About The Kaʻū Calendar

Ka`u, Hawai`i, United States
A locally owned and run community newspaper (www.kaucalendar.com) distributed in print to all Ka`u District residents of Ocean View, Na`alehu, Pahala, Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park, Volcano Village and Miloli`i on the Big Island of Hawai`i. This blog is where you can catch up on what's happening daily with our news briefs. This blog is provided by The Ka`u Calendar Newspaper (kaucalendar.com), Pahala Plantation Cottages (pahalaplantationcottages.com), Local Productions, Inc. and the Edmund C. Olson Trust.

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Kaʻū News Briefs Saturday, June 16, 2018

On the National Register of Historic Sites, Kīlauea Lodge has a new owner, Highway West Vacations,
of Irvine, California, which also owns inns, lodges, and RV resorts in Oregon, Washington, California,
Utah, and Colorado. Photo from Kīlauea Lodge
HISTORIC KĪLAUEA LODGE HAS A NEW OWNER. Highway West Vacations, an Irvine, California based company of lodges, inns, and recreational vehicle resorts near national parks in the Western United States, began operating the property on Wednesday.
     Pacific Business News reports that Kīlauea Lodge and its 11.2 acres sold through MacArthur Sotheby’s International Realty and Sofos Realty Corp., drawing a purchase price of $3.95 million. Highway West aims to add cottages, "while respecting the integrity of the historic Kīlauea Lodge," reports PBN.
     In 1988, Albert and Lorna Jeyte launched the transformation of YMCA Camp Hale O Aloha into their Kīlauea Lodge restaurant, banquet and meeting hall, 12 guest rooms, and four cottages. Honoring the history of the
Fireplace of Friendship at Kīlauea Lodge,
acquired by a hui that operates inns near
National Parks. Photo from Kīlauea Lodge
building, constructed in 1938, it was placed on the National Register of Historic Sites in 2013. Under the Jeytes' ownership, Kīlauea Lodge became known for its gourmet food, koa furnishings, and its stone fireplace with its many plaques from Rotary Clubs from around the world. Its meeting room hosted Rotary Club and many other groups and events.
     Scott Lewis, Highway West’s portfolio manager, told PBN, “We definitely plan to honor the existing design and architecture of the Kīlauea Lodge.
     “We want to be good curators of its history. We’re exploring the opportunity to potentially expand the property with the addition of some unique cabins and cottages to the site. We’ll make some renovations to it; we want to hold true to the existing charm of the property."
     Lewis told PBN writer Janis L. Magin, “We don’t plan to come in and add a huge amount of units. There’s certainly enough demand in this market, we think there’s opportunity to add perhaps 10 units.”
     He told PBN that the contract was in place to buy Kīlauea Lodge before Kīlauea volcanic activity began in May. With the closing of most of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park until volcanic conditions improve, business in Volcano Village has dropped dramatically. Reservations at the lodge and restaurant, which were usually full, fell off. However, Lewis said he expects the high occupancy rate to return, particularly when the Volcano section of the national park reopens.

The PUC praised HELCO for
keeping the electricity online in
all but places overrun or isolated by
lava. Photo from HELCO
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THE LOSS OF PUNA GEOTHERMAL VENTURE ELECTRICITY, when lava threatened and flowed onto its facility, drew Gov. David Ige to meet with the state Public Utilities Commission and producers of electricity to come up with rapid response actions to replace its production.
     Puna Geothermal provided about a quarter of all of the energy used on the island, and more than half of the renewable energy produced on the island. Its loss, until more renewable energy comes online, will lead to higher electric bills and use of fossil fuel, which contributes to air pollution, according to the PUC, which issued a statement Friday.
     Randy Iwase, Chair of the PUC, commended Hawaiian Electric Light Co. for its response to the lava flow, in maintaining most electrical services on the island. He said that HELCO and other Hawaiian Electric Companies will accelerate bringing more renewable energy projects online, as well as expedite additional rooftop solar and storage, and demand response and other energy efficiency programs.
     HELCO President Jay Ignacio said, “Hawaiʻi Electric Light and the other Hawaiian Electric Companies appreciate the community’s and Governor’s
Lava as it approached the Puna Geothermal wells in lower Puna.
Photo from Civil Defense
support in giving us the chance to process more pending renewable and energy saving projects that will help our customers and the environment in this time of need.”
     The PUC also emphasized: "As the quickest and cheapest grid resource, energy efficiency is a natural choice for mitigating the reliability and energy cost impacts of the lava flow. Hawai‘i Energy will ramp up energy efficiency program offerings and incentives for projects on Hawai‘i Island."
     "Demand response is another resource that can increase reserve margins" for HELCO and save money for customers. HELCO and Hawai‘i Energy will work together "to enable customers to take advantage of energy efficiency and demand response options, with an initial focus on large commercial and industrial customers," stated the PUC. See the complete PUC statement.

