27th lava flow became a threat, many people in the Puna District – long-term residents and recent arrivals alike – were unfamiliar with the vocabulary of volcanology. Summit deflation and inflation, lines of steepest descent, lava breakouts and flow advance rates were just abstract concepts initially. But residents quickly became well versed in these terms, making it easier for them to realize the unpredictable nature of slow-moving pahoehoe flows.
      “As the lava flow approached Pahoa, the questions asked by the community were difficult to answer with certainty and required full explanations instead of short sound bites.
      “How far would the flow eventually travel? When will lava arrive at this or that location? How wide will the flow spread? How long will Pu`u `O`o erupt lava into the tube? Is ‘my’ house going to be covered by lava? How will scientists know when the June 27th flow will stop?
      “HVO scientists answered these questions and shared new information about the flow in all kinds of ways. They provided written updates, image, and maps of the flow’s activity, location, and likely flow path(s) on the HVO website (http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov) and responded to hundreds of individual questions by telephone and email through askHVO@usgs.gov.
      “But perhaps most importantly, nearly all of HVO’s staff, at one time or another, participated in dozens of Puna District community meetings that were organized by the Hawai`i County Mayor’s office between Aug. 24, 2014 and Jan. 22, 2015.
      “At these meetings, HVO summarized the flow activity and discussed lava flow behavior, Hawaiian volcanism and volcano hazards through an illustrated slide presentation. Afterwards, HVO staff interacted with residents through one-on-one discussions at map stations set up around the room.
      “Without a doubt, these meetings were vital for HVO scientists, emergency management officials, business leaders, community organizations, elected government representatives and hundreds of residents at a time to listen to each other. Through these interactive discussions, people developed a common language, which helped everyone better understand the flow activity and the ways in which response plans were being developed and implemented. Online broadcasts of the community meetings allowed even more people to listen in.
      “The meetings helped Puna communities to appreciate the challenges and uncertainties HVO scientists faced in trying to forecast lava-flow paths and advance rates. Residents were able to speak directly with scientists, emergency managers and representatives from other government agencies about the lava flow activity and their individual concerns. Everyone was able to learn of plans for the worst-case scenario, all the while hoping for the best possible outcome.
      “The Puna Resiliency Block Party in Pahoa this past weekend was welcomed by HVO scientists as a time to visit once again with Puna residents and to talk about Kilauea’s eruptions and ongoing hazards, as well as Mauna Loa’s recent unrest. It was also a reminder of the ways in which the community meetings helped us develop a common volcano language and understanding. Mahalo Pahoa! We appreciate your resiliency!”
      See hvo.wr.usgs.gov/volcanowatch.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Community Tea-in is a week from today.
Photo from VAC
KA`U RESIDENTS CAN LEARN about the vital role of `ohi`a lehua in native Hawaiian forests, the many forms of the `ohi`a lehua tree and its flower tomorrow. Kahuku Unit of Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park offers a free, easy, one-mile walk at 9:30 a.m. Call 985-6011 for more.

TEA IS THE TOPIC AT TOTUS Awards Community Tea-In, which follows Tea of the United States competition to be held on Wednesday, Nov. 4. The event a week from today, on Saturday, Nov. 7 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., features talks and presentations by professionals in the art and science of tea worldwide, plus an exhibition of TOTUS competition entries.
      Speakers and topics include Bruce Richardson, The Book of Tea’s Influence on Western Art; Jane Pettigrew, The World’s Less Well-Known Tea Growing Regions; Kevin Gascoyne, Talking Terroir and Tea and Scotch Pairing; Selena Ahmed, Tea and the Taste of Climate Change; and Jane Pettigrew and Bruce Richardson, The Social History of Tea in Britain and America.
      All events are held at Volcano Art Center in Volcano Village. Admission is required with preregistration before 12 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 6 at $20 per person and $18 for VAC and Hawai`i Tea Society Members. Tickets may also be purchased at the door at $25 per person or $20 for active VAC and Hawai`i Tea Society members.
      See totus1awards.com and volcanoartcenter.org.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

FOR AFFORDABLE COMPUTER HELP, call John Derry at 936-1872.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for Retail Sales Associate: Full-Time, Competitive Wages, Medical & Dental Plans. Apply at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Call 928-0550 for an appointment.