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THE REGULAR HALEMAʻUMAʻU EXPLOSIONS in the crater received some new language today. Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense reported: "Hawaiian Volcano Observatory reports an explosive event at Halemaʻumaʻu Crater at 10:22 this morning.  The explosion had the energy of a 5.3 magnitude earthquake."
Click on the image for the live Webcam on the tower at Hawaiian Volcano
Observatory on the edge of Halemaʻumaʻu Crater. USGS image
     This message differs from headlines in media reporting the explosion as "No tsunami expected after another strong earthquake shakes Kīlauea." In the past, some of the headlines have indicated the explosions are earthquakes that shake the whole island. The explosive events are felt near the crater where walls are falling in, plugging up the "chimney" where steam pressure throws up rocks, and lava particles. During Saturday morning's seismic event, inward slumping of the rim and walls of Halema‘uma‘u continued in response to ongoing subsidence. A section of dark-colored wall rock detached and dropped downward into the crater, reported Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.
     Civil Defense updated its estimate on lava coverage - now 5,918 acres and reported today that Fissure 8 in the lower East Rift Zone remains very active, with 170 foot tall lava fountains, and is
A section of dark-colored wall detached and fell into
Halemaʻumaʻu Crater Crater this morning, June 16. USGS photo
flowing into the ocean at Kapoho. Fissure 16 is oozing lava and is being monitored closely. "This activity means volcanic gas emissions remain very high. Winds are expected to continue to bring VOG to the central, southern, and western parts of Hawaiʻi Island," says Civil Defense.
     Civil Defense Authorities are advising people of the following for information on the East Rift Zone eruption: "There is no immediate threat. Please only act on information obtained from agencies responsible for monitoring the volcano."

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BREATHE SLOW WITH THE FLOW urges Martin Blackwell in a new video. Blackwell – who says he is a trauma, grief, and crisis therapist with experience in licensed clinics – is busy providing comfort and assurance to folks who were on the verge of panic, after being displaced by lava flows and fountains in lower Puna. “Breathe slow… with the flow,” Blackwell’s business card reads. “Let excess fear and tension go.” His story is featured on Big Island Video News.
     Blackwell's own home was lost to Madame Pele in Kapoho. He watched it burn in a video released by Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense that was recorded from a fire department helicopter.
Martin Blackwell's message of an attitude of gratitude,
regardless of circumstances, persists - even after his home was
destroyed by lava. Photo from Big Island Video News
     In the video, he says, “My friend just sent me this video of my house being filmed by Civil Defense, as it was being engulfed by Pele… It seems almost surreal, but it is oh so very real. I feel only a slight sadness, but rather than focus on what was lost, I feel mostly a deep sense of gratitude at not being in the house when the lava came. And for the decade that I spent in the most amazing tropical paradise, swimming in the volcanically-heated fresh water ocean-front Champagne Pond, and in the waves of change in Kapoho Bay.
     Speaking to whomever watches the video, he said “I will let you settle into now, being empowered to choose to feel a deep sense of gratitude no matter what is happening to you in your life, and always being able to choose hope for the future waves of change that will be flowing our way together.”
     Blackwell documented his experience in a video Pele’s Ultimate Lesson = Instant Aloha Breathe Slow With the Flow Let Gopublished to YouTube. Blackwell said he hopes it will become a resource for “Optimum Stress – Crisis Management for the Lava Flow and all Traumas.”
     Blackwell says he leads “breathe slow with the flow” stress management groups on Monday evenings at 7:30 p.m. and Friday mornings at 8 a.m. at the Pāhoa Community Center near the Red Cross shelter.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

MARINE CORPS VETERAN ARTIST IN RESIDENCE at Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, Nicholas Collier, showcases his photography at the Kahuku Visitor Contact Station this Friday, June 22, at 10 a.m. The event is free to the public. Visitors will find the Kahuku Unit on the mauka (uphill) side of Highway 11 near mile marker 70.5.
     "More than likely this will be a show of photographs, but I wouldn't write off having the inclusion of a sculpture or two," Collier said. "My first love is working three-dimensionally."
     Kīlauea has been erupting continuously since 1983, but the most recent eruptions and accompanying earthquakes have caused the indefinite closure of two-thirds of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park since May 11. However, that's not an obstacle for Collier, says the announcement from HVNP.
Nicholas Collier, Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park first-ever
U.S. Veteran Artist in Residence, poses next to his
homemade, old-fashioned box camera. NPS photo
     Collier said, "A successful residency is one that inspires and creates growth. It's about a response to a time, place, and situation. A circular cycle completed."
     A Marine veteran, photographer, sculptor, and installation artist, Collier's path to the artist's vocation might have been true, but it wasn't exactly straight, says the announcement. Mid-way through a degree in graphic design, he quit school to join the Marines. When he returned, he changed his studies to a studio arts program, earning a bachelor of fine arts from George Mason University in 2012 and a master of fine arts from Florida State University in 2016. Having long worked in a variety of sculptural practices, he has turned to portrait and landscape photography, sometimes using his homemade, old-fashioned box camera to help create a fascinating mix of the documentary and the creative within a photograph, says the announcement.
     Collier will be the park's first-ever U.S. Veteran Artist in Residence. The National Parks Arts Foundation is piloting this program to connect thousands of other veterans-turned-artists to the incredible inspiration available to them at places like Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park, says the announcement.
     The Artist in Residence project is supported by the Friends of Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park and other benefactors. The NPAF is a 501c3 non-profit dedicated to the promotion of the national parks through creating dynamic opportunities for artwork based in the natural and historic heritage of America. Visit nationalparksartsfoundation.org for details. 