See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_Oct2015.pdf.



Friday, October 30, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Friday, Oct. 30, 2015

Tiger sharks pup and migrate to the main Hawaiian Islands in the fall, increasing the population during this time of year. See story below. Photo by Albert Kok from Wikipedia
TWO CASES OF DENGUE FEVER are confirmed on Hawai`i Island. The state Department of Health is also investigating four more probable cases of the disease in Hawai`i residents and visitors that were acquired on the island. Further testing and confirmation at the U.S. Center for Disease Control and Prevention is pending. The department sent out a medical advisory to Hawai`i County clinicians yesterday to alert them and urge them to report suspect dengue fever cases.
Aedes aegypti carried dengue fever. Photo from Wikipedia
      “Although dengue is not endemic to Hawai`i, we do have the mosquito species capable of transmitting the disease,” state Epidemiologist Dr. Sarah Park said. “It’s likely an infected traveler infected the local mosquito population, which led to this cluster, so we want the public to be aware of this mosquito-borne disease and the steps they can take to prevent infection.”
      Hawai`i District Health Officer Aaron Ueno said local environmental health assessments have not found significant mosquito activity in the affected area, but the department is conducting mosquito prevention activities such as spraying with consent from property owners.
      Travelers to areas with infected mosquitoes where dengue fever is endemic are at the highest risk of acquiring the disease. Mosquitoes breed in areas of standing water, such as planters, old tires and pet water bowls.
      Hawai`i DOH recommends using mosquito repellents containing 20–30 percent DEET and wearing long sleeves and pants in areas where mosquito-borne disease is a concern.
      For tips on mosquito control, see http://health.hawaii.gov/san/files/2013/06/Vector-mosquitohandout.pdf.
      For more information on dengue fever, see health.hawaii.gov/docd/dib/disease/dengue.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

FOLLOWING THE SEVENTH HUMAN/SHARK encounter in the state this year, Dr. Carl Meyer, of the Hawai`i Institute of Marine Biology, said there are more tiger sharks in water surrounding the main islands now than at other times of the year. “Tiger sharks pup during the fall, and migrations from the northwestern Hawaiian Islands … during this time of year are proven facts. Native Hawaiian oral traditions clearly link the fall months to a risk of shark bites. This traditional knowledge is reflected in our current shark incident statistics.    
      “In recent decades, almost one third of all shark bites in Hawai`i have occurred during the months of October and November. It is also important to remember that shark bites occur in all months of the year in Hawai`i and that the number of encounters at any time of the year is extremely low compared to the number of people in the water.”
U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono
      In December 2013, a tiger shark bit a bodyboarder at the Ninole Horseshoe area of Punalu`u. The 29-year-old Captain Cook man was paddling out for his second session with two friends when a shark knocked him off his board. He received stitches at Ka`u Hospital.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

SEN. MAZIE HIRONO VOTED EARLY this morning to support a budget agreement that removes caps put in place by the Budget Control Act for two years and keeps the country from defaulting on its debt. The measure overwhelmingly passed the Senate 64-35.
      “This bipartisan measure is a reasonable compromise that protects our seniors, keeps our economy on track and takes a number of manufactured crises off the table for two years,” Hirono said. “By removing harmful sequester caps on both military and domestic spending, this legislation is the first step to enacting a National Defense Authorization Act that appropriately supports our military and avoiding a government shutdown in December. While this agreement is not the one I would have written, it is a pathway to negotiating appropriations bills that adequately fund priorities like education, housing and community development, medical research and job creation.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz
SEN. BRIAN SCHATZ VOICED his opposition to the Obama Administration’s announcement that it will deploy a small number of Special Operations Forces to Syria.
      “The Administration’s announcement that it will deploy Special Operations Forces into Syria to combat ISIL marks a major shift in U.S. policy – a shift that is occurring without congressional debate, is unlikely to succeed in achieving our objective of defeating ISIL and instead threatens to embroil the United States in Syria’s civil war and could bring us into direct confrontation with the Russian Federation military and Syrian government forces,” Schatz

 said.
      “In the 16-months since the United States began its participation in the regional fight against ISIL, our military involvement has escalated without a clear sense of how our escalating involvement will achieve our strategic objectives. With ISIL’s control of northern Syria, we cannot reasonably expect that the deployment of Special Operations Forces would be limited in scope or duration.
      “As we have seen from our failed train-and-equip program, U.S. support for moderate Syrian opposition has its limits. Rather than ratchet up our own involvement, we must look for other opportunities to strengthen the coalition’s ability to effectively prosecute the fight against ISIL. 

 “This shift in policy is a strategic mistake. Regardless of my views, the War Powers Resolution requires Congress to debate and authorize the escalation of U.S. military involvement in Syria.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

NATIONAL FIRE PROTECTION ASSOCIATION offers tips on keeping safe this Halloween. 
      When choosing a costume, stay away from billowing or long-trailing fabric. If you are making your own costume, choose material that won’t easily ignite if it comes into contact with heat or flame.
      Provide children with flashlights to carry for lighting or glow sticks as part of their costumes. If your child is wearing a mask, make sure the eye holes are large enough so he/she can see clearly out of it.
      Dried flowers, cornstalks and crepe paper are highly flammable. Keep these and other decorations well away from all open flames and heat sources, including light bulbs and heaters.
      It is safest to use a glow stick or battery-operated candle in a jack-o-lantern. If you use a real candle, use extreme caution. When lighting candles inside jack-o-lanterns, use long fireplace-style matches or a utility lighter. If you choose to use candle decorations, make sure to keep them well attended at all times. Do not leave them near flammable objects or where trick-or-treaters may walk. Remind your children to avoid open flames. Make sure children are watched at all times when candles are lit.
      Remember to keep exits clear of decorations, so nothing blocks escape routes.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Yoga participants at Na`alehu Hongwanji use a variety of props to maintain
alignment and avoid injury. Photo from Stephanie Pepper
IYENGAR YOGA TEACHER Stephanie Pepper now offers Gentle Senior classes on Monday as well as Wednesday from 2:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Na`alehu Hongwangi. Pepper uses props to help students get into proper alignment safely, avoiding injury. All props are provided, and the first class is free. 
      Donations are $10 for 10 classes for participants over 65 and $5 per class for those 65 and under.
      On Wednesdays, Velvet Replogle leads a meditation class for about an hour.

KA`U LIBRARIES CELEBRATE HALLOWEEN this afternoon.
      Na`alehu library holds its Halloween party from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. with goodies, crafts, activities and a costume contest.
      Call 939-2442 for more information.
      Pahala Library’s Halloween Bash is from 2:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event features two Halloween movies, games and a snack-making demonstration.
      For more information, call 928-2015.

KA`U ARTISTS CAN DROP OFF THEIR Beauty of Ka`u entries today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. for the Monday, Nov. 2 through Thursday, Nov. 5 show at CU Hawai`i in Na`alehu.
      See more in ad below, at kauchamber.org, or call Donna Masaniai at 238-0505.

SOUTH SIDE SHAKA’S Restaurant in Na`alehu celebrates Halloween today. Call 929-7404 for more information.

Janice Morimoto
KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S Halloween Party is today from 7 p.m. to 12 p.m. DJ Thomas Ramirez keeps the music going in the Lava Lounge in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Entry is $3 for partiers in costume; $5 without. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.
      Call 967-8371 for more information.

AUNTIE JAN READS ISLAND KINE STORIES a week from today on Friday, Nov. 6, at 1:30 p.m. at Pahala Public & School Library. Janice Morimoto shares humorous folktales, poetry and participatory games from around the world adapted to local style. The program is suitable for ages 5 and older, and parents or caregivers must accompany young children.
      Call 928-2015 for more information.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

FOR AFFORDABLE COMPUTER HELP, call John Derry at 936-1872.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for Retail Sales Associate: Full-Time, Competitive Wages, Medical & Dental Plans. Apply at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Call 928-0550 for an appointment.






See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_October2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.