See public Ka‘ū events, meetings, entertainment
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throughout Ka‘ū, from Miloli‘i through Volcano, and free on 
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To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.

SUNDAY, JUNE 17
People and Land of Kahuku, Sun, Jun 17, 9:30-12:30pm, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Free, guided, 2.5-mile, moderately difficult hike over rugged terrain focuses on the area's human history. nps.gov/HAVO

MONDAY, JUNE 18
Tropic Care 2018 - providing medical, dental, and eye care for any community member, free of charge, whether they have insurance or not - lasts from June 18 to 28, at Keaʻau High School. First come-first served. Bring any current prescriptions or eye glasses. Long waits are expected; bring water and snacks. Free breakfast and lunch provided to those aged 3 to 18, Monday thru Friday. Food carts may be on site for purchases throughout the event. Questions can be directed to the public health nurse at 808-974-6035, or Adria Maderios, Vice Principal of Keaʻau High School, at 313-3333.

Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Mon/Tue, Jun 18 (Committees)/19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Discovery Harbour Neighborhood Watch Meeting, Mon, Jun 18, 5-6:30pm, Discovery Harbour Community Hall. 929-9576, discoveryharbour.net


TUESDAY, JUNE 19
Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Tuesday, June 19, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Cooper Center19-4030 Wright Road, Volcano; Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 20
Hawai‘i County Council Meetings, Tue, Jun 19 (Council), Kona. Ka‘ū residents can participate via videoconferencing at Nā‘ālehu State Office Building. Agendas at hawaiicounty.gov

Ocean View Community Association Board Meeting, Wed, Jun
e 20, noon-1pm, Ocean View Community Center. 939-7033, ovcahi.org

Rapid Response Workshops for Hawaiʻi Island residents whose employment status or business operations have been affected by the lava flow, held Wednesday, June 20, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at Pāhoa Community Center15-3022 Kauhale Street, Pāhoa.
     Residents can receive information about programs and services regarding Unemployment Insurance, State of Hawaiʻi job vacancies, mental health services, Veterans’ Affairs, housing rental assistance, employment training, emergency food assistance, WIC and medical services. For more information, contact the American Jobs Center Hawaiʻi at 935-6527.

THURSDAY, JUNE 21
Hawai‘i Disability Legal Services, Thu, Jun 21, 9-1pmOcean View Community Centerovcahi.org, 939-7033, ovcahawaii@gmail.com

Hawaiian Civic Club of Ka‘ū, Thu, Jun 21, 6:30pmUnited Methodist Church in Nā‘ālehu. Pres. Berkley Yoshida, 747-0197

FRIDAY, JUNE 22
Hawaiʻi Farmers Union United Kaʻū Chapter community meeting Fri, June 22, 5pm, Pāhala Plantation House. “Come chat about agriculture in Kaʻū, local food production, ag related legislation, and make connections with folks in the community. All Kaʻū Farmers and Ranchers are encouraged to attend.” Light pupus available; welcome to bring something to share. Any questions call Raina Whiting, Kaʻū Chapter President, at 464-0799 or rainawhiting@gmail.com.

SATURDAY, JUNE 23
Birth of Kahuku, Sat, Jun 23, 9:30-11:30am, Kahuku Unit of Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. Explore rich geologic history of Kahuku on this easy-to-moderate hike that traverses the vast 1868 lava flow, with different volcano features and formations. Learn about the Hawaiian hotspot and the creation of Kahuku. nps.gov/HAVO

ONGOING
Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park invites kamaʻaina and visitors alike to visit the Kahuku Unit. There are no entry fees, and all programs are free of charge. In addition to regularly scheduled Guided Hikes and the monthly Coffee Talk, Kahuku Unit has added daily Ranger Talks, and cultural demonstrations and activities on weekends.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ike Hana Noe ʻAu, Cultural Demonstrations and Activities, at 12:30 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June, made possible by Hawaiʻi Pacific Parks Association. Make an Eyelash Lei, Sun, June 17. Make an ͑Ohe Hana Ihu (Nose Flute), Sat, June 23. Make a Mini Feather Kahili, Sun, June 24.
     Visitor Contact Station hosts Ranger Talks on Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday at 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
     Guided Hikes begin at 9:30 a.m. every Saturday and Sunday in June. Meet the ranger at the welcome tent. Sun, June 17: People and Land. Sat, June 23: Birth of Kahuku. Sun, June 24: ͑Ōhi͑a Lehua.
     Artist in Residence Talk, in the Visitor Center on Fri, June 22, at 10 a.m.
     In the Visitor Contact Station, Coffee Talk, a monthly, casual get together, is held the last Friday of the month. On June 29 at 9:30 a.m., Hawaiʻi Wildlife Fund will present Removing Trash, Restoring Habitat.
     Join in the Cultural Festival, Pu ͑uhonua O Hōnaunau National Historical Park, in Hōnaunau, Sat and Sun, June 23 and 24, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
     See the Kahuku Unit Rangers,The Kahuku Cowgirls, in the Na ͑alehu 4th of July Parade Sat, June 30, beginning at 10 a.m.

Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program will take sign-ups in Kaʻū, through June 29.
     In Nā’ālehu, it will take place at the Hawai‘i County Economic Opportunity Council office, back of Senior Center, Wed-Fri, 8-1pm, 929-9263.
     In Ocean View, it will take place at Ocean View Community Center, Mon and Tue (except Mon, June 11), 8-4:30pm.
     In Pāhala, it will take place at the Edmund Olson Trust Office, Tue and Wed, 8:30-12:30pm. See more for eligibility requirements and application.

Libraries Rock Summer Reading Program: Hawai‘i State Public Library System, through July 14, statewide and online. Register and log reading at librarieshawaii.beanstack.org or at a local library. Free. Reading rewards, activities, and programs for children, teens, and adults. 2018 participants have a chance to win a Roundtrip for four to anywhere Alaska Airlines flies.

Park Rangers invite the public to downtown Hilo to learn about the volcanic activity, to get their NPS Passport Book stamped, and to experience the Hawaiian cultural connection to volcanoes. Rangers are providing programs at the Mokupāpapa Discovery Center at 76 Kamehameha Avenue, Tuesday through Saturdays, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is free.
     Two Park Rangers are stationed at the Grand Naniloa Hotel in downtown Hilo, from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., every Sunday and Monday, in the Willie K Crown Room - as long as nothing else is scheduled in the space. The rangers will be doing daily talks at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. about the eruption. They will show the park film that is normally available to visitors to see at the Kilauea Visitor’s Center at the Summit, Born of Fire, Born in the Sea, every half-hour beginning at 9:30 a.m.

Sign Up for the Nāʻālehu Independence Day Parade, to be held June 30. If interested, call Debra McIntosh at 929-9872.

Tūtū and Me Offers Home Visits to those with keiki zero to five years old: home visits to aid with helpful parenting tips and strategies, educational resources, and a compassionate listening ear. Home visits are free, last 1.5 hours, two to four times a month, for a total of 12 visits, and snacks are provided. For info and to register, call Linda Bong 464-9634.

St. Jude's Episcopal Church Calls For More Volunteers for the Saturday community outreach. Especially needed are cooks for the soup served to those in need, and organizers for the hot showers. "Volunteering for St. Jude's Saturday Shower and Soup ministry is an opportunity to serve God in a powerful way," states St. Jude's April newsletter. Volunteer by contacting Dave Breskin at 319-8333.

Volcano Forest Runs Registration Open through Friday, August 17, at 6 p.m. Half marathon $85, 10K $45, 5K $30. Registration increases August 1: half marathon to $95, 10K to $55, and 5K to $35. Race is run from Cooper Center on Wright Road in Volcano Village on Saturday, August 18.


5th annual Ka‘ū Coffee Trail Run registration open. Race day Sat, Sept 22, 7 a.m.; begins and ends at Ka‘ū Coffee Mill. Register online before Mon, July 9: 5K, $25/person; 10K, $35/person; and 1/2 Marathon, $45/person. From July 9 to Aug 11: $30/person, $40/person, and $45/person, respectively. From Aug 13 to Sept 20: $35/person, $45/person, and $55/person. Race day registration ends Sat, Sept 22, at 6:30 a.m. Event organizers, ‘O Ka‘ū Kākou; start location, Ka‘ū Coffee Mill.

To read comments, add your own, and like this story, see Facebook. Follow us on Instagram and Twitter. See our online calendars and our latest print edition at kaucalendar.com.