Thursday, October 29, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Thursday, Oct. 29, 2015

Ka`u High School graduate Marley Strand-Nicolaisen shows her focus playing volleyball for UH-Hilo, as UH President David Lassner, in yellow shirt, watches the Vulcans win their match with Chaminade University. See more below. Photo by Tim Wright
HAWAI`I’S CONGRESSIONAL DELEGATION today praised the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service’s announcement that it will provide a green bean pricing valuation for Hawai`i-grown coffee starting in January 2016. Currently, Hawai`i coffee “farm gate value” is based on parchment rather than green bean. Green bean coffee valuation will more accurately reflect market values and make reporting easier for growers.
A new pricing valuation for Ka`u and all Hawai`i coffees goes into effect
in January 2016. Photo by Geneveve Fyvie
      “Despite achieving global recognition, Hawai`i-grown coffee has long been valued differently than most of the global coffee market,” Rep. Tulsi Gabbard said. “This announcement by the USDA to value Hawai`i coffee in the same way as the global coffee marketplace will better align with global valuation standards, increase the value of Hawai`i-grown coffee and help attract additional research and development funds to support our local coffee farmers and industry. Hawai`i is our nation’s only domestic coffee producer, and this change will help strengthen our coffee industry and increase its potential for growth.”
      Sen. Brian Schatz said, “The USDA currently understates the value of Hawai`i’s coffee crops, which impacts the availability of financing and the importance of coffee to the U.S. economy. This action by the USDA will make it easier for Hawai`i farmers to get loans and to secure federal funding for research and pest control.”
      Sen. Mazie Hirono said, “This is a big win for our coffee farmers and was made possible thanks to members of the Hawai`i agriculture community, who have been working with me on this issue for years, and our ongoing collaboration with the USDA.”
Sens. Schatz and Hirono and Rep. Gabbard
represent Ka`u in U.S. Congress.
      The plan calls for Hawai`i coffee to be valued under a “non-citrus fruits and nuts” model from its current “field crop” model. This shift will allow for a more timely publication of data, with preliminary data published in January and final data published in July. Hawai`i’s coffee stakeholders will be provided with valuable data including bearing acreage, yield, total production, utilized production, average price and value of production on a cherry basis.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

SEN. MAZIE HIRONO, A MEMBER of the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, voted to support the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act. The legislation overwhelmingly passed the Senate 74-21.
      “Embracing the promise and vulnerabilities of the Internet age requires a delicate balance between promoting security online and protecting users’ privacy and Constitutional rights, Hirono said. “The Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act strikes that balance in a number of important ways.
      “This legislation will help prevent cyber attacks by facilitating a common awareness in the cyber realm. When the private sector has a common view of cyber threats and shares cybersecurity information, companies can more effectively defend their networks.
      “And although the privacy provisions should be strengthened further, the voluntary nature of the bill and the cyber threat awareness it would promote are worthy of support. Consumers deserve to know how their information is used, and maintaining Americans’ privacy remains a key priority as we finalize this legislation.”
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

A HUI THAT SUPPORTS CREATING an energy cooperative on Hawai`i Island on Tuesday defended itself against allegations by Hawaiian Electric Co. and Next Era Energy. In a motion to Hawai`i Public Utilities Commission, the merger applicants stated, “Intervenor Party Hawai`i Island Electric Cooperative has sought to introduce into the record evidence concerning plans or proposals for future electric cooperatives in Hawai`i.” The applicants consider such information to be outside the scope of the PUC’s current investigation.

Marco Mangelsdorf
      HIEC responded that it “has not sought to introduce any such proposal that the commission adopt or approve a cooperative model for electric utility service. Further, HIEC is not aware of any cooperative or municipal ownership proposals introduced by other intervenors in this docket.”
      HIEC said, “It is both unnecessary and premature to insist that the commission address the hypothetical introduction of a plan or proposal for cooperative or municipal ownership at this time.”
      In earlier testimony, HIEC Director Marco Mangelsdorf explained the purpose and relevance of HIEC’s evidence regarding the cooperative ownership model. “Given the critical importance of these issues, and the potential long-term, nearly statewide impact of the proposed merger, HIEC believes that, in order to properly and effectively determine the likely impact of the transaction on the public interest and cost to the consumer, the merits of the proposed merger should be examined and evaluated in relation to potential alternatives, including the alternative of a cooperative ownership model,” he said.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

VISITOR ARRIVALS CONTINUE TO REACH record highs, Hawai`i Tourism Authority President and CEO George D. Szigeti reported.
      Visitor arrivals have remained strong for the first nine months of the year, reaching 6.5 million visitors and pacing just slightly above projections. However, growth in spending is beginning to plateau; currently only 2.6 percent ahead of last year, reaching $11.3 billion.
George D. Szigeti
      According to Szigeti, Hawai`i will see a boost in air seats during the fourth quarter. Three new flights from two new carriers begin, pushing total air seats to the state to a record 11.8 million for 2015. Virgin America will begin flying from San Francisco to Honolulu in November and to Kahului in December, and Jin Air, a low-cost carrier from South Korea, will begin service from Seoul to Honolulu in December.
      “It is important for us to collaborate with our marketing and industry partners to ensure there is sufficient demand to support these new flights and all of our existing routes,” Szigeti said.
      HTA expects to see continued growth from core U.S. markets due to lower domestic fuel prices. However, it continues to monitor unstable economic conditions in Canada, Japan and China.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

KA`U HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATE Marley Strand-Nicolaisen, now an outside-hitter for UH-Hilo, led the Lady Vulcans on Wednesday, Oct. 28 to a victory over Chaminade University in five sets. Enjoying the game was UH President Dr. David Lassner. With over 200 kills and over 20 aces so far this season, Stand-Nicolaisen is on Lady Vulcan’s Leader Board.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

KA`U STUDENTS CAN PARTICIPATE in Hawai`i Community College’s first-ever Express Admissions Day on Saturday, Nov. 14 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Manono campus in Hilo and the Palamanui campus in Kona.
Express Admissions Day is Saturday, Nov. 14 at Hawai`i Community
College campuses in Hilo and Kona. Photo from Hawai`i CC
      Express Admissions Day is the fast way to apply for the Spring 2016 semester. Prospective students can complete an application; receive their MyUH Student Number; schedule the next steps in the enrollment process, such as academic advising, orientation and placement testing; and have their questions answered by Hawai`i CC representatives.
      “Express Admissions Day is designed to make enrollment as easy as possible,” said Jason Cifra, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at Hawai`i CC.
      The deadline to apply for the Spring 2016 semester is Dec. 1, and classes start on Jan. 11.
      Attendees of Express Admissions Day can enter to win a scholarship, and current Hawai`i CC students who bring a friend can also enter to win a scholarship.
      For more information, call 934-2800 (East Hawai`i) or 969-8816 (West Hawai`i), or see hawaii.hawaii.edu.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

TODAY AT 3:30 P.M. IS THE DEADLINE to enter fruit and vegetable creations in Pahala Library’s food decorating contest. Winners will be announced during the library’s Halloween Bash tomorrow from 2:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. The event also features two Halloween movies, games and a snack-making demonstration.
      For more information, call 928-2015.

NA`ALEHU LIBRARY HOLDS ITS Halloween party tomorrow from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. with goodies, crafts, activities and a costume contest.
      Call 939-2442 for more information. 

KA`U ARTISTS CAN DROP OFF THEIR Beauty of Ka`u entries tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. for the Monday, Nov. 2 through Thursday, Nov. 5 show at CU Hawai`i in Na`alehu.
      See more in ad at right, at kauchamber.org, or call Donna Masaniai at 238-0505.

SOUTH SIDE SHAKA'S Restaurant in Na`alehu celebrates Halloween tomorrow. Call 929-7404 for more information.

KILAUEA MILITARY CAMP’S Halloween Party is tomorrow from 7 p.m. to 12 p.m. DJ Thomas Ramirez keeps the music going in the Lava Lounge in Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. Entry is $3 for partiers in costume; $5 without. Open to authorized patrons and sponsored guests. Park entrance fees apply.
      Call 967-8371 for more information.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

FOR AFFORDABLE COMPUTER HELP, call John Derry at 936-1872.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for Retail Sales Associate: Full-Time, Competitive Wages, Medical & Dental Plans. Apply at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Call 928-0550 for an appointment.



See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_October2015.pdf.
See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.




Wednesday, October 28, 2015

Ka`u News Briefs Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2015

Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park warns motorists that nene, which are at their most vulnerable now, during breeding and nesting season, blend in with their natural environment and hard to spot. See more below. NPS Photo by Kathleen Misajon
A NEW ERA FOR MANAGEMENT of 5,800 coastal, ranch and coffee farm acres in Ka`u is expected to begin with Colorado-based company Resource Land Holdings, LLC closing on the purchase from Lehman Brothers Holdings in early November.
Resource Land Holdings is expected to close next month on 5,800 acres of Ka`u
coastal, coffee and ranch lands. Photo by Julia Neal
      The land, once the property of C. Brewer and its sugar company in Ka`u, is coveted by preservation groups involved in conserving the Ka`u Coast, ranchers who have cattle high above the shore of Waikapuna and coffee farmers who have developed small businesses and a new industry in Ka`u during the last two decades. All three groups are hoping that the land can be acquired from Resource Land Holdings for protection of natural resources, ranching and coffee and other agriculture.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

BRENDA IOKEPA-MOSES IS EXPECTED to assume the position of Ka`u land manager when Resource Land Holdings, LLC closes on the purchase of 5,800 acres in coffee, coastal and ranch properties from Lehman Brothers Holdings in November. She said she is serving as an interim consultant for RLH until the land transfer closes. Iokepa-Moses, a Pahala resident for more than 20 years, has a long history of working with farmers and ranchers on the land formerly owned by C. Brewer sugar company. “I started my career in Ka`u with C. Brewer and was part of the team that helped the displaced sugar workers retain a license for five acres free of rent for five years,” she said. “After the close of the plantation, I worked for WWK Holdings, which purchased some 2,000 acres that these very same farmers occupied.” She praised the famers who became successful with their award-winning Ka`u Coffee “despite the uncertainty of their future.”
Brenda Iokepa-Moses
      After working with WWK, Iokepa-Moses transferred to a job with Olson Trust under the land division, working with John Cross on land leasing to open up property to more coffee farmers as well as other diversified agriculture ventures. She worked in many different capacities for the Trust, the latest position at Ka`u Coffee Mill Visitors Center on Wood Valley Road in Pahala.
      Iokepa-Moses said, “I am really excited to work with new landowners in securing long-term licenses for our hard-working coffee farmers who have been tossed around since the close of the plantation. Over the last 20 years, I have built relationships with the Ka`u farmers. I know them personally and understand their hardships.
      “I will work hard to help them secure a future not only for themselves but also the next generation of Ka`u coffee farmers,” she promised.
      Iokepa-Moses also serves as President of the Hawai`i Agricultural Conservation District, President of Ka`u Farm Bureau, Chair of Ka`u Soil and Water Conservation Board, and is a member of the Hawai`i County Board of Water Supply, `O Ka`u Kakou and the Ka`u Coffee Festival Committee. She is a retired member of the U.S. Army Reserves.
      John Cross, of Olson Trust, who is another Brewer veteran, is also signed up as a consultant with Resource Land Holdings.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

Ka`u CDP staff and Steering Committee members are all smiles after voting to send the final document to the county. From left to right: Leina`ala Enos, Ron Whitmore, Simon Torres, Ron Ebert and Isobel Donovan, Michelle Galimba, Loren Heck, Patti Barry, Nalani Parlin, John Cross and Bob DaMate. Photo by Ron Johnson
ALMOST PAU WAS THE MESSAGE on the celebratory cake at yesterday’s meeting of the Ka`u Community Development Plan Steering Committee. The committee approved final revisions to the draft Ka`u CDP and voted to send the document to the county.
      After seven years of work, Project Manager Ron Whitmore thanked committee members for their service to the county and community. He noted the “thoughtful, diverse and productive conversations” that led to the final document. He said the committee “kept the county’s feet to the fire” as the project progressed to this “major milestone” in the process. 
      The majority of committee members voted to forward the document to the county. No one voted not to forward it, and Ron Ebert, of Punalu`u, was the only member to abstain.
      Committee member Michelle Galimba, representing Ka`alaiki and Honu`apo, said, “It is a good document.”
      Loren Heck, of Ocean View, said of last night’s meeting, “It’s easy to have a good, positive meeting when there’s so much good, positive preparation.”
      Non-voting member John Cross said, “We have agreed to disagree, and that’s good” and said some of the policies in the document “will raise eyebrows.” 
      The committee enjoyed a dinner of roast pork, rice, sushi and salad after adjourning.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

A trio of nene enjoy the view at Jaggar Museum.
NPS Photo by Michael Szoenyi
IT’S BREEDING AND NESTING SEASON for nene, and park visitors are urged to drive with caution and to give the endangered Hawaiian goose space.
       Nene, the largest native land animal in Hawai`i, are present in the park and other locations on Hawai`i Island year-round, but this seasonal window is vital for their survival, and it’s also when they are the most vulnerable to being run over by drivers. While getting ready to nest, the geese are focused on eating and often forage from dawn to dusk. They blend in with their surroundings, and in low-light periods, they are especially hard for motorists to spot.
      “One of the most important things people can do is give nene space,” said Kathleen Misajon, Nene Recovery Program manager at Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park. “This means not approaching them and never feeding them. Nene are easily habituated to food hand-outs from people and vehicles, and these birds often fall victim to vehicle strikes.”
       Nene crossing signs posted throughout the park call attention to roadside areas frequented by nene. These include sections of Hwy 11, Crater Rim Drive and Chain of Craters Road. Motorists are urged to use extra caution in signed nene crossing areas and to obey posted speed limits.
       Most nene fly between nighttime roosts and diurnal feeding grounds. The female builds a simple ground nest and incubates one to four eggs for a full month while her devoted mate acts as a sentry. Shortly after they hatch, goslings leave the nest and follow their parents to their traditional foraging grounds, which can be more than a mile away. At 14 weeks, nene can fly, and along with their parents, they join large flocks where they meet their relatives and potential mates. They usually mate for life.
      See nps.gov/havo/photosmultimedia/nene_psa.htm for more information. To report nene on the road in the park, call 985-6001. Outside the park, call 974-4221.
       For more information on nene and other endangered species the park works to protect, see the new On the Brink of Extinction brochure posted at nps.gov/havo/learn/nature/onthebrink.htm.
      Read comments, add your own, and like The Ka`u Calendar News Briefs on Facebook.

KAUAHA`AO CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH in Wai`ohinu will be having a fundraising bazaar on Saturday, Nov. 21 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and invites individuals, school/athletic groups, clubs and churches to be vendors at the flea market. The church is located on the corner of Hwy11, Kamaoa Road and Pinao Street, just above Wong Yuen Store and Gas Station.
      The charge for a 10’x10’ vendor space is $10. Vendors need to bring their own 10’x10’ tent, tables, chairs and, if needed, a generator. Vendors can sell anything except hot food and plate lunches.
      The church will be selling Kalau Pig plate lunches and containers of Kalua Pig plus hot dogs, baked goods and more. There will be entertainment throughout the day.
      For more information and to reserve a vendor space, call Walter Wong Yuen at 928-8039 after 7 p.m.

Overall winner will grace the cover
of next year's Directory.
LEGAL AID IS AVAILABLE TOMORROW from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Ocean View Community Center. Call 939-7033 for more information.

BEAUTY OF KA`U ENTRY DROP-OFF is Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. for the Monday, Nov. 2 through Thursday, Nov. 5 art show at CU Hawai`i in Na`alehu.
      See kauchamber.org or call Donna Masaniai at 238-0505 for more information.

KA`U RESIDENTS CAN HELP Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park and the `aina by cutting invasive himalayan ginger on park trails Friday from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. Loppers and gloves are provided. Participants are encouraged to wear long sleeve shirts, long pants and close-toed shoes.
      Work is often in the shade of the forest with sweet sounds of native honeycreepers like `apapane, `amakihi and a`ma`o above. Water, snacks, rain gear and sun protection are recommended.
      This project is open to the public, and no reservations are required. Interested people can stop by Kilauea Visitor Center to get directions and more information. The hike is around a one mile, moderate round trip into Kilauea caldera down Halem`auma`u Trail. The hike involves walking over rough, uneven terrain on a dirt and rock path, with up to a 400' elevation change.

SUPPORT OUR SPONSORS AT PAHALAPLANTATIONCOTTAGES.COM AND KAUCOFFEEMILL.COM. KA`U COFFEE MILL IS OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.

FOR AFFORDABLE COMPUTER HELP, call John Derry at 936-1872.

NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for Retail Sales Associate: Full-Time, Competitive Wages, Medical & Dental Plans. Apply at Ka`u Coffee Mill. Call 928-0550 for an appointment.




See kaucalendar.com/KauCalendar_October2015.pdf.


See kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.swf
and kaucalendar.com/Directory2015.pdf.